The Bright Art of Quilting

Colors detailby Mary Jo

Quilting is a very ancient skill, probably dating back to ancient Egypt and introduced to Europe by returning Crusaders.  It's wonderfully practical for warmth, or protecting a knight from chafing armor.  

These days we usually associate quilts with lovely cozy bed coverings, but they've also evolved into a beautiful form of craftwork.  A friend of ours is a honcho in the Baltimore Heritage Quilters Guild and she always notifies us of the guild's biennial quilt shows.  It's a treat to visit the shows, which are held in sprawling school gymnasiums, and only held every two years because it takes time to create new work.  (I blogged about the last show two years ago–the quilts are too pretty not to share!)

As the Mayhem consultant said when we visited the show, there weren't many of the cuddle-under-in-winter type  quilts.  Most were beautiful art pieces of various sizes, like modern tapestries designed to be hung on the walls.  There were hundreds of quilts, and the show was so visually dazzling that it was impossible to take it all in.  

Scary Cat by Carol Rubin



I attended the show to appreciate, not buy, but I succumbed to this guy.  Carol, the artist who made him, is part of a small group of quilters who like to do challenges together.  (It  made me think of the frontier quilting bees, where women gathered to socialize and make quilts.)

This group decided to do a mosaic challenge using a material that bonds to fabric on both sides with the heat of an iron.  First the pattern fabric is chosen and bonded, then mosaic squares are cut out, positioned on the backing fabric, and bonded with another ironing.  Then Carol did the quilting–sewing the patterned fabric to the final backing making sure that every square was sewed down.  A lot of work, but such a wonderful result!

We visited the show on the second day and I was really surprised that this piece, which is about two feet square, hadn't been snapped up by someone else.  But no, he was waiting for me!  The official title is "Scary Cat," but the immediate reaction of me and any other cat people was "Scaredy Cat."  

See that anxious expression in Quilt Cat's eyes?  He's asking, "Will you be my friend?"  In fact, he Ghost editted looks like our newest adoptee, The Spook, who has a similar anxious expression.  Poor Spook hung out at a feral colony for a long time after he lost his first home.  When you live rough,  you survive by being wary, and he's understandably concerned.  (He's getting over that. I found him on the dining room table a couple of days ago and he had that cross eyed anxious expression, but he didn't look the least bit guilty.  <G>)

Doorway

 

 

 

 

 

There were so many wonderful different designs.  This one is a beckoning doorway to magical new places.  

My friend Natalie did a marvelous marvelous quilt made up of squares based on photographs from her backyard after an ice storm.  It's so evocative and cold looking!  Here's a Winter Quilte close updetail.

I loved the one below of the female figures.  Haunting.  

Five Women


SpiralThere were several spirals like this in different gorgeous color combinations.  

I also really enjoyed this playful one called "Fish Gotta Swim." 

Fishes Gotta Swim

 

 

 

 

 

  Church in the vale

 

 

There were many, many more beautiful pieces. Here's a church in the vale. 

 

Are you a quilter?  Or a lover of quilts?  Have you ever had a beloved quilt that offered you comfort and warmth when you needed it?  Would you like to own one of these?  If so, which one?

Color quilt

By luck, I found this BHQG which has pictures of all the pieces in the show.  Feast your eyes here

Mary Jo, adding one last brilliantly covered quiltwork

150 thoughts on “The Bright Art of Quilting”

  1. I have absolutely no talent with a needle, but I can appreciate the artistry of these quilt makers. Thanks for the BHQG link. Too many beautiful works to pick just one, but I did get a chuckle out of the BLESSED ARE THE “PIECE” MAKERS quilt.

    Reply
  2. I have absolutely no talent with a needle, but I can appreciate the artistry of these quilt makers. Thanks for the BHQG link. Too many beautiful works to pick just one, but I did get a chuckle out of the BLESSED ARE THE “PIECE” MAKERS quilt.

    Reply
  3. I have absolutely no talent with a needle, but I can appreciate the artistry of these quilt makers. Thanks for the BHQG link. Too many beautiful works to pick just one, but I did get a chuckle out of the BLESSED ARE THE “PIECE” MAKERS quilt.

    Reply
  4. I have absolutely no talent with a needle, but I can appreciate the artistry of these quilt makers. Thanks for the BHQG link. Too many beautiful works to pick just one, but I did get a chuckle out of the BLESSED ARE THE “PIECE” MAKERS quilt.

    Reply
  5. I have absolutely no talent with a needle, but I can appreciate the artistry of these quilt makers. Thanks for the BHQG link. Too many beautiful works to pick just one, but I did get a chuckle out of the BLESSED ARE THE “PIECE” MAKERS quilt.

    Reply
  6. I’m not much good with the needle either,however I can appreciate the time and effort involved in creating these masterpieces. I have an old quilt that my grandmother and her Ladies Auxilliary group made in the late 1930’s, early 1940’s. Each lady made a square and signed them. It’s a bit of a treasure for me. Another favorite quilt is one my other grandmother made for my mom. I remember cuddling under the quilt and pointing out patches and my mom telling stories about what dress that patch came from. It had things like a patch from the dresses Nana made my mom and her sister for Queen Elizabeth’s coronation. More recently my favorite quilts are the rag quilts my mom made for my babies. My son (now 7) still sleeps with his little “monkey blanket” that mom made for him as a baby. And my new daughter has a rag quilt too, that my dad helped my mom make when her arthritis acted up this winter. Apparently he really enjoyed the quilting process… Maybe he’s found a new hobby for his retirement! I love how quilts are functional, beautiful, and connect us to our history. All of my special quilts have a story, or stories behind them.

    Reply
  7. I’m not much good with the needle either,however I can appreciate the time and effort involved in creating these masterpieces. I have an old quilt that my grandmother and her Ladies Auxilliary group made in the late 1930’s, early 1940’s. Each lady made a square and signed them. It’s a bit of a treasure for me. Another favorite quilt is one my other grandmother made for my mom. I remember cuddling under the quilt and pointing out patches and my mom telling stories about what dress that patch came from. It had things like a patch from the dresses Nana made my mom and her sister for Queen Elizabeth’s coronation. More recently my favorite quilts are the rag quilts my mom made for my babies. My son (now 7) still sleeps with his little “monkey blanket” that mom made for him as a baby. And my new daughter has a rag quilt too, that my dad helped my mom make when her arthritis acted up this winter. Apparently he really enjoyed the quilting process… Maybe he’s found a new hobby for his retirement! I love how quilts are functional, beautiful, and connect us to our history. All of my special quilts have a story, or stories behind them.

    Reply
  8. I’m not much good with the needle either,however I can appreciate the time and effort involved in creating these masterpieces. I have an old quilt that my grandmother and her Ladies Auxilliary group made in the late 1930’s, early 1940’s. Each lady made a square and signed them. It’s a bit of a treasure for me. Another favorite quilt is one my other grandmother made for my mom. I remember cuddling under the quilt and pointing out patches and my mom telling stories about what dress that patch came from. It had things like a patch from the dresses Nana made my mom and her sister for Queen Elizabeth’s coronation. More recently my favorite quilts are the rag quilts my mom made for my babies. My son (now 7) still sleeps with his little “monkey blanket” that mom made for him as a baby. And my new daughter has a rag quilt too, that my dad helped my mom make when her arthritis acted up this winter. Apparently he really enjoyed the quilting process… Maybe he’s found a new hobby for his retirement! I love how quilts are functional, beautiful, and connect us to our history. All of my special quilts have a story, or stories behind them.

    Reply
  9. I’m not much good with the needle either,however I can appreciate the time and effort involved in creating these masterpieces. I have an old quilt that my grandmother and her Ladies Auxilliary group made in the late 1930’s, early 1940’s. Each lady made a square and signed them. It’s a bit of a treasure for me. Another favorite quilt is one my other grandmother made for my mom. I remember cuddling under the quilt and pointing out patches and my mom telling stories about what dress that patch came from. It had things like a patch from the dresses Nana made my mom and her sister for Queen Elizabeth’s coronation. More recently my favorite quilts are the rag quilts my mom made for my babies. My son (now 7) still sleeps with his little “monkey blanket” that mom made for him as a baby. And my new daughter has a rag quilt too, that my dad helped my mom make when her arthritis acted up this winter. Apparently he really enjoyed the quilting process… Maybe he’s found a new hobby for his retirement! I love how quilts are functional, beautiful, and connect us to our history. All of my special quilts have a story, or stories behind them.

    Reply
  10. I’m not much good with the needle either,however I can appreciate the time and effort involved in creating these masterpieces. I have an old quilt that my grandmother and her Ladies Auxilliary group made in the late 1930’s, early 1940’s. Each lady made a square and signed them. It’s a bit of a treasure for me. Another favorite quilt is one my other grandmother made for my mom. I remember cuddling under the quilt and pointing out patches and my mom telling stories about what dress that patch came from. It had things like a patch from the dresses Nana made my mom and her sister for Queen Elizabeth’s coronation. More recently my favorite quilts are the rag quilts my mom made for my babies. My son (now 7) still sleeps with his little “monkey blanket” that mom made for him as a baby. And my new daughter has a rag quilt too, that my dad helped my mom make when her arthritis acted up this winter. Apparently he really enjoyed the quilting process… Maybe he’s found a new hobby for his retirement! I love how quilts are functional, beautiful, and connect us to our history. All of my special quilts have a story, or stories behind them.

    Reply
  11. Both my grandmothers were quilters as are two of my closest friends. I have quilts I treasure from each of them. I am hopeless with arts and crafts myself, but I am excellent at appreciating the creations of others. I marvel at the Gee’s Bend quilters’ exhibition, and I count Anna Grossnickle Hines’s books among my favorites. I especially love her Pieces: A Year in Poems and Quilts.

    Reply
  12. Both my grandmothers were quilters as are two of my closest friends. I have quilts I treasure from each of them. I am hopeless with arts and crafts myself, but I am excellent at appreciating the creations of others. I marvel at the Gee’s Bend quilters’ exhibition, and I count Anna Grossnickle Hines’s books among my favorites. I especially love her Pieces: A Year in Poems and Quilts.

    Reply
  13. Both my grandmothers were quilters as are two of my closest friends. I have quilts I treasure from each of them. I am hopeless with arts and crafts myself, but I am excellent at appreciating the creations of others. I marvel at the Gee’s Bend quilters’ exhibition, and I count Anna Grossnickle Hines’s books among my favorites. I especially love her Pieces: A Year in Poems and Quilts.

    Reply
  14. Both my grandmothers were quilters as are two of my closest friends. I have quilts I treasure from each of them. I am hopeless with arts and crafts myself, but I am excellent at appreciating the creations of others. I marvel at the Gee’s Bend quilters’ exhibition, and I count Anna Grossnickle Hines’s books among my favorites. I especially love her Pieces: A Year in Poems and Quilts.

    Reply
  15. Both my grandmothers were quilters as are two of my closest friends. I have quilts I treasure from each of them. I am hopeless with arts and crafts myself, but I am excellent at appreciating the creations of others. I marvel at the Gee’s Bend quilters’ exhibition, and I count Anna Grossnickle Hines’s books among my favorites. I especially love her Pieces: A Year in Poems and Quilts.

    Reply
  16. I know the basics of quilting, and one of my goals this year is to make my own quilt. So far I have only made small practice squares. My Mother used to quilt. She had a large quilting frame that she would set up in the living room. I remember lying under the frame, watching tv with my siblings, while Mamma quilted on the frame. They were beautiful, as are all the pieces pictured above.

    Reply
  17. I know the basics of quilting, and one of my goals this year is to make my own quilt. So far I have only made small practice squares. My Mother used to quilt. She had a large quilting frame that she would set up in the living room. I remember lying under the frame, watching tv with my siblings, while Mamma quilted on the frame. They were beautiful, as are all the pieces pictured above.

    Reply
  18. I know the basics of quilting, and one of my goals this year is to make my own quilt. So far I have only made small practice squares. My Mother used to quilt. She had a large quilting frame that she would set up in the living room. I remember lying under the frame, watching tv with my siblings, while Mamma quilted on the frame. They were beautiful, as are all the pieces pictured above.

    Reply
  19. I know the basics of quilting, and one of my goals this year is to make my own quilt. So far I have only made small practice squares. My Mother used to quilt. She had a large quilting frame that she would set up in the living room. I remember lying under the frame, watching tv with my siblings, while Mamma quilted on the frame. They were beautiful, as are all the pieces pictured above.

    Reply
  20. I know the basics of quilting, and one of my goals this year is to make my own quilt. So far I have only made small practice squares. My Mother used to quilt. She had a large quilting frame that she would set up in the living room. I remember lying under the frame, watching tv with my siblings, while Mamma quilted on the frame. They were beautiful, as are all the pieces pictured above.

    Reply
  21. I adore the quilt with the door to magical places. I actually like to sew, but I’ve never been very good at it. I regret (deeply) that I didn’t take my much beloved grandmother up on the offer to teach me things when I had the chance. I was much too busy trying to be cool. *sigh* I have recently started making myself a quilt out of all my racing tshirts. My hubbys best friend is an avid quilter, as is my aunt, and they’ve been giving me tips (from long distance). Maybe at some point I’ll figure out what I’m doing and make myself a new hobby but right now, I’m just making my way. These are gorgeous quilts!!

    Reply
  22. I adore the quilt with the door to magical places. I actually like to sew, but I’ve never been very good at it. I regret (deeply) that I didn’t take my much beloved grandmother up on the offer to teach me things when I had the chance. I was much too busy trying to be cool. *sigh* I have recently started making myself a quilt out of all my racing tshirts. My hubbys best friend is an avid quilter, as is my aunt, and they’ve been giving me tips (from long distance). Maybe at some point I’ll figure out what I’m doing and make myself a new hobby but right now, I’m just making my way. These are gorgeous quilts!!

    Reply
  23. I adore the quilt with the door to magical places. I actually like to sew, but I’ve never been very good at it. I regret (deeply) that I didn’t take my much beloved grandmother up on the offer to teach me things when I had the chance. I was much too busy trying to be cool. *sigh* I have recently started making myself a quilt out of all my racing tshirts. My hubbys best friend is an avid quilter, as is my aunt, and they’ve been giving me tips (from long distance). Maybe at some point I’ll figure out what I’m doing and make myself a new hobby but right now, I’m just making my way. These are gorgeous quilts!!

    Reply
  24. I adore the quilt with the door to magical places. I actually like to sew, but I’ve never been very good at it. I regret (deeply) that I didn’t take my much beloved grandmother up on the offer to teach me things when I had the chance. I was much too busy trying to be cool. *sigh* I have recently started making myself a quilt out of all my racing tshirts. My hubbys best friend is an avid quilter, as is my aunt, and they’ve been giving me tips (from long distance). Maybe at some point I’ll figure out what I’m doing and make myself a new hobby but right now, I’m just making my way. These are gorgeous quilts!!

    Reply
  25. I adore the quilt with the door to magical places. I actually like to sew, but I’ve never been very good at it. I regret (deeply) that I didn’t take my much beloved grandmother up on the offer to teach me things when I had the chance. I was much too busy trying to be cool. *sigh* I have recently started making myself a quilt out of all my racing tshirts. My hubbys best friend is an avid quilter, as is my aunt, and they’ve been giving me tips (from long distance). Maybe at some point I’ll figure out what I’m doing and make myself a new hobby but right now, I’m just making my way. These are gorgeous quilts!!

    Reply
  26. The closest I ever got to making something with a needle was needlepoint on canvases already painted with a scene.
    These quilts are truly magnificent. My favorite is the otherworldly quilt with the magic door.
    If a quilt show comes to NYC, I’ll have to make sure I know about it to see if I can purchase one.

    Reply
  27. The closest I ever got to making something with a needle was needlepoint on canvases already painted with a scene.
    These quilts are truly magnificent. My favorite is the otherworldly quilt with the magic door.
    If a quilt show comes to NYC, I’ll have to make sure I know about it to see if I can purchase one.

    Reply
  28. The closest I ever got to making something with a needle was needlepoint on canvases already painted with a scene.
    These quilts are truly magnificent. My favorite is the otherworldly quilt with the magic door.
    If a quilt show comes to NYC, I’ll have to make sure I know about it to see if I can purchase one.

    Reply
  29. The closest I ever got to making something with a needle was needlepoint on canvases already painted with a scene.
    These quilts are truly magnificent. My favorite is the otherworldly quilt with the magic door.
    If a quilt show comes to NYC, I’ll have to make sure I know about it to see if I can purchase one.

    Reply
  30. The closest I ever got to making something with a needle was needlepoint on canvases already painted with a scene.
    These quilts are truly magnificent. My favorite is the otherworldly quilt with the magic door.
    If a quilt show comes to NYC, I’ll have to make sure I know about it to see if I can purchase one.

    Reply
  31. Jana, what a wonderful collection of heirloom quilts you’re building? What is warmer than a quilt made with a mother’s or grandmother’s love? It will be fun if your dad turns into a quilter. *G*

    Reply
  32. Jana, what a wonderful collection of heirloom quilts you’re building? What is warmer than a quilt made with a mother’s or grandmother’s love? It will be fun if your dad turns into a quilter. *G*

    Reply
  33. Jana, what a wonderful collection of heirloom quilts you’re building? What is warmer than a quilt made with a mother’s or grandmother’s love? It will be fun if your dad turns into a quilter. *G*

    Reply
  34. Jana, what a wonderful collection of heirloom quilts you’re building? What is warmer than a quilt made with a mother’s or grandmother’s love? It will be fun if your dad turns into a quilter. *G*

    Reply
  35. Jana, what a wonderful collection of heirloom quilts you’re building? What is warmer than a quilt made with a mother’s or grandmother’s love? It will be fun if your dad turns into a quilter. *G*

    Reply
  36. What a great quilt racing T-shirts will make as you sew in your own history. It is unfortunate that you didn’t take advantage of your grandmother’s skills, but maybe she’ll look over your shoulder and keep you on track with the quilting.

    Reply
  37. What a great quilt racing T-shirts will make as you sew in your own history. It is unfortunate that you didn’t take advantage of your grandmother’s skills, but maybe she’ll look over your shoulder and keep you on track with the quilting.

    Reply
  38. What a great quilt racing T-shirts will make as you sew in your own history. It is unfortunate that you didn’t take advantage of your grandmother’s skills, but maybe she’ll look over your shoulder and keep you on track with the quilting.

    Reply
  39. What a great quilt racing T-shirts will make as you sew in your own history. It is unfortunate that you didn’t take advantage of your grandmother’s skills, but maybe she’ll look over your shoulder and keep you on track with the quilting.

    Reply
  40. What a great quilt racing T-shirts will make as you sew in your own history. It is unfortunate that you didn’t take advantage of your grandmother’s skills, but maybe she’ll look over your shoulder and keep you on track with the quilting.

    Reply
  41. Patricia, I googled and found a NY quilt show on the weekend of April 22nd! Spring must be the season. In fact there’s a map showing regular shows in different parts of the state. I hope one is convenient to you.

    Reply
  42. Patricia, I googled and found a NY quilt show on the weekend of April 22nd! Spring must be the season. In fact there’s a map showing regular shows in different parts of the state. I hope one is convenient to you.

    Reply
  43. Patricia, I googled and found a NY quilt show on the weekend of April 22nd! Spring must be the season. In fact there’s a map showing regular shows in different parts of the state. I hope one is convenient to you.

    Reply
  44. Patricia, I googled and found a NY quilt show on the weekend of April 22nd! Spring must be the season. In fact there’s a map showing regular shows in different parts of the state. I hope one is convenient to you.

    Reply
  45. Patricia, I googled and found a NY quilt show on the weekend of April 22nd! Spring must be the season. In fact there’s a map showing regular shows in different parts of the state. I hope one is convenient to you.

    Reply
  46. I admire the quilts, and all such pieced works, whether practical or purely decorative.
    I am going to make a distinction here (not because I’m picky, but because I need to
    describe what I do. The items shown here are piece-work. They probably are also quilted, but the quilting doesn’t show. Technically, the quilting is the stitching which holds the layers of cloth and batting together. Plain cloth held together with batting by quilting stitches, is usually called a counterpane. They can be beautiful also.
    I was so technical because I do not do piece-work of any kind. I have tried it, but I don’t have the necessary stitching skills. I DO quilt, however. I have made several tote bags which are quilted. They usually have a front featuring a cross-stitch project that
    I have completed then the are combined with a backing and some batting to form a sturdy light weight bag. The stitches used in the quilting can be works of art; some quilting patterns are very elaborate indeed. Mine alas are not. But I have fun with my quilting, and I get some very practical results from it.

    Reply
  47. I admire the quilts, and all such pieced works, whether practical or purely decorative.
    I am going to make a distinction here (not because I’m picky, but because I need to
    describe what I do. The items shown here are piece-work. They probably are also quilted, but the quilting doesn’t show. Technically, the quilting is the stitching which holds the layers of cloth and batting together. Plain cloth held together with batting by quilting stitches, is usually called a counterpane. They can be beautiful also.
    I was so technical because I do not do piece-work of any kind. I have tried it, but I don’t have the necessary stitching skills. I DO quilt, however. I have made several tote bags which are quilted. They usually have a front featuring a cross-stitch project that
    I have completed then the are combined with a backing and some batting to form a sturdy light weight bag. The stitches used in the quilting can be works of art; some quilting patterns are very elaborate indeed. Mine alas are not. But I have fun with my quilting, and I get some very practical results from it.

    Reply
  48. I admire the quilts, and all such pieced works, whether practical or purely decorative.
    I am going to make a distinction here (not because I’m picky, but because I need to
    describe what I do. The items shown here are piece-work. They probably are also quilted, but the quilting doesn’t show. Technically, the quilting is the stitching which holds the layers of cloth and batting together. Plain cloth held together with batting by quilting stitches, is usually called a counterpane. They can be beautiful also.
    I was so technical because I do not do piece-work of any kind. I have tried it, but I don’t have the necessary stitching skills. I DO quilt, however. I have made several tote bags which are quilted. They usually have a front featuring a cross-stitch project that
    I have completed then the are combined with a backing and some batting to form a sturdy light weight bag. The stitches used in the quilting can be works of art; some quilting patterns are very elaborate indeed. Mine alas are not. But I have fun with my quilting, and I get some very practical results from it.

    Reply
  49. I admire the quilts, and all such pieced works, whether practical or purely decorative.
    I am going to make a distinction here (not because I’m picky, but because I need to
    describe what I do. The items shown here are piece-work. They probably are also quilted, but the quilting doesn’t show. Technically, the quilting is the stitching which holds the layers of cloth and batting together. Plain cloth held together with batting by quilting stitches, is usually called a counterpane. They can be beautiful also.
    I was so technical because I do not do piece-work of any kind. I have tried it, but I don’t have the necessary stitching skills. I DO quilt, however. I have made several tote bags which are quilted. They usually have a front featuring a cross-stitch project that
    I have completed then the are combined with a backing and some batting to form a sturdy light weight bag. The stitches used in the quilting can be works of art; some quilting patterns are very elaborate indeed. Mine alas are not. But I have fun with my quilting, and I get some very practical results from it.

    Reply
  50. I admire the quilts, and all such pieced works, whether practical or purely decorative.
    I am going to make a distinction here (not because I’m picky, but because I need to
    describe what I do. The items shown here are piece-work. They probably are also quilted, but the quilting doesn’t show. Technically, the quilting is the stitching which holds the layers of cloth and batting together. Plain cloth held together with batting by quilting stitches, is usually called a counterpane. They can be beautiful also.
    I was so technical because I do not do piece-work of any kind. I have tried it, but I don’t have the necessary stitching skills. I DO quilt, however. I have made several tote bags which are quilted. They usually have a front featuring a cross-stitch project that
    I have completed then the are combined with a backing and some batting to form a sturdy light weight bag. The stitches used in the quilting can be works of art; some quilting patterns are very elaborate indeed. Mine alas are not. But I have fun with my quilting, and I get some very practical results from it.

    Reply
  51. That show is out on Long Island, about 1 1/2 hour east of NYC. It’s a small show by a show standards, put on by Smithtown Stitchers.
    There is a NYC guild, not sure of the name, maybe Gotham. Most guilds will do a show at some point.
    Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.
    The mecca for every quilt lover is attending Quilt Festival in Houston. I’m there the week before for the market. but we are allowed into the show. I must have a good eye because every year I photograph some quilts that blow my mind, and come to find out they were winners. Picture an area several football fields long and wide, filled with quilts.

    Reply
  52. That show is out on Long Island, about 1 1/2 hour east of NYC. It’s a small show by a show standards, put on by Smithtown Stitchers.
    There is a NYC guild, not sure of the name, maybe Gotham. Most guilds will do a show at some point.
    Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.
    The mecca for every quilt lover is attending Quilt Festival in Houston. I’m there the week before for the market. but we are allowed into the show. I must have a good eye because every year I photograph some quilts that blow my mind, and come to find out they were winners. Picture an area several football fields long and wide, filled with quilts.

    Reply
  53. That show is out on Long Island, about 1 1/2 hour east of NYC. It’s a small show by a show standards, put on by Smithtown Stitchers.
    There is a NYC guild, not sure of the name, maybe Gotham. Most guilds will do a show at some point.
    Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.
    The mecca for every quilt lover is attending Quilt Festival in Houston. I’m there the week before for the market. but we are allowed into the show. I must have a good eye because every year I photograph some quilts that blow my mind, and come to find out they were winners. Picture an area several football fields long and wide, filled with quilts.

    Reply
  54. That show is out on Long Island, about 1 1/2 hour east of NYC. It’s a small show by a show standards, put on by Smithtown Stitchers.
    There is a NYC guild, not sure of the name, maybe Gotham. Most guilds will do a show at some point.
    Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.
    The mecca for every quilt lover is attending Quilt Festival in Houston. I’m there the week before for the market. but we are allowed into the show. I must have a good eye because every year I photograph some quilts that blow my mind, and come to find out they were winners. Picture an area several football fields long and wide, filled with quilts.

    Reply
  55. That show is out on Long Island, about 1 1/2 hour east of NYC. It’s a small show by a show standards, put on by Smithtown Stitchers.
    There is a NYC guild, not sure of the name, maybe Gotham. Most guilds will do a show at some point.
    Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.
    The mecca for every quilt lover is attending Quilt Festival in Houston. I’m there the week before for the market. but we are allowed into the show. I must have a good eye because every year I photograph some quilts that blow my mind, and come to find out they were winners. Picture an area several football fields long and wide, filled with quilts.

    Reply
  56. I, too, love looking at beautiful quilts — the colors, the patterns and the clever designs, and there are some truly stunning ones around. I have a couple of quilts my mother made — all hand sewn — and one from a friend of mine’s mother, which I treasure, too.
    But my favorite thing is old quilts, made of scraps from clothes and other pieces — like Jana’s quilt with the bits from the dress made for QE2’s coronation and others. So as well as being beautiful and very personal, it’s also a quilt made of stories. I have an unfinished one my mother started with small hexagonal pieces in which I can recognize this dress of my sister’s or mine, or that dress of mum’s. I might have to finish it one day.

    Reply
  57. I, too, love looking at beautiful quilts — the colors, the patterns and the clever designs, and there are some truly stunning ones around. I have a couple of quilts my mother made — all hand sewn — and one from a friend of mine’s mother, which I treasure, too.
    But my favorite thing is old quilts, made of scraps from clothes and other pieces — like Jana’s quilt with the bits from the dress made for QE2’s coronation and others. So as well as being beautiful and very personal, it’s also a quilt made of stories. I have an unfinished one my mother started with small hexagonal pieces in which I can recognize this dress of my sister’s or mine, or that dress of mum’s. I might have to finish it one day.

    Reply
  58. I, too, love looking at beautiful quilts — the colors, the patterns and the clever designs, and there are some truly stunning ones around. I have a couple of quilts my mother made — all hand sewn — and one from a friend of mine’s mother, which I treasure, too.
    But my favorite thing is old quilts, made of scraps from clothes and other pieces — like Jana’s quilt with the bits from the dress made for QE2’s coronation and others. So as well as being beautiful and very personal, it’s also a quilt made of stories. I have an unfinished one my mother started with small hexagonal pieces in which I can recognize this dress of my sister’s or mine, or that dress of mum’s. I might have to finish it one day.

    Reply
  59. I, too, love looking at beautiful quilts — the colors, the patterns and the clever designs, and there are some truly stunning ones around. I have a couple of quilts my mother made — all hand sewn — and one from a friend of mine’s mother, which I treasure, too.
    But my favorite thing is old quilts, made of scraps from clothes and other pieces — like Jana’s quilt with the bits from the dress made for QE2’s coronation and others. So as well as being beautiful and very personal, it’s also a quilt made of stories. I have an unfinished one my mother started with small hexagonal pieces in which I can recognize this dress of my sister’s or mine, or that dress of mum’s. I might have to finish it one day.

    Reply
  60. I, too, love looking at beautiful quilts — the colors, the patterns and the clever designs, and there are some truly stunning ones around. I have a couple of quilts my mother made — all hand sewn — and one from a friend of mine’s mother, which I treasure, too.
    But my favorite thing is old quilts, made of scraps from clothes and other pieces — like Jana’s quilt with the bits from the dress made for QE2’s coronation and others. So as well as being beautiful and very personal, it’s also a quilt made of stories. I have an unfinished one my mother started with small hexagonal pieces in which I can recognize this dress of my sister’s or mine, or that dress of mum’s. I might have to finish it one day.

    Reply
  61. Thanks so much Mary Jo. I see it’s in Troy, NY, which is near Syracuse. I’ll see if I can find another who enjoys quilts and is able to drive us there.

    Reply
  62. Thanks so much Mary Jo. I see it’s in Troy, NY, which is near Syracuse. I’ll see if I can find another who enjoys quilts and is able to drive us there.

    Reply
  63. Thanks so much Mary Jo. I see it’s in Troy, NY, which is near Syracuse. I’ll see if I can find another who enjoys quilts and is able to drive us there.

    Reply
  64. Thanks so much Mary Jo. I see it’s in Troy, NY, which is near Syracuse. I’ll see if I can find another who enjoys quilts and is able to drive us there.

    Reply
  65. Thanks so much Mary Jo. I see it’s in Troy, NY, which is near Syracuse. I’ll see if I can find another who enjoys quilts and is able to drive us there.

    Reply
  66. Patricia, this from LiLLinda, above:
    ++Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.++
    The link I posted further up showed quilt shows all over the state, so lots of possibilities. Troy would be fun. (I went to college in Syracuse.)

    Reply
  67. Patricia, this from LiLLinda, above:
    ++Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.++
    The link I posted further up showed quilt shows all over the state, so lots of possibilities. Troy would be fun. (I went to college in Syracuse.)

    Reply
  68. Patricia, this from LiLLinda, above:
    ++Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.++
    The link I posted further up showed quilt shows all over the state, so lots of possibilities. Troy would be fun. (I went to college in Syracuse.)

    Reply
  69. Patricia, this from LiLLinda, above:
    ++Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.++
    The link I posted further up showed quilt shows all over the state, so lots of possibilities. Troy would be fun. (I went to college in Syracuse.)

    Reply
  70. Patricia, this from LiLLinda, above:
    ++Not a quilt show, but Quilters Take Manhattan is an awesome event held in September by the Quilt Alliance. It has spread to cover several days of behind the scenes tours, cocktail parties, lectures and more led by quilt-lebrities. A great group, great cause, fun events.++
    The link I posted further up showed quilt shows all over the state, so lots of possibilities. Troy would be fun. (I went to college in Syracuse.)

    Reply
  71. Sue McCormick, I knew that the actual quilting is the sewing of the layers, and in some of the images above the quilting can be seen if you double click the picture to blow it up. I didn’t know that a counter pane was a quilted bed covering in a solid color. Fun to learn new things! As you say, quilted tote bags are very strong, I have several bags like that.

    Reply
  72. Sue McCormick, I knew that the actual quilting is the sewing of the layers, and in some of the images above the quilting can be seen if you double click the picture to blow it up. I didn’t know that a counter pane was a quilted bed covering in a solid color. Fun to learn new things! As you say, quilted tote bags are very strong, I have several bags like that.

    Reply
  73. Sue McCormick, I knew that the actual quilting is the sewing of the layers, and in some of the images above the quilting can be seen if you double click the picture to blow it up. I didn’t know that a counter pane was a quilted bed covering in a solid color. Fun to learn new things! As you say, quilted tote bags are very strong, I have several bags like that.

    Reply
  74. Sue McCormick, I knew that the actual quilting is the sewing of the layers, and in some of the images above the quilting can be seen if you double click the picture to blow it up. I didn’t know that a counter pane was a quilted bed covering in a solid color. Fun to learn new things! As you say, quilted tote bags are very strong, I have several bags like that.

    Reply
  75. Sue McCormick, I knew that the actual quilting is the sewing of the layers, and in some of the images above the quilting can be seen if you double click the picture to blow it up. I didn’t know that a counter pane was a quilted bed covering in a solid color. Fun to learn new things! As you say, quilted tote bags are very strong, I have several bags like that.

    Reply
  76. I think memory quilts/story quilts are a special category. One of the friends I mentioned in my original post just completed a quilt for her son-in-law made of vintage tee shirts from rock concerts he attended. I covet that quilt! Also, one of the younger grands had a special relationship with my brother, and he was heartbroken when his uncle buddy died. His mother quilted a pillow cover from one of my brother’s favorite shirts. It was a great comfort to young Luke.

    Reply
  77. I think memory quilts/story quilts are a special category. One of the friends I mentioned in my original post just completed a quilt for her son-in-law made of vintage tee shirts from rock concerts he attended. I covet that quilt! Also, one of the younger grands had a special relationship with my brother, and he was heartbroken when his uncle buddy died. His mother quilted a pillow cover from one of my brother’s favorite shirts. It was a great comfort to young Luke.

    Reply
  78. I think memory quilts/story quilts are a special category. One of the friends I mentioned in my original post just completed a quilt for her son-in-law made of vintage tee shirts from rock concerts he attended. I covet that quilt! Also, one of the younger grands had a special relationship with my brother, and he was heartbroken when his uncle buddy died. His mother quilted a pillow cover from one of my brother’s favorite shirts. It was a great comfort to young Luke.

    Reply
  79. I think memory quilts/story quilts are a special category. One of the friends I mentioned in my original post just completed a quilt for her son-in-law made of vintage tee shirts from rock concerts he attended. I covet that quilt! Also, one of the younger grands had a special relationship with my brother, and he was heartbroken when his uncle buddy died. His mother quilted a pillow cover from one of my brother’s favorite shirts. It was a great comfort to young Luke.

    Reply
  80. I think memory quilts/story quilts are a special category. One of the friends I mentioned in my original post just completed a quilt for her son-in-law made of vintage tee shirts from rock concerts he attended. I covet that quilt! Also, one of the younger grands had a special relationship with my brother, and he was heartbroken when his uncle buddy died. His mother quilted a pillow cover from one of my brother’s favorite shirts. It was a great comfort to young Luke.

    Reply
  81. I am a fan of quilts and quilters. Unfortunately, God gave me the gene to admire the work of others, but I have no talent for anything creative. Of all the pictures of quilts, I think my favorite is the Church in the Vale or maybe the final colorful one or maybe the Magic Doorway…actually they are all lovely.

    Reply
  82. I am a fan of quilts and quilters. Unfortunately, God gave me the gene to admire the work of others, but I have no talent for anything creative. Of all the pictures of quilts, I think my favorite is the Church in the Vale or maybe the final colorful one or maybe the Magic Doorway…actually they are all lovely.

    Reply
  83. I am a fan of quilts and quilters. Unfortunately, God gave me the gene to admire the work of others, but I have no talent for anything creative. Of all the pictures of quilts, I think my favorite is the Church in the Vale or maybe the final colorful one or maybe the Magic Doorway…actually they are all lovely.

    Reply
  84. I am a fan of quilts and quilters. Unfortunately, God gave me the gene to admire the work of others, but I have no talent for anything creative. Of all the pictures of quilts, I think my favorite is the Church in the Vale or maybe the final colorful one or maybe the Magic Doorway…actually they are all lovely.

    Reply
  85. I am a fan of quilts and quilters. Unfortunately, God gave me the gene to admire the work of others, but I have no talent for anything creative. Of all the pictures of quilts, I think my favorite is the Church in the Vale or maybe the final colorful one or maybe the Magic Doorway…actually they are all lovely.

    Reply
  86. Hi Mary Jo. My mum’s best friend is a quilter. Her late husband was in Vietnam and they used to go to big company reunions regularly. He had collected all the photos of the company and digitised them and shared them with all his fellow veterans. She copied them onto fabric and made a huge quilt which they took to a special reunion. It was a big deal and a huge hit and very important to the vets that she had marked their anniversary in that way. It was so special that it is now in the Australian War Museum. Quilting can be more than just a hobby. It is part of the social history of our time.

    Reply
  87. Hi Mary Jo. My mum’s best friend is a quilter. Her late husband was in Vietnam and they used to go to big company reunions regularly. He had collected all the photos of the company and digitised them and shared them with all his fellow veterans. She copied them onto fabric and made a huge quilt which they took to a special reunion. It was a big deal and a huge hit and very important to the vets that she had marked their anniversary in that way. It was so special that it is now in the Australian War Museum. Quilting can be more than just a hobby. It is part of the social history of our time.

    Reply
  88. Hi Mary Jo. My mum’s best friend is a quilter. Her late husband was in Vietnam and they used to go to big company reunions regularly. He had collected all the photos of the company and digitised them and shared them with all his fellow veterans. She copied them onto fabric and made a huge quilt which they took to a special reunion. It was a big deal and a huge hit and very important to the vets that she had marked their anniversary in that way. It was so special that it is now in the Australian War Museum. Quilting can be more than just a hobby. It is part of the social history of our time.

    Reply
  89. Hi Mary Jo. My mum’s best friend is a quilter. Her late husband was in Vietnam and they used to go to big company reunions regularly. He had collected all the photos of the company and digitised them and shared them with all his fellow veterans. She copied them onto fabric and made a huge quilt which they took to a special reunion. It was a big deal and a huge hit and very important to the vets that she had marked their anniversary in that way. It was so special that it is now in the Australian War Museum. Quilting can be more than just a hobby. It is part of the social history of our time.

    Reply
  90. Hi Mary Jo. My mum’s best friend is a quilter. Her late husband was in Vietnam and they used to go to big company reunions regularly. He had collected all the photos of the company and digitised them and shared them with all his fellow veterans. She copied them onto fabric and made a huge quilt which they took to a special reunion. It was a big deal and a huge hit and very important to the vets that she had marked their anniversary in that way. It was so special that it is now in the Australian War Museum. Quilting can be more than just a hobby. It is part of the social history of our time.

    Reply
  91. i forgot to say that I really loved the piece and thank you for sharing it. I went to the website and have shared that with my friends who I know will enjoy it too. The creativity is amazing. I enjoyed learning about counterpanes too. I think those quilts that have old blankets and worn out clothes from the Depression are particularly amazing and something that we should think about now in terms of recycling. I guess that they would be a bit of asthma risk though.

    Reply
  92. i forgot to say that I really loved the piece and thank you for sharing it. I went to the website and have shared that with my friends who I know will enjoy it too. The creativity is amazing. I enjoyed learning about counterpanes too. I think those quilts that have old blankets and worn out clothes from the Depression are particularly amazing and something that we should think about now in terms of recycling. I guess that they would be a bit of asthma risk though.

    Reply
  93. i forgot to say that I really loved the piece and thank you for sharing it. I went to the website and have shared that with my friends who I know will enjoy it too. The creativity is amazing. I enjoyed learning about counterpanes too. I think those quilts that have old blankets and worn out clothes from the Depression are particularly amazing and something that we should think about now in terms of recycling. I guess that they would be a bit of asthma risk though.

    Reply
  94. i forgot to say that I really loved the piece and thank you for sharing it. I went to the website and have shared that with my friends who I know will enjoy it too. The creativity is amazing. I enjoyed learning about counterpanes too. I think those quilts that have old blankets and worn out clothes from the Depression are particularly amazing and something that we should think about now in terms of recycling. I guess that they would be a bit of asthma risk though.

    Reply
  95. i forgot to say that I really loved the piece and thank you for sharing it. I went to the website and have shared that with my friends who I know will enjoy it too. The creativity is amazing. I enjoyed learning about counterpanes too. I think those quilts that have old blankets and worn out clothes from the Depression are particularly amazing and something that we should think about now in terms of recycling. I guess that they would be a bit of asthma risk though.

    Reply
  96. I do quilt (beginner) mainly for the grand babies. I love quilting shows! Such inspiration, color, creativity. I usually buy something!!!

    Reply
  97. I do quilt (beginner) mainly for the grand babies. I love quilting shows! Such inspiration, color, creativity. I usually buy something!!!

    Reply
  98. I do quilt (beginner) mainly for the grand babies. I love quilting shows! Such inspiration, color, creativity. I usually buy something!!!

    Reply
  99. I do quilt (beginner) mainly for the grand babies. I love quilting shows! Such inspiration, color, creativity. I usually buy something!!!

    Reply
  100. I do quilt (beginner) mainly for the grand babies. I love quilting shows! Such inspiration, color, creativity. I usually buy something!!!

    Reply

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