The Happy Ending

Anne here. I participated in a symposium on Genre Fiction at Melbourne University last week. It was a fascinating day and I enjoyed myself immensely. I was on two panels and at the end of the day took part in a debate — "In the battle of the genres, romance will always win." It was lovely, lighthearted fun.

One thing that surprised me though, was that so many of the other participants in the day (not the romance writers) confused "romantic books" (in which one or both the lovers end up dead) with "romance novels" (in which the lovers end up alive, together, and happy.) They mostly talked about the former, and pretty much ignored the latter. Wedding-holding-hands

It was as if they weren't comfortable with the notion of "a happy ending" — which is a vital part of the definition of genre romance. As if it was a bit embarrassing to have to admit to. Or something.

Some people in the literary world think that books with a happy ending are somehow a cop-out, or unrealistic, or even flat out unbelievable — that tragic endings make for a more "real" experience.

BeachCoupleI've never understood it. When I look around at my relatives and friends, the vast majority are still together and happy. That's real enough for me.

And it bewilders me that so many writers (outside of the romance genre) think that crafting a happy ending is so darn easy, too. Because that's what they mean by "a cop out" — taking the easy way out. Clearly they've never tried to write a satisfying happy ending.

To me, it seems a lot easier to create a character that people care about, then kill them off at the end of the book. You're guaranteed an emotional response from readers after that — and presumably readers in those genres expect that sort of ending. To me that seems a much easier way to achieve a climactic ending. (Then again, I've never tried killing off my hero or heroine, either.)

Sure, it's effective. I've been reading a wonderful fantasy series, the most recent book of which was all about a tiny girl, kidnapped by evil people who intend to destroy her in the nastiest way. I worried about that little girl all through the book — and at the very end the author had her escape her evil captors and run off into the snowy forest — in the dead of winter.

I screamed with frustration. But I'll buy the next book — whenever it comes out, some time in the long-distant future. And that little girl had better survive! (I think she will. I trust the author — but I have to wait to find out!) Baby

I've read plenty of books with tragic endings — my degree in literature was full of them — not one happy ending in all my years at university — though some of them were wonderful. And I know a lot of people love a good "weepie." But more and more I prefer to read — and write — happy ones. The word is full of enough misery and gloom — I don't need to add more to my life, or anyone else's.

I think there is a deep human need to read books that balance the uncertainty and negativity of modern life, to read books that value love and relationships, that end on a hopeful note and remind you that life is worth living.

Crafting a believable happy ending is harder than it looks. Firstly you have to create couple who are right for each other —that's harder than you think. Then you need to make readers care about your characters, then you have to send them on a journey (physical or emotional) that is satisfying. Readers want characters to earn their happy ending — Mary Jo calls it "torturing her heroes".

At some point it has to look like they won't make it after all — creating believable doubt. Then you have to craft the ending so it isn't just a convenient mush of "I love you John, I love you Marsha" — though we do want "I love you" to be said. By both hero and heroine. It's a balancing act. The ending has to satisfy on a number of levels.

Holding-handsI like to tie up as many loose ends as I can. Some people hate that — they think that's unrealistic — and it probably is, but it's part of what makes a satisfying happy ending for me. I don't want to be left wondering what happened to the dog in chapter four, or whether the little girl who ran off into the snow—ahem—whether the nice minor character who was hit by a carriage survived.

Some people love an epilogue, others hate them. I'm quite fond of them myself — but not the kind of epilogue that starts twenty or fifty years later, with the hero and heroine gray-haired and cheery, surrounded by their many children and grandchildren. I hate that. As far as I'm concerned they've only just come together — I'm not ready for them to be old yet. I want all the joys of life to be ahead of them, rich and glowing in my imagination.

So what about you? What makes a good happy ending for you? Do you like loose ends tied up or dangling? To you like or loathe epilogues? What's a good "happy ever after" ending you've read lately? Or do you enjoy the occasional book with a tragic ending? 

390 thoughts on “The Happy Ending”

  1. To me a happy ending is that the couple have developed such a strong bond that they stick together thereafter to the end of their lives (and I always hope that will be quite a while). It doesn’t mean that they never have any trouble in their lives again, because trouble comes with life and a romance would lack all credibility if they never had to face any challenges again. It means that together they have the strength to face whatever life throws at them, and prevail.
    This is why I have got so that I can’t read series novels that end with gigantic family reunions in which all the couples from previous books show up and they all have the hots for each other after many years of marriage and all their children are so perfect that no one even has a zit. To me it not only strains credibility, it misses the whole point of partnering up. And it’s just so *boring* 🙁

    Reply
  2. To me a happy ending is that the couple have developed such a strong bond that they stick together thereafter to the end of their lives (and I always hope that will be quite a while). It doesn’t mean that they never have any trouble in their lives again, because trouble comes with life and a romance would lack all credibility if they never had to face any challenges again. It means that together they have the strength to face whatever life throws at them, and prevail.
    This is why I have got so that I can’t read series novels that end with gigantic family reunions in which all the couples from previous books show up and they all have the hots for each other after many years of marriage and all their children are so perfect that no one even has a zit. To me it not only strains credibility, it misses the whole point of partnering up. And it’s just so *boring* 🙁

    Reply
  3. To me a happy ending is that the couple have developed such a strong bond that they stick together thereafter to the end of their lives (and I always hope that will be quite a while). It doesn’t mean that they never have any trouble in their lives again, because trouble comes with life and a romance would lack all credibility if they never had to face any challenges again. It means that together they have the strength to face whatever life throws at them, and prevail.
    This is why I have got so that I can’t read series novels that end with gigantic family reunions in which all the couples from previous books show up and they all have the hots for each other after many years of marriage and all their children are so perfect that no one even has a zit. To me it not only strains credibility, it misses the whole point of partnering up. And it’s just so *boring* 🙁

    Reply
  4. To me a happy ending is that the couple have developed such a strong bond that they stick together thereafter to the end of their lives (and I always hope that will be quite a while). It doesn’t mean that they never have any trouble in their lives again, because trouble comes with life and a romance would lack all credibility if they never had to face any challenges again. It means that together they have the strength to face whatever life throws at them, and prevail.
    This is why I have got so that I can’t read series novels that end with gigantic family reunions in which all the couples from previous books show up and they all have the hots for each other after many years of marriage and all their children are so perfect that no one even has a zit. To me it not only strains credibility, it misses the whole point of partnering up. And it’s just so *boring* 🙁

    Reply
  5. To me a happy ending is that the couple have developed such a strong bond that they stick together thereafter to the end of their lives (and I always hope that will be quite a while). It doesn’t mean that they never have any trouble in their lives again, because trouble comes with life and a romance would lack all credibility if they never had to face any challenges again. It means that together they have the strength to face whatever life throws at them, and prevail.
    This is why I have got so that I can’t read series novels that end with gigantic family reunions in which all the couples from previous books show up and they all have the hots for each other after many years of marriage and all their children are so perfect that no one even has a zit. To me it not only strains credibility, it misses the whole point of partnering up. And it’s just so *boring* 🙁

    Reply
  6. Thanks, Janice. I know from personal experience that a lot of readers like to see main characters from previous books in the series reunited, if only for a wedding or christening or something like that — and I’ve done it quite a bit myself. But I hear you on the unbelievable perfection of some of those epilogues.

    Reply
  7. Thanks, Janice. I know from personal experience that a lot of readers like to see main characters from previous books in the series reunited, if only for a wedding or christening or something like that — and I’ve done it quite a bit myself. But I hear you on the unbelievable perfection of some of those epilogues.

    Reply
  8. Thanks, Janice. I know from personal experience that a lot of readers like to see main characters from previous books in the series reunited, if only for a wedding or christening or something like that — and I’ve done it quite a bit myself. But I hear you on the unbelievable perfection of some of those epilogues.

    Reply
  9. Thanks, Janice. I know from personal experience that a lot of readers like to see main characters from previous books in the series reunited, if only for a wedding or christening or something like that — and I’ve done it quite a bit myself. But I hear you on the unbelievable perfection of some of those epilogues.

    Reply
  10. Thanks, Janice. I know from personal experience that a lot of readers like to see main characters from previous books in the series reunited, if only for a wedding or christening or something like that — and I’ve done it quite a bit myself. But I hear you on the unbelievable perfection of some of those epilogues.

    Reply
  11. I do NOT enjoy tragic endings at all. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because my husband and I watched The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas the other night. I hadn’t read the book and didn’t know what to expect. I thought it was thought-provoking and really good right up until the ending which APPALLED me (insert three hundred million exclamation marks) and robbed me of peace of mind and several hours sleep. After thinking about why, I realised that many books with a very emotional weepy ending achieve it through the use of a ‘sacrificial lamb’ – a character or person who didn’t deserve the ending they got; who were punished for being in the wrong place at the wrong time; or the child of a bad parent, or a young person who dies of some unspeakable disease or a lover who loses a partner in war. In short, someone who suffers something unfair. I don’t think we should settle for that. We should always aim for better, for hope, and for happy endings. Thanks to all the Wenches and every other writer who strives to improve world mental health and resilience through hard won happy endings 🙂

    Reply
  12. I do NOT enjoy tragic endings at all. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because my husband and I watched The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas the other night. I hadn’t read the book and didn’t know what to expect. I thought it was thought-provoking and really good right up until the ending which APPALLED me (insert three hundred million exclamation marks) and robbed me of peace of mind and several hours sleep. After thinking about why, I realised that many books with a very emotional weepy ending achieve it through the use of a ‘sacrificial lamb’ – a character or person who didn’t deserve the ending they got; who were punished for being in the wrong place at the wrong time; or the child of a bad parent, or a young person who dies of some unspeakable disease or a lover who loses a partner in war. In short, someone who suffers something unfair. I don’t think we should settle for that. We should always aim for better, for hope, and for happy endings. Thanks to all the Wenches and every other writer who strives to improve world mental health and resilience through hard won happy endings 🙂

    Reply
  13. I do NOT enjoy tragic endings at all. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because my husband and I watched The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas the other night. I hadn’t read the book and didn’t know what to expect. I thought it was thought-provoking and really good right up until the ending which APPALLED me (insert three hundred million exclamation marks) and robbed me of peace of mind and several hours sleep. After thinking about why, I realised that many books with a very emotional weepy ending achieve it through the use of a ‘sacrificial lamb’ – a character or person who didn’t deserve the ending they got; who were punished for being in the wrong place at the wrong time; or the child of a bad parent, or a young person who dies of some unspeakable disease or a lover who loses a partner in war. In short, someone who suffers something unfair. I don’t think we should settle for that. We should always aim for better, for hope, and for happy endings. Thanks to all the Wenches and every other writer who strives to improve world mental health and resilience through hard won happy endings 🙂

    Reply
  14. I do NOT enjoy tragic endings at all. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because my husband and I watched The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas the other night. I hadn’t read the book and didn’t know what to expect. I thought it was thought-provoking and really good right up until the ending which APPALLED me (insert three hundred million exclamation marks) and robbed me of peace of mind and several hours sleep. After thinking about why, I realised that many books with a very emotional weepy ending achieve it through the use of a ‘sacrificial lamb’ – a character or person who didn’t deserve the ending they got; who were punished for being in the wrong place at the wrong time; or the child of a bad parent, or a young person who dies of some unspeakable disease or a lover who loses a partner in war. In short, someone who suffers something unfair. I don’t think we should settle for that. We should always aim for better, for hope, and for happy endings. Thanks to all the Wenches and every other writer who strives to improve world mental health and resilience through hard won happy endings 🙂

    Reply
  15. I do NOT enjoy tragic endings at all. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately because my husband and I watched The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas the other night. I hadn’t read the book and didn’t know what to expect. I thought it was thought-provoking and really good right up until the ending which APPALLED me (insert three hundred million exclamation marks) and robbed me of peace of mind and several hours sleep. After thinking about why, I realised that many books with a very emotional weepy ending achieve it through the use of a ‘sacrificial lamb’ – a character or person who didn’t deserve the ending they got; who were punished for being in the wrong place at the wrong time; or the child of a bad parent, or a young person who dies of some unspeakable disease or a lover who loses a partner in war. In short, someone who suffers something unfair. I don’t think we should settle for that. We should always aim for better, for hope, and for happy endings. Thanks to all the Wenches and every other writer who strives to improve world mental health and resilience through hard won happy endings 🙂

    Reply
  16. Funny you should mention that one Laura, because at the very beginning of this post when Anne mentioned tragic endings, that was the first book that popped into my mind. But it that case it was surely realistic, I don’t think anyone could have expected a happy ending!

    Reply
  17. Funny you should mention that one Laura, because at the very beginning of this post when Anne mentioned tragic endings, that was the first book that popped into my mind. But it that case it was surely realistic, I don’t think anyone could have expected a happy ending!

    Reply
  18. Funny you should mention that one Laura, because at the very beginning of this post when Anne mentioned tragic endings, that was the first book that popped into my mind. But it that case it was surely realistic, I don’t think anyone could have expected a happy ending!

    Reply
  19. Funny you should mention that one Laura, because at the very beginning of this post when Anne mentioned tragic endings, that was the first book that popped into my mind. But it that case it was surely realistic, I don’t think anyone could have expected a happy ending!

    Reply
  20. Funny you should mention that one Laura, because at the very beginning of this post when Anne mentioned tragic endings, that was the first book that popped into my mind. But it that case it was surely realistic, I don’t think anyone could have expected a happy ending!

    Reply
  21. I just finished reading “The Summer Bride” and you surely tied up all the loose ends in that one, even Lady Beatrice! Lovely ending!

    Reply
  22. I just finished reading “The Summer Bride” and you surely tied up all the loose ends in that one, even Lady Beatrice! Lovely ending!

    Reply
  23. I just finished reading “The Summer Bride” and you surely tied up all the loose ends in that one, even Lady Beatrice! Lovely ending!

    Reply
  24. I just finished reading “The Summer Bride” and you surely tied up all the loose ends in that one, even Lady Beatrice! Lovely ending!

    Reply
  25. I just finished reading “The Summer Bride” and you surely tied up all the loose ends in that one, even Lady Beatrice! Lovely ending!

    Reply
  26. I am a proud romance junkie and I love me a happy ending! I found romance novels about 30 years ago when I was going though and bad depression. I really didn’t want to waste my time on anything that didn’t end well. I had enough darkness in my life at that time. When I retired and had more time to read, I was naturally drawn back to those books.
    You ladies deserve more credit than you get. It’s not just a matter of slapping a happy ending on a story. You have to create characters that the reader believes are strong enough to make it through those “happily ever after” years that will include troubles and strife.
    I have nothing against books that end tragically. I read plenty of them in my younger days, and enjoyed them. I just don’t care for them anymore.

    Reply
  27. I am a proud romance junkie and I love me a happy ending! I found romance novels about 30 years ago when I was going though and bad depression. I really didn’t want to waste my time on anything that didn’t end well. I had enough darkness in my life at that time. When I retired and had more time to read, I was naturally drawn back to those books.
    You ladies deserve more credit than you get. It’s not just a matter of slapping a happy ending on a story. You have to create characters that the reader believes are strong enough to make it through those “happily ever after” years that will include troubles and strife.
    I have nothing against books that end tragically. I read plenty of them in my younger days, and enjoyed them. I just don’t care for them anymore.

    Reply
  28. I am a proud romance junkie and I love me a happy ending! I found romance novels about 30 years ago when I was going though and bad depression. I really didn’t want to waste my time on anything that didn’t end well. I had enough darkness in my life at that time. When I retired and had more time to read, I was naturally drawn back to those books.
    You ladies deserve more credit than you get. It’s not just a matter of slapping a happy ending on a story. You have to create characters that the reader believes are strong enough to make it through those “happily ever after” years that will include troubles and strife.
    I have nothing against books that end tragically. I read plenty of them in my younger days, and enjoyed them. I just don’t care for them anymore.

    Reply
  29. I am a proud romance junkie and I love me a happy ending! I found romance novels about 30 years ago when I was going though and bad depression. I really didn’t want to waste my time on anything that didn’t end well. I had enough darkness in my life at that time. When I retired and had more time to read, I was naturally drawn back to those books.
    You ladies deserve more credit than you get. It’s not just a matter of slapping a happy ending on a story. You have to create characters that the reader believes are strong enough to make it through those “happily ever after” years that will include troubles and strife.
    I have nothing against books that end tragically. I read plenty of them in my younger days, and enjoyed them. I just don’t care for them anymore.

    Reply
  30. I am a proud romance junkie and I love me a happy ending! I found romance novels about 30 years ago when I was going though and bad depression. I really didn’t want to waste my time on anything that didn’t end well. I had enough darkness in my life at that time. When I retired and had more time to read, I was naturally drawn back to those books.
    You ladies deserve more credit than you get. It’s not just a matter of slapping a happy ending on a story. You have to create characters that the reader believes are strong enough to make it through those “happily ever after” years that will include troubles and strife.
    I have nothing against books that end tragically. I read plenty of them in my younger days, and enjoyed them. I just don’t care for them anymore.

    Reply
  31. Lovely comment, Laura. I think the tragic or upsetting endings linger in my mind — and imagination — far longer than happy ones. Some of them still haunt me months later. There’s a reason I’m a romance writer — they say the genre chooses you, and I think that’s pretty true.

    Reply
  32. Lovely comment, Laura. I think the tragic or upsetting endings linger in my mind — and imagination — far longer than happy ones. Some of them still haunt me months later. There’s a reason I’m a romance writer — they say the genre chooses you, and I think that’s pretty true.

    Reply
  33. Lovely comment, Laura. I think the tragic or upsetting endings linger in my mind — and imagination — far longer than happy ones. Some of them still haunt me months later. There’s a reason I’m a romance writer — they say the genre chooses you, and I think that’s pretty true.

    Reply
  34. Lovely comment, Laura. I think the tragic or upsetting endings linger in my mind — and imagination — far longer than happy ones. Some of them still haunt me months later. There’s a reason I’m a romance writer — they say the genre chooses you, and I think that’s pretty true.

    Reply
  35. Lovely comment, Laura. I think the tragic or upsetting endings linger in my mind — and imagination — far longer than happy ones. Some of them still haunt me months later. There’s a reason I’m a romance writer — they say the genre chooses you, and I think that’s pretty true.

    Reply
  36. I wonder if it is part of age and experience affecting our enjoyment, Mary. I’m always amazed by how much young people — particularly teens — seem to adore grim and grisly books. I don’t think I was ever that kind, though — I never did read horror. And still don’t.

    Reply
  37. I wonder if it is part of age and experience affecting our enjoyment, Mary. I’m always amazed by how much young people — particularly teens — seem to adore grim and grisly books. I don’t think I was ever that kind, though — I never did read horror. And still don’t.

    Reply
  38. I wonder if it is part of age and experience affecting our enjoyment, Mary. I’m always amazed by how much young people — particularly teens — seem to adore grim and grisly books. I don’t think I was ever that kind, though — I never did read horror. And still don’t.

    Reply
  39. I wonder if it is part of age and experience affecting our enjoyment, Mary. I’m always amazed by how much young people — particularly teens — seem to adore grim and grisly books. I don’t think I was ever that kind, though — I never did read horror. And still don’t.

    Reply
  40. I wonder if it is part of age and experience affecting our enjoyment, Mary. I’m always amazed by how much young people — particularly teens — seem to adore grim and grisly books. I don’t think I was ever that kind, though — I never did read horror. And still don’t.

    Reply
  41. I don’t want to sound pretentious, but I think that successful happy endings in romance serve the same function as successful resolutions in mystery stories—order and harmony are restored to the universe. It isn’t simply a matter of a happy ending, where the hero and heroine walk off into the sunset while the birds sing joyful as they circle the happy couple. It has to be the RIGHT happy ending. It should leave the reader thinking, “Yes! This is the way things are supposed to be!”

    Reply
  42. I don’t want to sound pretentious, but I think that successful happy endings in romance serve the same function as successful resolutions in mystery stories—order and harmony are restored to the universe. It isn’t simply a matter of a happy ending, where the hero and heroine walk off into the sunset while the birds sing joyful as they circle the happy couple. It has to be the RIGHT happy ending. It should leave the reader thinking, “Yes! This is the way things are supposed to be!”

    Reply
  43. I don’t want to sound pretentious, but I think that successful happy endings in romance serve the same function as successful resolutions in mystery stories—order and harmony are restored to the universe. It isn’t simply a matter of a happy ending, where the hero and heroine walk off into the sunset while the birds sing joyful as they circle the happy couple. It has to be the RIGHT happy ending. It should leave the reader thinking, “Yes! This is the way things are supposed to be!”

    Reply
  44. I don’t want to sound pretentious, but I think that successful happy endings in romance serve the same function as successful resolutions in mystery stories—order and harmony are restored to the universe. It isn’t simply a matter of a happy ending, where the hero and heroine walk off into the sunset while the birds sing joyful as they circle the happy couple. It has to be the RIGHT happy ending. It should leave the reader thinking, “Yes! This is the way things are supposed to be!”

    Reply
  45. I don’t want to sound pretentious, but I think that successful happy endings in romance serve the same function as successful resolutions in mystery stories—order and harmony are restored to the universe. It isn’t simply a matter of a happy ending, where the hero and heroine walk off into the sunset while the birds sing joyful as they circle the happy couple. It has to be the RIGHT happy ending. It should leave the reader thinking, “Yes! This is the way things are supposed to be!”

    Reply
  46. People may gravitate toward the books that are different from their lives.
    I think the people who like unhappy endings may be the ones whose lives are in general happy. Teenagers, especially privileged ones, may like horror because the realities of life haven’t and may never catch up to them. In the same vein, I think women who like the so-called “bad boy” romances are the ones who have never met one. But after the slings and arrows of life take their toll, we tend toward happy books.
    Romance still has an undeserved bad reputation. Not just for the happy endings, which do happen in life, but also because they’re mainly written by women for women. God forbid that we women read the kind of books we like–and also take money out of the pockets of those writing all those depressing books.

    Reply
  47. People may gravitate toward the books that are different from their lives.
    I think the people who like unhappy endings may be the ones whose lives are in general happy. Teenagers, especially privileged ones, may like horror because the realities of life haven’t and may never catch up to them. In the same vein, I think women who like the so-called “bad boy” romances are the ones who have never met one. But after the slings and arrows of life take their toll, we tend toward happy books.
    Romance still has an undeserved bad reputation. Not just for the happy endings, which do happen in life, but also because they’re mainly written by women for women. God forbid that we women read the kind of books we like–and also take money out of the pockets of those writing all those depressing books.

    Reply
  48. People may gravitate toward the books that are different from their lives.
    I think the people who like unhappy endings may be the ones whose lives are in general happy. Teenagers, especially privileged ones, may like horror because the realities of life haven’t and may never catch up to them. In the same vein, I think women who like the so-called “bad boy” romances are the ones who have never met one. But after the slings and arrows of life take their toll, we tend toward happy books.
    Romance still has an undeserved bad reputation. Not just for the happy endings, which do happen in life, but also because they’re mainly written by women for women. God forbid that we women read the kind of books we like–and also take money out of the pockets of those writing all those depressing books.

    Reply
  49. People may gravitate toward the books that are different from their lives.
    I think the people who like unhappy endings may be the ones whose lives are in general happy. Teenagers, especially privileged ones, may like horror because the realities of life haven’t and may never catch up to them. In the same vein, I think women who like the so-called “bad boy” romances are the ones who have never met one. But after the slings and arrows of life take their toll, we tend toward happy books.
    Romance still has an undeserved bad reputation. Not just for the happy endings, which do happen in life, but also because they’re mainly written by women for women. God forbid that we women read the kind of books we like–and also take money out of the pockets of those writing all those depressing books.

    Reply
  50. People may gravitate toward the books that are different from their lives.
    I think the people who like unhappy endings may be the ones whose lives are in general happy. Teenagers, especially privileged ones, may like horror because the realities of life haven’t and may never catch up to them. In the same vein, I think women who like the so-called “bad boy” romances are the ones who have never met one. But after the slings and arrows of life take their toll, we tend toward happy books.
    Romance still has an undeserved bad reputation. Not just for the happy endings, which do happen in life, but also because they’re mainly written by women for women. God forbid that we women read the kind of books we like–and also take money out of the pockets of those writing all those depressing books.

    Reply
  51. Like the rest of you, I like happy endings. I have read — and remembered — some books with unhappy (or unfinished endings — Gone with the Wind comes to mind) but they have never been my favorites. Like Anne, most people I know have had (reasonably) happy endings in their lives; so I thoroughly believe happy endings are realistic. If you choose to make Anne Bolleyn or Mary, Queen of Scots your heroine, you MUST kill her — I don’t want history tampered with. But why choose these women as heroines?
    I believe that there is a true horror of happiness among intellectuals (people who or very consciously intelligent); I have never understood why. Life is a mixture of good and bad; but for most of us the glass is at least half-full and for most of us there is contentment. That is more satisfying and more realistic to read about than is the consciously tragic.

    Reply
  52. Like the rest of you, I like happy endings. I have read — and remembered — some books with unhappy (or unfinished endings — Gone with the Wind comes to mind) but they have never been my favorites. Like Anne, most people I know have had (reasonably) happy endings in their lives; so I thoroughly believe happy endings are realistic. If you choose to make Anne Bolleyn or Mary, Queen of Scots your heroine, you MUST kill her — I don’t want history tampered with. But why choose these women as heroines?
    I believe that there is a true horror of happiness among intellectuals (people who or very consciously intelligent); I have never understood why. Life is a mixture of good and bad; but for most of us the glass is at least half-full and for most of us there is contentment. That is more satisfying and more realistic to read about than is the consciously tragic.

    Reply
  53. Like the rest of you, I like happy endings. I have read — and remembered — some books with unhappy (or unfinished endings — Gone with the Wind comes to mind) but they have never been my favorites. Like Anne, most people I know have had (reasonably) happy endings in their lives; so I thoroughly believe happy endings are realistic. If you choose to make Anne Bolleyn or Mary, Queen of Scots your heroine, you MUST kill her — I don’t want history tampered with. But why choose these women as heroines?
    I believe that there is a true horror of happiness among intellectuals (people who or very consciously intelligent); I have never understood why. Life is a mixture of good and bad; but for most of us the glass is at least half-full and for most of us there is contentment. That is more satisfying and more realistic to read about than is the consciously tragic.

    Reply
  54. Like the rest of you, I like happy endings. I have read — and remembered — some books with unhappy (or unfinished endings — Gone with the Wind comes to mind) but they have never been my favorites. Like Anne, most people I know have had (reasonably) happy endings in their lives; so I thoroughly believe happy endings are realistic. If you choose to make Anne Bolleyn or Mary, Queen of Scots your heroine, you MUST kill her — I don’t want history tampered with. But why choose these women as heroines?
    I believe that there is a true horror of happiness among intellectuals (people who or very consciously intelligent); I have never understood why. Life is a mixture of good and bad; but for most of us the glass is at least half-full and for most of us there is contentment. That is more satisfying and more realistic to read about than is the consciously tragic.

    Reply
  55. Like the rest of you, I like happy endings. I have read — and remembered — some books with unhappy (or unfinished endings — Gone with the Wind comes to mind) but they have never been my favorites. Like Anne, most people I know have had (reasonably) happy endings in their lives; so I thoroughly believe happy endings are realistic. If you choose to make Anne Bolleyn or Mary, Queen of Scots your heroine, you MUST kill her — I don’t want history tampered with. But why choose these women as heroines?
    I believe that there is a true horror of happiness among intellectuals (people who or very consciously intelligent); I have never understood why. Life is a mixture of good and bad; but for most of us the glass is at least half-full and for most of us there is contentment. That is more satisfying and more realistic to read about than is the consciously tragic.

    Reply
  56. I enjoy happy endings. Whether they fell in love or the bad guy got caught or the family was reunited…whatever, I enjoy a happy ending. I think, as has already been stated, because the real world is so full of tragedy and nonsense, I want to escape for awhile. I understand what you mean about a HE NOT being a cop-out. I just read a book where the hero was lying and accusing the heroine of terrible things and then in two sentences he was determined not to live without her and she overlooked it all and they were getting married tomorrow. What? There has to be some resolution, some regret, some discussion. I also enjoy when whether they are “right” for each other, they work it out and communicate and love each other through it all. That’s a HEA for me. I have read those that don’t end well, and even enjoyed them, but I always want an additional chapter to tie it all up and at least let everyone else be at peace.

    Reply
  57. I enjoy happy endings. Whether they fell in love or the bad guy got caught or the family was reunited…whatever, I enjoy a happy ending. I think, as has already been stated, because the real world is so full of tragedy and nonsense, I want to escape for awhile. I understand what you mean about a HE NOT being a cop-out. I just read a book where the hero was lying and accusing the heroine of terrible things and then in two sentences he was determined not to live without her and she overlooked it all and they were getting married tomorrow. What? There has to be some resolution, some regret, some discussion. I also enjoy when whether they are “right” for each other, they work it out and communicate and love each other through it all. That’s a HEA for me. I have read those that don’t end well, and even enjoyed them, but I always want an additional chapter to tie it all up and at least let everyone else be at peace.

    Reply
  58. I enjoy happy endings. Whether they fell in love or the bad guy got caught or the family was reunited…whatever, I enjoy a happy ending. I think, as has already been stated, because the real world is so full of tragedy and nonsense, I want to escape for awhile. I understand what you mean about a HE NOT being a cop-out. I just read a book where the hero was lying and accusing the heroine of terrible things and then in two sentences he was determined not to live without her and she overlooked it all and they were getting married tomorrow. What? There has to be some resolution, some regret, some discussion. I also enjoy when whether they are “right” for each other, they work it out and communicate and love each other through it all. That’s a HEA for me. I have read those that don’t end well, and even enjoyed them, but I always want an additional chapter to tie it all up and at least let everyone else be at peace.

    Reply
  59. I enjoy happy endings. Whether they fell in love or the bad guy got caught or the family was reunited…whatever, I enjoy a happy ending. I think, as has already been stated, because the real world is so full of tragedy and nonsense, I want to escape for awhile. I understand what you mean about a HE NOT being a cop-out. I just read a book where the hero was lying and accusing the heroine of terrible things and then in two sentences he was determined not to live without her and she overlooked it all and they were getting married tomorrow. What? There has to be some resolution, some regret, some discussion. I also enjoy when whether they are “right” for each other, they work it out and communicate and love each other through it all. That’s a HEA for me. I have read those that don’t end well, and even enjoyed them, but I always want an additional chapter to tie it all up and at least let everyone else be at peace.

    Reply
  60. I enjoy happy endings. Whether they fell in love or the bad guy got caught or the family was reunited…whatever, I enjoy a happy ending. I think, as has already been stated, because the real world is so full of tragedy and nonsense, I want to escape for awhile. I understand what you mean about a HE NOT being a cop-out. I just read a book where the hero was lying and accusing the heroine of terrible things and then in two sentences he was determined not to live without her and she overlooked it all and they were getting married tomorrow. What? There has to be some resolution, some regret, some discussion. I also enjoy when whether they are “right” for each other, they work it out and communicate and love each other through it all. That’s a HEA for me. I have read those that don’t end well, and even enjoyed them, but I always want an additional chapter to tie it all up and at least let everyone else be at peace.

    Reply
  61. I suffer from a form of PTSD – and I NEED a happy ending.
    I found romance novels late in my life. Up until then, I was one of those people who simply did not “get it”. But, when I actually started reading romance novels and found that writers created worlds where things ended in the way that I thought they should end, I fell in love.
    And yes, I enjoy seeing things tied up neatly. After all, I am not going to be running into these people on the street or at the grocery store. So, I will not be able to say, “so how did things come out” or “whatever happened to??” And besides, the things I would want to ask are very personal and that is not what I would normally do.
    I don’t know where everyone else lives, but I live in a world where bad things happen. And the media is happy to tell me all about those bad things – over and over.
    I have never been a big fan of anxiety. Now that anxiety is my enemy, I like being able to move to a world where people fall in love, the bad guy is brought to justice and things all end happily ever after.

    Reply
  62. I suffer from a form of PTSD – and I NEED a happy ending.
    I found romance novels late in my life. Up until then, I was one of those people who simply did not “get it”. But, when I actually started reading romance novels and found that writers created worlds where things ended in the way that I thought they should end, I fell in love.
    And yes, I enjoy seeing things tied up neatly. After all, I am not going to be running into these people on the street or at the grocery store. So, I will not be able to say, “so how did things come out” or “whatever happened to??” And besides, the things I would want to ask are very personal and that is not what I would normally do.
    I don’t know where everyone else lives, but I live in a world where bad things happen. And the media is happy to tell me all about those bad things – over and over.
    I have never been a big fan of anxiety. Now that anxiety is my enemy, I like being able to move to a world where people fall in love, the bad guy is brought to justice and things all end happily ever after.

    Reply
  63. I suffer from a form of PTSD – and I NEED a happy ending.
    I found romance novels late in my life. Up until then, I was one of those people who simply did not “get it”. But, when I actually started reading romance novels and found that writers created worlds where things ended in the way that I thought they should end, I fell in love.
    And yes, I enjoy seeing things tied up neatly. After all, I am not going to be running into these people on the street or at the grocery store. So, I will not be able to say, “so how did things come out” or “whatever happened to??” And besides, the things I would want to ask are very personal and that is not what I would normally do.
    I don’t know where everyone else lives, but I live in a world where bad things happen. And the media is happy to tell me all about those bad things – over and over.
    I have never been a big fan of anxiety. Now that anxiety is my enemy, I like being able to move to a world where people fall in love, the bad guy is brought to justice and things all end happily ever after.

    Reply
  64. I suffer from a form of PTSD – and I NEED a happy ending.
    I found romance novels late in my life. Up until then, I was one of those people who simply did not “get it”. But, when I actually started reading romance novels and found that writers created worlds where things ended in the way that I thought they should end, I fell in love.
    And yes, I enjoy seeing things tied up neatly. After all, I am not going to be running into these people on the street or at the grocery store. So, I will not be able to say, “so how did things come out” or “whatever happened to??” And besides, the things I would want to ask are very personal and that is not what I would normally do.
    I don’t know where everyone else lives, but I live in a world where bad things happen. And the media is happy to tell me all about those bad things – over and over.
    I have never been a big fan of anxiety. Now that anxiety is my enemy, I like being able to move to a world where people fall in love, the bad guy is brought to justice and things all end happily ever after.

    Reply
  65. I suffer from a form of PTSD – and I NEED a happy ending.
    I found romance novels late in my life. Up until then, I was one of those people who simply did not “get it”. But, when I actually started reading romance novels and found that writers created worlds where things ended in the way that I thought they should end, I fell in love.
    And yes, I enjoy seeing things tied up neatly. After all, I am not going to be running into these people on the street or at the grocery store. So, I will not be able to say, “so how did things come out” or “whatever happened to??” And besides, the things I would want to ask are very personal and that is not what I would normally do.
    I don’t know where everyone else lives, but I live in a world where bad things happen. And the media is happy to tell me all about those bad things – over and over.
    I have never been a big fan of anxiety. Now that anxiety is my enemy, I like being able to move to a world where people fall in love, the bad guy is brought to justice and things all end happily ever after.

    Reply
  66. I’m not a fan of sad endings in my movies or books. Let me cry in the middle but end it with a smile knowing that all is well with the world. It’s hard enough to find the silver linings when you are surrounded by the dismal news feeds, fiction is an escape from the doom and gloom but also reminds us to have hope for better days ahead, that love isn’t just a fleeting chemical reaction, and that sometimes the good can in fact win out.

    Reply
  67. I’m not a fan of sad endings in my movies or books. Let me cry in the middle but end it with a smile knowing that all is well with the world. It’s hard enough to find the silver linings when you are surrounded by the dismal news feeds, fiction is an escape from the doom and gloom but also reminds us to have hope for better days ahead, that love isn’t just a fleeting chemical reaction, and that sometimes the good can in fact win out.

    Reply
  68. I’m not a fan of sad endings in my movies or books. Let me cry in the middle but end it with a smile knowing that all is well with the world. It’s hard enough to find the silver linings when you are surrounded by the dismal news feeds, fiction is an escape from the doom and gloom but also reminds us to have hope for better days ahead, that love isn’t just a fleeting chemical reaction, and that sometimes the good can in fact win out.

    Reply
  69. I’m not a fan of sad endings in my movies or books. Let me cry in the middle but end it with a smile knowing that all is well with the world. It’s hard enough to find the silver linings when you are surrounded by the dismal news feeds, fiction is an escape from the doom and gloom but also reminds us to have hope for better days ahead, that love isn’t just a fleeting chemical reaction, and that sometimes the good can in fact win out.

    Reply
  70. I’m not a fan of sad endings in my movies or books. Let me cry in the middle but end it with a smile knowing that all is well with the world. It’s hard enough to find the silver linings when you are surrounded by the dismal news feeds, fiction is an escape from the doom and gloom but also reminds us to have hope for better days ahead, that love isn’t just a fleeting chemical reaction, and that sometimes the good can in fact win out.

    Reply
  71. Hi! I’m a lurker, who loves reading each and every post. But I felt I had to chime in, especially in light of what is happening with the U.S. election (references made in social media about women who read romance erotica, therefore it’s all right for men to sexually assault women type-of-argument. BTW, I am neither endorsing that 50 shades book, nor condemning/shaming women who love it.)
    I’ve been a HEA gal all my life (I’m now 51) when it comes to my taste in books/movies. I no longer defend/discuss romance with others who do not read genre romance for, in my experience, it’s like arguing with a drunk. And it’s women, mostly, who have a problem with other women enjoying romance, which I cannot fathom why.
    Non romance readers who attach shame and loathing to genre romance and to those who read/write it speaks of ill of them, imo. For there is nothing wrong or shameful with in embracing hope, love, success in a relationship (with all it’s ups and downs as Janice pointed out) either IRL or in fiction.
    So keep writing those lovely love stories, Wenches, and I will keep buying!

    Reply
  72. Hi! I’m a lurker, who loves reading each and every post. But I felt I had to chime in, especially in light of what is happening with the U.S. election (references made in social media about women who read romance erotica, therefore it’s all right for men to sexually assault women type-of-argument. BTW, I am neither endorsing that 50 shades book, nor condemning/shaming women who love it.)
    I’ve been a HEA gal all my life (I’m now 51) when it comes to my taste in books/movies. I no longer defend/discuss romance with others who do not read genre romance for, in my experience, it’s like arguing with a drunk. And it’s women, mostly, who have a problem with other women enjoying romance, which I cannot fathom why.
    Non romance readers who attach shame and loathing to genre romance and to those who read/write it speaks of ill of them, imo. For there is nothing wrong or shameful with in embracing hope, love, success in a relationship (with all it’s ups and downs as Janice pointed out) either IRL or in fiction.
    So keep writing those lovely love stories, Wenches, and I will keep buying!

    Reply
  73. Hi! I’m a lurker, who loves reading each and every post. But I felt I had to chime in, especially in light of what is happening with the U.S. election (references made in social media about women who read romance erotica, therefore it’s all right for men to sexually assault women type-of-argument. BTW, I am neither endorsing that 50 shades book, nor condemning/shaming women who love it.)
    I’ve been a HEA gal all my life (I’m now 51) when it comes to my taste in books/movies. I no longer defend/discuss romance with others who do not read genre romance for, in my experience, it’s like arguing with a drunk. And it’s women, mostly, who have a problem with other women enjoying romance, which I cannot fathom why.
    Non romance readers who attach shame and loathing to genre romance and to those who read/write it speaks of ill of them, imo. For there is nothing wrong or shameful with in embracing hope, love, success in a relationship (with all it’s ups and downs as Janice pointed out) either IRL or in fiction.
    So keep writing those lovely love stories, Wenches, and I will keep buying!

    Reply
  74. Hi! I’m a lurker, who loves reading each and every post. But I felt I had to chime in, especially in light of what is happening with the U.S. election (references made in social media about women who read romance erotica, therefore it’s all right for men to sexually assault women type-of-argument. BTW, I am neither endorsing that 50 shades book, nor condemning/shaming women who love it.)
    I’ve been a HEA gal all my life (I’m now 51) when it comes to my taste in books/movies. I no longer defend/discuss romance with others who do not read genre romance for, in my experience, it’s like arguing with a drunk. And it’s women, mostly, who have a problem with other women enjoying romance, which I cannot fathom why.
    Non romance readers who attach shame and loathing to genre romance and to those who read/write it speaks of ill of them, imo. For there is nothing wrong or shameful with in embracing hope, love, success in a relationship (with all it’s ups and downs as Janice pointed out) either IRL or in fiction.
    So keep writing those lovely love stories, Wenches, and I will keep buying!

    Reply
  75. Hi! I’m a lurker, who loves reading each and every post. But I felt I had to chime in, especially in light of what is happening with the U.S. election (references made in social media about women who read romance erotica, therefore it’s all right for men to sexually assault women type-of-argument. BTW, I am neither endorsing that 50 shades book, nor condemning/shaming women who love it.)
    I’ve been a HEA gal all my life (I’m now 51) when it comes to my taste in books/movies. I no longer defend/discuss romance with others who do not read genre romance for, in my experience, it’s like arguing with a drunk. And it’s women, mostly, who have a problem with other women enjoying romance, which I cannot fathom why.
    Non romance readers who attach shame and loathing to genre romance and to those who read/write it speaks of ill of them, imo. For there is nothing wrong or shameful with in embracing hope, love, success in a relationship (with all it’s ups and downs as Janice pointed out) either IRL or in fiction.
    So keep writing those lovely love stories, Wenches, and I will keep buying!

    Reply
  76. I agree with all that was said about loving HEA because there’s enough misery and sadness in the world. Lack of HEA is why I don’t read most of the books on Oprah’s list. I think a lot of it is wanting to keep a hopeful attitude even in the midst of troubles. It’s hard to wait for heaven and bliss eternally. We also want some bliss here to help us make it through. IMO a strong romantic relationship is one thing that makes life worth living. Even though the relationship changes over time to be less acting like bunnies and more hand holding, it’s still that sweetness of having your best friend to kiss good morning and good night.

    Reply
  77. I agree with all that was said about loving HEA because there’s enough misery and sadness in the world. Lack of HEA is why I don’t read most of the books on Oprah’s list. I think a lot of it is wanting to keep a hopeful attitude even in the midst of troubles. It’s hard to wait for heaven and bliss eternally. We also want some bliss here to help us make it through. IMO a strong romantic relationship is one thing that makes life worth living. Even though the relationship changes over time to be less acting like bunnies and more hand holding, it’s still that sweetness of having your best friend to kiss good morning and good night.

    Reply
  78. I agree with all that was said about loving HEA because there’s enough misery and sadness in the world. Lack of HEA is why I don’t read most of the books on Oprah’s list. I think a lot of it is wanting to keep a hopeful attitude even in the midst of troubles. It’s hard to wait for heaven and bliss eternally. We also want some bliss here to help us make it through. IMO a strong romantic relationship is one thing that makes life worth living. Even though the relationship changes over time to be less acting like bunnies and more hand holding, it’s still that sweetness of having your best friend to kiss good morning and good night.

    Reply
  79. I agree with all that was said about loving HEA because there’s enough misery and sadness in the world. Lack of HEA is why I don’t read most of the books on Oprah’s list. I think a lot of it is wanting to keep a hopeful attitude even in the midst of troubles. It’s hard to wait for heaven and bliss eternally. We also want some bliss here to help us make it through. IMO a strong romantic relationship is one thing that makes life worth living. Even though the relationship changes over time to be less acting like bunnies and more hand holding, it’s still that sweetness of having your best friend to kiss good morning and good night.

    Reply
  80. I agree with all that was said about loving HEA because there’s enough misery and sadness in the world. Lack of HEA is why I don’t read most of the books on Oprah’s list. I think a lot of it is wanting to keep a hopeful attitude even in the midst of troubles. It’s hard to wait for heaven and bliss eternally. We also want some bliss here to help us make it through. IMO a strong romantic relationship is one thing that makes life worth living. Even though the relationship changes over time to be less acting like bunnies and more hand holding, it’s still that sweetness of having your best friend to kiss good morning and good night.

    Reply
  81. I like my happy endings, I read enough tragic endings in my life. I have found some romance books that give happy endings but with some sadness in them, I don’t mind that as long as they are together at the end.

    Reply
  82. I like my happy endings, I read enough tragic endings in my life. I have found some romance books that give happy endings but with some sadness in them, I don’t mind that as long as they are together at the end.

    Reply
  83. I like my happy endings, I read enough tragic endings in my life. I have found some romance books that give happy endings but with some sadness in them, I don’t mind that as long as they are together at the end.

    Reply
  84. I like my happy endings, I read enough tragic endings in my life. I have found some romance books that give happy endings but with some sadness in them, I don’t mind that as long as they are together at the end.

    Reply
  85. I like my happy endings, I read enough tragic endings in my life. I have found some romance books that give happy endings but with some sadness in them, I don’t mind that as long as they are together at the end.

    Reply
  86. I’m partial to happy endings too, especially in romances, because this is what I expect when I pick up one to read.
    I agree with you, Anne, books with tragic or upsetting endings tend to stay in your mind longer if not forever. Once read never forgotten. I’ve yet to re-read a book that had an unhappy ending.

    Reply
  87. I’m partial to happy endings too, especially in romances, because this is what I expect when I pick up one to read.
    I agree with you, Anne, books with tragic or upsetting endings tend to stay in your mind longer if not forever. Once read never forgotten. I’ve yet to re-read a book that had an unhappy ending.

    Reply
  88. I’m partial to happy endings too, especially in romances, because this is what I expect when I pick up one to read.
    I agree with you, Anne, books with tragic or upsetting endings tend to stay in your mind longer if not forever. Once read never forgotten. I’ve yet to re-read a book that had an unhappy ending.

    Reply
  89. I’m partial to happy endings too, especially in romances, because this is what I expect when I pick up one to read.
    I agree with you, Anne, books with tragic or upsetting endings tend to stay in your mind longer if not forever. Once read never forgotten. I’ve yet to re-read a book that had an unhappy ending.

    Reply
  90. I’m partial to happy endings too, especially in romances, because this is what I expect when I pick up one to read.
    I agree with you, Anne, books with tragic or upsetting endings tend to stay in your mind longer if not forever. Once read never forgotten. I’ve yet to re-read a book that had an unhappy ending.

    Reply
  91. Lilian I completely agree. When I am conducting workshops on writing romance, I often tell participants that a good mystery delivers justice at the end, and a good romance will deliver emotional justice. For me that balance at the end is a hallmark of most genre fiction. But it has to be said that the boundaries are being pushed all the time, and not all mysteries end with justice, but deeper injustice, where the criminal flourishes, and romance now includes stories where the end is “he’ll do for now” — which for me is not the fantasy I want.

    Reply
  92. Lilian I completely agree. When I am conducting workshops on writing romance, I often tell participants that a good mystery delivers justice at the end, and a good romance will deliver emotional justice. For me that balance at the end is a hallmark of most genre fiction. But it has to be said that the boundaries are being pushed all the time, and not all mysteries end with justice, but deeper injustice, where the criminal flourishes, and romance now includes stories where the end is “he’ll do for now” — which for me is not the fantasy I want.

    Reply
  93. Lilian I completely agree. When I am conducting workshops on writing romance, I often tell participants that a good mystery delivers justice at the end, and a good romance will deliver emotional justice. For me that balance at the end is a hallmark of most genre fiction. But it has to be said that the boundaries are being pushed all the time, and not all mysteries end with justice, but deeper injustice, where the criminal flourishes, and romance now includes stories where the end is “he’ll do for now” — which for me is not the fantasy I want.

    Reply
  94. Lilian I completely agree. When I am conducting workshops on writing romance, I often tell participants that a good mystery delivers justice at the end, and a good romance will deliver emotional justice. For me that balance at the end is a hallmark of most genre fiction. But it has to be said that the boundaries are being pushed all the time, and not all mysteries end with justice, but deeper injustice, where the criminal flourishes, and romance now includes stories where the end is “he’ll do for now” — which for me is not the fantasy I want.

    Reply
  95. Lilian I completely agree. When I am conducting workshops on writing romance, I often tell participants that a good mystery delivers justice at the end, and a good romance will deliver emotional justice. For me that balance at the end is a hallmark of most genre fiction. But it has to be said that the boundaries are being pushed all the time, and not all mysteries end with justice, but deeper injustice, where the criminal flourishes, and romance now includes stories where the end is “he’ll do for now” — which for me is not the fantasy I want.

    Reply
  96. Jana, I agree. I think the constant negative, gloom-and-doom newsfeeds are making this world — and us — unhappier, showing us every nasty little thing that happens across the world. Fiction that ends happily, especially romance fiction which also gives us a small dose of joy, is a balance to that.

    Reply
  97. Jana, I agree. I think the constant negative, gloom-and-doom newsfeeds are making this world — and us — unhappier, showing us every nasty little thing that happens across the world. Fiction that ends happily, especially romance fiction which also gives us a small dose of joy, is a balance to that.

    Reply
  98. Jana, I agree. I think the constant negative, gloom-and-doom newsfeeds are making this world — and us — unhappier, showing us every nasty little thing that happens across the world. Fiction that ends happily, especially romance fiction which also gives us a small dose of joy, is a balance to that.

    Reply
  99. Jana, I agree. I think the constant negative, gloom-and-doom newsfeeds are making this world — and us — unhappier, showing us every nasty little thing that happens across the world. Fiction that ends happily, especially romance fiction which also gives us a small dose of joy, is a balance to that.

    Reply
  100. Jana, I agree. I think the constant negative, gloom-and-doom newsfeeds are making this world — and us — unhappier, showing us every nasty little thing that happens across the world. Fiction that ends happily, especially romance fiction which also gives us a small dose of joy, is a balance to that.

    Reply
  101. Linda, such an interesting notion. I think it’s true that often people gravitate towards books that are different from their lives. Some people I know, who are the sweetest, gentlest people, and whose husbands are just lovely, really enjoy a virtual walk on the wild side with those rough tough bad-boy heroes. I think it’s a safe way of enjoying and experiencing another side of life. But I also think that some people like to see their own version reality reflected and enhanced — a kind of endorsement of their own experience. Thank goodness for variety. And for women writing to please women.

    Reply
  102. Linda, such an interesting notion. I think it’s true that often people gravitate towards books that are different from their lives. Some people I know, who are the sweetest, gentlest people, and whose husbands are just lovely, really enjoy a virtual walk on the wild side with those rough tough bad-boy heroes. I think it’s a safe way of enjoying and experiencing another side of life. But I also think that some people like to see their own version reality reflected and enhanced — a kind of endorsement of their own experience. Thank goodness for variety. And for women writing to please women.

    Reply
  103. Linda, such an interesting notion. I think it’s true that often people gravitate towards books that are different from their lives. Some people I know, who are the sweetest, gentlest people, and whose husbands are just lovely, really enjoy a virtual walk on the wild side with those rough tough bad-boy heroes. I think it’s a safe way of enjoying and experiencing another side of life. But I also think that some people like to see their own version reality reflected and enhanced — a kind of endorsement of their own experience. Thank goodness for variety. And for women writing to please women.

    Reply
  104. Linda, such an interesting notion. I think it’s true that often people gravitate towards books that are different from their lives. Some people I know, who are the sweetest, gentlest people, and whose husbands are just lovely, really enjoy a virtual walk on the wild side with those rough tough bad-boy heroes. I think it’s a safe way of enjoying and experiencing another side of life. But I also think that some people like to see their own version reality reflected and enhanced — a kind of endorsement of their own experience. Thank goodness for variety. And for women writing to please women.

    Reply
  105. Linda, such an interesting notion. I think it’s true that often people gravitate towards books that are different from their lives. Some people I know, who are the sweetest, gentlest people, and whose husbands are just lovely, really enjoy a virtual walk on the wild side with those rough tough bad-boy heroes. I think it’s a safe way of enjoying and experiencing another side of life. But I also think that some people like to see their own version reality reflected and enhanced — a kind of endorsement of their own experience. Thank goodness for variety. And for women writing to please women.

    Reply
  106. Sue, yes a lot of so-called intellectuals seem to think serious fiction is more or less synonymous with “must end badly for one or both protagonists.” Happy isn’t intellectual enough. And as I said, tragic is fairly easily achieved. But I also think that many of them have judged (and misjudged) romance without ever having read one, or having only read one or two very ordinary ones, and judging the genre on a few poor examples. I was like that in my youth — I didn’t need or want to read romance because I *knew* it was formulaic rubbish. I hadn’t read it — I didn’t count Georgette Heyer as romance — and I had no intention of starting. But years later when I did start reading romance, I fell in love with the genre I thought I’d despised. It was very heartening to hear at this symposium that they now teach popular fiction at some universities and that the classes are very popular. Even nicer was to hear that my Autumn Bride is being studied as a text at three Australian universities. 🙂

    Reply
  107. Sue, yes a lot of so-called intellectuals seem to think serious fiction is more or less synonymous with “must end badly for one or both protagonists.” Happy isn’t intellectual enough. And as I said, tragic is fairly easily achieved. But I also think that many of them have judged (and misjudged) romance without ever having read one, or having only read one or two very ordinary ones, and judging the genre on a few poor examples. I was like that in my youth — I didn’t need or want to read romance because I *knew* it was formulaic rubbish. I hadn’t read it — I didn’t count Georgette Heyer as romance — and I had no intention of starting. But years later when I did start reading romance, I fell in love with the genre I thought I’d despised. It was very heartening to hear at this symposium that they now teach popular fiction at some universities and that the classes are very popular. Even nicer was to hear that my Autumn Bride is being studied as a text at three Australian universities. 🙂

    Reply
  108. Sue, yes a lot of so-called intellectuals seem to think serious fiction is more or less synonymous with “must end badly for one or both protagonists.” Happy isn’t intellectual enough. And as I said, tragic is fairly easily achieved. But I also think that many of them have judged (and misjudged) romance without ever having read one, or having only read one or two very ordinary ones, and judging the genre on a few poor examples. I was like that in my youth — I didn’t need or want to read romance because I *knew* it was formulaic rubbish. I hadn’t read it — I didn’t count Georgette Heyer as romance — and I had no intention of starting. But years later when I did start reading romance, I fell in love with the genre I thought I’d despised. It was very heartening to hear at this symposium that they now teach popular fiction at some universities and that the classes are very popular. Even nicer was to hear that my Autumn Bride is being studied as a text at three Australian universities. 🙂

    Reply
  109. Sue, yes a lot of so-called intellectuals seem to think serious fiction is more or less synonymous with “must end badly for one or both protagonists.” Happy isn’t intellectual enough. And as I said, tragic is fairly easily achieved. But I also think that many of them have judged (and misjudged) romance without ever having read one, or having only read one or two very ordinary ones, and judging the genre on a few poor examples. I was like that in my youth — I didn’t need or want to read romance because I *knew* it was formulaic rubbish. I hadn’t read it — I didn’t count Georgette Heyer as romance — and I had no intention of starting. But years later when I did start reading romance, I fell in love with the genre I thought I’d despised. It was very heartening to hear at this symposium that they now teach popular fiction at some universities and that the classes are very popular. Even nicer was to hear that my Autumn Bride is being studied as a text at three Australian universities. 🙂

    Reply
  110. Sue, yes a lot of so-called intellectuals seem to think serious fiction is more or less synonymous with “must end badly for one or both protagonists.” Happy isn’t intellectual enough. And as I said, tragic is fairly easily achieved. But I also think that many of them have judged (and misjudged) romance without ever having read one, or having only read one or two very ordinary ones, and judging the genre on a few poor examples. I was like that in my youth — I didn’t need or want to read romance because I *knew* it was formulaic rubbish. I hadn’t read it — I didn’t count Georgette Heyer as romance — and I had no intention of starting. But years later when I did start reading romance, I fell in love with the genre I thought I’d despised. It was very heartening to hear at this symposium that they now teach popular fiction at some universities and that the classes are very popular. Even nicer was to hear that my Autumn Bride is being studied as a text at three Australian universities. 🙂

    Reply
  111. Suzanne, it is a rule of typos that you only see them when theyre fading off the screen and its too late to fix them. 😉 For some reason my comments always show up without apostrophes or quotation marks, so I always have to go in and put them back in — the composer of the post can edit comments.

    Reply
  112. Suzanne, it is a rule of typos that you only see them when theyre fading off the screen and its too late to fix them. 😉 For some reason my comments always show up without apostrophes or quotation marks, so I always have to go in and put them back in — the composer of the post can edit comments.

    Reply
  113. Suzanne, it is a rule of typos that you only see them when theyre fading off the screen and its too late to fix them. 😉 For some reason my comments always show up without apostrophes or quotation marks, so I always have to go in and put them back in — the composer of the post can edit comments.

    Reply
  114. Suzanne, it is a rule of typos that you only see them when theyre fading off the screen and its too late to fix them. 😉 For some reason my comments always show up without apostrophes or quotation marks, so I always have to go in and put them back in — the composer of the post can edit comments.

    Reply
  115. Suzanne, it is a rule of typos that you only see them when theyre fading off the screen and its too late to fix them. 😉 For some reason my comments always show up without apostrophes or quotation marks, so I always have to go in and put them back in — the composer of the post can edit comments.

    Reply
  116. Kathy, thats very true. I guess Im preaching to the converted here — and I love that! I suppose most of the romance is not serious fiction people dont realize that many romances embrace difficult life topics, explore them in depth, and still find a convincing way to lead readers — and the main characters — back into the light, and give them a hopeful, triumphanthappyending.

    Reply
  117. Kathy, thats very true. I guess Im preaching to the converted here — and I love that! I suppose most of the romance is not serious fiction people dont realize that many romances embrace difficult life topics, explore them in depth, and still find a convincing way to lead readers — and the main characters — back into the light, and give them a hopeful, triumphanthappyending.

    Reply
  118. Kathy, thats very true. I guess Im preaching to the converted here — and I love that! I suppose most of the romance is not serious fiction people dont realize that many romances embrace difficult life topics, explore them in depth, and still find a convincing way to lead readers — and the main characters — back into the light, and give them a hopeful, triumphanthappyending.

    Reply
  119. Kathy, thats very true. I guess Im preaching to the converted here — and I love that! I suppose most of the romance is not serious fiction people dont realize that many romances embrace difficult life topics, explore them in depth, and still find a convincing way to lead readers — and the main characters — back into the light, and give them a hopeful, triumphanthappyending.

    Reply
  120. Kathy, thats very true. I guess Im preaching to the converted here — and I love that! I suppose most of the romance is not serious fiction people dont realize that many romances embrace difficult life topics, explore them in depth, and still find a convincing way to lead readers — and the main characters — back into the light, and give them a hopeful, triumphanthappyending.

    Reply
  121. Stephanie, I have trouble with that kind of romance myself — the mean-mean-mean — I love you — oh, thats all right then I love you too — kind of story. For me to enjoy a happy ending I have to believe that one or both characters have earned it, often by confronting — and defeating — their inner demons.

    Reply
  122. Stephanie, I have trouble with that kind of romance myself — the mean-mean-mean — I love you — oh, thats all right then I love you too — kind of story. For me to enjoy a happy ending I have to believe that one or both characters have earned it, often by confronting — and defeating — their inner demons.

    Reply
  123. Stephanie, I have trouble with that kind of romance myself — the mean-mean-mean — I love you — oh, thats all right then I love you too — kind of story. For me to enjoy a happy ending I have to believe that one or both characters have earned it, often by confronting — and defeating — their inner demons.

    Reply
  124. Stephanie, I have trouble with that kind of romance myself — the mean-mean-mean — I love you — oh, thats all right then I love you too — kind of story. For me to enjoy a happy ending I have to believe that one or both characters have earned it, often by confronting — and defeating — their inner demons.

    Reply
  125. Stephanie, I have trouble with that kind of romance myself — the mean-mean-mean — I love you — oh, thats all right then I love you too — kind of story. For me to enjoy a happy ending I have to believe that one or both characters have earned it, often by confronting — and defeating — their inner demons.

    Reply
  126. Annette, I came to romance later in life, too (apart from Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart). We all live in a world where bad things happen, but I believe we always have. Wars, invasions, all kinds of horror has always existed –and as you know, those caught up in it suffer. But we are reminded of horrible events and ghastly things happening on the TV every single day of our lives, we hear of examples from every corner of the world, so it feels more immediate and as if its around every corner. Even people to whom nothing dreadful has happened now live in fear in case it does. My TV broke a while back and I havent replaced it. My world is now so much more peaceful and hopeful.

    Reply
  127. Annette, I came to romance later in life, too (apart from Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart). We all live in a world where bad things happen, but I believe we always have. Wars, invasions, all kinds of horror has always existed –and as you know, those caught up in it suffer. But we are reminded of horrible events and ghastly things happening on the TV every single day of our lives, we hear of examples from every corner of the world, so it feels more immediate and as if its around every corner. Even people to whom nothing dreadful has happened now live in fear in case it does. My TV broke a while back and I havent replaced it. My world is now so much more peaceful and hopeful.

    Reply
  128. Annette, I came to romance later in life, too (apart from Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart). We all live in a world where bad things happen, but I believe we always have. Wars, invasions, all kinds of horror has always existed –and as you know, those caught up in it suffer. But we are reminded of horrible events and ghastly things happening on the TV every single day of our lives, we hear of examples from every corner of the world, so it feels more immediate and as if its around every corner. Even people to whom nothing dreadful has happened now live in fear in case it does. My TV broke a while back and I havent replaced it. My world is now so much more peaceful and hopeful.

    Reply
  129. Annette, I came to romance later in life, too (apart from Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart). We all live in a world where bad things happen, but I believe we always have. Wars, invasions, all kinds of horror has always existed –and as you know, those caught up in it suffer. But we are reminded of horrible events and ghastly things happening on the TV every single day of our lives, we hear of examples from every corner of the world, so it feels more immediate and as if its around every corner. Even people to whom nothing dreadful has happened now live in fear in case it does. My TV broke a while back and I havent replaced it. My world is now so much more peaceful and hopeful.

    Reply
  130. Annette, I came to romance later in life, too (apart from Georgette Heyer and Mary Stewart). We all live in a world where bad things happen, but I believe we always have. Wars, invasions, all kinds of horror has always existed –and as you know, those caught up in it suffer. But we are reminded of horrible events and ghastly things happening on the TV every single day of our lives, we hear of examples from every corner of the world, so it feels more immediate and as if its around every corner. Even people to whom nothing dreadful has happened now live in fear in case it does. My TV broke a while back and I havent replaced it. My world is now so much more peaceful and hopeful.

    Reply
  131. It was accidental — but procrastination — and I think a book deadline — made me put off the shopping expedition –and then I realized how much calmer my house was without it.
    I now have a DVD player, but I dont have access to TV programs. I rent of buy DVDs and choose what I watch. Its lovely.

    Reply
  132. It was accidental — but procrastination — and I think a book deadline — made me put off the shopping expedition –and then I realized how much calmer my house was without it.
    I now have a DVD player, but I dont have access to TV programs. I rent of buy DVDs and choose what I watch. Its lovely.

    Reply
  133. It was accidental — but procrastination — and I think a book deadline — made me put off the shopping expedition –and then I realized how much calmer my house was without it.
    I now have a DVD player, but I dont have access to TV programs. I rent of buy DVDs and choose what I watch. Its lovely.

    Reply
  134. It was accidental — but procrastination — and I think a book deadline — made me put off the shopping expedition –and then I realized how much calmer my house was without it.
    I now have a DVD player, but I dont have access to TV programs. I rent of buy DVDs and choose what I watch. Its lovely.

    Reply
  135. It was accidental — but procrastination — and I think a book deadline — made me put off the shopping expedition –and then I realized how much calmer my house was without it.
    I now have a DVD player, but I dont have access to TV programs. I rent of buy DVDs and choose what I watch. Its lovely.

    Reply
  136. I just finished, the classic, “Flowers From the Storm” by Laura Kinsale. So many have mentioned this novel over the years. I felt dragged through an emotional upheaval.
    The happy ending came through more heart-rending scenes right up to the epilogue.
    With strife in my life personally and professionally, it’s important to me to read about a hard-won happiness with a lovely epilogue close to the previous heartbreak. It gives me hope to feel a greater fulfillment is available to me.
    I feel cheated if the story has the usual tropes. I don’t like vicious endings, no matter how well the story is written.
    “That Summer” by Lauren Willig, is great to read, but what happens to the 19th-century couple is one that I still remember with a shudder.

    Reply
  137. I just finished, the classic, “Flowers From the Storm” by Laura Kinsale. So many have mentioned this novel over the years. I felt dragged through an emotional upheaval.
    The happy ending came through more heart-rending scenes right up to the epilogue.
    With strife in my life personally and professionally, it’s important to me to read about a hard-won happiness with a lovely epilogue close to the previous heartbreak. It gives me hope to feel a greater fulfillment is available to me.
    I feel cheated if the story has the usual tropes. I don’t like vicious endings, no matter how well the story is written.
    “That Summer” by Lauren Willig, is great to read, but what happens to the 19th-century couple is one that I still remember with a shudder.

    Reply
  138. I just finished, the classic, “Flowers From the Storm” by Laura Kinsale. So many have mentioned this novel over the years. I felt dragged through an emotional upheaval.
    The happy ending came through more heart-rending scenes right up to the epilogue.
    With strife in my life personally and professionally, it’s important to me to read about a hard-won happiness with a lovely epilogue close to the previous heartbreak. It gives me hope to feel a greater fulfillment is available to me.
    I feel cheated if the story has the usual tropes. I don’t like vicious endings, no matter how well the story is written.
    “That Summer” by Lauren Willig, is great to read, but what happens to the 19th-century couple is one that I still remember with a shudder.

    Reply
  139. I just finished, the classic, “Flowers From the Storm” by Laura Kinsale. So many have mentioned this novel over the years. I felt dragged through an emotional upheaval.
    The happy ending came through more heart-rending scenes right up to the epilogue.
    With strife in my life personally and professionally, it’s important to me to read about a hard-won happiness with a lovely epilogue close to the previous heartbreak. It gives me hope to feel a greater fulfillment is available to me.
    I feel cheated if the story has the usual tropes. I don’t like vicious endings, no matter how well the story is written.
    “That Summer” by Lauren Willig, is great to read, but what happens to the 19th-century couple is one that I still remember with a shudder.

    Reply
  140. I just finished, the classic, “Flowers From the Storm” by Laura Kinsale. So many have mentioned this novel over the years. I felt dragged through an emotional upheaval.
    The happy ending came through more heart-rending scenes right up to the epilogue.
    With strife in my life personally and professionally, it’s important to me to read about a hard-won happiness with a lovely epilogue close to the previous heartbreak. It gives me hope to feel a greater fulfillment is available to me.
    I feel cheated if the story has the usual tropes. I don’t like vicious endings, no matter how well the story is written.
    “That Summer” by Lauren Willig, is great to read, but what happens to the 19th-century couple is one that I still remember with a shudder.

    Reply
  141. We used to have cable TV but we found it expensive and I despise more than I can ever put into words the commercial breaks. So we cancelled our cable and just watch Netflix when we feel like it. But even before we cancelled it, I stopped watching the TV news. I couldn’t stand it anymore. The war and hate mongers – and that was just the broadcasters – forget the reporters told to find and sell war and hate.
    I’ve lived through depression and still find it lurks if I get too little sleep. The news was affecting my sleep. It would replay in my dreams.
    A happy ending is mandatory in my reading. There is nothing more rewarding than finishing a well crafted book with an awesome, believable happy ending. I will clutch it to my breast with a happy sigh and a sappy smile. And I only want questions left unanswered if there’s a sequel! 😀
    I adore romances and I will sing their praises from the highest – especially to book snobs who denigrate them.
    I’m living my own happy ending with my hubby and believe me, there’s nothing unrealistic about it.

    Reply
  142. We used to have cable TV but we found it expensive and I despise more than I can ever put into words the commercial breaks. So we cancelled our cable and just watch Netflix when we feel like it. But even before we cancelled it, I stopped watching the TV news. I couldn’t stand it anymore. The war and hate mongers – and that was just the broadcasters – forget the reporters told to find and sell war and hate.
    I’ve lived through depression and still find it lurks if I get too little sleep. The news was affecting my sleep. It would replay in my dreams.
    A happy ending is mandatory in my reading. There is nothing more rewarding than finishing a well crafted book with an awesome, believable happy ending. I will clutch it to my breast with a happy sigh and a sappy smile. And I only want questions left unanswered if there’s a sequel! 😀
    I adore romances and I will sing their praises from the highest – especially to book snobs who denigrate them.
    I’m living my own happy ending with my hubby and believe me, there’s nothing unrealistic about it.

    Reply
  143. We used to have cable TV but we found it expensive and I despise more than I can ever put into words the commercial breaks. So we cancelled our cable and just watch Netflix when we feel like it. But even before we cancelled it, I stopped watching the TV news. I couldn’t stand it anymore. The war and hate mongers – and that was just the broadcasters – forget the reporters told to find and sell war and hate.
    I’ve lived through depression and still find it lurks if I get too little sleep. The news was affecting my sleep. It would replay in my dreams.
    A happy ending is mandatory in my reading. There is nothing more rewarding than finishing a well crafted book with an awesome, believable happy ending. I will clutch it to my breast with a happy sigh and a sappy smile. And I only want questions left unanswered if there’s a sequel! 😀
    I adore romances and I will sing their praises from the highest – especially to book snobs who denigrate them.
    I’m living my own happy ending with my hubby and believe me, there’s nothing unrealistic about it.

    Reply
  144. We used to have cable TV but we found it expensive and I despise more than I can ever put into words the commercial breaks. So we cancelled our cable and just watch Netflix when we feel like it. But even before we cancelled it, I stopped watching the TV news. I couldn’t stand it anymore. The war and hate mongers – and that was just the broadcasters – forget the reporters told to find and sell war and hate.
    I’ve lived through depression and still find it lurks if I get too little sleep. The news was affecting my sleep. It would replay in my dreams.
    A happy ending is mandatory in my reading. There is nothing more rewarding than finishing a well crafted book with an awesome, believable happy ending. I will clutch it to my breast with a happy sigh and a sappy smile. And I only want questions left unanswered if there’s a sequel! 😀
    I adore romances and I will sing their praises from the highest – especially to book snobs who denigrate them.
    I’m living my own happy ending with my hubby and believe me, there’s nothing unrealistic about it.

    Reply
  145. We used to have cable TV but we found it expensive and I despise more than I can ever put into words the commercial breaks. So we cancelled our cable and just watch Netflix when we feel like it. But even before we cancelled it, I stopped watching the TV news. I couldn’t stand it anymore. The war and hate mongers – and that was just the broadcasters – forget the reporters told to find and sell war and hate.
    I’ve lived through depression and still find it lurks if I get too little sleep. The news was affecting my sleep. It would replay in my dreams.
    A happy ending is mandatory in my reading. There is nothing more rewarding than finishing a well crafted book with an awesome, believable happy ending. I will clutch it to my breast with a happy sigh and a sappy smile. And I only want questions left unanswered if there’s a sequel! 😀
    I adore romances and I will sing their praises from the highest – especially to book snobs who denigrate them.
    I’m living my own happy ending with my hubby and believe me, there’s nothing unrealistic about it.

    Reply
  146. I love a happy endings. I read romance for that reason only. I don’t want to be depressed and unhappy at the end of the book I want that feel good factor. There is nothing better on a cold, horrible wet day in the middle of winter, wrapped up on the sofa with a drink and a good romance. It’s like a someone has given you a big hug and brightened up your day. I agree it’s not easy to do, not every book gives you the happy ending you would like and I can be disappointed at times if the happy ending isn’t strong enough. Overall though happy endings are the reasons I read romance. Could you image what it would be like to get to the end of Pride and Prejudice and there be no happy ending!

    Reply
  147. I love a happy endings. I read romance for that reason only. I don’t want to be depressed and unhappy at the end of the book I want that feel good factor. There is nothing better on a cold, horrible wet day in the middle of winter, wrapped up on the sofa with a drink and a good romance. It’s like a someone has given you a big hug and brightened up your day. I agree it’s not easy to do, not every book gives you the happy ending you would like and I can be disappointed at times if the happy ending isn’t strong enough. Overall though happy endings are the reasons I read romance. Could you image what it would be like to get to the end of Pride and Prejudice and there be no happy ending!

    Reply
  148. I love a happy endings. I read romance for that reason only. I don’t want to be depressed and unhappy at the end of the book I want that feel good factor. There is nothing better on a cold, horrible wet day in the middle of winter, wrapped up on the sofa with a drink and a good romance. It’s like a someone has given you a big hug and brightened up your day. I agree it’s not easy to do, not every book gives you the happy ending you would like and I can be disappointed at times if the happy ending isn’t strong enough. Overall though happy endings are the reasons I read romance. Could you image what it would be like to get to the end of Pride and Prejudice and there be no happy ending!

    Reply
  149. I love a happy endings. I read romance for that reason only. I don’t want to be depressed and unhappy at the end of the book I want that feel good factor. There is nothing better on a cold, horrible wet day in the middle of winter, wrapped up on the sofa with a drink and a good romance. It’s like a someone has given you a big hug and brightened up your day. I agree it’s not easy to do, not every book gives you the happy ending you would like and I can be disappointed at times if the happy ending isn’t strong enough. Overall though happy endings are the reasons I read romance. Could you image what it would be like to get to the end of Pride and Prejudice and there be no happy ending!

    Reply
  150. I love a happy endings. I read romance for that reason only. I don’t want to be depressed and unhappy at the end of the book I want that feel good factor. There is nothing better on a cold, horrible wet day in the middle of winter, wrapped up on the sofa with a drink and a good romance. It’s like a someone has given you a big hug and brightened up your day. I agree it’s not easy to do, not every book gives you the happy ending you would like and I can be disappointed at times if the happy ending isn’t strong enough. Overall though happy endings are the reasons I read romance. Could you image what it would be like to get to the end of Pride and Prejudice and there be no happy ending!

    Reply
  151. Hallo! I love to read since I was a girl, have read many kinds of books but besides the classics,like ,Anna Karenina just to say one, I absolutely avoid romantic books, thank you very much for explaining me the difference between that and romance, I don’t see why I have to ambush myself with tragedy, beside Shakespeare of course 😁, when I read I want to amuse myself so it can be with a thriller, a romance, occasionally something different but nothing so cruel that will kill my main character. And when I read a romance I like a happy ever after, we already have a lot of divorce 😁 In real life, it’s true they are a bit unrealistic but so is when you catch the killer in thriller books, a little bit of hope it’s what we need.
    Maybe when I was younger I passed a period in which I read tragic books, I remember I MALAVOGLIA from Giovanni Verga, a book in which the characters fight poverty and tragic events all their life coming to nothing, gaining nothing, maybe it’s age related, by now, I’m 45, I enjoy romance
    Cheers!
    Laura from Rome

    Reply
  152. Hallo! I love to read since I was a girl, have read many kinds of books but besides the classics,like ,Anna Karenina just to say one, I absolutely avoid romantic books, thank you very much for explaining me the difference between that and romance, I don’t see why I have to ambush myself with tragedy, beside Shakespeare of course 😁, when I read I want to amuse myself so it can be with a thriller, a romance, occasionally something different but nothing so cruel that will kill my main character. And when I read a romance I like a happy ever after, we already have a lot of divorce 😁 In real life, it’s true they are a bit unrealistic but so is when you catch the killer in thriller books, a little bit of hope it’s what we need.
    Maybe when I was younger I passed a period in which I read tragic books, I remember I MALAVOGLIA from Giovanni Verga, a book in which the characters fight poverty and tragic events all their life coming to nothing, gaining nothing, maybe it’s age related, by now, I’m 45, I enjoy romance
    Cheers!
    Laura from Rome

    Reply
  153. Hallo! I love to read since I was a girl, have read many kinds of books but besides the classics,like ,Anna Karenina just to say one, I absolutely avoid romantic books, thank you very much for explaining me the difference between that and romance, I don’t see why I have to ambush myself with tragedy, beside Shakespeare of course 😁, when I read I want to amuse myself so it can be with a thriller, a romance, occasionally something different but nothing so cruel that will kill my main character. And when I read a romance I like a happy ever after, we already have a lot of divorce 😁 In real life, it’s true they are a bit unrealistic but so is when you catch the killer in thriller books, a little bit of hope it’s what we need.
    Maybe when I was younger I passed a period in which I read tragic books, I remember I MALAVOGLIA from Giovanni Verga, a book in which the characters fight poverty and tragic events all their life coming to nothing, gaining nothing, maybe it’s age related, by now, I’m 45, I enjoy romance
    Cheers!
    Laura from Rome

    Reply
  154. Hallo! I love to read since I was a girl, have read many kinds of books but besides the classics,like ,Anna Karenina just to say one, I absolutely avoid romantic books, thank you very much for explaining me the difference between that and romance, I don’t see why I have to ambush myself with tragedy, beside Shakespeare of course 😁, when I read I want to amuse myself so it can be with a thriller, a romance, occasionally something different but nothing so cruel that will kill my main character. And when I read a romance I like a happy ever after, we already have a lot of divorce 😁 In real life, it’s true they are a bit unrealistic but so is when you catch the killer in thriller books, a little bit of hope it’s what we need.
    Maybe when I was younger I passed a period in which I read tragic books, I remember I MALAVOGLIA from Giovanni Verga, a book in which the characters fight poverty and tragic events all their life coming to nothing, gaining nothing, maybe it’s age related, by now, I’m 45, I enjoy romance
    Cheers!
    Laura from Rome

    Reply
  155. Hallo! I love to read since I was a girl, have read many kinds of books but besides the classics,like ,Anna Karenina just to say one, I absolutely avoid romantic books, thank you very much for explaining me the difference between that and romance, I don’t see why I have to ambush myself with tragedy, beside Shakespeare of course 😁, when I read I want to amuse myself so it can be with a thriller, a romance, occasionally something different but nothing so cruel that will kill my main character. And when I read a romance I like a happy ever after, we already have a lot of divorce 😁 In real life, it’s true they are a bit unrealistic but so is when you catch the killer in thriller books, a little bit of hope it’s what we need.
    Maybe when I was younger I passed a period in which I read tragic books, I remember I MALAVOGLIA from Giovanni Verga, a book in which the characters fight poverty and tragic events all their life coming to nothing, gaining nothing, maybe it’s age related, by now, I’m 45, I enjoy romance
    Cheers!
    Laura from Rome

    Reply
  156. I don’t mind a weepy ending every now and then and actually loved The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas, but most of the time I’m all for a ripping good story n which I really care about the hero and the heroine and in which they end up happily together. They don’t need to marry for me to be happy, as long as they end up declaring their love and on the road to HEA. I like loose ends tidied up too. As for epilogues, well lke you I don’t mind them but not set ar into the future and only if te epilogue helps to complete the story. I get very frustrated when writes indulge in false fnishes, only to continue the story on the next page. Some epilogues feel like that to me.

    Reply
  157. I don’t mind a weepy ending every now and then and actually loved The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas, but most of the time I’m all for a ripping good story n which I really care about the hero and the heroine and in which they end up happily together. They don’t need to marry for me to be happy, as long as they end up declaring their love and on the road to HEA. I like loose ends tidied up too. As for epilogues, well lke you I don’t mind them but not set ar into the future and only if te epilogue helps to complete the story. I get very frustrated when writes indulge in false fnishes, only to continue the story on the next page. Some epilogues feel like that to me.

    Reply
  158. I don’t mind a weepy ending every now and then and actually loved The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas, but most of the time I’m all for a ripping good story n which I really care about the hero and the heroine and in which they end up happily together. They don’t need to marry for me to be happy, as long as they end up declaring their love and on the road to HEA. I like loose ends tidied up too. As for epilogues, well lke you I don’t mind them but not set ar into the future and only if te epilogue helps to complete the story. I get very frustrated when writes indulge in false fnishes, only to continue the story on the next page. Some epilogues feel like that to me.

    Reply
  159. I don’t mind a weepy ending every now and then and actually loved The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas, but most of the time I’m all for a ripping good story n which I really care about the hero and the heroine and in which they end up happily together. They don’t need to marry for me to be happy, as long as they end up declaring their love and on the road to HEA. I like loose ends tidied up too. As for epilogues, well lke you I don’t mind them but not set ar into the future and only if te epilogue helps to complete the story. I get very frustrated when writes indulge in false fnishes, only to continue the story on the next page. Some epilogues feel like that to me.

    Reply
  160. I don’t mind a weepy ending every now and then and actually loved The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas, but most of the time I’m all for a ripping good story n which I really care about the hero and the heroine and in which they end up happily together. They don’t need to marry for me to be happy, as long as they end up declaring their love and on the road to HEA. I like loose ends tidied up too. As for epilogues, well lke you I don’t mind them but not set ar into the future and only if te epilogue helps to complete the story. I get very frustrated when writes indulge in false fnishes, only to continue the story on the next page. Some epilogues feel like that to me.

    Reply
  161. It’s such a mistake to think that ‘happy ending’ is the same as an ‘easy ending’ – and I think killing off your protagonist is often very much an ‘easy ending’. How much more challenging and satisfying to have two characters work out how they work together, learning how to respect each other’s differences as well as the things that bring them together, who *grow* together, to the point where they’re ready to say, yes, you’re the one I will make the effort for – to listen, to understand, to grow with, even when it’s hard, even when it hurts.
    Right. So. Yes. Bring on the happy endings!

    Reply
  162. It’s such a mistake to think that ‘happy ending’ is the same as an ‘easy ending’ – and I think killing off your protagonist is often very much an ‘easy ending’. How much more challenging and satisfying to have two characters work out how they work together, learning how to respect each other’s differences as well as the things that bring them together, who *grow* together, to the point where they’re ready to say, yes, you’re the one I will make the effort for – to listen, to understand, to grow with, even when it’s hard, even when it hurts.
    Right. So. Yes. Bring on the happy endings!

    Reply
  163. It’s such a mistake to think that ‘happy ending’ is the same as an ‘easy ending’ – and I think killing off your protagonist is often very much an ‘easy ending’. How much more challenging and satisfying to have two characters work out how they work together, learning how to respect each other’s differences as well as the things that bring them together, who *grow* together, to the point where they’re ready to say, yes, you’re the one I will make the effort for – to listen, to understand, to grow with, even when it’s hard, even when it hurts.
    Right. So. Yes. Bring on the happy endings!

    Reply
  164. It’s such a mistake to think that ‘happy ending’ is the same as an ‘easy ending’ – and I think killing off your protagonist is often very much an ‘easy ending’. How much more challenging and satisfying to have two characters work out how they work together, learning how to respect each other’s differences as well as the things that bring them together, who *grow* together, to the point where they’re ready to say, yes, you’re the one I will make the effort for – to listen, to understand, to grow with, even when it’s hard, even when it hurts.
    Right. So. Yes. Bring on the happy endings!

    Reply
  165. It’s such a mistake to think that ‘happy ending’ is the same as an ‘easy ending’ – and I think killing off your protagonist is often very much an ‘easy ending’. How much more challenging and satisfying to have two characters work out how they work together, learning how to respect each other’s differences as well as the things that bring them together, who *grow* together, to the point where they’re ready to say, yes, you’re the one I will make the effort for – to listen, to understand, to grow with, even when it’s hard, even when it hurts.
    Right. So. Yes. Bring on the happy endings!

    Reply
  166. Declared HEA-fan here. My wife only has to mention the word “Atonement” and I start shaking. It’s a personal choice, but for me the news can be depressing enough without voluntarily adding more negativity through the books I read.
    But as many have said, what’s a true happy end without hurdles and hindrances?
    Just found the blog – enjoying it very much.

    Reply
  167. Declared HEA-fan here. My wife only has to mention the word “Atonement” and I start shaking. It’s a personal choice, but for me the news can be depressing enough without voluntarily adding more negativity through the books I read.
    But as many have said, what’s a true happy end without hurdles and hindrances?
    Just found the blog – enjoying it very much.

    Reply
  168. Declared HEA-fan here. My wife only has to mention the word “Atonement” and I start shaking. It’s a personal choice, but for me the news can be depressing enough without voluntarily adding more negativity through the books I read.
    But as many have said, what’s a true happy end without hurdles and hindrances?
    Just found the blog – enjoying it very much.

    Reply
  169. Declared HEA-fan here. My wife only has to mention the word “Atonement” and I start shaking. It’s a personal choice, but for me the news can be depressing enough without voluntarily adding more negativity through the books I read.
    But as many have said, what’s a true happy end without hurdles and hindrances?
    Just found the blog – enjoying it very much.

    Reply
  170. Declared HEA-fan here. My wife only has to mention the word “Atonement” and I start shaking. It’s a personal choice, but for me the news can be depressing enough without voluntarily adding more negativity through the books I read.
    But as many have said, what’s a true happy end without hurdles and hindrances?
    Just found the blog – enjoying it very much.

    Reply
  171. Thanks, Jo, yes the good ones are comfort reads, arent they? I think right about now, after a long days work, Im ready to snuggle down for an hour or two with a good romance, myself.

    Reply
  172. Thanks, Jo, yes the good ones are comfort reads, arent they? I think right about now, after a long days work, Im ready to snuggle down for an hour or two with a good romance, myself.

    Reply
  173. Thanks, Jo, yes the good ones are comfort reads, arent they? I think right about now, after a long days work, Im ready to snuggle down for an hour or two with a good romance, myself.

    Reply
  174. Thanks, Jo, yes the good ones are comfort reads, arent they? I think right about now, after a long days work, Im ready to snuggle down for an hour or two with a good romance, myself.

    Reply
  175. Thanks, Jo, yes the good ones are comfort reads, arent they? I think right about now, after a long days work, Im ready to snuggle down for an hour or two with a good romance, myself.

    Reply
  176. Hi Laura — I love that expression, Ambush myself with tragedy — its so true. One of the speakers on the day, a romance blogger, said she wouldnt read a book unless she was certain the ending would be happy.

    Reply
  177. Hi Laura — I love that expression, Ambush myself with tragedy — its so true. One of the speakers on the day, a romance blogger, said she wouldnt read a book unless she was certain the ending would be happy.

    Reply
  178. Hi Laura — I love that expression, Ambush myself with tragedy — its so true. One of the speakers on the day, a romance blogger, said she wouldnt read a book unless she was certain the ending would be happy.

    Reply
  179. Hi Laura — I love that expression, Ambush myself with tragedy — its so true. One of the speakers on the day, a romance blogger, said she wouldnt read a book unless she was certain the ending would be happy.

    Reply
  180. Hi Laura — I love that expression, Ambush myself with tragedy — its so true. One of the speakers on the day, a romance blogger, said she wouldnt read a book unless she was certain the ending would be happy.

    Reply
  181. Thanks, Shelagh, I think it would be interesting to discuss the art of the epilogue one day. Mine are usually a bit rushed, I suspect, as Im generally running later with a book and the deadline is screaming at me. Luckily I have a chance to redo them in the editing phase. But it would be nice to explore epilogues in general, as Im usually thinking of only one very particular epilogue at a time

    Reply
  182. Thanks, Shelagh, I think it would be interesting to discuss the art of the epilogue one day. Mine are usually a bit rushed, I suspect, as Im generally running later with a book and the deadline is screaming at me. Luckily I have a chance to redo them in the editing phase. But it would be nice to explore epilogues in general, as Im usually thinking of only one very particular epilogue at a time

    Reply
  183. Thanks, Shelagh, I think it would be interesting to discuss the art of the epilogue one day. Mine are usually a bit rushed, I suspect, as Im generally running later with a book and the deadline is screaming at me. Luckily I have a chance to redo them in the editing phase. But it would be nice to explore epilogues in general, as Im usually thinking of only one very particular epilogue at a time

    Reply
  184. Thanks, Shelagh, I think it would be interesting to discuss the art of the epilogue one day. Mine are usually a bit rushed, I suspect, as Im generally running later with a book and the deadline is screaming at me. Luckily I have a chance to redo them in the editing phase. But it would be nice to explore epilogues in general, as Im usually thinking of only one very particular epilogue at a time

    Reply
  185. Thanks, Shelagh, I think it would be interesting to discuss the art of the epilogue one day. Mine are usually a bit rushed, I suspect, as Im generally running later with a book and the deadline is screaming at me. Luckily I have a chance to redo them in the editing phase. But it would be nice to explore epilogues in general, as Im usually thinking of only one very particular epilogue at a time

    Reply
  186. Thanks, Mark — welcome to the word wenches. As for Atonement, The Notebook and other novels that are hugely popular — but grim — I avoid them. Cowardly, I know, but I I dont need to be haunted by tragedy, thank you. I read Code Name Verity a few months back and though it was brilliantly written, images and thoughts about the novel still haunt and distress me.

    Reply
  187. Thanks, Mark — welcome to the word wenches. As for Atonement, The Notebook and other novels that are hugely popular — but grim — I avoid them. Cowardly, I know, but I I dont need to be haunted by tragedy, thank you. I read Code Name Verity a few months back and though it was brilliantly written, images and thoughts about the novel still haunt and distress me.

    Reply
  188. Thanks, Mark — welcome to the word wenches. As for Atonement, The Notebook and other novels that are hugely popular — but grim — I avoid them. Cowardly, I know, but I I dont need to be haunted by tragedy, thank you. I read Code Name Verity a few months back and though it was brilliantly written, images and thoughts about the novel still haunt and distress me.

    Reply
  189. Thanks, Mark — welcome to the word wenches. As for Atonement, The Notebook and other novels that are hugely popular — but grim — I avoid them. Cowardly, I know, but I I dont need to be haunted by tragedy, thank you. I read Code Name Verity a few months back and though it was brilliantly written, images and thoughts about the novel still haunt and distress me.

    Reply
  190. Thanks, Mark — welcome to the word wenches. As for Atonement, The Notebook and other novels that are hugely popular — but grim — I avoid them. Cowardly, I know, but I I dont need to be haunted by tragedy, thank you. I read Code Name Verity a few months back and though it was brilliantly written, images and thoughts about the novel still haunt and distress me.

    Reply
  191. I agree with absolutely everything you said, Anne – loathe unhappy endings and want all the loose ends tied up (epilogues are fine). As you said, real life is often miserable enough so when I read, I want it to be a happy experience. I even go as far as to check if a book has a happy ending before buying it sometimes! (I read so much I won’t remember what happened anyway). Like you, I spent my university years reading sad literature (hate Tess of the D’Urbervilles with a passion!) and life is too short!

    Reply
  192. I agree with absolutely everything you said, Anne – loathe unhappy endings and want all the loose ends tied up (epilogues are fine). As you said, real life is often miserable enough so when I read, I want it to be a happy experience. I even go as far as to check if a book has a happy ending before buying it sometimes! (I read so much I won’t remember what happened anyway). Like you, I spent my university years reading sad literature (hate Tess of the D’Urbervilles with a passion!) and life is too short!

    Reply
  193. I agree with absolutely everything you said, Anne – loathe unhappy endings and want all the loose ends tied up (epilogues are fine). As you said, real life is often miserable enough so when I read, I want it to be a happy experience. I even go as far as to check if a book has a happy ending before buying it sometimes! (I read so much I won’t remember what happened anyway). Like you, I spent my university years reading sad literature (hate Tess of the D’Urbervilles with a passion!) and life is too short!

    Reply
  194. I agree with absolutely everything you said, Anne – loathe unhappy endings and want all the loose ends tied up (epilogues are fine). As you said, real life is often miserable enough so when I read, I want it to be a happy experience. I even go as far as to check if a book has a happy ending before buying it sometimes! (I read so much I won’t remember what happened anyway). Like you, I spent my university years reading sad literature (hate Tess of the D’Urbervilles with a passion!) and life is too short!

    Reply
  195. I agree with absolutely everything you said, Anne – loathe unhappy endings and want all the loose ends tied up (epilogues are fine). As you said, real life is often miserable enough so when I read, I want it to be a happy experience. I even go as far as to check if a book has a happy ending before buying it sometimes! (I read so much I won’t remember what happened anyway). Like you, I spent my university years reading sad literature (hate Tess of the D’Urbervilles with a passion!) and life is too short!

    Reply
  196. I couldn’t agree more with your post. I get so tired of the idea that sad endings make something “serious” literature, and of the negative attitudes towards romance literature. While this is no longer as true, it is important to remember that for a long time “serious” literature was also literature written by men. Happy endings affirm connection; we need connection with others to function well. I work as a psychotherapist, and happy endings in books help me keep the faith– so that I can keep seeing the potential in my clients, and can work from that.

    Reply
  197. I couldn’t agree more with your post. I get so tired of the idea that sad endings make something “serious” literature, and of the negative attitudes towards romance literature. While this is no longer as true, it is important to remember that for a long time “serious” literature was also literature written by men. Happy endings affirm connection; we need connection with others to function well. I work as a psychotherapist, and happy endings in books help me keep the faith– so that I can keep seeing the potential in my clients, and can work from that.

    Reply
  198. I couldn’t agree more with your post. I get so tired of the idea that sad endings make something “serious” literature, and of the negative attitudes towards romance literature. While this is no longer as true, it is important to remember that for a long time “serious” literature was also literature written by men. Happy endings affirm connection; we need connection with others to function well. I work as a psychotherapist, and happy endings in books help me keep the faith– so that I can keep seeing the potential in my clients, and can work from that.

    Reply
  199. I couldn’t agree more with your post. I get so tired of the idea that sad endings make something “serious” literature, and of the negative attitudes towards romance literature. While this is no longer as true, it is important to remember that for a long time “serious” literature was also literature written by men. Happy endings affirm connection; we need connection with others to function well. I work as a psychotherapist, and happy endings in books help me keep the faith– so that I can keep seeing the potential in my clients, and can work from that.

    Reply
  200. I couldn’t agree more with your post. I get so tired of the idea that sad endings make something “serious” literature, and of the negative attitudes towards romance literature. While this is no longer as true, it is important to remember that for a long time “serious” literature was also literature written by men. Happy endings affirm connection; we need connection with others to function well. I work as a psychotherapist, and happy endings in books help me keep the faith– so that I can keep seeing the potential in my clients, and can work from that.

    Reply
  201. The other thing you can do to improve your world is eliminate or greatly reduce Facebook. The TV news has a bit of decorum, but not Facebook. Every hater in the world is on there, spews vitriol of the worst kind constantly and gets away with it. I just deactivated my account. I may never go back.

    Reply
  202. The other thing you can do to improve your world is eliminate or greatly reduce Facebook. The TV news has a bit of decorum, but not Facebook. Every hater in the world is on there, spews vitriol of the worst kind constantly and gets away with it. I just deactivated my account. I may never go back.

    Reply
  203. The other thing you can do to improve your world is eliminate or greatly reduce Facebook. The TV news has a bit of decorum, but not Facebook. Every hater in the world is on there, spews vitriol of the worst kind constantly and gets away with it. I just deactivated my account. I may never go back.

    Reply
  204. The other thing you can do to improve your world is eliminate or greatly reduce Facebook. The TV news has a bit of decorum, but not Facebook. Every hater in the world is on there, spews vitriol of the worst kind constantly and gets away with it. I just deactivated my account. I may never go back.

    Reply
  205. The other thing you can do to improve your world is eliminate or greatly reduce Facebook. The TV news has a bit of decorum, but not Facebook. Every hater in the world is on there, spews vitriol of the worst kind constantly and gets away with it. I just deactivated my account. I may never go back.

    Reply
  206. Also a fan of (too mild, I demand my) HEA. In fact, when I was a teenager and finished “Gone With the Wind,” I hurled it across the room because of the ending (teenagers can be so dramatic), in spite of the fact that I deeply love books (and never crease the spines of paperbacks) and it was 3am. Fortunately, my mother was very understanding after she came rushing upstairs to see what the noise was and why I was crying. I agree with the previous posts, too.
    I was an English major and have read all the unhappy endings in the classics and I am done with that. I tried Nicholas Sparks and will never pick up a book of his or watch a movie of one again because he’s so manipulative. I get emotionally attached to a character and he kills him off! Why? I admit there are some romance authors who don’t do a good job but there are sooooo many who are wonderful that I read a new book every day or so. Cozy mysteries are a favorite, too, for the same reason.
    I like epilogues, even if they’re years in the future.

    Reply
  207. Also a fan of (too mild, I demand my) HEA. In fact, when I was a teenager and finished “Gone With the Wind,” I hurled it across the room because of the ending (teenagers can be so dramatic), in spite of the fact that I deeply love books (and never crease the spines of paperbacks) and it was 3am. Fortunately, my mother was very understanding after she came rushing upstairs to see what the noise was and why I was crying. I agree with the previous posts, too.
    I was an English major and have read all the unhappy endings in the classics and I am done with that. I tried Nicholas Sparks and will never pick up a book of his or watch a movie of one again because he’s so manipulative. I get emotionally attached to a character and he kills him off! Why? I admit there are some romance authors who don’t do a good job but there are sooooo many who are wonderful that I read a new book every day or so. Cozy mysteries are a favorite, too, for the same reason.
    I like epilogues, even if they’re years in the future.

    Reply
  208. Also a fan of (too mild, I demand my) HEA. In fact, when I was a teenager and finished “Gone With the Wind,” I hurled it across the room because of the ending (teenagers can be so dramatic), in spite of the fact that I deeply love books (and never crease the spines of paperbacks) and it was 3am. Fortunately, my mother was very understanding after she came rushing upstairs to see what the noise was and why I was crying. I agree with the previous posts, too.
    I was an English major and have read all the unhappy endings in the classics and I am done with that. I tried Nicholas Sparks and will never pick up a book of his or watch a movie of one again because he’s so manipulative. I get emotionally attached to a character and he kills him off! Why? I admit there are some romance authors who don’t do a good job but there are sooooo many who are wonderful that I read a new book every day or so. Cozy mysteries are a favorite, too, for the same reason.
    I like epilogues, even if they’re years in the future.

    Reply
  209. Also a fan of (too mild, I demand my) HEA. In fact, when I was a teenager and finished “Gone With the Wind,” I hurled it across the room because of the ending (teenagers can be so dramatic), in spite of the fact that I deeply love books (and never crease the spines of paperbacks) and it was 3am. Fortunately, my mother was very understanding after she came rushing upstairs to see what the noise was and why I was crying. I agree with the previous posts, too.
    I was an English major and have read all the unhappy endings in the classics and I am done with that. I tried Nicholas Sparks and will never pick up a book of his or watch a movie of one again because he’s so manipulative. I get emotionally attached to a character and he kills him off! Why? I admit there are some romance authors who don’t do a good job but there are sooooo many who are wonderful that I read a new book every day or so. Cozy mysteries are a favorite, too, for the same reason.
    I like epilogues, even if they’re years in the future.

    Reply
  210. Also a fan of (too mild, I demand my) HEA. In fact, when I was a teenager and finished “Gone With the Wind,” I hurled it across the room because of the ending (teenagers can be so dramatic), in spite of the fact that I deeply love books (and never crease the spines of paperbacks) and it was 3am. Fortunately, my mother was very understanding after she came rushing upstairs to see what the noise was and why I was crying. I agree with the previous posts, too.
    I was an English major and have read all the unhappy endings in the classics and I am done with that. I tried Nicholas Sparks and will never pick up a book of his or watch a movie of one again because he’s so manipulative. I get emotionally attached to a character and he kills him off! Why? I admit there are some romance authors who don’t do a good job but there are sooooo many who are wonderful that I read a new book every day or so. Cozy mysteries are a favorite, too, for the same reason.
    I like epilogues, even if they’re years in the future.

    Reply
  211. I like happy endings. I like all my loose ends tied. I also used to read my endings first because of a traumatic shock while reading Nakoa’s Woman back in the 70s. Spoiler – she dies. Never got over it.

    Reply
  212. I like happy endings. I like all my loose ends tied. I also used to read my endings first because of a traumatic shock while reading Nakoa’s Woman back in the 70s. Spoiler – she dies. Never got over it.

    Reply
  213. I like happy endings. I like all my loose ends tied. I also used to read my endings first because of a traumatic shock while reading Nakoa’s Woman back in the 70s. Spoiler – she dies. Never got over it.

    Reply
  214. I like happy endings. I like all my loose ends tied. I also used to read my endings first because of a traumatic shock while reading Nakoa’s Woman back in the 70s. Spoiler – she dies. Never got over it.

    Reply
  215. I like happy endings. I like all my loose ends tied. I also used to read my endings first because of a traumatic shock while reading Nakoa’s Woman back in the 70s. Spoiler – she dies. Never got over it.

    Reply
  216. Correction! Spoiler – it was him who died. See I’m still traumatized. I think he’s a ghost at the end. OMG I don’t remember and I’m not reading it again to find out.

    Reply
  217. Correction! Spoiler – it was him who died. See I’m still traumatized. I think he’s a ghost at the end. OMG I don’t remember and I’m not reading it again to find out.

    Reply
  218. Correction! Spoiler – it was him who died. See I’m still traumatized. I think he’s a ghost at the end. OMG I don’t remember and I’m not reading it again to find out.

    Reply
  219. Correction! Spoiler – it was him who died. See I’m still traumatized. I think he’s a ghost at the end. OMG I don’t remember and I’m not reading it again to find out.

    Reply
  220. Correction! Spoiler – it was him who died. See I’m still traumatized. I think he’s a ghost at the end. OMG I don’t remember and I’m not reading it again to find out.

    Reply
  221. I want a happy ending in the books I read and the movies I watch. I don’t read romance to have someone die at the end. I love epilogues, I want to know what happens next or the in future for the couple. I read for enjoyment and I still believe in happily ever after.

    Reply
  222. I want a happy ending in the books I read and the movies I watch. I don’t read romance to have someone die at the end. I love epilogues, I want to know what happens next or the in future for the couple. I read for enjoyment and I still believe in happily ever after.

    Reply
  223. I want a happy ending in the books I read and the movies I watch. I don’t read romance to have someone die at the end. I love epilogues, I want to know what happens next or the in future for the couple. I read for enjoyment and I still believe in happily ever after.

    Reply
  224. I want a happy ending in the books I read and the movies I watch. I don’t read romance to have someone die at the end. I love epilogues, I want to know what happens next or the in future for the couple. I read for enjoyment and I still believe in happily ever after.

    Reply
  225. I want a happy ending in the books I read and the movies I watch. I don’t read romance to have someone die at the end. I love epilogues, I want to know what happens next or the in future for the couple. I read for enjoyment and I still believe in happily ever after.

    Reply
  226. I definitely want a happy ending. There is enough unhappiness and “doom and gloom” in the every day world. I too know many people who have happy and fulfilling lives. Thanks to all the Word Wenches and other romance writers who believe in happy endings.

    Reply
  227. I definitely want a happy ending. There is enough unhappiness and “doom and gloom” in the every day world. I too know many people who have happy and fulfilling lives. Thanks to all the Word Wenches and other romance writers who believe in happy endings.

    Reply
  228. I definitely want a happy ending. There is enough unhappiness and “doom and gloom” in the every day world. I too know many people who have happy and fulfilling lives. Thanks to all the Word Wenches and other romance writers who believe in happy endings.

    Reply
  229. I definitely want a happy ending. There is enough unhappiness and “doom and gloom” in the every day world. I too know many people who have happy and fulfilling lives. Thanks to all the Word Wenches and other romance writers who believe in happy endings.

    Reply
  230. I definitely want a happy ending. There is enough unhappiness and “doom and gloom” in the every day world. I too know many people who have happy and fulfilling lives. Thanks to all the Word Wenches and other romance writers who believe in happy endings.

    Reply
  231. Anne, I want to thank you so much for your wonderful books and their beautiful happy endings. That said, I think there’s great value to The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and Code Name Verity as they teach us lessons we need to remember. (Not so much Atonement – I always say you can’t say McEwan without saying ewwww). But I have no patience with those who imply that happy endings are a cop-out. Many of the wenches and many of their readers (myself included) are involved in long and “happy” marriages. Those “happy” marriages are the result of truly hard work – of adjusting, making concessions, admitting faults and mistakes, FORGIVING faults and mistakes, and somehow day after day deciding that the love you started with and the “you” that the two of you became over the years has intrinsic value that’s worth fighting for. That’s not easy, and many people find divorce the far simpler choice. I have a hunch that’s one reason people deride happy endings – they don’t have the guts or the stamina to get one in their own life so they mock what they see in romance. Sorry if I sound like a strident b-; I think the world out there is getting to me!

    Reply
  232. Anne, I want to thank you so much for your wonderful books and their beautiful happy endings. That said, I think there’s great value to The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and Code Name Verity as they teach us lessons we need to remember. (Not so much Atonement – I always say you can’t say McEwan without saying ewwww). But I have no patience with those who imply that happy endings are a cop-out. Many of the wenches and many of their readers (myself included) are involved in long and “happy” marriages. Those “happy” marriages are the result of truly hard work – of adjusting, making concessions, admitting faults and mistakes, FORGIVING faults and mistakes, and somehow day after day deciding that the love you started with and the “you” that the two of you became over the years has intrinsic value that’s worth fighting for. That’s not easy, and many people find divorce the far simpler choice. I have a hunch that’s one reason people deride happy endings – they don’t have the guts or the stamina to get one in their own life so they mock what they see in romance. Sorry if I sound like a strident b-; I think the world out there is getting to me!

    Reply
  233. Anne, I want to thank you so much for your wonderful books and their beautiful happy endings. That said, I think there’s great value to The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and Code Name Verity as they teach us lessons we need to remember. (Not so much Atonement – I always say you can’t say McEwan without saying ewwww). But I have no patience with those who imply that happy endings are a cop-out. Many of the wenches and many of their readers (myself included) are involved in long and “happy” marriages. Those “happy” marriages are the result of truly hard work – of adjusting, making concessions, admitting faults and mistakes, FORGIVING faults and mistakes, and somehow day after day deciding that the love you started with and the “you” that the two of you became over the years has intrinsic value that’s worth fighting for. That’s not easy, and many people find divorce the far simpler choice. I have a hunch that’s one reason people deride happy endings – they don’t have the guts or the stamina to get one in their own life so they mock what they see in romance. Sorry if I sound like a strident b-; I think the world out there is getting to me!

    Reply
  234. Anne, I want to thank you so much for your wonderful books and their beautiful happy endings. That said, I think there’s great value to The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and Code Name Verity as they teach us lessons we need to remember. (Not so much Atonement – I always say you can’t say McEwan without saying ewwww). But I have no patience with those who imply that happy endings are a cop-out. Many of the wenches and many of their readers (myself included) are involved in long and “happy” marriages. Those “happy” marriages are the result of truly hard work – of adjusting, making concessions, admitting faults and mistakes, FORGIVING faults and mistakes, and somehow day after day deciding that the love you started with and the “you” that the two of you became over the years has intrinsic value that’s worth fighting for. That’s not easy, and many people find divorce the far simpler choice. I have a hunch that’s one reason people deride happy endings – they don’t have the guts or the stamina to get one in their own life so they mock what they see in romance. Sorry if I sound like a strident b-; I think the world out there is getting to me!

    Reply
  235. Anne, I want to thank you so much for your wonderful books and their beautiful happy endings. That said, I think there’s great value to The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and Code Name Verity as they teach us lessons we need to remember. (Not so much Atonement – I always say you can’t say McEwan without saying ewwww). But I have no patience with those who imply that happy endings are a cop-out. Many of the wenches and many of their readers (myself included) are involved in long and “happy” marriages. Those “happy” marriages are the result of truly hard work – of adjusting, making concessions, admitting faults and mistakes, FORGIVING faults and mistakes, and somehow day after day deciding that the love you started with and the “you” that the two of you became over the years has intrinsic value that’s worth fighting for. That’s not easy, and many people find divorce the far simpler choice. I have a hunch that’s one reason people deride happy endings – they don’t have the guts or the stamina to get one in their own life so they mock what they see in romance. Sorry if I sound like a strident b-; I think the world out there is getting to me!

    Reply
  236. Thats interesting, Linda. A friend of mine recently said much the same about FaceBook – says it really brings her down. I get the occasional person wanting to stir up hate and controversy, and I quietly unfriend them. But most people who leave comments on my page have been lovely — and I hope it stays that way.

    Reply
  237. Thats interesting, Linda. A friend of mine recently said much the same about FaceBook – says it really brings her down. I get the occasional person wanting to stir up hate and controversy, and I quietly unfriend them. But most people who leave comments on my page have been lovely — and I hope it stays that way.

    Reply
  238. Thats interesting, Linda. A friend of mine recently said much the same about FaceBook – says it really brings her down. I get the occasional person wanting to stir up hate and controversy, and I quietly unfriend them. But most people who leave comments on my page have been lovely — and I hope it stays that way.

    Reply
  239. Thats interesting, Linda. A friend of mine recently said much the same about FaceBook – says it really brings her down. I get the occasional person wanting to stir up hate and controversy, and I quietly unfriend them. But most people who leave comments on my page have been lovely — and I hope it stays that way.

    Reply
  240. Thats interesting, Linda. A friend of mine recently said much the same about FaceBook – says it really brings her down. I get the occasional person wanting to stir up hate and controversy, and I quietly unfriend them. But most people who leave comments on my page have been lovely — and I hope it stays that way.

    Reply
  241. Thanks, Karen. I do think the occasional unhappy ending might be necessary in some instances, but mostly I think the book or movie would be just as good, if not better — and a much happier experience— if it ended happily. There are several books and movies that Ive itched to rewrite the ending of, where the ending has, in my view, been a cop-out, only there for shock value, and not an honest reflection of where the story was headed.

    Reply
  242. Thanks, Karen. I do think the occasional unhappy ending might be necessary in some instances, but mostly I think the book or movie would be just as good, if not better — and a much happier experience— if it ended happily. There are several books and movies that Ive itched to rewrite the ending of, where the ending has, in my view, been a cop-out, only there for shock value, and not an honest reflection of where the story was headed.

    Reply
  243. Thanks, Karen. I do think the occasional unhappy ending might be necessary in some instances, but mostly I think the book or movie would be just as good, if not better — and a much happier experience— if it ended happily. There are several books and movies that Ive itched to rewrite the ending of, where the ending has, in my view, been a cop-out, only there for shock value, and not an honest reflection of where the story was headed.

    Reply
  244. Thanks, Karen. I do think the occasional unhappy ending might be necessary in some instances, but mostly I think the book or movie would be just as good, if not better — and a much happier experience— if it ended happily. There are several books and movies that Ive itched to rewrite the ending of, where the ending has, in my view, been a cop-out, only there for shock value, and not an honest reflection of where the story was headed.

    Reply
  245. Thanks, Karen. I do think the occasional unhappy ending might be necessary in some instances, but mostly I think the book or movie would be just as good, if not better — and a much happier experience— if it ended happily. There are several books and movies that Ive itched to rewrite the ending of, where the ending has, in my view, been a cop-out, only there for shock value, and not an honest reflection of where the story was headed.

    Reply
  246. Kay, I rarely read endings, except where the story starts to head places that make me worried, so I glance at the end to see if my character is alive or not. But I feel as if Im cheating, LOL

    Reply
  247. Kay, I rarely read endings, except where the story starts to head places that make me worried, so I glance at the end to see if my character is alive or not. But I feel as if Im cheating, LOL

    Reply
  248. Kay, I rarely read endings, except where the story starts to head places that make me worried, so I glance at the end to see if my character is alive or not. But I feel as if Im cheating, LOL

    Reply
  249. Kay, I rarely read endings, except where the story starts to head places that make me worried, so I glance at the end to see if my character is alive or not. But I feel as if Im cheating, LOL

    Reply
  250. Kay, I rarely read endings, except where the story starts to head places that make me worried, so I glance at the end to see if my character is alive or not. But I feel as if Im cheating, LOL

    Reply
  251. Thank you for your very kind words, Margaret. I havent read The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, but Code Name Verity was a wonderfully written book, and I agree, it probably teaches a lot of lessons we need to remember. But I was haunted for ages about what that young woman endured, and I so wanted a happy ending, even though it probably wasnt realistic, and sadly, I dont think the people who send young people to war will learn the lessons we need to remember.
    As for the real-life happy relationships — I absolutely agree that it takes a lot of work and compromise and forgiveness to create a successful marriage. And I think many romances show that process happening enough that we know it will continue into the characters future — its how they — and we — earn our happy ending.

    Reply
  252. Thank you for your very kind words, Margaret. I havent read The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, but Code Name Verity was a wonderfully written book, and I agree, it probably teaches a lot of lessons we need to remember. But I was haunted for ages about what that young woman endured, and I so wanted a happy ending, even though it probably wasnt realistic, and sadly, I dont think the people who send young people to war will learn the lessons we need to remember.
    As for the real-life happy relationships — I absolutely agree that it takes a lot of work and compromise and forgiveness to create a successful marriage. And I think many romances show that process happening enough that we know it will continue into the characters future — its how they — and we — earn our happy ending.

    Reply
  253. Thank you for your very kind words, Margaret. I havent read The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, but Code Name Verity was a wonderfully written book, and I agree, it probably teaches a lot of lessons we need to remember. But I was haunted for ages about what that young woman endured, and I so wanted a happy ending, even though it probably wasnt realistic, and sadly, I dont think the people who send young people to war will learn the lessons we need to remember.
    As for the real-life happy relationships — I absolutely agree that it takes a lot of work and compromise and forgiveness to create a successful marriage. And I think many romances show that process happening enough that we know it will continue into the characters future — its how they — and we — earn our happy ending.

    Reply
  254. Thank you for your very kind words, Margaret. I havent read The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, but Code Name Verity was a wonderfully written book, and I agree, it probably teaches a lot of lessons we need to remember. But I was haunted for ages about what that young woman endured, and I so wanted a happy ending, even though it probably wasnt realistic, and sadly, I dont think the people who send young people to war will learn the lessons we need to remember.
    As for the real-life happy relationships — I absolutely agree that it takes a lot of work and compromise and forgiveness to create a successful marriage. And I think many romances show that process happening enough that we know it will continue into the characters future — its how they — and we — earn our happy ending.

    Reply
  255. Thank you for your very kind words, Margaret. I havent read The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, but Code Name Verity was a wonderfully written book, and I agree, it probably teaches a lot of lessons we need to remember. But I was haunted for ages about what that young woman endured, and I so wanted a happy ending, even though it probably wasnt realistic, and sadly, I dont think the people who send young people to war will learn the lessons we need to remember.
    As for the real-life happy relationships — I absolutely agree that it takes a lot of work and compromise and forgiveness to create a successful marriage. And I think many romances show that process happening enough that we know it will continue into the characters future — its how they — and we — earn our happy ending.

    Reply
  256. I agree with what you said. I like to feel good at the end of a book. A sad/tragic ending, or a downer book, no matter how well written puts me in a “low” mood (depressed, sad, angry, etc) and that bleeds over into real life. I get caught up in a well written book. feel part of it. I like feeling happy at the end (happy in life, too). Same with movies.
    I like all the dangling ends resolved. I hate the “but what happened to…” I understand and accept if it is a series; if not – resolution!

    Reply
  257. I agree with what you said. I like to feel good at the end of a book. A sad/tragic ending, or a downer book, no matter how well written puts me in a “low” mood (depressed, sad, angry, etc) and that bleeds over into real life. I get caught up in a well written book. feel part of it. I like feeling happy at the end (happy in life, too). Same with movies.
    I like all the dangling ends resolved. I hate the “but what happened to…” I understand and accept if it is a series; if not – resolution!

    Reply
  258. I agree with what you said. I like to feel good at the end of a book. A sad/tragic ending, or a downer book, no matter how well written puts me in a “low” mood (depressed, sad, angry, etc) and that bleeds over into real life. I get caught up in a well written book. feel part of it. I like feeling happy at the end (happy in life, too). Same with movies.
    I like all the dangling ends resolved. I hate the “but what happened to…” I understand and accept if it is a series; if not – resolution!

    Reply
  259. I agree with what you said. I like to feel good at the end of a book. A sad/tragic ending, or a downer book, no matter how well written puts me in a “low” mood (depressed, sad, angry, etc) and that bleeds over into real life. I get caught up in a well written book. feel part of it. I like feeling happy at the end (happy in life, too). Same with movies.
    I like all the dangling ends resolved. I hate the “but what happened to…” I understand and accept if it is a series; if not – resolution!

    Reply
  260. I agree with what you said. I like to feel good at the end of a book. A sad/tragic ending, or a downer book, no matter how well written puts me in a “low” mood (depressed, sad, angry, etc) and that bleeds over into real life. I get caught up in a well written book. feel part of it. I like feeling happy at the end (happy in life, too). Same with movies.
    I like all the dangling ends resolved. I hate the “but what happened to…” I understand and accept if it is a series; if not – resolution!

    Reply
  261. Thanks, Merry — yes for a long time Literature was written — and judged — by men. And somehow popular fiction writers such as Dickens and Wilkie Collins and many others also became Literature, mainly I think because it was old. And yet somehow, it is practically sacrilege to call Pride and Prejudice a romance. I dont get it.
    Good luck with the good work you do — and keep the happy ending faith.

    Reply
  262. Thanks, Merry — yes for a long time Literature was written — and judged — by men. And somehow popular fiction writers such as Dickens and Wilkie Collins and many others also became Literature, mainly I think because it was old. And yet somehow, it is practically sacrilege to call Pride and Prejudice a romance. I dont get it.
    Good luck with the good work you do — and keep the happy ending faith.

    Reply
  263. Thanks, Merry — yes for a long time Literature was written — and judged — by men. And somehow popular fiction writers such as Dickens and Wilkie Collins and many others also became Literature, mainly I think because it was old. And yet somehow, it is practically sacrilege to call Pride and Prejudice a romance. I dont get it.
    Good luck with the good work you do — and keep the happy ending faith.

    Reply
  264. Thanks, Merry — yes for a long time Literature was written — and judged — by men. And somehow popular fiction writers such as Dickens and Wilkie Collins and many others also became Literature, mainly I think because it was old. And yet somehow, it is practically sacrilege to call Pride and Prejudice a romance. I dont get it.
    Good luck with the good work you do — and keep the happy ending faith.

    Reply
  265. Thanks, Merry — yes for a long time Literature was written — and judged — by men. And somehow popular fiction writers such as Dickens and Wilkie Collins and many others also became Literature, mainly I think because it was old. And yet somehow, it is practically sacrilege to call Pride and Prejudice a romance. I dont get it.
    Good luck with the good work you do — and keep the happy ending faith.

    Reply
  266. I was at a conference and another writer (Selena Laurence) said there was only one rule left in writing romance, and that was the HEA. She wanted that rule left alone, and I’m with her.
    I love epilogues, even the 50-years-later ones, because I like to know what happened, but understand why people don’t care for them. It’s part of the tying up loose ends–I want them tied!
    It’s the season for holiday books, so I’m reading them and enjoying ALL the happy endings.
    I enjoyed your post.

    Reply
  267. I was at a conference and another writer (Selena Laurence) said there was only one rule left in writing romance, and that was the HEA. She wanted that rule left alone, and I’m with her.
    I love epilogues, even the 50-years-later ones, because I like to know what happened, but understand why people don’t care for them. It’s part of the tying up loose ends–I want them tied!
    It’s the season for holiday books, so I’m reading them and enjoying ALL the happy endings.
    I enjoyed your post.

    Reply
  268. I was at a conference and another writer (Selena Laurence) said there was only one rule left in writing romance, and that was the HEA. She wanted that rule left alone, and I’m with her.
    I love epilogues, even the 50-years-later ones, because I like to know what happened, but understand why people don’t care for them. It’s part of the tying up loose ends–I want them tied!
    It’s the season for holiday books, so I’m reading them and enjoying ALL the happy endings.
    I enjoyed your post.

    Reply
  269. I was at a conference and another writer (Selena Laurence) said there was only one rule left in writing romance, and that was the HEA. She wanted that rule left alone, and I’m with her.
    I love epilogues, even the 50-years-later ones, because I like to know what happened, but understand why people don’t care for them. It’s part of the tying up loose ends–I want them tied!
    It’s the season for holiday books, so I’m reading them and enjoying ALL the happy endings.
    I enjoyed your post.

    Reply
  270. I was at a conference and another writer (Selena Laurence) said there was only one rule left in writing romance, and that was the HEA. She wanted that rule left alone, and I’m with her.
    I love epilogues, even the 50-years-later ones, because I like to know what happened, but understand why people don’t care for them. It’s part of the tying up loose ends–I want them tied!
    It’s the season for holiday books, so I’m reading them and enjoying ALL the happy endings.
    I enjoyed your post.

    Reply
  271. Thanks, Liz — I agree with Selena. I also love a good holiday romance. The word wenches anthology is out in mass market paperback at the moment. The Last Chance Christmas Ball.

    Reply
  272. Thanks, Liz — I agree with Selena. I also love a good holiday romance. The word wenches anthology is out in mass market paperback at the moment. The Last Chance Christmas Ball.

    Reply
  273. Thanks, Liz — I agree with Selena. I also love a good holiday romance. The word wenches anthology is out in mass market paperback at the moment. The Last Chance Christmas Ball.

    Reply
  274. Thanks, Liz — I agree with Selena. I also love a good holiday romance. The word wenches anthology is out in mass market paperback at the moment. The Last Chance Christmas Ball.

    Reply
  275. Thanks, Liz — I agree with Selena. I also love a good holiday romance. The word wenches anthology is out in mass market paperback at the moment. The Last Chance Christmas Ball.

    Reply
  276. It may be that some loose ends were left so that there would be material for a sequel, which didn’t materialize.
    I am too dumb to follow plot mechanics — they can trick me every time — but I *do* notice when an interesting character vanishes from the story and I am left wondering whatever became of him/her/the dog.

    Reply
  277. It may be that some loose ends were left so that there would be material for a sequel, which didn’t materialize.
    I am too dumb to follow plot mechanics — they can trick me every time — but I *do* notice when an interesting character vanishes from the story and I am left wondering whatever became of him/her/the dog.

    Reply
  278. It may be that some loose ends were left so that there would be material for a sequel, which didn’t materialize.
    I am too dumb to follow plot mechanics — they can trick me every time — but I *do* notice when an interesting character vanishes from the story and I am left wondering whatever became of him/her/the dog.

    Reply
  279. It may be that some loose ends were left so that there would be material for a sequel, which didn’t materialize.
    I am too dumb to follow plot mechanics — they can trick me every time — but I *do* notice when an interesting character vanishes from the story and I am left wondering whatever became of him/her/the dog.

    Reply
  280. It may be that some loose ends were left so that there would be material for a sequel, which didn’t materialize.
    I am too dumb to follow plot mechanics — they can trick me every time — but I *do* notice when an interesting character vanishes from the story and I am left wondering whatever became of him/her/the dog.

    Reply
  281. You guys should do a column on what your own favorite holiday romances are, or ones that you’d recommend. I used to love the old Signet Christmas books and I’d eagerly await October so I could get that year’s collection. I wish we had them again. I am glad you all did The Last Chance Christmas Ball, but it’s only one 🙁

    Reply
  282. You guys should do a column on what your own favorite holiday romances are, or ones that you’d recommend. I used to love the old Signet Christmas books and I’d eagerly await October so I could get that year’s collection. I wish we had them again. I am glad you all did The Last Chance Christmas Ball, but it’s only one 🙁

    Reply
  283. You guys should do a column on what your own favorite holiday romances are, or ones that you’d recommend. I used to love the old Signet Christmas books and I’d eagerly await October so I could get that year’s collection. I wish we had them again. I am glad you all did The Last Chance Christmas Ball, but it’s only one 🙁

    Reply
  284. You guys should do a column on what your own favorite holiday romances are, or ones that you’d recommend. I used to love the old Signet Christmas books and I’d eagerly await October so I could get that year’s collection. I wish we had them again. I am glad you all did The Last Chance Christmas Ball, but it’s only one 🙁

    Reply
  285. You guys should do a column on what your own favorite holiday romances are, or ones that you’d recommend. I used to love the old Signet Christmas books and I’d eagerly await October so I could get that year’s collection. I wish we had them again. I am glad you all did The Last Chance Christmas Ball, but it’s only one 🙁

    Reply
  286. That could be true, Janice — left on the cutting room floor. But some of my loose-ending-gripes are things I think were deliberate, for true-life reasons, or (which is the bit that annoys me) for reasons of wanting to intrigue. Instead it irritates. *g*

    Reply
  287. That could be true, Janice — left on the cutting room floor. But some of my loose-ending-gripes are things I think were deliberate, for true-life reasons, or (which is the bit that annoys me) for reasons of wanting to intrigue. Instead it irritates. *g*

    Reply
  288. That could be true, Janice — left on the cutting room floor. But some of my loose-ending-gripes are things I think were deliberate, for true-life reasons, or (which is the bit that annoys me) for reasons of wanting to intrigue. Instead it irritates. *g*

    Reply
  289. That could be true, Janice — left on the cutting room floor. But some of my loose-ending-gripes are things I think were deliberate, for true-life reasons, or (which is the bit that annoys me) for reasons of wanting to intrigue. Instead it irritates. *g*

    Reply
  290. That could be true, Janice — left on the cutting room floor. But some of my loose-ending-gripes are things I think were deliberate, for true-life reasons, or (which is the bit that annoys me) for reasons of wanting to intrigue. Instead it irritates. *g*

    Reply

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