The cluttered mind!

Edith_layton2

Hi, Edith here, there and everywhere.

Recently some of our Wenches have been talking about clutter on their desks and in their homes.

I am here to talk about clutter in my mind.
I never realized that not only is my desk quite literally covered with useless and forgotten items, as is my entire house, but my mind is overflowing with useless information.

I realized this when a kind reader, Charliene Turner, recently emailed me to ask: “Is there any chance that you will write a novel about Leland Grant’s younger brother Martin?”

Martin? Grant?
I sat frozen.

The name was sorta familiar.
The brother was not.
Was it something I had written?
I couldn’t recall which book or who she was talking about.
I was, I promise you, stricken.

It came to me in the shower one morning. The great Terry Pratchett wrote that ideas come sleeting down through the Multiverse. Mine come pelting down in the shower.

Two books! I had written two books with Leland Grant!

Tn_gypsylover

I realized after days of rifling through my cluttered memory, that they both were in the C series I wrote for AVON. Leland Grant, Viscount Haye, was introduced in GYPSY LOVER as the half brother of the hero, Daffyd Reynard. Martin was introduced in HOW TO SEDUCE A BRIDE – Leland Grants story.

How_to_seduce_a_bride_cov

How could I have forgotten, even for a moment?
Even if I’d no plans for Martin’s story – I ought to have remembered instantly!

Now, understand, I’ve written lots of novels. I remember most of them, but it appears, not all.

Because, I now see, my poor brain is filled with useless clutter. It is overstuffed with shards of old commercial jingles. I know them all, just start humming and I’ll join in. I know the old Chiquita banana jingle – except for one line I always fudged. I have also stored old toothpaste songs; detergent melodies, cereal ditties – the fun commercials down through the ages, in fact. I also harbor popular songs, Broadway scores, themes from favorite TV shows and the actors that appeared in them: every Star Trek episode, old and new generation, for example.

Also, there’s a box near my cerebellum stuffed with great lines from every movie I ever enjoyed. Baseball stats. Facts about things I had to know in eighth grade. Friends’ obsolete phone numbers, scraps of historical oddities, dates of great wars and peaces, titles of books and names of authors I loved – even back in fifth grade. Who else could immediately name the author of Bambi? (hint: its not Walt Disney.) The compleat works of Louise May Alcott? John MacDonalds Travis McGee series?

My mind is cluttered to the max. So it’s not surprising that I forgot. But yes – it is disappointing.

So I dare to ask is it because minds are like computers, and we are assimilating so much we need new memory cards from time to time? After all, we see tragedies and comedies from lands we never knew existed on TV every nightly news. We learn new media every week. We are garnering information daily.

So please, tell me any of you suffer from mind clutter too? Or, if you don’t, have you any idea of how to throw out old and now useless data to make room for the new? All contributions gratefully accepted and one random one rewarded with a shiny new copy of my latest book HIS DARK AND DANGEROUS WAYS!

I remember that!

(Although I confess I owe some past winners their books. I know it. Its not due to mind stuffing. I’ve just had a super busy May and June. Four family birthdays! Proposals to write and proofs to correct. But never doubt. I will send them onward!)

85 thoughts on “The cluttered mind!”

  1. I can really relate to your cluttered mind problem. Life can become so crazy and busy. When we have a lot on our plates, it becomes very difficult to keep track of everything. I have resorted to a daily planner that tells me even when I need to wash a load of clothes, pay a bill, and take the garbage to the street! Believe me, it helps to keep me organized and keep my sanity. I even leave notes for myself in the car and on the bathroom mirror!

    Reply
  2. I can really relate to your cluttered mind problem. Life can become so crazy and busy. When we have a lot on our plates, it becomes very difficult to keep track of everything. I have resorted to a daily planner that tells me even when I need to wash a load of clothes, pay a bill, and take the garbage to the street! Believe me, it helps to keep me organized and keep my sanity. I even leave notes for myself in the car and on the bathroom mirror!

    Reply
  3. I can really relate to your cluttered mind problem. Life can become so crazy and busy. When we have a lot on our plates, it becomes very difficult to keep track of everything. I have resorted to a daily planner that tells me even when I need to wash a load of clothes, pay a bill, and take the garbage to the street! Believe me, it helps to keep me organized and keep my sanity. I even leave notes for myself in the car and on the bathroom mirror!

    Reply
  4. I can really relate to your cluttered mind problem. Life can become so crazy and busy. When we have a lot on our plates, it becomes very difficult to keep track of everything. I have resorted to a daily planner that tells me even when I need to wash a load of clothes, pay a bill, and take the garbage to the street! Believe me, it helps to keep me organized and keep my sanity. I even leave notes for myself in the car and on the bathroom mirror!

    Reply
  5. I can really relate to your cluttered mind problem. Life can become so crazy and busy. When we have a lot on our plates, it becomes very difficult to keep track of everything. I have resorted to a daily planner that tells me even when I need to wash a load of clothes, pay a bill, and take the garbage to the street! Believe me, it helps to keep me organized and keep my sanity. I even leave notes for myself in the car and on the bathroom mirror!

    Reply
  6. (taking self out of D&D possibilities)
    I live in fear of the day I will have a variation of your Martin?Grant? reaction when looking at one of my IRL children and taking a second or two to come up with the right name.
    And it’s not like I have the excuse of owning many. I’ve topped out at three, which would make such a moment all the more pathetic.

    Reply
  7. (taking self out of D&D possibilities)
    I live in fear of the day I will have a variation of your Martin?Grant? reaction when looking at one of my IRL children and taking a second or two to come up with the right name.
    And it’s not like I have the excuse of owning many. I’ve topped out at three, which would make such a moment all the more pathetic.

    Reply
  8. (taking self out of D&D possibilities)
    I live in fear of the day I will have a variation of your Martin?Grant? reaction when looking at one of my IRL children and taking a second or two to come up with the right name.
    And it’s not like I have the excuse of owning many. I’ve topped out at three, which would make such a moment all the more pathetic.

    Reply
  9. (taking self out of D&D possibilities)
    I live in fear of the day I will have a variation of your Martin?Grant? reaction when looking at one of my IRL children and taking a second or two to come up with the right name.
    And it’s not like I have the excuse of owning many. I’ve topped out at three, which would make such a moment all the more pathetic.

    Reply
  10. (taking self out of D&D possibilities)
    I live in fear of the day I will have a variation of your Martin?Grant? reaction when looking at one of my IRL children and taking a second or two to come up with the right name.
    And it’s not like I have the excuse of owning many. I’ve topped out at three, which would make such a moment all the more pathetic.

    Reply
  11. +JMJ+
    Edith, mind clutter is my life! Keeping with the metaphor, there are times when I do one huge cleaning, toss out everything I don’t think I’ll be thinking about in the next few months, and then find myself red in the face when it turns out that I should have kept it around after all.
    The big cleaning often took the form of rambling lectures to my long-suffering students: a captive audience I shamelessly took advantage of. A few months ago, two girls I had taught the year before came back to visit and to brag that they remembered my “Superman lessons” during their Film class. All I could think was: “I taught Superman???”
    Five minutes later, they had refreshed my memory, effectively giving me back the Superman data I had carelessly thrown out. I guess I can now consider it perpetual clutter. =P

    Reply
  12. +JMJ+
    Edith, mind clutter is my life! Keeping with the metaphor, there are times when I do one huge cleaning, toss out everything I don’t think I’ll be thinking about in the next few months, and then find myself red in the face when it turns out that I should have kept it around after all.
    The big cleaning often took the form of rambling lectures to my long-suffering students: a captive audience I shamelessly took advantage of. A few months ago, two girls I had taught the year before came back to visit and to brag that they remembered my “Superman lessons” during their Film class. All I could think was: “I taught Superman???”
    Five minutes later, they had refreshed my memory, effectively giving me back the Superman data I had carelessly thrown out. I guess I can now consider it perpetual clutter. =P

    Reply
  13. +JMJ+
    Edith, mind clutter is my life! Keeping with the metaphor, there are times when I do one huge cleaning, toss out everything I don’t think I’ll be thinking about in the next few months, and then find myself red in the face when it turns out that I should have kept it around after all.
    The big cleaning often took the form of rambling lectures to my long-suffering students: a captive audience I shamelessly took advantage of. A few months ago, two girls I had taught the year before came back to visit and to brag that they remembered my “Superman lessons” during their Film class. All I could think was: “I taught Superman???”
    Five minutes later, they had refreshed my memory, effectively giving me back the Superman data I had carelessly thrown out. I guess I can now consider it perpetual clutter. =P

    Reply
  14. +JMJ+
    Edith, mind clutter is my life! Keeping with the metaphor, there are times when I do one huge cleaning, toss out everything I don’t think I’ll be thinking about in the next few months, and then find myself red in the face when it turns out that I should have kept it around after all.
    The big cleaning often took the form of rambling lectures to my long-suffering students: a captive audience I shamelessly took advantage of. A few months ago, two girls I had taught the year before came back to visit and to brag that they remembered my “Superman lessons” during their Film class. All I could think was: “I taught Superman???”
    Five minutes later, they had refreshed my memory, effectively giving me back the Superman data I had carelessly thrown out. I guess I can now consider it perpetual clutter. =P

    Reply
  15. +JMJ+
    Edith, mind clutter is my life! Keeping with the metaphor, there are times when I do one huge cleaning, toss out everything I don’t think I’ll be thinking about in the next few months, and then find myself red in the face when it turns out that I should have kept it around after all.
    The big cleaning often took the form of rambling lectures to my long-suffering students: a captive audience I shamelessly took advantage of. A few months ago, two girls I had taught the year before came back to visit and to brag that they remembered my “Superman lessons” during their Film class. All I could think was: “I taught Superman???”
    Five minutes later, they had refreshed my memory, effectively giving me back the Superman data I had carelessly thrown out. I guess I can now consider it perpetual clutter. =P

    Reply
  16. From Sherrie:
    Bambi’s author–Felix Salten!!! (or was it Sultan?) I remembered that piece of utterly useless information without looking it up, but can I remember if I took my vitamins this morning? Nooooo. I’d be nothing without my paper brains: Post-it notes. And yes, I’ve been known to stick them on my forehead. And yes, I went to the grocery store once with a neon orange Post-it note on my forehead.
    I’ve even resorted to using Memo to Me, a Web site for listing all your little reminders. You set it up so that you get e-mail reminders regarding birthdays, doctor appointments, meetings, etc.
    My favorite trick used to be this: I’d put something unusual on the floor, such as a hammer. I’d see it on the way out the door and remember I had to pick up XXX at the grocery store. Turns out my sister used that same method. But several years ago she and my BIL lived with me while their new house was being built. One day, a mixing bowl appeared in the middle of the kitchen floor. For 2 days we walked around it, assuming it was someone’s memory trigger. Finally, on the 3rd day, my BIL put his hands on his hips and looked at the bowl. “Is someone trying to remember something?” he asked aloud. After some discussion, it became evident that neither my sister nor I had put the bowl on the floor. After more discussion, we came to the conclusion that it had fallen to the floor from an overfull dish rack on the kitchen counter! We still laugh over that one.

    Reply
  17. From Sherrie:
    Bambi’s author–Felix Salten!!! (or was it Sultan?) I remembered that piece of utterly useless information without looking it up, but can I remember if I took my vitamins this morning? Nooooo. I’d be nothing without my paper brains: Post-it notes. And yes, I’ve been known to stick them on my forehead. And yes, I went to the grocery store once with a neon orange Post-it note on my forehead.
    I’ve even resorted to using Memo to Me, a Web site for listing all your little reminders. You set it up so that you get e-mail reminders regarding birthdays, doctor appointments, meetings, etc.
    My favorite trick used to be this: I’d put something unusual on the floor, such as a hammer. I’d see it on the way out the door and remember I had to pick up XXX at the grocery store. Turns out my sister used that same method. But several years ago she and my BIL lived with me while their new house was being built. One day, a mixing bowl appeared in the middle of the kitchen floor. For 2 days we walked around it, assuming it was someone’s memory trigger. Finally, on the 3rd day, my BIL put his hands on his hips and looked at the bowl. “Is someone trying to remember something?” he asked aloud. After some discussion, it became evident that neither my sister nor I had put the bowl on the floor. After more discussion, we came to the conclusion that it had fallen to the floor from an overfull dish rack on the kitchen counter! We still laugh over that one.

    Reply
  18. From Sherrie:
    Bambi’s author–Felix Salten!!! (or was it Sultan?) I remembered that piece of utterly useless information without looking it up, but can I remember if I took my vitamins this morning? Nooooo. I’d be nothing without my paper brains: Post-it notes. And yes, I’ve been known to stick them on my forehead. And yes, I went to the grocery store once with a neon orange Post-it note on my forehead.
    I’ve even resorted to using Memo to Me, a Web site for listing all your little reminders. You set it up so that you get e-mail reminders regarding birthdays, doctor appointments, meetings, etc.
    My favorite trick used to be this: I’d put something unusual on the floor, such as a hammer. I’d see it on the way out the door and remember I had to pick up XXX at the grocery store. Turns out my sister used that same method. But several years ago she and my BIL lived with me while their new house was being built. One day, a mixing bowl appeared in the middle of the kitchen floor. For 2 days we walked around it, assuming it was someone’s memory trigger. Finally, on the 3rd day, my BIL put his hands on his hips and looked at the bowl. “Is someone trying to remember something?” he asked aloud. After some discussion, it became evident that neither my sister nor I had put the bowl on the floor. After more discussion, we came to the conclusion that it had fallen to the floor from an overfull dish rack on the kitchen counter! We still laugh over that one.

    Reply
  19. From Sherrie:
    Bambi’s author–Felix Salten!!! (or was it Sultan?) I remembered that piece of utterly useless information without looking it up, but can I remember if I took my vitamins this morning? Nooooo. I’d be nothing without my paper brains: Post-it notes. And yes, I’ve been known to stick them on my forehead. And yes, I went to the grocery store once with a neon orange Post-it note on my forehead.
    I’ve even resorted to using Memo to Me, a Web site for listing all your little reminders. You set it up so that you get e-mail reminders regarding birthdays, doctor appointments, meetings, etc.
    My favorite trick used to be this: I’d put something unusual on the floor, such as a hammer. I’d see it on the way out the door and remember I had to pick up XXX at the grocery store. Turns out my sister used that same method. But several years ago she and my BIL lived with me while their new house was being built. One day, a mixing bowl appeared in the middle of the kitchen floor. For 2 days we walked around it, assuming it was someone’s memory trigger. Finally, on the 3rd day, my BIL put his hands on his hips and looked at the bowl. “Is someone trying to remember something?” he asked aloud. After some discussion, it became evident that neither my sister nor I had put the bowl on the floor. After more discussion, we came to the conclusion that it had fallen to the floor from an overfull dish rack on the kitchen counter! We still laugh over that one.

    Reply
  20. From Sherrie:
    Bambi’s author–Felix Salten!!! (or was it Sultan?) I remembered that piece of utterly useless information without looking it up, but can I remember if I took my vitamins this morning? Nooooo. I’d be nothing without my paper brains: Post-it notes. And yes, I’ve been known to stick them on my forehead. And yes, I went to the grocery store once with a neon orange Post-it note on my forehead.
    I’ve even resorted to using Memo to Me, a Web site for listing all your little reminders. You set it up so that you get e-mail reminders regarding birthdays, doctor appointments, meetings, etc.
    My favorite trick used to be this: I’d put something unusual on the floor, such as a hammer. I’d see it on the way out the door and remember I had to pick up XXX at the grocery store. Turns out my sister used that same method. But several years ago she and my BIL lived with me while their new house was being built. One day, a mixing bowl appeared in the middle of the kitchen floor. For 2 days we walked around it, assuming it was someone’s memory trigger. Finally, on the 3rd day, my BIL put his hands on his hips and looked at the bowl. “Is someone trying to remember something?” he asked aloud. After some discussion, it became evident that neither my sister nor I had put the bowl on the floor. After more discussion, we came to the conclusion that it had fallen to the floor from an overfull dish rack on the kitchen counter! We still laugh over that one.

    Reply
  21. Edith, you definitely are not alone here, but I have to tell you, I find it much easier to clean the clutter on my desk than that in my mind! Unfortunately for me, a lot of the clutter in my brain is information I have to retain for my daughters – school info, medical info, and the like – so I’ve learned how to give it its own space, don’t ask me how, though! Still, it does try to encroach on the space reserved for my story ideas, but with the summer, my story ideas get to take center stage again!

    Reply
  22. Edith, you definitely are not alone here, but I have to tell you, I find it much easier to clean the clutter on my desk than that in my mind! Unfortunately for me, a lot of the clutter in my brain is information I have to retain for my daughters – school info, medical info, and the like – so I’ve learned how to give it its own space, don’t ask me how, though! Still, it does try to encroach on the space reserved for my story ideas, but with the summer, my story ideas get to take center stage again!

    Reply
  23. Edith, you definitely are not alone here, but I have to tell you, I find it much easier to clean the clutter on my desk than that in my mind! Unfortunately for me, a lot of the clutter in my brain is information I have to retain for my daughters – school info, medical info, and the like – so I’ve learned how to give it its own space, don’t ask me how, though! Still, it does try to encroach on the space reserved for my story ideas, but with the summer, my story ideas get to take center stage again!

    Reply
  24. Edith, you definitely are not alone here, but I have to tell you, I find it much easier to clean the clutter on my desk than that in my mind! Unfortunately for me, a lot of the clutter in my brain is information I have to retain for my daughters – school info, medical info, and the like – so I’ve learned how to give it its own space, don’t ask me how, though! Still, it does try to encroach on the space reserved for my story ideas, but with the summer, my story ideas get to take center stage again!

    Reply
  25. Edith, you definitely are not alone here, but I have to tell you, I find it much easier to clean the clutter on my desk than that in my mind! Unfortunately for me, a lot of the clutter in my brain is information I have to retain for my daughters – school info, medical info, and the like – so I’ve learned how to give it its own space, don’t ask me how, though! Still, it does try to encroach on the space reserved for my story ideas, but with the summer, my story ideas get to take center stage again!

    Reply
  26. Hmmm…what did I have for dinner last night?
    I am in the same boat as everyone else here. Someone mentioned a planner. I tried using one but forgot where I put it down and it was two weeks before I found it. I’d go to the store remembering I needed deodorant for the DH, only to come home and find the list of twelve other items I also needed. Now, I keep a dry erase marker and write everything bathroom or personal hygiene related on the mirror. Not pretty, but it works! My computer monitor is covered around the frame with post-it notes which I forget to read, I tried keeping a daily list of things, only to find myself forgetting to check it in the morning. And yet, I too can remember little ditties, catch phrases, quotes, books, things I did thirty years ago. I’m a veritable storehouse of useless information that will most likely never be used again, and I don’t know how to file it away for the stuff I really do need to remember!
    I feared for a time it was beginning stages of Alzheimer’s but then I realized it happened the day I brought my first child home, and it’s been happening ever since.
    And I can’t seem now to remember where I was going with all of this so…
    😉

    Reply
  27. Hmmm…what did I have for dinner last night?
    I am in the same boat as everyone else here. Someone mentioned a planner. I tried using one but forgot where I put it down and it was two weeks before I found it. I’d go to the store remembering I needed deodorant for the DH, only to come home and find the list of twelve other items I also needed. Now, I keep a dry erase marker and write everything bathroom or personal hygiene related on the mirror. Not pretty, but it works! My computer monitor is covered around the frame with post-it notes which I forget to read, I tried keeping a daily list of things, only to find myself forgetting to check it in the morning. And yet, I too can remember little ditties, catch phrases, quotes, books, things I did thirty years ago. I’m a veritable storehouse of useless information that will most likely never be used again, and I don’t know how to file it away for the stuff I really do need to remember!
    I feared for a time it was beginning stages of Alzheimer’s but then I realized it happened the day I brought my first child home, and it’s been happening ever since.
    And I can’t seem now to remember where I was going with all of this so…
    😉

    Reply
  28. Hmmm…what did I have for dinner last night?
    I am in the same boat as everyone else here. Someone mentioned a planner. I tried using one but forgot where I put it down and it was two weeks before I found it. I’d go to the store remembering I needed deodorant for the DH, only to come home and find the list of twelve other items I also needed. Now, I keep a dry erase marker and write everything bathroom or personal hygiene related on the mirror. Not pretty, but it works! My computer monitor is covered around the frame with post-it notes which I forget to read, I tried keeping a daily list of things, only to find myself forgetting to check it in the morning. And yet, I too can remember little ditties, catch phrases, quotes, books, things I did thirty years ago. I’m a veritable storehouse of useless information that will most likely never be used again, and I don’t know how to file it away for the stuff I really do need to remember!
    I feared for a time it was beginning stages of Alzheimer’s but then I realized it happened the day I brought my first child home, and it’s been happening ever since.
    And I can’t seem now to remember where I was going with all of this so…
    😉

    Reply
  29. Hmmm…what did I have for dinner last night?
    I am in the same boat as everyone else here. Someone mentioned a planner. I tried using one but forgot where I put it down and it was two weeks before I found it. I’d go to the store remembering I needed deodorant for the DH, only to come home and find the list of twelve other items I also needed. Now, I keep a dry erase marker and write everything bathroom or personal hygiene related on the mirror. Not pretty, but it works! My computer monitor is covered around the frame with post-it notes which I forget to read, I tried keeping a daily list of things, only to find myself forgetting to check it in the morning. And yet, I too can remember little ditties, catch phrases, quotes, books, things I did thirty years ago. I’m a veritable storehouse of useless information that will most likely never be used again, and I don’t know how to file it away for the stuff I really do need to remember!
    I feared for a time it was beginning stages of Alzheimer’s but then I realized it happened the day I brought my first child home, and it’s been happening ever since.
    And I can’t seem now to remember where I was going with all of this so…
    😉

    Reply
  30. Hmmm…what did I have for dinner last night?
    I am in the same boat as everyone else here. Someone mentioned a planner. I tried using one but forgot where I put it down and it was two weeks before I found it. I’d go to the store remembering I needed deodorant for the DH, only to come home and find the list of twelve other items I also needed. Now, I keep a dry erase marker and write everything bathroom or personal hygiene related on the mirror. Not pretty, but it works! My computer monitor is covered around the frame with post-it notes which I forget to read, I tried keeping a daily list of things, only to find myself forgetting to check it in the morning. And yet, I too can remember little ditties, catch phrases, quotes, books, things I did thirty years ago. I’m a veritable storehouse of useless information that will most likely never be used again, and I don’t know how to file it away for the stuff I really do need to remember!
    I feared for a time it was beginning stages of Alzheimer’s but then I realized it happened the day I brought my first child home, and it’s been happening ever since.
    And I can’t seem now to remember where I was going with all of this so…
    😉

    Reply
  31. Love this post. I don’t understand why some things are THERE and other things DISAPPEAR. The other day I was multiplying—by 4, mind you, not those pesky higher numbers that sometimes give people trouble, and I simply couldn’t remember what 4X7 was.This is rather ghastly when you consider I taught Title 1 math for a while.I reminded myself what I told the kids— you just double the double and breathed a sigh of relief.
    And I remember when the Toni children’s home permanent set came with paper dolls. I was addicted to paper dolls although my cutting and punching out skills were negligible.Now it’s my thinking skills that are on the fritz.

    Reply
  32. Love this post. I don’t understand why some things are THERE and other things DISAPPEAR. The other day I was multiplying—by 4, mind you, not those pesky higher numbers that sometimes give people trouble, and I simply couldn’t remember what 4X7 was.This is rather ghastly when you consider I taught Title 1 math for a while.I reminded myself what I told the kids— you just double the double and breathed a sigh of relief.
    And I remember when the Toni children’s home permanent set came with paper dolls. I was addicted to paper dolls although my cutting and punching out skills were negligible.Now it’s my thinking skills that are on the fritz.

    Reply
  33. Love this post. I don’t understand why some things are THERE and other things DISAPPEAR. The other day I was multiplying—by 4, mind you, not those pesky higher numbers that sometimes give people trouble, and I simply couldn’t remember what 4X7 was.This is rather ghastly when you consider I taught Title 1 math for a while.I reminded myself what I told the kids— you just double the double and breathed a sigh of relief.
    And I remember when the Toni children’s home permanent set came with paper dolls. I was addicted to paper dolls although my cutting and punching out skills were negligible.Now it’s my thinking skills that are on the fritz.

    Reply
  34. Love this post. I don’t understand why some things are THERE and other things DISAPPEAR. The other day I was multiplying—by 4, mind you, not those pesky higher numbers that sometimes give people trouble, and I simply couldn’t remember what 4X7 was.This is rather ghastly when you consider I taught Title 1 math for a while.I reminded myself what I told the kids— you just double the double and breathed a sigh of relief.
    And I remember when the Toni children’s home permanent set came with paper dolls. I was addicted to paper dolls although my cutting and punching out skills were negligible.Now it’s my thinking skills that are on the fritz.

    Reply
  35. Love this post. I don’t understand why some things are THERE and other things DISAPPEAR. The other day I was multiplying—by 4, mind you, not those pesky higher numbers that sometimes give people trouble, and I simply couldn’t remember what 4X7 was.This is rather ghastly when you consider I taught Title 1 math for a while.I reminded myself what I told the kids— you just double the double and breathed a sigh of relief.
    And I remember when the Toni children’s home permanent set came with paper dolls. I was addicted to paper dolls although my cutting and punching out skills were negligible.Now it’s my thinking skills that are on the fritz.

    Reply
  36. From Sherrie:
    I am so enjoying everyone’s memory stories! I LOL’d at Theo’s description of how she uses the bathroom mirror. I suspect that is as common as taping notes to the door handle. I really worried I was getting Alzheimer’s until I started comparing notes with others my age, and found *they* were worried they had Alzheimer’s for the same reason! Too funny. We must have the modified version: Halfheimer’s.
    The other day I was in Costco with my lime green Post-it grocery/errand list (the theory being that if it’s bright, I can’t lose it) when I realized I couldn’t find the list. It wasn’t just a list, it was my life, at least for that day. I hate shopping, so I always combine my errands and get them done in one fell swoop. Plus, it saves on gas, an important issue in itself. So after Costco, I had to go to Office Depot, Home Depot, the feed store, the hardware store, etc. I needed that list!
    I retraced my steps in the store and found it–lying on the floor in all its bright green glory in front of the dairy case. I was too embarrassed to bend over and pick up something from the floor in front of so many people, so I stepped on the note (it had fallen sticky side up) and then pushed my cart around the corner and peeled it from the bottom of my shoe. LOL!

    Reply
  37. From Sherrie:
    I am so enjoying everyone’s memory stories! I LOL’d at Theo’s description of how she uses the bathroom mirror. I suspect that is as common as taping notes to the door handle. I really worried I was getting Alzheimer’s until I started comparing notes with others my age, and found *they* were worried they had Alzheimer’s for the same reason! Too funny. We must have the modified version: Halfheimer’s.
    The other day I was in Costco with my lime green Post-it grocery/errand list (the theory being that if it’s bright, I can’t lose it) when I realized I couldn’t find the list. It wasn’t just a list, it was my life, at least for that day. I hate shopping, so I always combine my errands and get them done in one fell swoop. Plus, it saves on gas, an important issue in itself. So after Costco, I had to go to Office Depot, Home Depot, the feed store, the hardware store, etc. I needed that list!
    I retraced my steps in the store and found it–lying on the floor in all its bright green glory in front of the dairy case. I was too embarrassed to bend over and pick up something from the floor in front of so many people, so I stepped on the note (it had fallen sticky side up) and then pushed my cart around the corner and peeled it from the bottom of my shoe. LOL!

    Reply
  38. From Sherrie:
    I am so enjoying everyone’s memory stories! I LOL’d at Theo’s description of how she uses the bathroom mirror. I suspect that is as common as taping notes to the door handle. I really worried I was getting Alzheimer’s until I started comparing notes with others my age, and found *they* were worried they had Alzheimer’s for the same reason! Too funny. We must have the modified version: Halfheimer’s.
    The other day I was in Costco with my lime green Post-it grocery/errand list (the theory being that if it’s bright, I can’t lose it) when I realized I couldn’t find the list. It wasn’t just a list, it was my life, at least for that day. I hate shopping, so I always combine my errands and get them done in one fell swoop. Plus, it saves on gas, an important issue in itself. So after Costco, I had to go to Office Depot, Home Depot, the feed store, the hardware store, etc. I needed that list!
    I retraced my steps in the store and found it–lying on the floor in all its bright green glory in front of the dairy case. I was too embarrassed to bend over and pick up something from the floor in front of so many people, so I stepped on the note (it had fallen sticky side up) and then pushed my cart around the corner and peeled it from the bottom of my shoe. LOL!

    Reply
  39. From Sherrie:
    I am so enjoying everyone’s memory stories! I LOL’d at Theo’s description of how she uses the bathroom mirror. I suspect that is as common as taping notes to the door handle. I really worried I was getting Alzheimer’s until I started comparing notes with others my age, and found *they* were worried they had Alzheimer’s for the same reason! Too funny. We must have the modified version: Halfheimer’s.
    The other day I was in Costco with my lime green Post-it grocery/errand list (the theory being that if it’s bright, I can’t lose it) when I realized I couldn’t find the list. It wasn’t just a list, it was my life, at least for that day. I hate shopping, so I always combine my errands and get them done in one fell swoop. Plus, it saves on gas, an important issue in itself. So after Costco, I had to go to Office Depot, Home Depot, the feed store, the hardware store, etc. I needed that list!
    I retraced my steps in the store and found it–lying on the floor in all its bright green glory in front of the dairy case. I was too embarrassed to bend over and pick up something from the floor in front of so many people, so I stepped on the note (it had fallen sticky side up) and then pushed my cart around the corner and peeled it from the bottom of my shoe. LOL!

    Reply
  40. From Sherrie:
    I am so enjoying everyone’s memory stories! I LOL’d at Theo’s description of how she uses the bathroom mirror. I suspect that is as common as taping notes to the door handle. I really worried I was getting Alzheimer’s until I started comparing notes with others my age, and found *they* were worried they had Alzheimer’s for the same reason! Too funny. We must have the modified version: Halfheimer’s.
    The other day I was in Costco with my lime green Post-it grocery/errand list (the theory being that if it’s bright, I can’t lose it) when I realized I couldn’t find the list. It wasn’t just a list, it was my life, at least for that day. I hate shopping, so I always combine my errands and get them done in one fell swoop. Plus, it saves on gas, an important issue in itself. So after Costco, I had to go to Office Depot, Home Depot, the feed store, the hardware store, etc. I needed that list!
    I retraced my steps in the store and found it–lying on the floor in all its bright green glory in front of the dairy case. I was too embarrassed to bend over and pick up something from the floor in front of so many people, so I stepped on the note (it had fallen sticky side up) and then pushed my cart around the corner and peeled it from the bottom of my shoe. LOL!

    Reply
  41. My son and I had this discussion the other day. Why is my brain so full. Then he reminded me that Thomas Jefferson had a library with every bit of scientific and historical knowledge of his time, but now it is impossible to gather that much information. Fortunately there is the Internet. We just have to teach our students the skills to find the good stuff. (I recommend your site to other teachers, not my Middle School students). Thanks for validating that it is good to know so much about historical fiction and not remember to pick up my husband’s shirts at the cleaners.

    Reply
  42. My son and I had this discussion the other day. Why is my brain so full. Then he reminded me that Thomas Jefferson had a library with every bit of scientific and historical knowledge of his time, but now it is impossible to gather that much information. Fortunately there is the Internet. We just have to teach our students the skills to find the good stuff. (I recommend your site to other teachers, not my Middle School students). Thanks for validating that it is good to know so much about historical fiction and not remember to pick up my husband’s shirts at the cleaners.

    Reply
  43. My son and I had this discussion the other day. Why is my brain so full. Then he reminded me that Thomas Jefferson had a library with every bit of scientific and historical knowledge of his time, but now it is impossible to gather that much information. Fortunately there is the Internet. We just have to teach our students the skills to find the good stuff. (I recommend your site to other teachers, not my Middle School students). Thanks for validating that it is good to know so much about historical fiction and not remember to pick up my husband’s shirts at the cleaners.

    Reply
  44. My son and I had this discussion the other day. Why is my brain so full. Then he reminded me that Thomas Jefferson had a library with every bit of scientific and historical knowledge of his time, but now it is impossible to gather that much information. Fortunately there is the Internet. We just have to teach our students the skills to find the good stuff. (I recommend your site to other teachers, not my Middle School students). Thanks for validating that it is good to know so much about historical fiction and not remember to pick up my husband’s shirts at the cleaners.

    Reply
  45. My son and I had this discussion the other day. Why is my brain so full. Then he reminded me that Thomas Jefferson had a library with every bit of scientific and historical knowledge of his time, but now it is impossible to gather that much information. Fortunately there is the Internet. We just have to teach our students the skills to find the good stuff. (I recommend your site to other teachers, not my Middle School students). Thanks for validating that it is good to know so much about historical fiction and not remember to pick up my husband’s shirts at the cleaners.

    Reply
  46. Oh, Edith, my evil twin! I have forgotten entire books as well as characters! just ask mary jo when she insisted I wrote a book with a certain plot and I insisted she had the wrong person. She won, of course. I have come to hate people with memories!
    I’ve always been absent-minded though, so the notes all over the house and calendars everywhere are pretty much a regular set-up for me. Keeping them organized, however, requires a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?

    Reply
  47. Oh, Edith, my evil twin! I have forgotten entire books as well as characters! just ask mary jo when she insisted I wrote a book with a certain plot and I insisted she had the wrong person. She won, of course. I have come to hate people with memories!
    I’ve always been absent-minded though, so the notes all over the house and calendars everywhere are pretty much a regular set-up for me. Keeping them organized, however, requires a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?

    Reply
  48. Oh, Edith, my evil twin! I have forgotten entire books as well as characters! just ask mary jo when she insisted I wrote a book with a certain plot and I insisted she had the wrong person. She won, of course. I have come to hate people with memories!
    I’ve always been absent-minded though, so the notes all over the house and calendars everywhere are pretty much a regular set-up for me. Keeping them organized, however, requires a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?

    Reply
  49. Oh, Edith, my evil twin! I have forgotten entire books as well as characters! just ask mary jo when she insisted I wrote a book with a certain plot and I insisted she had the wrong person. She won, of course. I have come to hate people with memories!
    I’ve always been absent-minded though, so the notes all over the house and calendars everywhere are pretty much a regular set-up for me. Keeping them organized, however, requires a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?

    Reply
  50. Oh, Edith, my evil twin! I have forgotten entire books as well as characters! just ask mary jo when she insisted I wrote a book with a certain plot and I insisted she had the wrong person. She won, of course. I have come to hate people with memories!
    I’ve always been absent-minded though, so the notes all over the house and calendars everywhere are pretty much a regular set-up for me. Keeping them organized, however, requires a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?

    Reply
  51. Sherrie, your story about the bowl reminded me of the old joke about the woman who finally got up enough nerve to tell her husband that she’d put up with his brother living with them for five years, and she’d had enough.
    His reply: “MY brother? I thought he was YOUR brother!”
    Meg Langslow, the blacksmith heroine of Donna Andrews’s mystery series with bird titles, has a notebook that she calls “the book that tells me when to breathe” to keep track of her life.

    Reply
  52. Sherrie, your story about the bowl reminded me of the old joke about the woman who finally got up enough nerve to tell her husband that she’d put up with his brother living with them for five years, and she’d had enough.
    His reply: “MY brother? I thought he was YOUR brother!”
    Meg Langslow, the blacksmith heroine of Donna Andrews’s mystery series with bird titles, has a notebook that she calls “the book that tells me when to breathe” to keep track of her life.

    Reply
  53. Sherrie, your story about the bowl reminded me of the old joke about the woman who finally got up enough nerve to tell her husband that she’d put up with his brother living with them for five years, and she’d had enough.
    His reply: “MY brother? I thought he was YOUR brother!”
    Meg Langslow, the blacksmith heroine of Donna Andrews’s mystery series with bird titles, has a notebook that she calls “the book that tells me when to breathe” to keep track of her life.

    Reply
  54. Sherrie, your story about the bowl reminded me of the old joke about the woman who finally got up enough nerve to tell her husband that she’d put up with his brother living with them for five years, and she’d had enough.
    His reply: “MY brother? I thought he was YOUR brother!”
    Meg Langslow, the blacksmith heroine of Donna Andrews’s mystery series with bird titles, has a notebook that she calls “the book that tells me when to breathe” to keep track of her life.

    Reply
  55. Sherrie, your story about the bowl reminded me of the old joke about the woman who finally got up enough nerve to tell her husband that she’d put up with his brother living with them for five years, and she’d had enough.
    His reply: “MY brother? I thought he was YOUR brother!”
    Meg Langslow, the blacksmith heroine of Donna Andrews’s mystery series with bird titles, has a notebook that she calls “the book that tells me when to breathe” to keep track of her life.

    Reply
  56. Edith I think we all agree that you are not alone. I find myself having to write things down just so I won’t forget.

    Reply
  57. Edith I think we all agree that you are not alone. I find myself having to write things down just so I won’t forget.

    Reply
  58. Edith I think we all agree that you are not alone. I find myself having to write things down just so I won’t forget.

    Reply
  59. Edith I think we all agree that you are not alone. I find myself having to write things down just so I won’t forget.

    Reply
  60. Edith I think we all agree that you are not alone. I find myself having to write things down just so I won’t forget.

    Reply
  61. Edith, Oh My Goodness, Lots of LOL & LOL,
    Sherrie wrote-‘We must have the modified version
    :Halfheimer’s.’LOL
    It’s when we forget its called half-heimers or allheimers…we are in trouble!
    Patrica Rice wrote… a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?
    Gosh-some bright spark will come up with one before too long!
    I can never remember which folder in my computer I’ve put stuff!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  62. Edith, Oh My Goodness, Lots of LOL & LOL,
    Sherrie wrote-‘We must have the modified version
    :Halfheimer’s.’LOL
    It’s when we forget its called half-heimers or allheimers…we are in trouble!
    Patrica Rice wrote… a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?
    Gosh-some bright spark will come up with one before too long!
    I can never remember which folder in my computer I’ve put stuff!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  63. Edith, Oh My Goodness, Lots of LOL & LOL,
    Sherrie wrote-‘We must have the modified version
    :Halfheimer’s.’LOL
    It’s when we forget its called half-heimers or allheimers…we are in trouble!
    Patrica Rice wrote… a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?
    Gosh-some bright spark will come up with one before too long!
    I can never remember which folder in my computer I’ve put stuff!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  64. Edith, Oh My Goodness, Lots of LOL & LOL,
    Sherrie wrote-‘We must have the modified version
    :Halfheimer’s.’LOL
    It’s when we forget its called half-heimers or allheimers…we are in trouble!
    Patrica Rice wrote… a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?
    Gosh-some bright spark will come up with one before too long!
    I can never remember which folder in my computer I’ve put stuff!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  65. Edith, Oh My Goodness, Lots of LOL & LOL,
    Sherrie wrote-‘We must have the modified version
    :Halfheimer’s.’LOL
    It’s when we forget its called half-heimers or allheimers…we are in trouble!
    Patrica Rice wrote… a memory chip for my brain. Anyone got one?
    Gosh-some bright spark will come up with one before too long!
    I can never remember which folder in my computer I’ve put stuff!
    Cheers Carol

    Reply
  66. Oh, how much better you make me feel! I too make lists and notes and take them in my back pocket.
    Then I wear a different pair of jeans,and have to wing it. especially in the supermarket. Believe me, this gets expensive with gas prices so high.
    But I do have interesting meals with new recipes I have to invent.
    (Ever try an appetizer of mozzerella nd tomatoes without tomatoes?)
    As for the to-do lists?
    I have learned to overlook them and so they become did-I-do? lists.
    Our Adam says that if I had the kind of electronic reminder pad he has never forget again. He whips it out to make appointments and see reminders.
    Lovely device.
    I’d lose it in a day.

    Reply
  67. Oh, how much better you make me feel! I too make lists and notes and take them in my back pocket.
    Then I wear a different pair of jeans,and have to wing it. especially in the supermarket. Believe me, this gets expensive with gas prices so high.
    But I do have interesting meals with new recipes I have to invent.
    (Ever try an appetizer of mozzerella nd tomatoes without tomatoes?)
    As for the to-do lists?
    I have learned to overlook them and so they become did-I-do? lists.
    Our Adam says that if I had the kind of electronic reminder pad he has never forget again. He whips it out to make appointments and see reminders.
    Lovely device.
    I’d lose it in a day.

    Reply
  68. Oh, how much better you make me feel! I too make lists and notes and take them in my back pocket.
    Then I wear a different pair of jeans,and have to wing it. especially in the supermarket. Believe me, this gets expensive with gas prices so high.
    But I do have interesting meals with new recipes I have to invent.
    (Ever try an appetizer of mozzerella nd tomatoes without tomatoes?)
    As for the to-do lists?
    I have learned to overlook them and so they become did-I-do? lists.
    Our Adam says that if I had the kind of electronic reminder pad he has never forget again. He whips it out to make appointments and see reminders.
    Lovely device.
    I’d lose it in a day.

    Reply
  69. Oh, how much better you make me feel! I too make lists and notes and take them in my back pocket.
    Then I wear a different pair of jeans,and have to wing it. especially in the supermarket. Believe me, this gets expensive with gas prices so high.
    But I do have interesting meals with new recipes I have to invent.
    (Ever try an appetizer of mozzerella nd tomatoes without tomatoes?)
    As for the to-do lists?
    I have learned to overlook them and so they become did-I-do? lists.
    Our Adam says that if I had the kind of electronic reminder pad he has never forget again. He whips it out to make appointments and see reminders.
    Lovely device.
    I’d lose it in a day.

    Reply
  70. Oh, how much better you make me feel! I too make lists and notes and take them in my back pocket.
    Then I wear a different pair of jeans,and have to wing it. especially in the supermarket. Believe me, this gets expensive with gas prices so high.
    But I do have interesting meals with new recipes I have to invent.
    (Ever try an appetizer of mozzerella nd tomatoes without tomatoes?)
    As for the to-do lists?
    I have learned to overlook them and so they become did-I-do? lists.
    Our Adam says that if I had the kind of electronic reminder pad he has never forget again. He whips it out to make appointments and see reminders.
    Lovely device.
    I’d lose it in a day.

    Reply
  71. I have reread letters, papers and articles I wrote in college, and I swear to you, I am not that person that could write that and never was. Yet I was. It was definitely me, all by myself.
    This is why the alleged time travel paradox of meeting oneself in the past has never bothered me in the slightest. How can you meet yourself when you’re never the same person two microseconds running anyway?
    My desk is as cluttered as my mind; right now it has my makeup and brushes, because this is where the light is best; three bottles of water; two phones; four stuffed animals, one of whom is wearing an LA Dodgers baseball cap; spiral bound daybooks for the last 6 years or so; a Windows manual that is totally useless for anything I ever wanted to know; a binder full of X-Files trading cards; a truly gorgeous photo of David Tennant; a bottle of Tylenol; a tin of Burt’s Bees Cuticle Cream which I keep forgetting to use; a Webster’s dictionary I got when there were still Blue Chip stamps; a Christmas card from my brother John who died four years ago; a mug with a quote from Buckaroo Banzai on it (“Spacemonsters, my ass”); laptop, printer & assorted computer stuff; and a cartoon of an oddly dressed dinosaur cruising the plains of the Mesozoic – The DonJuanodon. All overseen by a framed Kid Notorious print and a poster from Speed, the one showing the Santa Monica bus I used to ride to work sometimes in flames.
    I’m not ashamed of any of it; it’s all necessary, in its way, except maybe for that wretched Windows manual.

    Reply
  72. I have reread letters, papers and articles I wrote in college, and I swear to you, I am not that person that could write that and never was. Yet I was. It was definitely me, all by myself.
    This is why the alleged time travel paradox of meeting oneself in the past has never bothered me in the slightest. How can you meet yourself when you’re never the same person two microseconds running anyway?
    My desk is as cluttered as my mind; right now it has my makeup and brushes, because this is where the light is best; three bottles of water; two phones; four stuffed animals, one of whom is wearing an LA Dodgers baseball cap; spiral bound daybooks for the last 6 years or so; a Windows manual that is totally useless for anything I ever wanted to know; a binder full of X-Files trading cards; a truly gorgeous photo of David Tennant; a bottle of Tylenol; a tin of Burt’s Bees Cuticle Cream which I keep forgetting to use; a Webster’s dictionary I got when there were still Blue Chip stamps; a Christmas card from my brother John who died four years ago; a mug with a quote from Buckaroo Banzai on it (“Spacemonsters, my ass”); laptop, printer & assorted computer stuff; and a cartoon of an oddly dressed dinosaur cruising the plains of the Mesozoic – The DonJuanodon. All overseen by a framed Kid Notorious print and a poster from Speed, the one showing the Santa Monica bus I used to ride to work sometimes in flames.
    I’m not ashamed of any of it; it’s all necessary, in its way, except maybe for that wretched Windows manual.

    Reply
  73. I have reread letters, papers and articles I wrote in college, and I swear to you, I am not that person that could write that and never was. Yet I was. It was definitely me, all by myself.
    This is why the alleged time travel paradox of meeting oneself in the past has never bothered me in the slightest. How can you meet yourself when you’re never the same person two microseconds running anyway?
    My desk is as cluttered as my mind; right now it has my makeup and brushes, because this is where the light is best; three bottles of water; two phones; four stuffed animals, one of whom is wearing an LA Dodgers baseball cap; spiral bound daybooks for the last 6 years or so; a Windows manual that is totally useless for anything I ever wanted to know; a binder full of X-Files trading cards; a truly gorgeous photo of David Tennant; a bottle of Tylenol; a tin of Burt’s Bees Cuticle Cream which I keep forgetting to use; a Webster’s dictionary I got when there were still Blue Chip stamps; a Christmas card from my brother John who died four years ago; a mug with a quote from Buckaroo Banzai on it (“Spacemonsters, my ass”); laptop, printer & assorted computer stuff; and a cartoon of an oddly dressed dinosaur cruising the plains of the Mesozoic – The DonJuanodon. All overseen by a framed Kid Notorious print and a poster from Speed, the one showing the Santa Monica bus I used to ride to work sometimes in flames.
    I’m not ashamed of any of it; it’s all necessary, in its way, except maybe for that wretched Windows manual.

    Reply
  74. I have reread letters, papers and articles I wrote in college, and I swear to you, I am not that person that could write that and never was. Yet I was. It was definitely me, all by myself.
    This is why the alleged time travel paradox of meeting oneself in the past has never bothered me in the slightest. How can you meet yourself when you’re never the same person two microseconds running anyway?
    My desk is as cluttered as my mind; right now it has my makeup and brushes, because this is where the light is best; three bottles of water; two phones; four stuffed animals, one of whom is wearing an LA Dodgers baseball cap; spiral bound daybooks for the last 6 years or so; a Windows manual that is totally useless for anything I ever wanted to know; a binder full of X-Files trading cards; a truly gorgeous photo of David Tennant; a bottle of Tylenol; a tin of Burt’s Bees Cuticle Cream which I keep forgetting to use; a Webster’s dictionary I got when there were still Blue Chip stamps; a Christmas card from my brother John who died four years ago; a mug with a quote from Buckaroo Banzai on it (“Spacemonsters, my ass”); laptop, printer & assorted computer stuff; and a cartoon of an oddly dressed dinosaur cruising the plains of the Mesozoic – The DonJuanodon. All overseen by a framed Kid Notorious print and a poster from Speed, the one showing the Santa Monica bus I used to ride to work sometimes in flames.
    I’m not ashamed of any of it; it’s all necessary, in its way, except maybe for that wretched Windows manual.

    Reply
  75. I have reread letters, papers and articles I wrote in college, and I swear to you, I am not that person that could write that and never was. Yet I was. It was definitely me, all by myself.
    This is why the alleged time travel paradox of meeting oneself in the past has never bothered me in the slightest. How can you meet yourself when you’re never the same person two microseconds running anyway?
    My desk is as cluttered as my mind; right now it has my makeup and brushes, because this is where the light is best; three bottles of water; two phones; four stuffed animals, one of whom is wearing an LA Dodgers baseball cap; spiral bound daybooks for the last 6 years or so; a Windows manual that is totally useless for anything I ever wanted to know; a binder full of X-Files trading cards; a truly gorgeous photo of David Tennant; a bottle of Tylenol; a tin of Burt’s Bees Cuticle Cream which I keep forgetting to use; a Webster’s dictionary I got when there were still Blue Chip stamps; a Christmas card from my brother John who died four years ago; a mug with a quote from Buckaroo Banzai on it (“Spacemonsters, my ass”); laptop, printer & assorted computer stuff; and a cartoon of an oddly dressed dinosaur cruising the plains of the Mesozoic – The DonJuanodon. All overseen by a framed Kid Notorious print and a poster from Speed, the one showing the Santa Monica bus I used to ride to work sometimes in flames.
    I’m not ashamed of any of it; it’s all necessary, in its way, except maybe for that wretched Windows manual.

    Reply
  76. OMGosh!! Sherrie! Stepping on the note and walking around the corner. That one is priceless LOL!!
    Alzheimer’s isn’t remembering where you put the keys, it’s remembering what the keys are used for…
    *sigh* Some days, for me, it’s a toss up lately…
    😉

    Reply
  77. OMGosh!! Sherrie! Stepping on the note and walking around the corner. That one is priceless LOL!!
    Alzheimer’s isn’t remembering where you put the keys, it’s remembering what the keys are used for…
    *sigh* Some days, for me, it’s a toss up lately…
    😉

    Reply
  78. OMGosh!! Sherrie! Stepping on the note and walking around the corner. That one is priceless LOL!!
    Alzheimer’s isn’t remembering where you put the keys, it’s remembering what the keys are used for…
    *sigh* Some days, for me, it’s a toss up lately…
    😉

    Reply
  79. OMGosh!! Sherrie! Stepping on the note and walking around the corner. That one is priceless LOL!!
    Alzheimer’s isn’t remembering where you put the keys, it’s remembering what the keys are used for…
    *sigh* Some days, for me, it’s a toss up lately…
    😉

    Reply
  80. OMGosh!! Sherrie! Stepping on the note and walking around the corner. That one is priceless LOL!!
    Alzheimer’s isn’t remembering where you put the keys, it’s remembering what the keys are used for…
    *sigh* Some days, for me, it’s a toss up lately…
    😉

    Reply

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