The Home of the Heart

By Mary Jo

A couple of weeks ago the Wenches got to chatting behind the scenes about what places feel like home, and the answers were interesting. In some cases, home is where we were born and raised even if we're not there anymore. In other cases, it's a place one has moved to and then claimed for oneself. It could be a place you've never lived. Here's what the Wenches have to say:

New England 1 Andrea

NE stone wallAndrea/Cara:
I must not be very adventurous at heart, for I’ve lived in New England all my life. (There were a number of years in New York City, but I always felt I had one foot in the country, as it’s only a hop, skip and jump to the Connecticut border.) Or maybe it’s just I that I feel a great affinity to the stark and simple beauty of the area—the colonial clapboard houses of the old towns, the rugged little harbors, the meandering stone walls, the sense of history around every bend. There’s a quiet, reserved air to this part of the country—a good vibe for an introvert like me.

New England leaves--AndreaNew Englanders are a pretty taciturn lot, perhaps a vestige of the area’s Puritan heritage, but they are also observant, and given to introspection—think Henry David Thoreau and Emily Dickenson. I feel at home here, despite having traveled all over the world. I love the stubborn sense of place, the old-school traditions, the independent spirit. And I love the changing seasons—especially a New England fall, with its bright blaze of colors and crisp apple-scented air.

 

However, I do wonder at times whether we have some sort of inherited memory of place because the other place that sings to my soul is Switzerland, which is where my mother was born. I love its alpine valleys, glimmering lakes and craggy mountains. I sometimes fantasize about having a rustic wood chalet set high in a steep pasture as a writing retreat. The larder with be filled with local Gruyere and Emmenthaler cheeses. And Swiss chocolate. (Hmm, maybe I’m not going home to New England after all!)

Nicola:

My “home of my heart” is definitely the north of England. I take pride in the fact that I was born in Yorkshire even though I only lived there for the first 18 years of my life and have lived far longer in the south of the country. In fact I see myself as an exile which implies that one day I might go back, and I always define myself as northern in some vague way.Identity is very complicated, I think. For me it’s not just about being a Yorkshire Girl but is broader than that. I feel much more affinity to the whole of the North and love visiting places like Scotland, Northumberland and Cumbria. There’s something about the wild spirit of these places that appeals more than the tame south.

Yorkshire moors--NicolaThat said, I’ve been to other parts of England and felt a very strong pull to them even when they were previously unknown to me. I write about time travel and reincarnation, and sometimes I feel a place is so familiar I do wonder whether I have lived there in a past life. That happened to me when I visited the county of Suffolk for the first time. It was completely new to me and yet it felt as though I knew it so well. Later I discovered that my mother’s family came from the area hundreds of years ago. Perhaps there is a memory of that sort of connection inside us all.

I’ve been lucky enough to travel all over the world and I’ve seen some wonderful places. I love exploring them and getting to know their history and culture, yet I only really feel rooted in Britain. My husband, on the other hand, moved about so much as a child that he sees his home of the heart as wherever we are settled at the time. It’s more moveable than mine!

Pat:
As a sun lover, I’ve spent my life attempting to find a place in the sun—or pretend I SC pier--Pat  Californiawas in one. When I was just a kid, I formed a Beach Boy fan club and played their albums for years and years because they created the fantasy I wanted to live of sun, sun, sun. As an adult, all our vacations were aimed at seeking the sunniest places for whatever time of year it was. Once our kids took off on their own—to places like Florida, California, and the Philippines because they inherited my craving for sun—we were free to plan our own escape.

After all those years of traveling from one sunny clime to another, we knew exactly which one we wanted when it came time for my husband to retire—California. It wasn’t just that the grandkid was there, although that sealed the deal, but it never gets so hot and humid that IT Guy can’t tolerate it. We love to garden, and we can grow anything here—including tomatoes all winter long! And where we live not only has beautiful beaches we can walk every day, but we’re surrounded by people who care about the same things as we do. It’s hard to describe how we can feel so at home in a place so foreign from where we’ve lived, but we’re home now, and we’re not going anywhere else. 

Joanna here:
I’m lucky enough to live in the home of my heart. For many years I traveled all over the world, settled in big gray cities, tropical sea sides, and blindingly bright deserts. Never really comfy.

Now I live in the middle Appalachians. I didn’t grow up in this place, but if you go back a few generations, some of my people come from here. That might be why it feels “right.” My house is deep in the woods of a National Park, high in the hills, eight miles from the nearest little town. Nothing here but green growing stuff and the change of seasons and quiet.

Cabin back porch 2 copyAnd … y’know … the kind of crazy neighbors you’d expect to live in the woods.

What’s most homelike?

Sunrise out my eastern window.

The sun slides up over the mountains. Under its belly, folds of dark green and black fill up with orange, minute by minute.

This time of year there’s usually cloud cover hundreds of feet below me, stretched out over the valley. The tips of the hills stick out of a flat white sea of cloud like islands, like peninsulas, like other lands, like something you 'd need to get into a magical boat to visit.

Sunrise takes ten or fifteen minutes and every second of it is different. I could never get tired of it.

Home of my heart, definitely.

Susanna:

The home of my heart is a moveable concept. Brantford Bridge by A__ Williamson

Quite literally.

My father’s engineering work continually brought him, and our family, new projects and opportunities, and by the time I graduated high school I’d moved house eight times, and had lived in three countries on two different continents.

Not that I complained. As the second-born child, I was used to just going along and adapting to whatever my family was doing, and I still had my parents and built-in best friend of a sister no matter where we ended up, so I was happy. I learned early on that, of my other friends, the ones who truly mattered stayed around, the ones who didn’t fell away, and there were always new adventures to be had.

The fixed point for me in those years was the city of Brantford, Ontario, where I’d been born. I didn’t live there long myself—briefly as a baby, and again in my last year of high school, in my first apartment, on my own—but all my grandparents lived there, as did my great-grandmother, various great aunts and uncles, and too many cousins to count. Some still do.

No matter where we were living, Brantford was always there, reassuringly solid and the same, and selling the last of my grandparents’ houses was a hundred times harder than I’d thought it would be.

Port Elgin beach at sunriseBut home is a thing that I carry in pieces—the flashing red light at the end of the long rural road that we watched for together as children, that told us we’d nearly arrived in Port Elgin, the town where I spent the most years as a small child, and where I returned as an adult to waitress and write my first novels.

The sound of the wind in the pine trees that stood at the window of my childhood bedroom in that same small town, and the cooling calm waves of Lake Huron that, no matter how deeply I waded into it, pushed me back gently to shore.

The home of my childhood heart, certainly. But there are other pieces that I carry with me, too, like bits of shells and pebbles tucked to treasure in my pocket.

Memories of the winter light across the hills in South Korea. “My” bench, by Westminster pier, in London, when the lights are coming on along the Thames. And Chinon. Always Chinon.

Maybe my heart has too many homes. Maybe I haven’t yet found the one that it can settle in. And maybe that’s why my stories all seem to be trying to answer the question of what home is, and where my characters truly belong.

NEVictoriaAnne:

I spent most of my childhood on the move, going where my father's job took us, sometimes overseas. Most of the places were beautiful — the world is a beautiful place — but the landscape that imprinted itself most strongly on my heart is the area we lived in until I was seven. It's about half way between Melbourne and Sydney, near the border of New South Wales and Victoria, in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range. It's grazing land, cleared for sheep, and those bare brown hills with their rocky outcrops and ragged crown of eucalypts sing "home" to me every time. I remember sitting in the car, driving in to town (a trip of about 15 miles) and finding shapes in the silhouetted trees. I still do it now, when I drive through that country, going from Melbourne to Sydney.

But it's not all bare and brown and dusty. When you go a little way into the hills and Rainforest&Riverthe valleys, you'll find crystal clear streams burbling over smooth stones, and you're surrounded by lush greenery — it's cool temperate rainforest, with tall eucalypts, tangled vines and masses of ferns, from leggy, elegant tree ferns to delicate maidenhair nestling on the riverbanks. I used to make little "gardens" in a saucer from those tiny ferns and pretty stones — of course they never took, but I was only 5 or 6, so what did I know? And the smell, fresh and clean and glorious — the breath of life. We'd have barbecues and picnics beside those streams, with Dad building a makeshift fireplace of river stones, while we kids collected fallen branches for the fire. We drank straight from the stream, the water clear and pure and cold.

This area, with its contrasts and memories, is the home of my heart. There is a poem, well known in Australia, where one of the lines is: "I love a sunburnt country" and for me it rings very true. The poet, Dorothea McKellar, was living in England and, homesick, she wrote it as a love-letter to Australia. It still rings true for me, and many other Australians. It's here, if you want to read it.
https://www.dorotheamackellar.com.au/archive/mycountry.htm

20140713_160647Susan weighs in: 

Even with decades spent in Maryland (a very nice place to live, and likely where my family and I will always be), I still feel very attached to Upstate New York, particularly the area where I was born–a small town a few miles from Lake George in the Adirondacks.

We lived there until I was a teenager, when Dad sold his company (he was an engineer and his family company built many major roads in that area), and we moved to what seemed, to us Yankees, the Deep South. Growing up in a place of mountains and lakes, deliciously fresh and non-humid air, long and snowy winters, warm summers with cool evenings, and surrounded not only by the beauty of the landscape but fascinating history formed me in ways that will never change (I still haven't acclimated to Maryland humidity!).

In summer, my parents took my sisters and I up to the lake often, where my grandparents kept a cabin, a dock, and a boat, and we went swimming and fishing. In winter, we skated on frozen ponds and went skiing, and the yard was always populated with snow people. We walked to school, rode bikes to the corner store, walked to our grandmother's house to bake cookies and speak a little French (she was). We visited family in Upstate NY as well as Lake george  seen from dad's road Vermont and even Canada… the freedom, the fun, the beauty of that clean, gorgeous environment, the history that captivated me, the happiness of those years helped shape me. This Marylander will always be part Upstater. 

Just a few miles from where we lived was Fort William Henry, at the southern end of Lake George–many of you may know it as the fort in "Last of the Mohicans." We all knew about the massacre that happened there…though the site is now a strip of motels and Indian-themed log cabin shops, where you can buy maple candy and moccasins. As a kid, I loved visiting the fort to gawk at Colonial skeletons in an archaeological pit, and I loved the wax figures acting out daily activities in various rooms in the fort, including the dungeon (oh, Hawkeye!). History was everywhere, and fascinating, and that immersion inspired my love of history.

I go back now and then to the lake, and all the happiness and contentment of those early years comes back, tinted with nostalgia. Other families own the homes we had, and many loved ones are gone now. But the pull of the place is still very strong for me. And next time I go back, I'll buy maple sugar candy and a pair of sandals with moccasin beading, and sit and gaze at one of the most beautiful and cleanest lakes in our country, and feel grateful and privileged that I once belonged there, and feel part of it still.    

 

LetchworthParkbyDanielChristiensenMary Jo here:

I'm loving all these meditations on home, and find much to agree with. Like Susan, I was  born and raised in Upstate New York but in the far west of the state, in the rolling farmland between Lakes Erie and Ontario.(Photo at left of Letchworth Park, near where I grew up, Wikipedia by Daniel Christensen.)

It was eight hours and a world apart from New York City. After college (six years in Syracuse, which is Central New York,) bought a one way ticket to San Francisco and headed west with my design portfolio in hand. I spent a couple of years in Northern California, a couple more in Southern California, then more than two years in Oxford, England.

When I returned to the US, I stayed with my brother's family in Northern Virginia and looked for work, landing a job in Baltimore, Maryland. Inertia took over <G> and I've lived in Maryland ever since–I've spend more than half my life here. I love Maryland. It has variety, history, texture, and great people. I have no intention of leaving.

I haven't actually lived anywhere other than the places I've mentioned, but I've traveled widely and as Anne says, it's a beautiful world, from the Upper Amazon to the wild islands of the North Atlantic to the deliciously civilized city of Melbourne. I've found much to love everywhere I've lived, and just about everywhere I've visited.

Yet nothing says "home" to me as much as those hills and characteristic small towns of Western New 2012-08-04 14.40.16York. When I visit, there's a resonance unlike what I feel anywhere else. My family roots are there, several generations worth of farmers who loved the land. I don't feel like an exile who might some day return–yet that part of the world is part of me, and always will be.

The concept of home is an integral theme in many romances–certainly it is in mine. (My book Silk and Shadows ended with the words, "Welcome home, wanderer.  Welcome home."

Do you have a home of the heart you'd like to tell us about? We'd all love to know!

Mary Jo

 

 

125 thoughts on “The Home of the Heart”

  1. I used to love my home town when I was little, but I’ve never really felt at home in my flat and I do not love it despite having always been interested in houses. I mean I get vibes from houses (especially old ones), I like to imagine the stories behind them, how people live(d) in them etc
    I live in a block of flats which was built in 1981. Probably not old enough for me. :p There is a sinagogue just behind it and I get a vibe from that one, but it’s locked, no one uses it any longer and I can’t visit it.
    I love Devon and I feel very well whenever I go there, yet I have a very strange connection with certain places in Spain and the first time I got there I felt I was supposed to go there. In Toledo, El Escorial and Alcala de Henares there are spots I find so familiar that it’s… uncanny, I suppose. Given my ease in learning Spanish as if I wasn’t really learning something new, but just remembering something I had forgotten, I think there must be some kind of a link between me and those places.

    Reply
  2. I used to love my home town when I was little, but I’ve never really felt at home in my flat and I do not love it despite having always been interested in houses. I mean I get vibes from houses (especially old ones), I like to imagine the stories behind them, how people live(d) in them etc
    I live in a block of flats which was built in 1981. Probably not old enough for me. :p There is a sinagogue just behind it and I get a vibe from that one, but it’s locked, no one uses it any longer and I can’t visit it.
    I love Devon and I feel very well whenever I go there, yet I have a very strange connection with certain places in Spain and the first time I got there I felt I was supposed to go there. In Toledo, El Escorial and Alcala de Henares there are spots I find so familiar that it’s… uncanny, I suppose. Given my ease in learning Spanish as if I wasn’t really learning something new, but just remembering something I had forgotten, I think there must be some kind of a link between me and those places.

    Reply
  3. I used to love my home town when I was little, but I’ve never really felt at home in my flat and I do not love it despite having always been interested in houses. I mean I get vibes from houses (especially old ones), I like to imagine the stories behind them, how people live(d) in them etc
    I live in a block of flats which was built in 1981. Probably not old enough for me. :p There is a sinagogue just behind it and I get a vibe from that one, but it’s locked, no one uses it any longer and I can’t visit it.
    I love Devon and I feel very well whenever I go there, yet I have a very strange connection with certain places in Spain and the first time I got there I felt I was supposed to go there. In Toledo, El Escorial and Alcala de Henares there are spots I find so familiar that it’s… uncanny, I suppose. Given my ease in learning Spanish as if I wasn’t really learning something new, but just remembering something I had forgotten, I think there must be some kind of a link between me and those places.

    Reply
  4. I used to love my home town when I was little, but I’ve never really felt at home in my flat and I do not love it despite having always been interested in houses. I mean I get vibes from houses (especially old ones), I like to imagine the stories behind them, how people live(d) in them etc
    I live in a block of flats which was built in 1981. Probably not old enough for me. :p There is a sinagogue just behind it and I get a vibe from that one, but it’s locked, no one uses it any longer and I can’t visit it.
    I love Devon and I feel very well whenever I go there, yet I have a very strange connection with certain places in Spain and the first time I got there I felt I was supposed to go there. In Toledo, El Escorial and Alcala de Henares there are spots I find so familiar that it’s… uncanny, I suppose. Given my ease in learning Spanish as if I wasn’t really learning something new, but just remembering something I had forgotten, I think there must be some kind of a link between me and those places.

    Reply
  5. I used to love my home town when I was little, but I’ve never really felt at home in my flat and I do not love it despite having always been interested in houses. I mean I get vibes from houses (especially old ones), I like to imagine the stories behind them, how people live(d) in them etc
    I live in a block of flats which was built in 1981. Probably not old enough for me. :p There is a sinagogue just behind it and I get a vibe from that one, but it’s locked, no one uses it any longer and I can’t visit it.
    I love Devon and I feel very well whenever I go there, yet I have a very strange connection with certain places in Spain and the first time I got there I felt I was supposed to go there. In Toledo, El Escorial and Alcala de Henares there are spots I find so familiar that it’s… uncanny, I suppose. Given my ease in learning Spanish as if I wasn’t really learning something new, but just remembering something I had forgotten, I think there must be some kind of a link between me and those places.

    Reply
  6. I am not much of a traveler. I grew up in a small town in the Sullivan County Catskills of New York State and settled in the foothills of western Maine,which look very much like my old stomping ground except that there are no billboards. Both say “home” to me. Even the winters are similar! And if you’ll forgive the plug, when I decided to start a new cozy mystery series (launch in June) I made the amateur sleuth a retired Sullivan County native returning to her old home town after fifty plus years away. I’ve been having a great time reminiscing but have definitely realized I don’t want to live there again in real life.

    Reply
  7. I am not much of a traveler. I grew up in a small town in the Sullivan County Catskills of New York State and settled in the foothills of western Maine,which look very much like my old stomping ground except that there are no billboards. Both say “home” to me. Even the winters are similar! And if you’ll forgive the plug, when I decided to start a new cozy mystery series (launch in June) I made the amateur sleuth a retired Sullivan County native returning to her old home town after fifty plus years away. I’ve been having a great time reminiscing but have definitely realized I don’t want to live there again in real life.

    Reply
  8. I am not much of a traveler. I grew up in a small town in the Sullivan County Catskills of New York State and settled in the foothills of western Maine,which look very much like my old stomping ground except that there are no billboards. Both say “home” to me. Even the winters are similar! And if you’ll forgive the plug, when I decided to start a new cozy mystery series (launch in June) I made the amateur sleuth a retired Sullivan County native returning to her old home town after fifty plus years away. I’ve been having a great time reminiscing but have definitely realized I don’t want to live there again in real life.

    Reply
  9. I am not much of a traveler. I grew up in a small town in the Sullivan County Catskills of New York State and settled in the foothills of western Maine,which look very much like my old stomping ground except that there are no billboards. Both say “home” to me. Even the winters are similar! And if you’ll forgive the plug, when I decided to start a new cozy mystery series (launch in June) I made the amateur sleuth a retired Sullivan County native returning to her old home town after fifty plus years away. I’ve been having a great time reminiscing but have definitely realized I don’t want to live there again in real life.

    Reply
  10. I am not much of a traveler. I grew up in a small town in the Sullivan County Catskills of New York State and settled in the foothills of western Maine,which look very much like my old stomping ground except that there are no billboards. Both say “home” to me. Even the winters are similar! And if you’ll forgive the plug, when I decided to start a new cozy mystery series (launch in June) I made the amateur sleuth a retired Sullivan County native returning to her old home town after fifty plus years away. I’ve been having a great time reminiscing but have definitely realized I don’t want to live there again in real life.

    Reply
  11. Oana-Maria, it really does sound like you have a connection with that area of Spain, especially since you picked up the language so easily.
    Yes, 1981 just isn’t old enough for someone who tunes into places as you do. I hope someday you do live in a place that sings to your heart.

    Reply
  12. Oana-Maria, it really does sound like you have a connection with that area of Spain, especially since you picked up the language so easily.
    Yes, 1981 just isn’t old enough for someone who tunes into places as you do. I hope someday you do live in a place that sings to your heart.

    Reply
  13. Oana-Maria, it really does sound like you have a connection with that area of Spain, especially since you picked up the language so easily.
    Yes, 1981 just isn’t old enough for someone who tunes into places as you do. I hope someday you do live in a place that sings to your heart.

    Reply
  14. Oana-Maria, it really does sound like you have a connection with that area of Spain, especially since you picked up the language so easily.
    Yes, 1981 just isn’t old enough for someone who tunes into places as you do. I hope someday you do live in a place that sings to your heart.

    Reply
  15. Oana-Maria, it really does sound like you have a connection with that area of Spain, especially since you picked up the language so easily.
    Yes, 1981 just isn’t old enough for someone who tunes into places as you do. I hope someday you do live in a place that sings to your heart.

    Reply
  16. Kathy, the new series sounds great–and right in tune with today’s post. *G* What is there about Upstate New York that calls to us natives even if we end up living else??? (Maine beauty without billboards is a pretty good alternative!)

    Reply
  17. Kathy, the new series sounds great–and right in tune with today’s post. *G* What is there about Upstate New York that calls to us natives even if we end up living else??? (Maine beauty without billboards is a pretty good alternative!)

    Reply
  18. Kathy, the new series sounds great–and right in tune with today’s post. *G* What is there about Upstate New York that calls to us natives even if we end up living else??? (Maine beauty without billboards is a pretty good alternative!)

    Reply
  19. Kathy, the new series sounds great–and right in tune with today’s post. *G* What is there about Upstate New York that calls to us natives even if we end up living else??? (Maine beauty without billboards is a pretty good alternative!)

    Reply
  20. Kathy, the new series sounds great–and right in tune with today’s post. *G* What is there about Upstate New York that calls to us natives even if we end up living else??? (Maine beauty without billboards is a pretty good alternative!)

    Reply
  21. I grew up in New York City, and even though I have lived most of my life elsewhere, I still think of it as home. For decades now I have lived in a semi-rural area, very pretty, near the beach, with lovely neighbors, but I still feel like a visitor. I feel as if I ought to be able to walk (on sidewalks, not in the road) to the grocery store or the library, not have to drive every place, and take a bus or subway to go farther afield.
    Even when traveling, I have always felt more at home in major cities than in the countryside. Scenic views are nice to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. *grin*

    Reply
  22. I grew up in New York City, and even though I have lived most of my life elsewhere, I still think of it as home. For decades now I have lived in a semi-rural area, very pretty, near the beach, with lovely neighbors, but I still feel like a visitor. I feel as if I ought to be able to walk (on sidewalks, not in the road) to the grocery store or the library, not have to drive every place, and take a bus or subway to go farther afield.
    Even when traveling, I have always felt more at home in major cities than in the countryside. Scenic views are nice to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. *grin*

    Reply
  23. I grew up in New York City, and even though I have lived most of my life elsewhere, I still think of it as home. For decades now I have lived in a semi-rural area, very pretty, near the beach, with lovely neighbors, but I still feel like a visitor. I feel as if I ought to be able to walk (on sidewalks, not in the road) to the grocery store or the library, not have to drive every place, and take a bus or subway to go farther afield.
    Even when traveling, I have always felt more at home in major cities than in the countryside. Scenic views are nice to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. *grin*

    Reply
  24. I grew up in New York City, and even though I have lived most of my life elsewhere, I still think of it as home. For decades now I have lived in a semi-rural area, very pretty, near the beach, with lovely neighbors, but I still feel like a visitor. I feel as if I ought to be able to walk (on sidewalks, not in the road) to the grocery store or the library, not have to drive every place, and take a bus or subway to go farther afield.
    Even when traveling, I have always felt more at home in major cities than in the countryside. Scenic views are nice to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. *grin*

    Reply
  25. I grew up in New York City, and even though I have lived most of my life elsewhere, I still think of it as home. For decades now I have lived in a semi-rural area, very pretty, near the beach, with lovely neighbors, but I still feel like a visitor. I feel as if I ought to be able to walk (on sidewalks, not in the road) to the grocery store or the library, not have to drive every place, and take a bus or subway to go farther afield.
    Even when traveling, I have always felt more at home in major cities than in the countryside. Scenic views are nice to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. *grin*

    Reply
  26. LOL re Letchworth Park, Mary Jo! And I adore your photo. I must have taken a gazillion rainbow-over-the-massive falls pix, none as lovely as yours, but the best so far have been of the narrow falls right next to the big one.
    And Joanna, I’m planning to visit the Appalachians this spring for the first time. Still searching for a new home of my heart here in the northeast US.
    The home of my heart (so far) is the Pacific Northwest, and the best of the best of that region for me is a little town north of Eureka, right on the coast, a crab-fishing community with a population of 130 (or so) called Trinidad.
    My 15 years living there spoiled me for anywhere else…massive, fragrant old-growth redwoods, ocean within hearing and almost within walking distance (steep inclines), and nearly empty beaches everywhere. And the wildlife! I got to watch river otter kits grow up every year, see eagles and herons and pelicans, and whales breaching and dolphin pods racing past. And masses of hummingbirds and songbirds.

    Reply
  27. LOL re Letchworth Park, Mary Jo! And I adore your photo. I must have taken a gazillion rainbow-over-the-massive falls pix, none as lovely as yours, but the best so far have been of the narrow falls right next to the big one.
    And Joanna, I’m planning to visit the Appalachians this spring for the first time. Still searching for a new home of my heart here in the northeast US.
    The home of my heart (so far) is the Pacific Northwest, and the best of the best of that region for me is a little town north of Eureka, right on the coast, a crab-fishing community with a population of 130 (or so) called Trinidad.
    My 15 years living there spoiled me for anywhere else…massive, fragrant old-growth redwoods, ocean within hearing and almost within walking distance (steep inclines), and nearly empty beaches everywhere. And the wildlife! I got to watch river otter kits grow up every year, see eagles and herons and pelicans, and whales breaching and dolphin pods racing past. And masses of hummingbirds and songbirds.

    Reply
  28. LOL re Letchworth Park, Mary Jo! And I adore your photo. I must have taken a gazillion rainbow-over-the-massive falls pix, none as lovely as yours, but the best so far have been of the narrow falls right next to the big one.
    And Joanna, I’m planning to visit the Appalachians this spring for the first time. Still searching for a new home of my heart here in the northeast US.
    The home of my heart (so far) is the Pacific Northwest, and the best of the best of that region for me is a little town north of Eureka, right on the coast, a crab-fishing community with a population of 130 (or so) called Trinidad.
    My 15 years living there spoiled me for anywhere else…massive, fragrant old-growth redwoods, ocean within hearing and almost within walking distance (steep inclines), and nearly empty beaches everywhere. And the wildlife! I got to watch river otter kits grow up every year, see eagles and herons and pelicans, and whales breaching and dolphin pods racing past. And masses of hummingbirds and songbirds.

    Reply
  29. LOL re Letchworth Park, Mary Jo! And I adore your photo. I must have taken a gazillion rainbow-over-the-massive falls pix, none as lovely as yours, but the best so far have been of the narrow falls right next to the big one.
    And Joanna, I’m planning to visit the Appalachians this spring for the first time. Still searching for a new home of my heart here in the northeast US.
    The home of my heart (so far) is the Pacific Northwest, and the best of the best of that region for me is a little town north of Eureka, right on the coast, a crab-fishing community with a population of 130 (or so) called Trinidad.
    My 15 years living there spoiled me for anywhere else…massive, fragrant old-growth redwoods, ocean within hearing and almost within walking distance (steep inclines), and nearly empty beaches everywhere. And the wildlife! I got to watch river otter kits grow up every year, see eagles and herons and pelicans, and whales breaching and dolphin pods racing past. And masses of hummingbirds and songbirds.

    Reply
  30. LOL re Letchworth Park, Mary Jo! And I adore your photo. I must have taken a gazillion rainbow-over-the-massive falls pix, none as lovely as yours, but the best so far have been of the narrow falls right next to the big one.
    And Joanna, I’m planning to visit the Appalachians this spring for the first time. Still searching for a new home of my heart here in the northeast US.
    The home of my heart (so far) is the Pacific Northwest, and the best of the best of that region for me is a little town north of Eureka, right on the coast, a crab-fishing community with a population of 130 (or so) called Trinidad.
    My 15 years living there spoiled me for anywhere else…massive, fragrant old-growth redwoods, ocean within hearing and almost within walking distance (steep inclines), and nearly empty beaches everywhere. And the wildlife! I got to watch river otter kits grow up every year, see eagles and herons and pelicans, and whales breaching and dolphin pods racing past. And masses of hummingbirds and songbirds.

    Reply
  31. Joanna, I may write more after finishing the reading, but my memory is such that I forget too soon if I don’t write it down. Your description of sunrise reminded me of Grandpa’s and Little Tree’s description of sunrise in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee – “It’s coming alive! It’s coming alive!” That book has a lot of critics but parts are so poignant and others just hilarious.

    Reply
  32. Joanna, I may write more after finishing the reading, but my memory is such that I forget too soon if I don’t write it down. Your description of sunrise reminded me of Grandpa’s and Little Tree’s description of sunrise in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee – “It’s coming alive! It’s coming alive!” That book has a lot of critics but parts are so poignant and others just hilarious.

    Reply
  33. Joanna, I may write more after finishing the reading, but my memory is such that I forget too soon if I don’t write it down. Your description of sunrise reminded me of Grandpa’s and Little Tree’s description of sunrise in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee – “It’s coming alive! It’s coming alive!” That book has a lot of critics but parts are so poignant and others just hilarious.

    Reply
  34. Joanna, I may write more after finishing the reading, but my memory is such that I forget too soon if I don’t write it down. Your description of sunrise reminded me of Grandpa’s and Little Tree’s description of sunrise in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee – “It’s coming alive! It’s coming alive!” That book has a lot of critics but parts are so poignant and others just hilarious.

    Reply
  35. Joanna, I may write more after finishing the reading, but my memory is such that I forget too soon if I don’t write it down. Your description of sunrise reminded me of Grandpa’s and Little Tree’s description of sunrise in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee – “It’s coming alive! It’s coming alive!” That book has a lot of critics but parts are so poignant and others just hilarious.

    Reply
  36. Anywhere in the Mid-West, but most important the Northern Indiana town my father grew up in.
    I never lived there, and mostly had quick visits, but North Manchester always resonates with me.
    However, ANYWHERE in the mid-west is my home.

    Reply
  37. Anywhere in the Mid-West, but most important the Northern Indiana town my father grew up in.
    I never lived there, and mostly had quick visits, but North Manchester always resonates with me.
    However, ANYWHERE in the mid-west is my home.

    Reply
  38. Anywhere in the Mid-West, but most important the Northern Indiana town my father grew up in.
    I never lived there, and mostly had quick visits, but North Manchester always resonates with me.
    However, ANYWHERE in the mid-west is my home.

    Reply
  39. Anywhere in the Mid-West, but most important the Northern Indiana town my father grew up in.
    I never lived there, and mostly had quick visits, but North Manchester always resonates with me.
    However, ANYWHERE in the mid-west is my home.

    Reply
  40. Anywhere in the Mid-West, but most important the Northern Indiana town my father grew up in.
    I never lived there, and mostly had quick visits, but North Manchester always resonates with me.
    However, ANYWHERE in the mid-west is my home.

    Reply
  41. I just had some additional thoughts!
    As I frequently say, I grew up in St. Louis. It may be the best place in the county for a U. S. citizen to grew up in. In St. Louis you learn how to drive in San Francisco AND you learn how to drive in the plains. You learn how to live in a metropolitan area, but you also know how to live in a small town. You live on dry land, but you CANNOT leave the city without crossing a bridge, so you also know how to live on an island.
    Patricia Rice has said that her home is the sun lands, but I believe she will understand what I say about my home town being an introduction to almost the entire United States.

    Reply
  42. I just had some additional thoughts!
    As I frequently say, I grew up in St. Louis. It may be the best place in the county for a U. S. citizen to grew up in. In St. Louis you learn how to drive in San Francisco AND you learn how to drive in the plains. You learn how to live in a metropolitan area, but you also know how to live in a small town. You live on dry land, but you CANNOT leave the city without crossing a bridge, so you also know how to live on an island.
    Patricia Rice has said that her home is the sun lands, but I believe she will understand what I say about my home town being an introduction to almost the entire United States.

    Reply
  43. I just had some additional thoughts!
    As I frequently say, I grew up in St. Louis. It may be the best place in the county for a U. S. citizen to grew up in. In St. Louis you learn how to drive in San Francisco AND you learn how to drive in the plains. You learn how to live in a metropolitan area, but you also know how to live in a small town. You live on dry land, but you CANNOT leave the city without crossing a bridge, so you also know how to live on an island.
    Patricia Rice has said that her home is the sun lands, but I believe she will understand what I say about my home town being an introduction to almost the entire United States.

    Reply
  44. I just had some additional thoughts!
    As I frequently say, I grew up in St. Louis. It may be the best place in the county for a U. S. citizen to grew up in. In St. Louis you learn how to drive in San Francisco AND you learn how to drive in the plains. You learn how to live in a metropolitan area, but you also know how to live in a small town. You live on dry land, but you CANNOT leave the city without crossing a bridge, so you also know how to live on an island.
    Patricia Rice has said that her home is the sun lands, but I believe she will understand what I say about my home town being an introduction to almost the entire United States.

    Reply
  45. I just had some additional thoughts!
    As I frequently say, I grew up in St. Louis. It may be the best place in the county for a U. S. citizen to grew up in. In St. Louis you learn how to drive in San Francisco AND you learn how to drive in the plains. You learn how to live in a metropolitan area, but you also know how to live in a small town. You live on dry land, but you CANNOT leave the city without crossing a bridge, so you also know how to live on an island.
    Patricia Rice has said that her home is the sun lands, but I believe she will understand what I say about my home town being an introduction to almost the entire United States.

    Reply
  46. I was born and raised in the mid-west, so it seems like (real) home to me. I was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri many years ago and I loved the countryside down there. Foothills of the Ozarks – just beautiful.
    But I think the home of my heart would be somewhere near the ocean. I have lived in California and Washington state not too far from the ocean. I have never been to Maine, but pictures of the coastline up there look just beautiful. They talk to me. They say, “come on up here, you will love it.” (sigh)

    Reply
  47. I was born and raised in the mid-west, so it seems like (real) home to me. I was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri many years ago and I loved the countryside down there. Foothills of the Ozarks – just beautiful.
    But I think the home of my heart would be somewhere near the ocean. I have lived in California and Washington state not too far from the ocean. I have never been to Maine, but pictures of the coastline up there look just beautiful. They talk to me. They say, “come on up here, you will love it.” (sigh)

    Reply
  48. I was born and raised in the mid-west, so it seems like (real) home to me. I was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri many years ago and I loved the countryside down there. Foothills of the Ozarks – just beautiful.
    But I think the home of my heart would be somewhere near the ocean. I have lived in California and Washington state not too far from the ocean. I have never been to Maine, but pictures of the coastline up there look just beautiful. They talk to me. They say, “come on up here, you will love it.” (sigh)

    Reply
  49. I was born and raised in the mid-west, so it seems like (real) home to me. I was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri many years ago and I loved the countryside down there. Foothills of the Ozarks – just beautiful.
    But I think the home of my heart would be somewhere near the ocean. I have lived in California and Washington state not too far from the ocean. I have never been to Maine, but pictures of the coastline up there look just beautiful. They talk to me. They say, “come on up here, you will love it.” (sigh)

    Reply
  50. I was born and raised in the mid-west, so it seems like (real) home to me. I was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri many years ago and I loved the countryside down there. Foothills of the Ozarks – just beautiful.
    But I think the home of my heart would be somewhere near the ocean. I have lived in California and Washington state not too far from the ocean. I have never been to Maine, but pictures of the coastline up there look just beautiful. They talk to me. They say, “come on up here, you will love it.” (sigh)

    Reply
  51. The thick parts of the woods here are so dark. When you’re in the “hollows” between the hills there’s not a speck of light anywhere, except a few stars overhead between the trees.
    Yes. Sunrise brings the place to life.

    Reply
  52. The thick parts of the woods here are so dark. When you’re in the “hollows” between the hills there’s not a speck of light anywhere, except a few stars overhead between the trees.
    Yes. Sunrise brings the place to life.

    Reply
  53. The thick parts of the woods here are so dark. When you’re in the “hollows” between the hills there’s not a speck of light anywhere, except a few stars overhead between the trees.
    Yes. Sunrise brings the place to life.

    Reply
  54. The thick parts of the woods here are so dark. When you’re in the “hollows” between the hills there’s not a speck of light anywhere, except a few stars overhead between the trees.
    Yes. Sunrise brings the place to life.

    Reply
  55. The thick parts of the woods here are so dark. When you’re in the “hollows” between the hills there’s not a speck of light anywhere, except a few stars overhead between the trees.
    Yes. Sunrise brings the place to life.

    Reply
  56. Let me put in a plug for the coast of Maine. Driving up from the south along the coast you come to Arcadia National Park.
    The sea and the rocks and the sun . . . One of the beautiful places of the earth.

    Reply
  57. Let me put in a plug for the coast of Maine. Driving up from the south along the coast you come to Arcadia National Park.
    The sea and the rocks and the sun . . . One of the beautiful places of the earth.

    Reply
  58. Let me put in a plug for the coast of Maine. Driving up from the south along the coast you come to Arcadia National Park.
    The sea and the rocks and the sun . . . One of the beautiful places of the earth.

    Reply
  59. Let me put in a plug for the coast of Maine. Driving up from the south along the coast you come to Arcadia National Park.
    The sea and the rocks and the sun . . . One of the beautiful places of the earth.

    Reply
  60. Let me put in a plug for the coast of Maine. Driving up from the south along the coast you come to Arcadia National Park.
    The sea and the rocks and the sun . . . One of the beautiful places of the earth.

    Reply
  61. I honestly don’t believe I’ve ever found it. I continue to search. I can tell you where I was born, where I was raised, where I live…none of those places feel like home. I always want to “go” somewhere…always trying to find that place that makes me just never want to leave. LOVE these photos and stories!

    Reply
  62. I honestly don’t believe I’ve ever found it. I continue to search. I can tell you where I was born, where I was raised, where I live…none of those places feel like home. I always want to “go” somewhere…always trying to find that place that makes me just never want to leave. LOVE these photos and stories!

    Reply
  63. I honestly don’t believe I’ve ever found it. I continue to search. I can tell you where I was born, where I was raised, where I live…none of those places feel like home. I always want to “go” somewhere…always trying to find that place that makes me just never want to leave. LOVE these photos and stories!

    Reply
  64. I honestly don’t believe I’ve ever found it. I continue to search. I can tell you where I was born, where I was raised, where I live…none of those places feel like home. I always want to “go” somewhere…always trying to find that place that makes me just never want to leave. LOVE these photos and stories!

    Reply
  65. I honestly don’t believe I’ve ever found it. I continue to search. I can tell you where I was born, where I was raised, where I live…none of those places feel like home. I always want to “go” somewhere…always trying to find that place that makes me just never want to leave. LOVE these photos and stories!

    Reply
  66. LOL! I think we’re seeing a lot of evidence that where we spent our formative really shapes us long term. (I suppose that’s not surprising.) I grew up in the country and I like green leafy suburbs like the one I live in now–lots of trees, but close to city amenities.

    Reply
  67. LOL! I think we’re seeing a lot of evidence that where we spent our formative really shapes us long term. (I suppose that’s not surprising.) I grew up in the country and I like green leafy suburbs like the one I live in now–lots of trees, but close to city amenities.

    Reply
  68. LOL! I think we’re seeing a lot of evidence that where we spent our formative really shapes us long term. (I suppose that’s not surprising.) I grew up in the country and I like green leafy suburbs like the one I live in now–lots of trees, but close to city amenities.

    Reply
  69. LOL! I think we’re seeing a lot of evidence that where we spent our formative really shapes us long term. (I suppose that’s not surprising.) I grew up in the country and I like green leafy suburbs like the one I live in now–lots of trees, but close to city amenities.

    Reply
  70. LOL! I think we’re seeing a lot of evidence that where we spent our formative really shapes us long term. (I suppose that’s not surprising.) I grew up in the country and I like green leafy suburbs like the one I live in now–lots of trees, but close to city amenities.

    Reply
  71. Faith, I didn’t take that picture of Letchworth Park (there’s a photocredit from Wikipedia), but it sure is a pretty picture of a pretty place. I’ve seen enough of the Pacific Northwest to totally understand people falling in love with. Sounds like Trinidad is GORGEOUS!

    Reply
  72. Faith, I didn’t take that picture of Letchworth Park (there’s a photocredit from Wikipedia), but it sure is a pretty picture of a pretty place. I’ve seen enough of the Pacific Northwest to totally understand people falling in love with. Sounds like Trinidad is GORGEOUS!

    Reply
  73. Faith, I didn’t take that picture of Letchworth Park (there’s a photocredit from Wikipedia), but it sure is a pretty picture of a pretty place. I’ve seen enough of the Pacific Northwest to totally understand people falling in love with. Sounds like Trinidad is GORGEOUS!

    Reply
  74. Faith, I didn’t take that picture of Letchworth Park (there’s a photocredit from Wikipedia), but it sure is a pretty picture of a pretty place. I’ve seen enough of the Pacific Northwest to totally understand people falling in love with. Sounds like Trinidad is GORGEOUS!

    Reply
  75. Faith, I didn’t take that picture of Letchworth Park (there’s a photocredit from Wikipedia), but it sure is a pretty picture of a pretty place. I’ve seen enough of the Pacific Northwest to totally understand people falling in love with. Sounds like Trinidad is GORGEOUS!

    Reply
  76. Sue, the American Mid-West truly does have a culture of its own, and that culture is the heart of America. A friend of mine who was raised in Kansas considered “Midwesterner” to be her ethnicity.

    Reply
  77. Sue, the American Mid-West truly does have a culture of its own, and that culture is the heart of America. A friend of mine who was raised in Kansas considered “Midwesterner” to be her ethnicity.

    Reply
  78. Sue, the American Mid-West truly does have a culture of its own, and that culture is the heart of America. A friend of mine who was raised in Kansas considered “Midwesterner” to be her ethnicity.

    Reply
  79. Sue, the American Mid-West truly does have a culture of its own, and that culture is the heart of America. A friend of mine who was raised in Kansas considered “Midwesterner” to be her ethnicity.

    Reply
  80. Sue, the American Mid-West truly does have a culture of its own, and that culture is the heart of America. A friend of mine who was raised in Kansas considered “Midwesterner” to be her ethnicity.

    Reply
  81. LOL! My main memory of St. Louis is an RWA conference that was there when the Mississippi was flooding and the Arch was standing out there in the water. It was pretty interesting, actually. *G*

    Reply
  82. LOL! My main memory of St. Louis is an RWA conference that was there when the Mississippi was flooding and the Arch was standing out there in the water. It was pretty interesting, actually. *G*

    Reply
  83. LOL! My main memory of St. Louis is an RWA conference that was there when the Mississippi was flooding and the Arch was standing out there in the water. It was pretty interesting, actually. *G*

    Reply
  84. LOL! My main memory of St. Louis is an RWA conference that was there when the Mississippi was flooding and the Arch was standing out there in the water. It was pretty interesting, actually. *G*

    Reply
  85. LOL! My main memory of St. Louis is an RWA conference that was there when the Mississippi was flooding and the Arch was standing out there in the water. It was pretty interesting, actually. *G*

    Reply
  86. You’ve all mentioned places I’ve lived–Pacific Northwest, Syracuse, Maryland, etc. I don’t think I have a home of the heart. Except for my childhood in Idaho, I’ve chosen where I wanted to be, and I pulled up stakes when something better beckoned. I’ll eventually have to find somewhere to land, but I have three more years in the UK (got word a month ago that my contract had been extended), and I can’t call it home, but it’s a fine place to bloom until I’m transplanted again.

    Reply
  87. You’ve all mentioned places I’ve lived–Pacific Northwest, Syracuse, Maryland, etc. I don’t think I have a home of the heart. Except for my childhood in Idaho, I’ve chosen where I wanted to be, and I pulled up stakes when something better beckoned. I’ll eventually have to find somewhere to land, but I have three more years in the UK (got word a month ago that my contract had been extended), and I can’t call it home, but it’s a fine place to bloom until I’m transplanted again.

    Reply
  88. You’ve all mentioned places I’ve lived–Pacific Northwest, Syracuse, Maryland, etc. I don’t think I have a home of the heart. Except for my childhood in Idaho, I’ve chosen where I wanted to be, and I pulled up stakes when something better beckoned. I’ll eventually have to find somewhere to land, but I have three more years in the UK (got word a month ago that my contract had been extended), and I can’t call it home, but it’s a fine place to bloom until I’m transplanted again.

    Reply
  89. You’ve all mentioned places I’ve lived–Pacific Northwest, Syracuse, Maryland, etc. I don’t think I have a home of the heart. Except for my childhood in Idaho, I’ve chosen where I wanted to be, and I pulled up stakes when something better beckoned. I’ll eventually have to find somewhere to land, but I have three more years in the UK (got word a month ago that my contract had been extended), and I can’t call it home, but it’s a fine place to bloom until I’m transplanted again.

    Reply
  90. You’ve all mentioned places I’ve lived–Pacific Northwest, Syracuse, Maryland, etc. I don’t think I have a home of the heart. Except for my childhood in Idaho, I’ve chosen where I wanted to be, and I pulled up stakes when something better beckoned. I’ll eventually have to find somewhere to land, but I have three more years in the UK (got word a month ago that my contract had been extended), and I can’t call it home, but it’s a fine place to bloom until I’m transplanted again.

    Reply
  91. Shannon, congratulations on getting your contract extended! As you say, the UK is a wonderful place to bloom even if you don’t take up permanent root.
    Maybe you’re not designed to put down permanent roots–not everyone is. Enjoying each place you land is a pretty good trait! Maybe so many of us mention where we spent our early years is because the location imprinted on us because it was the first place where we came alive to the world?

    Reply
  92. Shannon, congratulations on getting your contract extended! As you say, the UK is a wonderful place to bloom even if you don’t take up permanent root.
    Maybe you’re not designed to put down permanent roots–not everyone is. Enjoying each place you land is a pretty good trait! Maybe so many of us mention where we spent our early years is because the location imprinted on us because it was the first place where we came alive to the world?

    Reply
  93. Shannon, congratulations on getting your contract extended! As you say, the UK is a wonderful place to bloom even if you don’t take up permanent root.
    Maybe you’re not designed to put down permanent roots–not everyone is. Enjoying each place you land is a pretty good trait! Maybe so many of us mention where we spent our early years is because the location imprinted on us because it was the first place where we came alive to the world?

    Reply
  94. Shannon, congratulations on getting your contract extended! As you say, the UK is a wonderful place to bloom even if you don’t take up permanent root.
    Maybe you’re not designed to put down permanent roots–not everyone is. Enjoying each place you land is a pretty good trait! Maybe so many of us mention where we spent our early years is because the location imprinted on us because it was the first place where we came alive to the world?

    Reply
  95. Shannon, congratulations on getting your contract extended! As you say, the UK is a wonderful place to bloom even if you don’t take up permanent root.
    Maybe you’re not designed to put down permanent roots–not everyone is. Enjoying each place you land is a pretty good trait! Maybe so many of us mention where we spent our early years is because the location imprinted on us because it was the first place where we came alive to the world?

    Reply
  96. I’m late commenting here on this blog, but I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this post. Tender, affectionate, and infused with “je me souviens…”
    Like Pat, I yearn for the sun so much. Every sunny day makes me smile and feel happy to my very bones. And yet, I live in Seattle, an evergreen city of rain and clouds. There is much, much beauty to be found here in the craggy, snow-covered mountains and lush greenery. But I will always years for Hawaii, which I haven’t visited in more than a decade.

    Reply
  97. I’m late commenting here on this blog, but I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this post. Tender, affectionate, and infused with “je me souviens…”
    Like Pat, I yearn for the sun so much. Every sunny day makes me smile and feel happy to my very bones. And yet, I live in Seattle, an evergreen city of rain and clouds. There is much, much beauty to be found here in the craggy, snow-covered mountains and lush greenery. But I will always years for Hawaii, which I haven’t visited in more than a decade.

    Reply
  98. I’m late commenting here on this blog, but I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this post. Tender, affectionate, and infused with “je me souviens…”
    Like Pat, I yearn for the sun so much. Every sunny day makes me smile and feel happy to my very bones. And yet, I live in Seattle, an evergreen city of rain and clouds. There is much, much beauty to be found here in the craggy, snow-covered mountains and lush greenery. But I will always years for Hawaii, which I haven’t visited in more than a decade.

    Reply
  99. I’m late commenting here on this blog, but I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this post. Tender, affectionate, and infused with “je me souviens…”
    Like Pat, I yearn for the sun so much. Every sunny day makes me smile and feel happy to my very bones. And yet, I live in Seattle, an evergreen city of rain and clouds. There is much, much beauty to be found here in the craggy, snow-covered mountains and lush greenery. But I will always years for Hawaii, which I haven’t visited in more than a decade.

    Reply
  100. I’m late commenting here on this blog, but I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this post. Tender, affectionate, and infused with “je me souviens…”
    Like Pat, I yearn for the sun so much. Every sunny day makes me smile and feel happy to my very bones. And yet, I live in Seattle, an evergreen city of rain and clouds. There is much, much beauty to be found here in the craggy, snow-covered mountains and lush greenery. But I will always years for Hawaii, which I haven’t visited in more than a decade.

    Reply
  101. I’ve lived in North Texas most of my life. It’s not particularly a pretty place. But what makes it home is my family and friends. For beauty I love the Colorado Rockies.

    Reply
  102. I’ve lived in North Texas most of my life. It’s not particularly a pretty place. But what makes it home is my family and friends. For beauty I love the Colorado Rockies.

    Reply
  103. I’ve lived in North Texas most of my life. It’s not particularly a pretty place. But what makes it home is my family and friends. For beauty I love the Colorado Rockies.

    Reply
  104. I’ve lived in North Texas most of my life. It’s not particularly a pretty place. But what makes it home is my family and friends. For beauty I love the Colorado Rockies.

    Reply
  105. I’ve lived in North Texas most of my life. It’s not particularly a pretty place. But what makes it home is my family and friends. For beauty I love the Colorado Rockies.

    Reply
  106. Keira, I’m glad you enjoyed this post–we really liked doing it.
    It sounds like you’re overdue for a trip to Hawaii! Seattle is a wonderful city, but sunshine central it it is not.

    Reply
  107. Keira, I’m glad you enjoyed this post–we really liked doing it.
    It sounds like you’re overdue for a trip to Hawaii! Seattle is a wonderful city, but sunshine central it it is not.

    Reply
  108. Keira, I’m glad you enjoyed this post–we really liked doing it.
    It sounds like you’re overdue for a trip to Hawaii! Seattle is a wonderful city, but sunshine central it it is not.

    Reply
  109. Keira, I’m glad you enjoyed this post–we really liked doing it.
    It sounds like you’re overdue for a trip to Hawaii! Seattle is a wonderful city, but sunshine central it it is not.

    Reply
  110. Keira, I’m glad you enjoyed this post–we really liked doing it.
    It sounds like you’re overdue for a trip to Hawaii! Seattle is a wonderful city, but sunshine central it it is not.

    Reply

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