The Fine Art of Regency Satire

Gillray_plumpuddingAndrea/Cara here, musing today about the power of the pen—or in this case, the quill. In Murder on Black Swan Lane, the first book in my new Regency-set mystery series, which will be released on June 27th, I decided to make my heroine, Charlotte Sloane, a satirical cartoonist, as it seemed to me to be a perfect profession for someone who also proves skilled at unraveling diabolical mysteries. After all, skewering the political and social foibles of an era MBSL coverrequires a razor-sharp eye, a keen understanding of human nature—warts and all!—and a sardonic sense of humor . . . not to speak of a vast network of eyes and ears to keep informed of all the latest gossip and scandals.

I found wonderful inspiration for Charlotte in the real-life Regency artists, as the era is considered by many to be the golden age of satirical prints. Two of my favorites are James Gillray and Thomas Rowlandson, who combined cutting edge wit and perception with exquisite artistic skills.



Gillray 3Gillray is considered the father of the political cartoon, and among of his favorite targets were George III and his profligate sons. (The King is said to have remarked of Gillray’s drawings, “I don’t understand these caricatures.” In his case, ignorance was bliss, because Gillray was not one to pull his punches.) The politics of in the interminable Napoleonic wars, as well as the vanities of the beau monde were also subjects for his scathing wit. (The print at the top of the blog is considered a classic—showing the world being sliced up like a plum pudding.) And so keen were his perceptions that his prints are also a wonderful commentary on the fashion, ornament and architecture of the era, making them invaluable resources on the tiny details of everyday life for historians (and writers!)

Gillray 2Rowlandson studied at the Royal Academy for a time, and also pursued figure drawing in Paris, His work displays a highly developed artistic flair as well as a knack for caricature.  He did much of his satirical work for the well-known publisher Rudolph Ackermann, and also illustrated the literary Rowlandson_portraitworks of Smollet, Sterne and Goldsmith. Rowlandson was slightly gentler than Gillray, and focused more on societal commentary than politics. He also did lovely watercolors of country life and rigors of continental travel. (I remember several years ago Jo Beverley being delighted with a print I posted because she finally could see what a certain type of traveling coach looked like!)

Roz_Chast_pg10Satirical cartoonists have thrived throughout history, and today we have no dearth of sharp-eyed, sharp-witted artists who keep a basilisk eye on every facet of society. I don’t know about you, but I adore The New Yorker magazine, not only for its insightful writing but also for the humor and cutting edge commentary of its cartoons. Roz Chast is a favorite with her trenchant observations on the stresses of modern life . . . and then there’s Booth and his dogs. Funny how the quirk of an ear or the shape of a mouth can be so supremely expressive.

Db711021
I’m also a big fan of Garry Trudeau and Doonesbury. (For those who don’t know his history, Garry started drawing his strip, which was called Bull Tales back then, for the student newspaper as an undergrad at Yale. He took great glee in skewering campus life, from dating, to the football team, to the Black Panthers and the Vietnam War protests. (The above one pokes a little fun at the earnestness of fellow undergrad John Kerry.) The students absolutely loved the strip, and his wit caught the attention of media . . . and the rest, as they say, is history.) Like the best satirical artists, he has the gift at making us laugh, while at the same time making us think about the serious issues that lie beneath the humor.

Gillray 4 For me, historical and modern day cartoonists share an elemental quality: a passion for shining a light on the foibles of society. Their pens expose injustice, hypocrisy and outright criminal acts. And as a picture is often truly more powerful than a thousand words, the impact of their work often helps focus the public’s eye on the less-than-admirable actions of our leaders and high profile business moguls and media celebrities. I appreciate their courage Jamesgilrayfeetand conviction, for satire—the best of which makes us laugh at our own pretensions as well as those of others—is a powerful voice for keeping vanity, greed and the hunger for power from running amuck. I’ve created Charlotte Sloane as a tribute the artists of the past and present, and their fundamental idealism in taking on the ills and excesses of society. Sharp quills challenge us to take a closer look at the world around us, and as far as I’m concerned, that’s all for the good!

Doctor-Convex-and-Lady-Co-004Do you like satirical cartoons? Do you have a favorite cartoonist, either in historical times or present day? I’ll be giving away an advance e-book ARC of Murder on Black Swan Lane to one winner, chosen at random from those who leave a comment here between now and Sunday evening.

140 thoughts on “The Fine Art of Regency Satire”

  1. Andrea, you’ve hit a favorite topic of mine! One picture is indeed worth a thousand words, and the best political cartoonist of today have the same masterful ability to bring subjects to life with scalpel like precision that their predecessors had. I love Doonesbury, with the diverse characters and their long running stories. His up close and personal cartoons of the our soldiers and the costs of war go where no one else is going. I hope he NEVER retires!

    Reply
  2. Andrea, you’ve hit a favorite topic of mine! One picture is indeed worth a thousand words, and the best political cartoonist of today have the same masterful ability to bring subjects to life with scalpel like precision that their predecessors had. I love Doonesbury, with the diverse characters and their long running stories. His up close and personal cartoons of the our soldiers and the costs of war go where no one else is going. I hope he NEVER retires!

    Reply
  3. Andrea, you’ve hit a favorite topic of mine! One picture is indeed worth a thousand words, and the best political cartoonist of today have the same masterful ability to bring subjects to life with scalpel like precision that their predecessors had. I love Doonesbury, with the diverse characters and their long running stories. His up close and personal cartoons of the our soldiers and the costs of war go where no one else is going. I hope he NEVER retires!

    Reply
  4. Andrea, you’ve hit a favorite topic of mine! One picture is indeed worth a thousand words, and the best political cartoonist of today have the same masterful ability to bring subjects to life with scalpel like precision that their predecessors had. I love Doonesbury, with the diverse characters and their long running stories. His up close and personal cartoons of the our soldiers and the costs of war go where no one else is going. I hope he NEVER retires!

    Reply
  5. Andrea, you’ve hit a favorite topic of mine! One picture is indeed worth a thousand words, and the best political cartoonist of today have the same masterful ability to bring subjects to life with scalpel like precision that their predecessors had. I love Doonesbury, with the diverse characters and their long running stories. His up close and personal cartoons of the our soldiers and the costs of war go where no one else is going. I hope he NEVER retires!

    Reply
  6. I think cartoonists are hugely important in any era. They serve as as our gadflies—and most importantly, our moral compasses. And yes, somehow a single image can say more than reams of words, and hit like a punch to the gut.
    I hope Trudeau never retires either . . .but I think his cartooning is like our writing—it’s simply a part of him that refuses to shut up! At least, I hope so!

    Reply
  7. I think cartoonists are hugely important in any era. They serve as as our gadflies—and most importantly, our moral compasses. And yes, somehow a single image can say more than reams of words, and hit like a punch to the gut.
    I hope Trudeau never retires either . . .but I think his cartooning is like our writing—it’s simply a part of him that refuses to shut up! At least, I hope so!

    Reply
  8. I think cartoonists are hugely important in any era. They serve as as our gadflies—and most importantly, our moral compasses. And yes, somehow a single image can say more than reams of words, and hit like a punch to the gut.
    I hope Trudeau never retires either . . .but I think his cartooning is like our writing—it’s simply a part of him that refuses to shut up! At least, I hope so!

    Reply
  9. I think cartoonists are hugely important in any era. They serve as as our gadflies—and most importantly, our moral compasses. And yes, somehow a single image can say more than reams of words, and hit like a punch to the gut.
    I hope Trudeau never retires either . . .but I think his cartooning is like our writing—it’s simply a part of him that refuses to shut up! At least, I hope so!

    Reply
  10. I think cartoonists are hugely important in any era. They serve as as our gadflies—and most importantly, our moral compasses. And yes, somehow a single image can say more than reams of words, and hit like a punch to the gut.
    I hope Trudeau never retires either . . .but I think his cartooning is like our writing—it’s simply a part of him that refuses to shut up! At least, I hope so!

    Reply
  11. Fascinating blog Andrea!
    Cartoons are not really my favourite art form. However, while a student in London studying science, I developed a taste for art and spent much leisure time in the London Galleries.For many years I had one of Picaso’s cubist pictures (sadly a photo-copy!) on my wall and to this day his ‘Madame Z’ graces the stairway in my home.
    Scientists spend much time stripping away superfluous detail to get down to the essence of a problem and I greatly admire the way that artists can get beyond the surface, photographic aspects, to capture the soul or character of a subject. Your cartoon examples illustrate that skill very nicely!

    Reply
  12. Fascinating blog Andrea!
    Cartoons are not really my favourite art form. However, while a student in London studying science, I developed a taste for art and spent much leisure time in the London Galleries.For many years I had one of Picaso’s cubist pictures (sadly a photo-copy!) on my wall and to this day his ‘Madame Z’ graces the stairway in my home.
    Scientists spend much time stripping away superfluous detail to get down to the essence of a problem and I greatly admire the way that artists can get beyond the surface, photographic aspects, to capture the soul or character of a subject. Your cartoon examples illustrate that skill very nicely!

    Reply
  13. Fascinating blog Andrea!
    Cartoons are not really my favourite art form. However, while a student in London studying science, I developed a taste for art and spent much leisure time in the London Galleries.For many years I had one of Picaso’s cubist pictures (sadly a photo-copy!) on my wall and to this day his ‘Madame Z’ graces the stairway in my home.
    Scientists spend much time stripping away superfluous detail to get down to the essence of a problem and I greatly admire the way that artists can get beyond the surface, photographic aspects, to capture the soul or character of a subject. Your cartoon examples illustrate that skill very nicely!

    Reply
  14. Fascinating blog Andrea!
    Cartoons are not really my favourite art form. However, while a student in London studying science, I developed a taste for art and spent much leisure time in the London Galleries.For many years I had one of Picaso’s cubist pictures (sadly a photo-copy!) on my wall and to this day his ‘Madame Z’ graces the stairway in my home.
    Scientists spend much time stripping away superfluous detail to get down to the essence of a problem and I greatly admire the way that artists can get beyond the surface, photographic aspects, to capture the soul or character of a subject. Your cartoon examples illustrate that skill very nicely!

    Reply
  15. Fascinating blog Andrea!
    Cartoons are not really my favourite art form. However, while a student in London studying science, I developed a taste for art and spent much leisure time in the London Galleries.For many years I had one of Picaso’s cubist pictures (sadly a photo-copy!) on my wall and to this day his ‘Madame Z’ graces the stairway in my home.
    Scientists spend much time stripping away superfluous detail to get down to the essence of a problem and I greatly admire the way that artists can get beyond the surface, photographic aspects, to capture the soul or character of a subject. Your cartoon examples illustrate that skill very nicely!

    Reply
  16. I prefer watching mysteries (such as Miss Fisher) to reading them, but I’m intrigued by your new series, Andrea. Political satire is a fav of mine, so sounds like Charlotte Sloane and I will get along quite nicely! Looking forward to reading it 😊

    Reply
  17. I prefer watching mysteries (such as Miss Fisher) to reading them, but I’m intrigued by your new series, Andrea. Political satire is a fav of mine, so sounds like Charlotte Sloane and I will get along quite nicely! Looking forward to reading it 😊

    Reply
  18. I prefer watching mysteries (such as Miss Fisher) to reading them, but I’m intrigued by your new series, Andrea. Political satire is a fav of mine, so sounds like Charlotte Sloane and I will get along quite nicely! Looking forward to reading it 😊

    Reply
  19. I prefer watching mysteries (such as Miss Fisher) to reading them, but I’m intrigued by your new series, Andrea. Political satire is a fav of mine, so sounds like Charlotte Sloane and I will get along quite nicely! Looking forward to reading it 😊

    Reply
  20. I prefer watching mysteries (such as Miss Fisher) to reading them, but I’m intrigued by your new series, Andrea. Political satire is a fav of mine, so sounds like Charlotte Sloane and I will get along quite nicely! Looking forward to reading it 😊

    Reply
  21. Those Gilroy and Rowlandson caricature are a real boon for researchers because they show the ordinary details of existence that no one would bother to mention simply because they were so ordinary.
    And I love cartoons. I grew up on Charles Addams, and I especially liked William Hamilton’s New Yorker cartoons.

    Reply
  22. Those Gilroy and Rowlandson caricature are a real boon for researchers because they show the ordinary details of existence that no one would bother to mention simply because they were so ordinary.
    And I love cartoons. I grew up on Charles Addams, and I especially liked William Hamilton’s New Yorker cartoons.

    Reply
  23. Those Gilroy and Rowlandson caricature are a real boon for researchers because they show the ordinary details of existence that no one would bother to mention simply because they were so ordinary.
    And I love cartoons. I grew up on Charles Addams, and I especially liked William Hamilton’s New Yorker cartoons.

    Reply
  24. Those Gilroy and Rowlandson caricature are a real boon for researchers because they show the ordinary details of existence that no one would bother to mention simply because they were so ordinary.
    And I love cartoons. I grew up on Charles Addams, and I especially liked William Hamilton’s New Yorker cartoons.

    Reply
  25. Those Gilroy and Rowlandson caricature are a real boon for researchers because they show the ordinary details of existence that no one would bother to mention simply because they were so ordinary.
    And I love cartoons. I grew up on Charles Addams, and I especially liked William Hamilton’s New Yorker cartoons.

    Reply
  26. Thanks for an enjoyable column, Andrea. I do enjoy a good cartoon though as I tend not to be politically aware much political satire would elude me.
    Some cartoonists (not terribly satirical) that I enjoy are Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott, creators of Baby Blues, and Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes.

    Reply
  27. Thanks for an enjoyable column, Andrea. I do enjoy a good cartoon though as I tend not to be politically aware much political satire would elude me.
    Some cartoonists (not terribly satirical) that I enjoy are Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott, creators of Baby Blues, and Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes.

    Reply
  28. Thanks for an enjoyable column, Andrea. I do enjoy a good cartoon though as I tend not to be politically aware much political satire would elude me.
    Some cartoonists (not terribly satirical) that I enjoy are Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott, creators of Baby Blues, and Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes.

    Reply
  29. Thanks for an enjoyable column, Andrea. I do enjoy a good cartoon though as I tend not to be politically aware much political satire would elude me.
    Some cartoonists (not terribly satirical) that I enjoy are Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott, creators of Baby Blues, and Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes.

    Reply
  30. Thanks for an enjoyable column, Andrea. I do enjoy a good cartoon though as I tend not to be politically aware much political satire would elude me.
    Some cartoonists (not terribly satirical) that I enjoy are Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott, creators of Baby Blues, and Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes.

    Reply
  31. Quantum, I love your comparison of art and science having in the common the stripping away of superfluous detail to get to the essence. I have an art background, and it’s so true. There is a quintessential elegance and power in simplicity. (You would love a current art exhibit at the Met in NYC where a number of leading mathematician named what they thought were the most influential equations. (Euler’s Number, etc.) They are written in stark white on black, and are strikingly beautiful!)

    Reply
  32. Quantum, I love your comparison of art and science having in the common the stripping away of superfluous detail to get to the essence. I have an art background, and it’s so true. There is a quintessential elegance and power in simplicity. (You would love a current art exhibit at the Met in NYC where a number of leading mathematician named what they thought were the most influential equations. (Euler’s Number, etc.) They are written in stark white on black, and are strikingly beautiful!)

    Reply
  33. Quantum, I love your comparison of art and science having in the common the stripping away of superfluous detail to get to the essence. I have an art background, and it’s so true. There is a quintessential elegance and power in simplicity. (You would love a current art exhibit at the Met in NYC where a number of leading mathematician named what they thought were the most influential equations. (Euler’s Number, etc.) They are written in stark white on black, and are strikingly beautiful!)

    Reply
  34. Quantum, I love your comparison of art and science having in the common the stripping away of superfluous detail to get to the essence. I have an art background, and it’s so true. There is a quintessential elegance and power in simplicity. (You would love a current art exhibit at the Met in NYC where a number of leading mathematician named what they thought were the most influential equations. (Euler’s Number, etc.) They are written in stark white on black, and are strikingly beautiful!)

    Reply
  35. Quantum, I love your comparison of art and science having in the common the stripping away of superfluous detail to get to the essence. I have an art background, and it’s so true. There is a quintessential elegance and power in simplicity. (You would love a current art exhibit at the Met in NYC where a number of leading mathematician named what they thought were the most influential equations. (Euler’s Number, etc.) They are written in stark white on black, and are strikingly beautiful!)

    Reply
  36. My son and daughter love Calvin and Hobbs too. If there is a cartoonist looking for new material they should do our Irish Government. They wouldn’t have enough paper to cover the fools that are running our country at the moment. Great post. Please don’t put me in the draw as I very kindly received an ARC from you already. All I have to add is please hurry up with the second one. I can’t wait!!!!!

    Reply
  37. My son and daughter love Calvin and Hobbs too. If there is a cartoonist looking for new material they should do our Irish Government. They wouldn’t have enough paper to cover the fools that are running our country at the moment. Great post. Please don’t put me in the draw as I very kindly received an ARC from you already. All I have to add is please hurry up with the second one. I can’t wait!!!!!

    Reply
  38. My son and daughter love Calvin and Hobbs too. If there is a cartoonist looking for new material they should do our Irish Government. They wouldn’t have enough paper to cover the fools that are running our country at the moment. Great post. Please don’t put me in the draw as I very kindly received an ARC from you already. All I have to add is please hurry up with the second one. I can’t wait!!!!!

    Reply
  39. My son and daughter love Calvin and Hobbs too. If there is a cartoonist looking for new material they should do our Irish Government. They wouldn’t have enough paper to cover the fools that are running our country at the moment. Great post. Please don’t put me in the draw as I very kindly received an ARC from you already. All I have to add is please hurry up with the second one. I can’t wait!!!!!

    Reply
  40. My son and daughter love Calvin and Hobbs too. If there is a cartoonist looking for new material they should do our Irish Government. They wouldn’t have enough paper to cover the fools that are running our country at the moment. Great post. Please don’t put me in the draw as I very kindly received an ARC from you already. All I have to add is please hurry up with the second one. I can’t wait!!!!!

    Reply
  41. Great blog. Political cartooning has a very special history in Australia. When we built our new Parliament House in Canberra the Old Parliament House became the home of the Museum of Australian Democracy which has a permanent exhibition ‘Behind The Lines’ on political cartooning from before Federation. Each year it also has a current exhibition on the previous year’s best political cartoons. https://moadoph.gov.au/exhibitions/behind-the-lines-2016-the-year-s-best-political-cartoons/ This recognises the just how much power political satirists still have in the political context in Australia and the international political scene. Of course now it is not just the pen. British, US and Australia television have done hilarious and pointed jobs of moving that satire into broadcast. The political process of any age provides ample fodder, I’d say because human nature remains the same. I guess the flipside of this movement still exists too. Jo Beverley’s last book illustrated the personal pain and havoc that irresponsible publication could cause and we are still living with that debate today with paparazzi and social media. But none of us would give up our cartoons willingly.

    Reply
  42. Great blog. Political cartooning has a very special history in Australia. When we built our new Parliament House in Canberra the Old Parliament House became the home of the Museum of Australian Democracy which has a permanent exhibition ‘Behind The Lines’ on political cartooning from before Federation. Each year it also has a current exhibition on the previous year’s best political cartoons. https://moadoph.gov.au/exhibitions/behind-the-lines-2016-the-year-s-best-political-cartoons/ This recognises the just how much power political satirists still have in the political context in Australia and the international political scene. Of course now it is not just the pen. British, US and Australia television have done hilarious and pointed jobs of moving that satire into broadcast. The political process of any age provides ample fodder, I’d say because human nature remains the same. I guess the flipside of this movement still exists too. Jo Beverley’s last book illustrated the personal pain and havoc that irresponsible publication could cause and we are still living with that debate today with paparazzi and social media. But none of us would give up our cartoons willingly.

    Reply
  43. Great blog. Political cartooning has a very special history in Australia. When we built our new Parliament House in Canberra the Old Parliament House became the home of the Museum of Australian Democracy which has a permanent exhibition ‘Behind The Lines’ on political cartooning from before Federation. Each year it also has a current exhibition on the previous year’s best political cartoons. https://moadoph.gov.au/exhibitions/behind-the-lines-2016-the-year-s-best-political-cartoons/ This recognises the just how much power political satirists still have in the political context in Australia and the international political scene. Of course now it is not just the pen. British, US and Australia television have done hilarious and pointed jobs of moving that satire into broadcast. The political process of any age provides ample fodder, I’d say because human nature remains the same. I guess the flipside of this movement still exists too. Jo Beverley’s last book illustrated the personal pain and havoc that irresponsible publication could cause and we are still living with that debate today with paparazzi and social media. But none of us would give up our cartoons willingly.

    Reply
  44. Great blog. Political cartooning has a very special history in Australia. When we built our new Parliament House in Canberra the Old Parliament House became the home of the Museum of Australian Democracy which has a permanent exhibition ‘Behind The Lines’ on political cartooning from before Federation. Each year it also has a current exhibition on the previous year’s best political cartoons. https://moadoph.gov.au/exhibitions/behind-the-lines-2016-the-year-s-best-political-cartoons/ This recognises the just how much power political satirists still have in the political context in Australia and the international political scene. Of course now it is not just the pen. British, US and Australia television have done hilarious and pointed jobs of moving that satire into broadcast. The political process of any age provides ample fodder, I’d say because human nature remains the same. I guess the flipside of this movement still exists too. Jo Beverley’s last book illustrated the personal pain and havoc that irresponsible publication could cause and we are still living with that debate today with paparazzi and social media. But none of us would give up our cartoons willingly.

    Reply
  45. Great blog. Political cartooning has a very special history in Australia. When we built our new Parliament House in Canberra the Old Parliament House became the home of the Museum of Australian Democracy which has a permanent exhibition ‘Behind The Lines’ on political cartooning from before Federation. Each year it also has a current exhibition on the previous year’s best political cartoons. https://moadoph.gov.au/exhibitions/behind-the-lines-2016-the-year-s-best-political-cartoons/ This recognises the just how much power political satirists still have in the political context in Australia and the international political scene. Of course now it is not just the pen. British, US and Australia television have done hilarious and pointed jobs of moving that satire into broadcast. The political process of any age provides ample fodder, I’d say because human nature remains the same. I guess the flipside of this movement still exists too. Jo Beverley’s last book illustrated the personal pain and havoc that irresponsible publication could cause and we are still living with that debate today with paparazzi and social media. But none of us would give up our cartoons willingly.

    Reply
  46. Berkeley Breathed brought back the denizens of Bloom County last year to the delight of hundred of thousands of fans on https://www.facebook.com/berkeleybreathed/
    His jabs are gentle, very timely on FB, and so funny that I have to remember not to be eating or drinking during my daily visits to his page, to avoid choking with laughter or snorting coffee thru my nose.

    Reply
  47. Berkeley Breathed brought back the denizens of Bloom County last year to the delight of hundred of thousands of fans on https://www.facebook.com/berkeleybreathed/
    His jabs are gentle, very timely on FB, and so funny that I have to remember not to be eating or drinking during my daily visits to his page, to avoid choking with laughter or snorting coffee thru my nose.

    Reply
  48. Berkeley Breathed brought back the denizens of Bloom County last year to the delight of hundred of thousands of fans on https://www.facebook.com/berkeleybreathed/
    His jabs are gentle, very timely on FB, and so funny that I have to remember not to be eating or drinking during my daily visits to his page, to avoid choking with laughter or snorting coffee thru my nose.

    Reply
  49. Berkeley Breathed brought back the denizens of Bloom County last year to the delight of hundred of thousands of fans on https://www.facebook.com/berkeleybreathed/
    His jabs are gentle, very timely on FB, and so funny that I have to remember not to be eating or drinking during my daily visits to his page, to avoid choking with laughter or snorting coffee thru my nose.

    Reply
  50. Berkeley Breathed brought back the denizens of Bloom County last year to the delight of hundred of thousands of fans on https://www.facebook.com/berkeleybreathed/
    His jabs are gentle, very timely on FB, and so funny that I have to remember not to be eating or drinking during my daily visits to his page, to avoid choking with laughter or snorting coffee thru my nose.

    Reply
  51. One of my favorite comics includes plenty of commentary (satirical & otherwise) — it’s (mostly) online only: Kevin & Kell set in an alternate anthropomorphic animal version of our world. The titular characters represent a different kind of mixed marriage. He’s a rabbit, she’s a wolf. She has a wolf son from a previous marriage (currently dating fennec fox) and he has an adopted hedgehog daughter from a previous marriage (married to a bat). Together, they have a carnivorous rabbit daughter. Plus, he runs Harelink an internet service provider (cue computer commentary) and she’s ceo of a company providing fresh meat . . .

    Reply
  52. One of my favorite comics includes plenty of commentary (satirical & otherwise) — it’s (mostly) online only: Kevin & Kell set in an alternate anthropomorphic animal version of our world. The titular characters represent a different kind of mixed marriage. He’s a rabbit, she’s a wolf. She has a wolf son from a previous marriage (currently dating fennec fox) and he has an adopted hedgehog daughter from a previous marriage (married to a bat). Together, they have a carnivorous rabbit daughter. Plus, he runs Harelink an internet service provider (cue computer commentary) and she’s ceo of a company providing fresh meat . . .

    Reply
  53. One of my favorite comics includes plenty of commentary (satirical & otherwise) — it’s (mostly) online only: Kevin & Kell set in an alternate anthropomorphic animal version of our world. The titular characters represent a different kind of mixed marriage. He’s a rabbit, she’s a wolf. She has a wolf son from a previous marriage (currently dating fennec fox) and he has an adopted hedgehog daughter from a previous marriage (married to a bat). Together, they have a carnivorous rabbit daughter. Plus, he runs Harelink an internet service provider (cue computer commentary) and she’s ceo of a company providing fresh meat . . .

    Reply
  54. One of my favorite comics includes plenty of commentary (satirical & otherwise) — it’s (mostly) online only: Kevin & Kell set in an alternate anthropomorphic animal version of our world. The titular characters represent a different kind of mixed marriage. He’s a rabbit, she’s a wolf. She has a wolf son from a previous marriage (currently dating fennec fox) and he has an adopted hedgehog daughter from a previous marriage (married to a bat). Together, they have a carnivorous rabbit daughter. Plus, he runs Harelink an internet service provider (cue computer commentary) and she’s ceo of a company providing fresh meat . . .

    Reply
  55. One of my favorite comics includes plenty of commentary (satirical & otherwise) — it’s (mostly) online only: Kevin & Kell set in an alternate anthropomorphic animal version of our world. The titular characters represent a different kind of mixed marriage. He’s a rabbit, she’s a wolf. She has a wolf son from a previous marriage (currently dating fennec fox) and he has an adopted hedgehog daughter from a previous marriage (married to a bat). Together, they have a carnivorous rabbit daughter. Plus, he runs Harelink an internet service provider (cue computer commentary) and she’s ceo of a company providing fresh meat . . .

    Reply
  56. Thanks for your thoughts, Mary. SO true about human nature, and the power of cartoons to highlight the good, the bad and the ugly. And so true about the press and paparazzi can forment trouble in any era.
    That’s wonderful that Australia recognizes the power of political cartooning. It IS important, IMO.

    Reply
  57. Thanks for your thoughts, Mary. SO true about human nature, and the power of cartoons to highlight the good, the bad and the ugly. And so true about the press and paparazzi can forment trouble in any era.
    That’s wonderful that Australia recognizes the power of political cartooning. It IS important, IMO.

    Reply
  58. Thanks for your thoughts, Mary. SO true about human nature, and the power of cartoons to highlight the good, the bad and the ugly. And so true about the press and paparazzi can forment trouble in any era.
    That’s wonderful that Australia recognizes the power of political cartooning. It IS important, IMO.

    Reply
  59. Thanks for your thoughts, Mary. SO true about human nature, and the power of cartoons to highlight the good, the bad and the ugly. And so true about the press and paparazzi can forment trouble in any era.
    That’s wonderful that Australia recognizes the power of political cartooning. It IS important, IMO.

    Reply
  60. Thanks for your thoughts, Mary. SO true about human nature, and the power of cartoons to highlight the good, the bad and the ugly. And so true about the press and paparazzi can forment trouble in any era.
    That’s wonderful that Australia recognizes the power of political cartooning. It IS important, IMO.

    Reply
  61. I enjoy the satirical cartoons in The New Yorker.
    The biting intrigue of seeing the politicians of our time in such a way helps to defuse some of the tension through the great gift these cartoons express of immediate laughter.

    Reply
  62. I enjoy the satirical cartoons in The New Yorker.
    The biting intrigue of seeing the politicians of our time in such a way helps to defuse some of the tension through the great gift these cartoons express of immediate laughter.

    Reply
  63. I enjoy the satirical cartoons in The New Yorker.
    The biting intrigue of seeing the politicians of our time in such a way helps to defuse some of the tension through the great gift these cartoons express of immediate laughter.

    Reply
  64. I enjoy the satirical cartoons in The New Yorker.
    The biting intrigue of seeing the politicians of our time in such a way helps to defuse some of the tension through the great gift these cartoons express of immediate laughter.

    Reply
  65. I enjoy the satirical cartoons in The New Yorker.
    The biting intrigue of seeing the politicians of our time in such a way helps to defuse some of the tension through the great gift these cartoons express of immediate laughter.

    Reply
  66. I love seeing the historical examples of political cartoons. The question about a possible favorite historical cartoonist makes me want to go on a research spree just to see all the possibilities. (That’s a responsible use of my time, yes?) I adore well done satire.
    As for current examples, add me to the list of Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County fans. (Yes, I have a stuffed Opus.)

    Reply
  67. I love seeing the historical examples of political cartoons. The question about a possible favorite historical cartoonist makes me want to go on a research spree just to see all the possibilities. (That’s a responsible use of my time, yes?) I adore well done satire.
    As for current examples, add me to the list of Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County fans. (Yes, I have a stuffed Opus.)

    Reply
  68. I love seeing the historical examples of political cartoons. The question about a possible favorite historical cartoonist makes me want to go on a research spree just to see all the possibilities. (That’s a responsible use of my time, yes?) I adore well done satire.
    As for current examples, add me to the list of Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County fans. (Yes, I have a stuffed Opus.)

    Reply
  69. I love seeing the historical examples of political cartoons. The question about a possible favorite historical cartoonist makes me want to go on a research spree just to see all the possibilities. (That’s a responsible use of my time, yes?) I adore well done satire.
    As for current examples, add me to the list of Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County fans. (Yes, I have a stuffed Opus.)

    Reply
  70. I love seeing the historical examples of political cartoons. The question about a possible favorite historical cartoonist makes me want to go on a research spree just to see all the possibilities. (That’s a responsible use of my time, yes?) I adore well done satire.
    As for current examples, add me to the list of Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County fans. (Yes, I have a stuffed Opus.)

    Reply
  71. I also enjoy pithy cartoons that make you laugh, or sigh, or wince — and cut to the heart of things. Some are incredibly wise. A favorite here is Leunig — when I was a young adult, pretty much every fridge in every house you ever visited had at least one Leunig cartoon cut out of the newspaper and placed on the fridge. One I used to use in school teaching was a cartoon of a man and his son sitting watching a sunset on TV, while outside there was a real sunset. 20+ years old, but just as true — maybe more so– today. Here’s his website: http://www.leunig.com.au/works/cartoons

    Reply
  72. I also enjoy pithy cartoons that make you laugh, or sigh, or wince — and cut to the heart of things. Some are incredibly wise. A favorite here is Leunig — when I was a young adult, pretty much every fridge in every house you ever visited had at least one Leunig cartoon cut out of the newspaper and placed on the fridge. One I used to use in school teaching was a cartoon of a man and his son sitting watching a sunset on TV, while outside there was a real sunset. 20+ years old, but just as true — maybe more so– today. Here’s his website: http://www.leunig.com.au/works/cartoons

    Reply
  73. I also enjoy pithy cartoons that make you laugh, or sigh, or wince — and cut to the heart of things. Some are incredibly wise. A favorite here is Leunig — when I was a young adult, pretty much every fridge in every house you ever visited had at least one Leunig cartoon cut out of the newspaper and placed on the fridge. One I used to use in school teaching was a cartoon of a man and his son sitting watching a sunset on TV, while outside there was a real sunset. 20+ years old, but just as true — maybe more so– today. Here’s his website: http://www.leunig.com.au/works/cartoons

    Reply
  74. I also enjoy pithy cartoons that make you laugh, or sigh, or wince — and cut to the heart of things. Some are incredibly wise. A favorite here is Leunig — when I was a young adult, pretty much every fridge in every house you ever visited had at least one Leunig cartoon cut out of the newspaper and placed on the fridge. One I used to use in school teaching was a cartoon of a man and his son sitting watching a sunset on TV, while outside there was a real sunset. 20+ years old, but just as true — maybe more so– today. Here’s his website: http://www.leunig.com.au/works/cartoons

    Reply
  75. I also enjoy pithy cartoons that make you laugh, or sigh, or wince — and cut to the heart of things. Some are incredibly wise. A favorite here is Leunig — when I was a young adult, pretty much every fridge in every house you ever visited had at least one Leunig cartoon cut out of the newspaper and placed on the fridge. One I used to use in school teaching was a cartoon of a man and his son sitting watching a sunset on TV, while outside there was a real sunset. 20+ years old, but just as true — maybe more so– today. Here’s his website: http://www.leunig.com.au/works/cartoons

    Reply
  76. So interesting, Anne. I have never heard of Leunig, but clearly he is an Aussie institution.
    The cartoon of watching a cyber sunset instead of a real one DOES indeed cut to the heart of things. I am constantly amazed at people walking around hunched down with eyes on the phone screen instead of looking at the world around them. It’s frightening to me. What sort of breadth of experience are they taking in? Their world is one-dimensional. Sad, really.

    Reply
  77. So interesting, Anne. I have never heard of Leunig, but clearly he is an Aussie institution.
    The cartoon of watching a cyber sunset instead of a real one DOES indeed cut to the heart of things. I am constantly amazed at people walking around hunched down with eyes on the phone screen instead of looking at the world around them. It’s frightening to me. What sort of breadth of experience are they taking in? Their world is one-dimensional. Sad, really.

    Reply
  78. So interesting, Anne. I have never heard of Leunig, but clearly he is an Aussie institution.
    The cartoon of watching a cyber sunset instead of a real one DOES indeed cut to the heart of things. I am constantly amazed at people walking around hunched down with eyes on the phone screen instead of looking at the world around them. It’s frightening to me. What sort of breadth of experience are they taking in? Their world is one-dimensional. Sad, really.

    Reply
  79. So interesting, Anne. I have never heard of Leunig, but clearly he is an Aussie institution.
    The cartoon of watching a cyber sunset instead of a real one DOES indeed cut to the heart of things. I am constantly amazed at people walking around hunched down with eyes on the phone screen instead of looking at the world around them. It’s frightening to me. What sort of breadth of experience are they taking in? Their world is one-dimensional. Sad, really.

    Reply
  80. So interesting, Anne. I have never heard of Leunig, but clearly he is an Aussie institution.
    The cartoon of watching a cyber sunset instead of a real one DOES indeed cut to the heart of things. I am constantly amazed at people walking around hunched down with eyes on the phone screen instead of looking at the world around them. It’s frightening to me. What sort of breadth of experience are they taking in? Their world is one-dimensional. Sad, really.

    Reply
  81. When I was growing up in St. Louis in the 1940s, one of the papers had a political cartoonist named Herbert Block (Herblock). His cartoons were often reprinted in other papers.
    My current hometown (Columbia, Missouri) is home to a museum created by the newspapers of the state. It contains Microfilms from many state papers, books on various subjects, and is a valuable research resource.
    They have an art gallery in the halls. The gallery almost always has one or more of Herblock’s cartoons on display. They are still as fresh and interesting as they were 60 years ago.

    Reply
  82. When I was growing up in St. Louis in the 1940s, one of the papers had a political cartoonist named Herbert Block (Herblock). His cartoons were often reprinted in other papers.
    My current hometown (Columbia, Missouri) is home to a museum created by the newspapers of the state. It contains Microfilms from many state papers, books on various subjects, and is a valuable research resource.
    They have an art gallery in the halls. The gallery almost always has one or more of Herblock’s cartoons on display. They are still as fresh and interesting as they were 60 years ago.

    Reply
  83. When I was growing up in St. Louis in the 1940s, one of the papers had a political cartoonist named Herbert Block (Herblock). His cartoons were often reprinted in other papers.
    My current hometown (Columbia, Missouri) is home to a museum created by the newspapers of the state. It contains Microfilms from many state papers, books on various subjects, and is a valuable research resource.
    They have an art gallery in the halls. The gallery almost always has one or more of Herblock’s cartoons on display. They are still as fresh and interesting as they were 60 years ago.

    Reply
  84. When I was growing up in St. Louis in the 1940s, one of the papers had a political cartoonist named Herbert Block (Herblock). His cartoons were often reprinted in other papers.
    My current hometown (Columbia, Missouri) is home to a museum created by the newspapers of the state. It contains Microfilms from many state papers, books on various subjects, and is a valuable research resource.
    They have an art gallery in the halls. The gallery almost always has one or more of Herblock’s cartoons on display. They are still as fresh and interesting as they were 60 years ago.

    Reply
  85. When I was growing up in St. Louis in the 1940s, one of the papers had a political cartoonist named Herbert Block (Herblock). His cartoons were often reprinted in other papers.
    My current hometown (Columbia, Missouri) is home to a museum created by the newspapers of the state. It contains Microfilms from many state papers, books on various subjects, and is a valuable research resource.
    They have an art gallery in the halls. The gallery almost always has one or more of Herblock’s cartoons on display. They are still as fresh and interesting as they were 60 years ago.

    Reply
  86. Oh, Herb Block is a legend!
    I think the beauty of a great satirist is that their work does stay fresh, because basic human nature—warts and all—remains has remained essentially the same throughout the different eras.
    Your state museum sounds wonderful. The Library of Congress also has a political cartoon collection, and it’s terrific.

    Reply
  87. Oh, Herb Block is a legend!
    I think the beauty of a great satirist is that their work does stay fresh, because basic human nature—warts and all—remains has remained essentially the same throughout the different eras.
    Your state museum sounds wonderful. The Library of Congress also has a political cartoon collection, and it’s terrific.

    Reply
  88. Oh, Herb Block is a legend!
    I think the beauty of a great satirist is that their work does stay fresh, because basic human nature—warts and all—remains has remained essentially the same throughout the different eras.
    Your state museum sounds wonderful. The Library of Congress also has a political cartoon collection, and it’s terrific.

    Reply
  89. Oh, Herb Block is a legend!
    I think the beauty of a great satirist is that their work does stay fresh, because basic human nature—warts and all—remains has remained essentially the same throughout the different eras.
    Your state museum sounds wonderful. The Library of Congress also has a political cartoon collection, and it’s terrific.

    Reply
  90. Oh, Herb Block is a legend!
    I think the beauty of a great satirist is that their work does stay fresh, because basic human nature—warts and all—remains has remained essentially the same throughout the different eras.
    Your state museum sounds wonderful. The Library of Congress also has a political cartoon collection, and it’s terrific.

    Reply
  91. The Atlanta Journal Constitution has a gifted political cartoonist who I enjoy reading. As well I like Doonesbury and many of the other’s mentioned.
    I had forgotten Kevin & Kell..it used to be in the AJC and then, bloop, it was gone.
    It is interesting how every now and then a regular cartoonist will have a political theme that is very timely and pointed.
    I’ll have to look at the regular cartoons with a different eye to see what details are in them that might clue someone in to culture in 200 years time.
    Your new book does sound fascinating. I look forward to reading it when it comes out.

    Reply
  92. The Atlanta Journal Constitution has a gifted political cartoonist who I enjoy reading. As well I like Doonesbury and many of the other’s mentioned.
    I had forgotten Kevin & Kell..it used to be in the AJC and then, bloop, it was gone.
    It is interesting how every now and then a regular cartoonist will have a political theme that is very timely and pointed.
    I’ll have to look at the regular cartoons with a different eye to see what details are in them that might clue someone in to culture in 200 years time.
    Your new book does sound fascinating. I look forward to reading it when it comes out.

    Reply
  93. The Atlanta Journal Constitution has a gifted political cartoonist who I enjoy reading. As well I like Doonesbury and many of the other’s mentioned.
    I had forgotten Kevin & Kell..it used to be in the AJC and then, bloop, it was gone.
    It is interesting how every now and then a regular cartoonist will have a political theme that is very timely and pointed.
    I’ll have to look at the regular cartoons with a different eye to see what details are in them that might clue someone in to culture in 200 years time.
    Your new book does sound fascinating. I look forward to reading it when it comes out.

    Reply
  94. The Atlanta Journal Constitution has a gifted political cartoonist who I enjoy reading. As well I like Doonesbury and many of the other’s mentioned.
    I had forgotten Kevin & Kell..it used to be in the AJC and then, bloop, it was gone.
    It is interesting how every now and then a regular cartoonist will have a political theme that is very timely and pointed.
    I’ll have to look at the regular cartoons with a different eye to see what details are in them that might clue someone in to culture in 200 years time.
    Your new book does sound fascinating. I look forward to reading it when it comes out.

    Reply
  95. The Atlanta Journal Constitution has a gifted political cartoonist who I enjoy reading. As well I like Doonesbury and many of the other’s mentioned.
    I had forgotten Kevin & Kell..it used to be in the AJC and then, bloop, it was gone.
    It is interesting how every now and then a regular cartoonist will have a political theme that is very timely and pointed.
    I’ll have to look at the regular cartoons with a different eye to see what details are in them that might clue someone in to culture in 200 years time.
    Your new book does sound fascinating. I look forward to reading it when it comes out.

    Reply

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