The Brides of Waterloo

Waterloo brides coversNicola here! Today it is my very great pleasure to welcome to the Word Wenches three fabulous Regency authors who have collaborated on a trilogy to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Louise Allen, Annie Burrows and Sarah Mallory are the best selling authors who have joined together to write linked books to celebrate the heroes who fought and the women they loved. The trilogy is based on the real-life story of the artillery unit led by Captain Mercer who held one of the most hotly contested sections of the British line, and the love stories unfold in the authentic setting of Brussels society and the field of Waterloo before, during and after the battle.

Now it’s over to Annie to tell us about the background to the Waterloo Brides! Welcome to the blog!

Thanks for inviting us to your blog to talk about our brand new mini-series from Harlequin "Waterloo Brides".

When Sarah Mallory and Louise Allen contacted me, asking if I'd like to join in the project they were planning, to commemorate the 200th anniversary of that iconic battle, I barely hesitated before saying Yes!

SharpeFor one thing, I absolutely adore writing military heroes – actually, I have to confess I adore reading them, too.  If a book has a navy SEAL or an ex marine hero, I fancy him straight away.  Even before I learn if his eyes are blue, or brown or anything else about how he looks.  He is obviously going to be a Real Man.  He has sacrificially served his country.  Has probably done brave deeds, possibly suffered injury, and will therefore be that irresistible mix of warrior hero, and tortured soul.  At once brave, yet broken.  Needing the love of just the right woman to make him whole again.

So – did I want to write a military hero?  You bet I did!

We warmed up to the series itself by creating the world of Randall's Rogues.  Sarah saw the hero of her book, Colonel Randall, as the creator of a unit of trained artillerymen – the troublemakers from various regiments who are on their last chance before getting hanged.  Or, as Louise Allen put it – a kind of dirty dozen in breeches.

The artillery were, in fact, answerable to the Board of Ordnance, and frequently annoyed Wellington by Small blue jacketdoing their own thing on the battlefield and on campaign, which was perfect for our purposes!

Before long, Randall's Rogues had not only a motto (Semper Laurifer), a mascot, (a huge, black shaggy dog) and a full complement of men (I could include the spreadsheet here with the names of their staff sargeants, farrier, and smiths!) but also, for aesthetic purposes, a uniform with blue jackets.

And then Louise Allen and I went along to a re-enactors event, to learn as much as we could about camp life (since her heroine is a camp-follower), and because they promised to fire a cannon.

Beaux cannon 7It is one thing reading about the noise of cannon, quite another experiencing it.  The noise of just the one being fired was incredibly loud.  It no longer surprises me that people could hear the cannon fire from Quatre Bras as far away as Antwerp.

 We also saw examples of what a soldier of the time would have carried in his pack. It may surprise you to know (well, it did me, anyway) that soldiers of that time were expected to be clean-shaven, and were supplied with a mirror and razor for the purpose.  You can just see a shaving brush in the picture of kit.

The typical kit for a junior regimental officer would have had to fit into one haversack and two Small kitportmanteaux.  In his haversack were clasp knife, fork, spoon, tin mug, and any provisions he might be carrying.  The rest of his belongings were carried in two small portmanteaux, slung on each side of a mule.  In one of these was a uniform jacket, two pairs of trousers, waistcoats (white, coloured and flannel) a few pairs of flannel drawers and a dozen pairs of stockings.  In the other were shirts, cravats, a fitted dressing case, three pairs of boots, two pairs of shoes and a number of handkerchiefs.

All the men were expected to wash regularly and wear clean shirts.  Between the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo, many took the opportunity to shave and change their shirts.  Last time I met up with Sarah, we had a long discussion about whether this explained the appeal of soldiers over civilians at that time.  The rank and file not only had regular pay, and a pension if they were invalided out, but also washed more often and wore clean linen.

Beaux camp 5Shirts were one thing, the jackets another.  Made of wool, they must have been very hot to wear.  When I asked one of the re-enactors about it, he explained that wool was actually very practical.  It would soak up sweat, and then dry out rapidly when removed and hung out to air.

 In these two pictures you can see two ways the soldiers used to air out their damp Highland regiment jackets – in the first, they've used their stacked weapons as a makeshift clothes horse.  In the second, where the highland regiment are preparing for drill, you can just see, outside each tent, a sort of wooden cross – which had been put up specifically for hanging their jackets on.

Cheap dye could pose a problem, however.  In the rain, it could wash out and stain the trousers, which were often white, so that the unfortunate individual in a cheaply produced uniform would end up wearing shades of pink.

Beaux camp 2Taking care of the uniforms, and keeping their menfolk smartly turned out, in clean linen, provided plenty of work for the camp followers.

 And yet, in spite of learning about the hard work that went into keeping the soldiers looking smart, the perils of wool on a hot day, and cheap dye in the rain, I still think there is something inherently romantic about a Regency soldier's uniform.

Thank you to Annie, Louise and Sarah for giving us such a fascinating insight into their research. Waterloo brides coversThey will be dropping in to chat so if you have any questions for them on the Waterloo Brides series or what it was like to write linked books or anything else, post a comment! To get the (cannon) ball rolling we’re asking you who is your favourite fictional military hero?  One reader who comments will receive a signed copy of "A Mistress for Major Bartlett" by Annie Burrows.

310 thoughts on “The Brides of Waterloo”

  1. I am starting you off by going against the request. For me one of the most romantic of military heroes would be Marquis de Lafayette. As a very young man (I think he was only 19) he decided the adventure of joining the rebels in America would bring glory. He was wounded in the battle of Brandeywine and yet even after that he organized an orderly retreat. He saw war as an adventure – and yet I bet after seeing the reality it was no longer a glorious adventure. He was brave and smart and he earned respect of the revolutionary leaders such as Washington and Hamilton. I think that made his real life very romantic.

    Reply
  2. I am starting you off by going against the request. For me one of the most romantic of military heroes would be Marquis de Lafayette. As a very young man (I think he was only 19) he decided the adventure of joining the rebels in America would bring glory. He was wounded in the battle of Brandeywine and yet even after that he organized an orderly retreat. He saw war as an adventure – and yet I bet after seeing the reality it was no longer a glorious adventure. He was brave and smart and he earned respect of the revolutionary leaders such as Washington and Hamilton. I think that made his real life very romantic.

    Reply
  3. I am starting you off by going against the request. For me one of the most romantic of military heroes would be Marquis de Lafayette. As a very young man (I think he was only 19) he decided the adventure of joining the rebels in America would bring glory. He was wounded in the battle of Brandeywine and yet even after that he organized an orderly retreat. He saw war as an adventure – and yet I bet after seeing the reality it was no longer a glorious adventure. He was brave and smart and he earned respect of the revolutionary leaders such as Washington and Hamilton. I think that made his real life very romantic.

    Reply
  4. I am starting you off by going against the request. For me one of the most romantic of military heroes would be Marquis de Lafayette. As a very young man (I think he was only 19) he decided the adventure of joining the rebels in America would bring glory. He was wounded in the battle of Brandeywine and yet even after that he organized an orderly retreat. He saw war as an adventure – and yet I bet after seeing the reality it was no longer a glorious adventure. He was brave and smart and he earned respect of the revolutionary leaders such as Washington and Hamilton. I think that made his real life very romantic.

    Reply
  5. I am starting you off by going against the request. For me one of the most romantic of military heroes would be Marquis de Lafayette. As a very young man (I think he was only 19) he decided the adventure of joining the rebels in America would bring glory. He was wounded in the battle of Brandeywine and yet even after that he organized an orderly retreat. He saw war as an adventure – and yet I bet after seeing the reality it was no longer a glorious adventure. He was brave and smart and he earned respect of the revolutionary leaders such as Washington and Hamilton. I think that made his real life very romantic.

    Reply
  6. Just popping in to say Hi to everyone and thanks to Annie for writing the blog about our collaboration. Annette the Marquis does sound a very heroic figure, and proves that true life can be every bit as exciting and romantic as fiction!

    Reply
  7. Just popping in to say Hi to everyone and thanks to Annie for writing the blog about our collaboration. Annette the Marquis does sound a very heroic figure, and proves that true life can be every bit as exciting and romantic as fiction!

    Reply
  8. Just popping in to say Hi to everyone and thanks to Annie for writing the blog about our collaboration. Annette the Marquis does sound a very heroic figure, and proves that true life can be every bit as exciting and romantic as fiction!

    Reply
  9. Just popping in to say Hi to everyone and thanks to Annie for writing the blog about our collaboration. Annette the Marquis does sound a very heroic figure, and proves that true life can be every bit as exciting and romantic as fiction!

    Reply
  10. Just popping in to say Hi to everyone and thanks to Annie for writing the blog about our collaboration. Annette the Marquis does sound a very heroic figure, and proves that true life can be every bit as exciting and romantic as fiction!

    Reply
  11. This is such a wonderful and interesting blog! Thanks so much for sharing the inside info. The nitty gritty of wearing those romantic red uniforms might not have always been comfortable, but I agree that they make a man look smashing!

    Reply
  12. This is such a wonderful and interesting blog! Thanks so much for sharing the inside info. The nitty gritty of wearing those romantic red uniforms might not have always been comfortable, but I agree that they make a man look smashing!

    Reply
  13. This is such a wonderful and interesting blog! Thanks so much for sharing the inside info. The nitty gritty of wearing those romantic red uniforms might not have always been comfortable, but I agree that they make a man look smashing!

    Reply
  14. This is such a wonderful and interesting blog! Thanks so much for sharing the inside info. The nitty gritty of wearing those romantic red uniforms might not have always been comfortable, but I agree that they make a man look smashing!

    Reply
  15. This is such a wonderful and interesting blog! Thanks so much for sharing the inside info. The nitty gritty of wearing those romantic red uniforms might not have always been comfortable, but I agree that they make a man look smashing!

    Reply
  16. my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!

    Reply
  17. my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!

    Reply
  18. my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!

    Reply
  19. my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!

    Reply
  20. my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!

    Reply
  21. Well I think I’d have to go with Richard Sharpe (pictured above) and his crew of Chosen Men! This guy rose in the ranks purely from talent, leadership and loyalty alone. No purchased commission for him!
    Encampments are fun. There is much valuable and interesting information from the participants. Went to a Civil War one last year and learned quite a bit about, well, everything!

    Reply
  22. Well I think I’d have to go with Richard Sharpe (pictured above) and his crew of Chosen Men! This guy rose in the ranks purely from talent, leadership and loyalty alone. No purchased commission for him!
    Encampments are fun. There is much valuable and interesting information from the participants. Went to a Civil War one last year and learned quite a bit about, well, everything!

    Reply
  23. Well I think I’d have to go with Richard Sharpe (pictured above) and his crew of Chosen Men! This guy rose in the ranks purely from talent, leadership and loyalty alone. No purchased commission for him!
    Encampments are fun. There is much valuable and interesting information from the participants. Went to a Civil War one last year and learned quite a bit about, well, everything!

    Reply
  24. Well I think I’d have to go with Richard Sharpe (pictured above) and his crew of Chosen Men! This guy rose in the ranks purely from talent, leadership and loyalty alone. No purchased commission for him!
    Encampments are fun. There is much valuable and interesting information from the participants. Went to a Civil War one last year and learned quite a bit about, well, everything!

    Reply
  25. Well I think I’d have to go with Richard Sharpe (pictured above) and his crew of Chosen Men! This guy rose in the ranks purely from talent, leadership and loyalty alone. No purchased commission for him!
    Encampments are fun. There is much valuable and interesting information from the participants. Went to a Civil War one last year and learned quite a bit about, well, everything!

    Reply
  26. Thanks so much for visiting! What a fabulous way to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Waterloo, and what great details you’ve found. I’m a sucker for military heroes myself, so maybe I’ll mention the hero of my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS–Lord Michael Kenyon. I took him through the whole of the battle right up to being found (almost) mortally wounded by the heroine, an officer’s wife and battlefield nurse. And I had a -most- splendid time researching the battle.
    To answer this comment:
    ++jeannette halpin said…
    my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!<< Jeannette, I'm so glad you fell in love with Randall! He's a special favorite of mine also. His book was NEVER LESS THAN A LADY. And because I'm totally addicted to military heroes, the book I'm writing now, ONCE A SOLDIER, features Major Lord Will Masterson, who is heading home after Napoleon's abdication in 1814 and thinking the long wars are over... Again, thanks so much for sharing about your wonderful series.

    Reply
  27. Thanks so much for visiting! What a fabulous way to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Waterloo, and what great details you’ve found. I’m a sucker for military heroes myself, so maybe I’ll mention the hero of my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS–Lord Michael Kenyon. I took him through the whole of the battle right up to being found (almost) mortally wounded by the heroine, an officer’s wife and battlefield nurse. And I had a -most- splendid time researching the battle.
    To answer this comment:
    ++jeannette halpin said…
    my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!<< Jeannette, I'm so glad you fell in love with Randall! He's a special favorite of mine also. His book was NEVER LESS THAN A LADY. And because I'm totally addicted to military heroes, the book I'm writing now, ONCE A SOLDIER, features Major Lord Will Masterson, who is heading home after Napoleon's abdication in 1814 and thinking the long wars are over... Again, thanks so much for sharing about your wonderful series.

    Reply
  28. Thanks so much for visiting! What a fabulous way to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Waterloo, and what great details you’ve found. I’m a sucker for military heroes myself, so maybe I’ll mention the hero of my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS–Lord Michael Kenyon. I took him through the whole of the battle right up to being found (almost) mortally wounded by the heroine, an officer’s wife and battlefield nurse. And I had a -most- splendid time researching the battle.
    To answer this comment:
    ++jeannette halpin said…
    my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!<< Jeannette, I'm so glad you fell in love with Randall! He's a special favorite of mine also. His book was NEVER LESS THAN A LADY. And because I'm totally addicted to military heroes, the book I'm writing now, ONCE A SOLDIER, features Major Lord Will Masterson, who is heading home after Napoleon's abdication in 1814 and thinking the long wars are over... Again, thanks so much for sharing about your wonderful series.

    Reply
  29. Thanks so much for visiting! What a fabulous way to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Waterloo, and what great details you’ve found. I’m a sucker for military heroes myself, so maybe I’ll mention the hero of my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS–Lord Michael Kenyon. I took him through the whole of the battle right up to being found (almost) mortally wounded by the heroine, an officer’s wife and battlefield nurse. And I had a -most- splendid time researching the battle.
    To answer this comment:
    ++jeannette halpin said…
    my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!<< Jeannette, I'm so glad you fell in love with Randall! He's a special favorite of mine also. His book was NEVER LESS THAN A LADY. And because I'm totally addicted to military heroes, the book I'm writing now, ONCE A SOLDIER, features Major Lord Will Masterson, who is heading home after Napoleon's abdication in 1814 and thinking the long wars are over... Again, thanks so much for sharing about your wonderful series.

    Reply
  30. Thanks so much for visiting! What a fabulous way to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Waterloo, and what great details you’ve found. I’m a sucker for military heroes myself, so maybe I’ll mention the hero of my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS–Lord Michael Kenyon. I took him through the whole of the battle right up to being found (almost) mortally wounded by the heroine, an officer’s wife and battlefield nurse. And I had a -most- splendid time researching the battle.
    To answer this comment:
    ++jeannette halpin said…
    my favorite fictional military hero of yours is Major Alex Randall from Mary Jo Putney. There is just something about that man …… sigh!!<< Jeannette, I'm so glad you fell in love with Randall! He's a special favorite of mine also. His book was NEVER LESS THAN A LADY. And because I'm totally addicted to military heroes, the book I'm writing now, ONCE A SOLDIER, features Major Lord Will Masterson, who is heading home after Napoleon's abdication in 1814 and thinking the long wars are over... Again, thanks so much for sharing about your wonderful series.

    Reply
  31. PS: I just enlarged the covers, and here’s a special call-out for the Harlequin Historical art department for doing such a terrific job on the covers, the uniforms, and the characters. A serious YUM!

    Reply
  32. PS: I just enlarged the covers, and here’s a special call-out for the Harlequin Historical art department for doing such a terrific job on the covers, the uniforms, and the characters. A serious YUM!

    Reply
  33. PS: I just enlarged the covers, and here’s a special call-out for the Harlequin Historical art department for doing such a terrific job on the covers, the uniforms, and the characters. A serious YUM!

    Reply
  34. PS: I just enlarged the covers, and here’s a special call-out for the Harlequin Historical art department for doing such a terrific job on the covers, the uniforms, and the characters. A serious YUM!

    Reply
  35. PS: I just enlarged the covers, and here’s a special call-out for the Harlequin Historical art department for doing such a terrific job on the covers, the uniforms, and the characters. A serious YUM!

    Reply
  36. Military heroes are actually new to me, so I do not yet have a favorite. I do know that, for the first time, I am tackling a hero who was wounded at Waterloo.
    Is it unfair of me to say I like him, when no one (outside of my writer’s group and blog readers) has met him? I’m going with no.
    Major Stratford Clarion, newly the Duke of Westerfell.

    Reply
  37. Military heroes are actually new to me, so I do not yet have a favorite. I do know that, for the first time, I am tackling a hero who was wounded at Waterloo.
    Is it unfair of me to say I like him, when no one (outside of my writer’s group and blog readers) has met him? I’m going with no.
    Major Stratford Clarion, newly the Duke of Westerfell.

    Reply
  38. Military heroes are actually new to me, so I do not yet have a favorite. I do know that, for the first time, I am tackling a hero who was wounded at Waterloo.
    Is it unfair of me to say I like him, when no one (outside of my writer’s group and blog readers) has met him? I’m going with no.
    Major Stratford Clarion, newly the Duke of Westerfell.

    Reply
  39. Military heroes are actually new to me, so I do not yet have a favorite. I do know that, for the first time, I am tackling a hero who was wounded at Waterloo.
    Is it unfair of me to say I like him, when no one (outside of my writer’s group and blog readers) has met him? I’m going with no.
    Major Stratford Clarion, newly the Duke of Westerfell.

    Reply
  40. Military heroes are actually new to me, so I do not yet have a favorite. I do know that, for the first time, I am tackling a hero who was wounded at Waterloo.
    Is it unfair of me to say I like him, when no one (outside of my writer’s group and blog readers) has met him? I’m going with no.
    Major Stratford Clarion, newly the Duke of Westerfell.

    Reply
  41. If the Navy counts (I’m sure it does) my longest held “favorite” military hero would be Captain Wentworth of Persuasion. This is because Captain Wentworth is probably the first military hero I met in literature.
    After naming him, I cannot begin to name the others. ALL of the young men in Mary Balogh’s Survivors’ Club series; Stephanie Lauren’s many heroes; the “dying” officer of Mary Jo’s The Bargain (and the military surgeon also!); Jo’s Berverley’s military men from the Rogues (and their friends the Georges); the military men among Mary Balogh’s Bedwyns — and so on. I don’t think I have ONE favorite!

    Reply
  42. If the Navy counts (I’m sure it does) my longest held “favorite” military hero would be Captain Wentworth of Persuasion. This is because Captain Wentworth is probably the first military hero I met in literature.
    After naming him, I cannot begin to name the others. ALL of the young men in Mary Balogh’s Survivors’ Club series; Stephanie Lauren’s many heroes; the “dying” officer of Mary Jo’s The Bargain (and the military surgeon also!); Jo’s Berverley’s military men from the Rogues (and their friends the Georges); the military men among Mary Balogh’s Bedwyns — and so on. I don’t think I have ONE favorite!

    Reply
  43. If the Navy counts (I’m sure it does) my longest held “favorite” military hero would be Captain Wentworth of Persuasion. This is because Captain Wentworth is probably the first military hero I met in literature.
    After naming him, I cannot begin to name the others. ALL of the young men in Mary Balogh’s Survivors’ Club series; Stephanie Lauren’s many heroes; the “dying” officer of Mary Jo’s The Bargain (and the military surgeon also!); Jo’s Berverley’s military men from the Rogues (and their friends the Georges); the military men among Mary Balogh’s Bedwyns — and so on. I don’t think I have ONE favorite!

    Reply
  44. If the Navy counts (I’m sure it does) my longest held “favorite” military hero would be Captain Wentworth of Persuasion. This is because Captain Wentworth is probably the first military hero I met in literature.
    After naming him, I cannot begin to name the others. ALL of the young men in Mary Balogh’s Survivors’ Club series; Stephanie Lauren’s many heroes; the “dying” officer of Mary Jo’s The Bargain (and the military surgeon also!); Jo’s Berverley’s military men from the Rogues (and their friends the Georges); the military men among Mary Balogh’s Bedwyns — and so on. I don’t think I have ONE favorite!

    Reply
  45. If the Navy counts (I’m sure it does) my longest held “favorite” military hero would be Captain Wentworth of Persuasion. This is because Captain Wentworth is probably the first military hero I met in literature.
    After naming him, I cannot begin to name the others. ALL of the young men in Mary Balogh’s Survivors’ Club series; Stephanie Lauren’s many heroes; the “dying” officer of Mary Jo’s The Bargain (and the military surgeon also!); Jo’s Berverley’s military men from the Rogues (and their friends the Georges); the military men among Mary Balogh’s Bedwyns — and so on. I don’t think I have ONE favorite!

    Reply
  46. Truly I have no favorite military man, but I cannot let Carla Kelly’s Hugh Philippe Junot in Marrying the Royal Marine not be listed. Now there is a HERO (capital letters). Additionally, Grace Burrowes’ Devlin St. Just is a man any woman would be proud to love.

    Reply
  47. Truly I have no favorite military man, but I cannot let Carla Kelly’s Hugh Philippe Junot in Marrying the Royal Marine not be listed. Now there is a HERO (capital letters). Additionally, Grace Burrowes’ Devlin St. Just is a man any woman would be proud to love.

    Reply
  48. Truly I have no favorite military man, but I cannot let Carla Kelly’s Hugh Philippe Junot in Marrying the Royal Marine not be listed. Now there is a HERO (capital letters). Additionally, Grace Burrowes’ Devlin St. Just is a man any woman would be proud to love.

    Reply
  49. Truly I have no favorite military man, but I cannot let Carla Kelly’s Hugh Philippe Junot in Marrying the Royal Marine not be listed. Now there is a HERO (capital letters). Additionally, Grace Burrowes’ Devlin St. Just is a man any woman would be proud to love.

    Reply
  50. Truly I have no favorite military man, but I cannot let Carla Kelly’s Hugh Philippe Junot in Marrying the Royal Marine not be listed. Now there is a HERO (capital letters). Additionally, Grace Burrowes’ Devlin St. Just is a man any woman would be proud to love.

    Reply
  51. Hi Susan – If you like Sharpe then you’ll probably love the hero of Louise’s book – “A Rose for Major Flint” as he is a man who has risen from the ranks, too.

    Reply
  52. Hi Susan – If you like Sharpe then you’ll probably love the hero of Louise’s book – “A Rose for Major Flint” as he is a man who has risen from the ranks, too.

    Reply
  53. Hi Susan – If you like Sharpe then you’ll probably love the hero of Louise’s book – “A Rose for Major Flint” as he is a man who has risen from the ranks, too.

    Reply
  54. Hi Susan – If you like Sharpe then you’ll probably love the hero of Louise’s book – “A Rose for Major Flint” as he is a man who has risen from the ranks, too.

    Reply
  55. Hi Susan – If you like Sharpe then you’ll probably love the hero of Louise’s book – “A Rose for Major Flint” as he is a man who has risen from the ranks, too.

    Reply
  56. Thanks for those kind words Mary Jo – We were all thrilled by the covers to this series. As you say, the art department have done a terrific job.
    They have put the farm at Hougoumont in the background of all three books. In Sarah’s, the first of the series, the farm is intact. In mine it is in flames. And in Louise’s, it is just a burned out shell. And the cover for A Mistress for Major Bartlett has been nominated for the Cover Cafe award!

    Reply
  57. Thanks for those kind words Mary Jo – We were all thrilled by the covers to this series. As you say, the art department have done a terrific job.
    They have put the farm at Hougoumont in the background of all three books. In Sarah’s, the first of the series, the farm is intact. In mine it is in flames. And in Louise’s, it is just a burned out shell. And the cover for A Mistress for Major Bartlett has been nominated for the Cover Cafe award!

    Reply
  58. Thanks for those kind words Mary Jo – We were all thrilled by the covers to this series. As you say, the art department have done a terrific job.
    They have put the farm at Hougoumont in the background of all three books. In Sarah’s, the first of the series, the farm is intact. In mine it is in flames. And in Louise’s, it is just a burned out shell. And the cover for A Mistress for Major Bartlett has been nominated for the Cover Cafe award!

    Reply
  59. Thanks for those kind words Mary Jo – We were all thrilled by the covers to this series. As you say, the art department have done a terrific job.
    They have put the farm at Hougoumont in the background of all three books. In Sarah’s, the first of the series, the farm is intact. In mine it is in flames. And in Louise’s, it is just a burned out shell. And the cover for A Mistress for Major Bartlett has been nominated for the Cover Cafe award!

    Reply
  60. Thanks for those kind words Mary Jo – We were all thrilled by the covers to this series. As you say, the art department have done a terrific job.
    They have put the farm at Hougoumont in the background of all three books. In Sarah’s, the first of the series, the farm is intact. In mine it is in flames. And in Louise’s, it is just a burned out shell. And the cover for A Mistress for Major Bartlett has been nominated for the Cover Cafe award!

    Reply
  61. Laura – no, of course it’s not unfair to say you like someone nobody else has heard of yet. I think we have to be in love with our own heroes, or we wouldn’t be able to create them, and make our readers fall in love with them either!

    Reply
  62. Laura – no, of course it’s not unfair to say you like someone nobody else has heard of yet. I think we have to be in love with our own heroes, or we wouldn’t be able to create them, and make our readers fall in love with them either!

    Reply
  63. Laura – no, of course it’s not unfair to say you like someone nobody else has heard of yet. I think we have to be in love with our own heroes, or we wouldn’t be able to create them, and make our readers fall in love with them either!

    Reply
  64. Laura – no, of course it’s not unfair to say you like someone nobody else has heard of yet. I think we have to be in love with our own heroes, or we wouldn’t be able to create them, and make our readers fall in love with them either!

    Reply
  65. Laura – no, of course it’s not unfair to say you like someone nobody else has heard of yet. I think we have to be in love with our own heroes, or we wouldn’t be able to create them, and make our readers fall in love with them either!

    Reply
  66. LOL Sue – you have a lot of favourites! I have to confess one of my first military “crushes” was on Hornblower. Who wasn’t written as a romantic hero at all, I don’t think…

    Reply
  67. LOL Sue – you have a lot of favourites! I have to confess one of my first military “crushes” was on Hornblower. Who wasn’t written as a romantic hero at all, I don’t think…

    Reply
  68. LOL Sue – you have a lot of favourites! I have to confess one of my first military “crushes” was on Hornblower. Who wasn’t written as a romantic hero at all, I don’t think…

    Reply
  69. LOL Sue – you have a lot of favourites! I have to confess one of my first military “crushes” was on Hornblower. Who wasn’t written as a romantic hero at all, I don’t think…

    Reply
  70. LOL Sue – you have a lot of favourites! I have to confess one of my first military “crushes” was on Hornblower. Who wasn’t written as a romantic hero at all, I don’t think…

    Reply
  71. I enjoy reading about aristocratic spies for the British Government during the war with Napolean, so I offer Michael Hepburn from “His Sinful Secret” by Emma Wildes.

    Reply
  72. I enjoy reading about aristocratic spies for the British Government during the war with Napolean, so I offer Michael Hepburn from “His Sinful Secret” by Emma Wildes.

    Reply
  73. I enjoy reading about aristocratic spies for the British Government during the war with Napolean, so I offer Michael Hepburn from “His Sinful Secret” by Emma Wildes.

    Reply
  74. I enjoy reading about aristocratic spies for the British Government during the war with Napolean, so I offer Michael Hepburn from “His Sinful Secret” by Emma Wildes.

    Reply
  75. I enjoy reading about aristocratic spies for the British Government during the war with Napolean, so I offer Michael Hepburn from “His Sinful Secret” by Emma Wildes.

    Reply
  76. I’ve been enjoying Mary Balogh’s Survivor’s Club series – they all went thru horrendous experiences that probably only touched on what happened in actuality.

    Reply
  77. I’ve been enjoying Mary Balogh’s Survivor’s Club series – they all went thru horrendous experiences that probably only touched on what happened in actuality.

    Reply
  78. I’ve been enjoying Mary Balogh’s Survivor’s Club series – they all went thru horrendous experiences that probably only touched on what happened in actuality.

    Reply
  79. I’ve been enjoying Mary Balogh’s Survivor’s Club series – they all went thru horrendous experiences that probably only touched on what happened in actuality.

    Reply
  80. I’ve been enjoying Mary Balogh’s Survivor’s Club series – they all went thru horrendous experiences that probably only touched on what happened in actuality.

    Reply
  81. I love the Survivor’s Club books. I love all the Regency heroes, too many to mention. I remember one where the heroine did a blood transfusion to save the hero’s life (I’m guessing one of the first). Contemporary – I love Sandra Hill’s SEALS, and Vikings turned SEALS books. They are funny and seem to get across the heroism of the characters.

    Reply
  82. I love the Survivor’s Club books. I love all the Regency heroes, too many to mention. I remember one where the heroine did a blood transfusion to save the hero’s life (I’m guessing one of the first). Contemporary – I love Sandra Hill’s SEALS, and Vikings turned SEALS books. They are funny and seem to get across the heroism of the characters.

    Reply
  83. I love the Survivor’s Club books. I love all the Regency heroes, too many to mention. I remember one where the heroine did a blood transfusion to save the hero’s life (I’m guessing one of the first). Contemporary – I love Sandra Hill’s SEALS, and Vikings turned SEALS books. They are funny and seem to get across the heroism of the characters.

    Reply
  84. I love the Survivor’s Club books. I love all the Regency heroes, too many to mention. I remember one where the heroine did a blood transfusion to save the hero’s life (I’m guessing one of the first). Contemporary – I love Sandra Hill’s SEALS, and Vikings turned SEALS books. They are funny and seem to get across the heroism of the characters.

    Reply
  85. I love the Survivor’s Club books. I love all the Regency heroes, too many to mention. I remember one where the heroine did a blood transfusion to save the hero’s life (I’m guessing one of the first). Contemporary – I love Sandra Hill’s SEALS, and Vikings turned SEALS books. They are funny and seem to get across the heroism of the characters.

    Reply
  86. Cindy, the blood transfusion was in my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS. The research was pretty hair-raising, and the two doctors I asked about this were horrified at the very thought. But it wasn’t quite impossible that such a transfusion could be successfully done.

    Reply
  87. Cindy, the blood transfusion was in my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS. The research was pretty hair-raising, and the two doctors I asked about this were horrified at the very thought. But it wasn’t quite impossible that such a transfusion could be successfully done.

    Reply
  88. Cindy, the blood transfusion was in my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS. The research was pretty hair-raising, and the two doctors I asked about this were horrified at the very thought. But it wasn’t quite impossible that such a transfusion could be successfully done.

    Reply
  89. Cindy, the blood transfusion was in my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS. The research was pretty hair-raising, and the two doctors I asked about this were horrified at the very thought. But it wasn’t quite impossible that such a transfusion could be successfully done.

    Reply
  90. Cindy, the blood transfusion was in my Waterloo book, SHATTERED RAINBOWS. The research was pretty hair-raising, and the two doctors I asked about this were horrified at the very thought. But it wasn’t quite impossible that such a transfusion could be successfully done.

    Reply
  91. I’d have to start with Stephanie Lauren’s Cynsters and Bastion Club. From there, too many to tell. Oh, and the bridegroom from Barbara Cartland’s The Bored Bridegroom. Read it as a teenager and still one of my all-time favorite books.

    Reply
  92. I’d have to start with Stephanie Lauren’s Cynsters and Bastion Club. From there, too many to tell. Oh, and the bridegroom from Barbara Cartland’s The Bored Bridegroom. Read it as a teenager and still one of my all-time favorite books.

    Reply
  93. I’d have to start with Stephanie Lauren’s Cynsters and Bastion Club. From there, too many to tell. Oh, and the bridegroom from Barbara Cartland’s The Bored Bridegroom. Read it as a teenager and still one of my all-time favorite books.

    Reply
  94. I’d have to start with Stephanie Lauren’s Cynsters and Bastion Club. From there, too many to tell. Oh, and the bridegroom from Barbara Cartland’s The Bored Bridegroom. Read it as a teenager and still one of my all-time favorite books.

    Reply
  95. I’d have to start with Stephanie Lauren’s Cynsters and Bastion Club. From there, too many to tell. Oh, and the bridegroom from Barbara Cartland’s The Bored Bridegroom. Read it as a teenager and still one of my all-time favorite books.

    Reply
  96. For Heyer, I like Gervase St. Erth in The Quiet Gentleman and Capt. John Staple in The Toll Gate. For WW2, I like Captain Milja in The Polish Officer and Col. Jean-Francois Mercier in The Spies of Warsaw, both by Alan Furst. I’ve read so many other regencies with military heroes that it’s hard to remember their names, let alone pick one 🙁

    Reply
  97. For Heyer, I like Gervase St. Erth in The Quiet Gentleman and Capt. John Staple in The Toll Gate. For WW2, I like Captain Milja in The Polish Officer and Col. Jean-Francois Mercier in The Spies of Warsaw, both by Alan Furst. I’ve read so many other regencies with military heroes that it’s hard to remember their names, let alone pick one 🙁

    Reply
  98. For Heyer, I like Gervase St. Erth in The Quiet Gentleman and Capt. John Staple in The Toll Gate. For WW2, I like Captain Milja in The Polish Officer and Col. Jean-Francois Mercier in The Spies of Warsaw, both by Alan Furst. I’ve read so many other regencies with military heroes that it’s hard to remember their names, let alone pick one 🙁

    Reply
  99. For Heyer, I like Gervase St. Erth in The Quiet Gentleman and Capt. John Staple in The Toll Gate. For WW2, I like Captain Milja in The Polish Officer and Col. Jean-Francois Mercier in The Spies of Warsaw, both by Alan Furst. I’ve read so many other regencies with military heroes that it’s hard to remember their names, let alone pick one 🙁

    Reply
  100. For Heyer, I like Gervase St. Erth in The Quiet Gentleman and Capt. John Staple in The Toll Gate. For WW2, I like Captain Milja in The Polish Officer and Col. Jean-Francois Mercier in The Spies of Warsaw, both by Alan Furst. I’ve read so many other regencies with military heroes that it’s hard to remember their names, let alone pick one 🙁

    Reply
  101. My favorite military hero is Colonel Charles Audley in Georgette Heyer’s An Infamous Army. He is intelligent and brave, and he has the good taste to fall in love with the granddaughter of my favorite heroine, Mary Challoner, who is now the Duchess of Avon. An Infamous Army provides a good love story, a masterful description of the battle of Waterloo, and glimpses of characters from three other Heyer books.

    Reply
  102. My favorite military hero is Colonel Charles Audley in Georgette Heyer’s An Infamous Army. He is intelligent and brave, and he has the good taste to fall in love with the granddaughter of my favorite heroine, Mary Challoner, who is now the Duchess of Avon. An Infamous Army provides a good love story, a masterful description of the battle of Waterloo, and glimpses of characters from three other Heyer books.

    Reply
  103. My favorite military hero is Colonel Charles Audley in Georgette Heyer’s An Infamous Army. He is intelligent and brave, and he has the good taste to fall in love with the granddaughter of my favorite heroine, Mary Challoner, who is now the Duchess of Avon. An Infamous Army provides a good love story, a masterful description of the battle of Waterloo, and glimpses of characters from three other Heyer books.

    Reply
  104. My favorite military hero is Colonel Charles Audley in Georgette Heyer’s An Infamous Army. He is intelligent and brave, and he has the good taste to fall in love with the granddaughter of my favorite heroine, Mary Challoner, who is now the Duchess of Avon. An Infamous Army provides a good love story, a masterful description of the battle of Waterloo, and glimpses of characters from three other Heyer books.

    Reply
  105. My favorite military hero is Colonel Charles Audley in Georgette Heyer’s An Infamous Army. He is intelligent and brave, and he has the good taste to fall in love with the granddaughter of my favorite heroine, Mary Challoner, who is now the Duchess of Avon. An Infamous Army provides a good love story, a masterful description of the battle of Waterloo, and glimpses of characters from three other Heyer books.

    Reply
  106. Clearly, military heroes resonate with so many of you! I love Randall, Tom Bartlett and Adam Flint, the heroes of our Brides of Waterloo series, three very different men but all quite gorgeous (naturally!)and worthy partners for our heroines. However, I also love Austen’s Captain Wentworth, clearly a man of passion! AND Hornblower, a strong man but with a soft centre,just how I like my heroes.
    We were delighted with the covers for our trilogy,too. The art department did really well and I think they are amongst the best covers I have ever had on my books!

    Reply
  107. Clearly, military heroes resonate with so many of you! I love Randall, Tom Bartlett and Adam Flint, the heroes of our Brides of Waterloo series, three very different men but all quite gorgeous (naturally!)and worthy partners for our heroines. However, I also love Austen’s Captain Wentworth, clearly a man of passion! AND Hornblower, a strong man but with a soft centre,just how I like my heroes.
    We were delighted with the covers for our trilogy,too. The art department did really well and I think they are amongst the best covers I have ever had on my books!

    Reply
  108. Clearly, military heroes resonate with so many of you! I love Randall, Tom Bartlett and Adam Flint, the heroes of our Brides of Waterloo series, three very different men but all quite gorgeous (naturally!)and worthy partners for our heroines. However, I also love Austen’s Captain Wentworth, clearly a man of passion! AND Hornblower, a strong man but with a soft centre,just how I like my heroes.
    We were delighted with the covers for our trilogy,too. The art department did really well and I think they are amongst the best covers I have ever had on my books!

    Reply
  109. Clearly, military heroes resonate with so many of you! I love Randall, Tom Bartlett and Adam Flint, the heroes of our Brides of Waterloo series, three very different men but all quite gorgeous (naturally!)and worthy partners for our heroines. However, I also love Austen’s Captain Wentworth, clearly a man of passion! AND Hornblower, a strong man but with a soft centre,just how I like my heroes.
    We were delighted with the covers for our trilogy,too. The art department did really well and I think they are amongst the best covers I have ever had on my books!

    Reply
  110. Clearly, military heroes resonate with so many of you! I love Randall, Tom Bartlett and Adam Flint, the heroes of our Brides of Waterloo series, three very different men but all quite gorgeous (naturally!)and worthy partners for our heroines. However, I also love Austen’s Captain Wentworth, clearly a man of passion! AND Hornblower, a strong man but with a soft centre,just how I like my heroes.
    We were delighted with the covers for our trilogy,too. The art department did really well and I think they are amongst the best covers I have ever had on my books!

    Reply
  111. It is a wonderful book isn’t it, Meg, and a very accurately researched story as well. I like the fact that you get glimpses of other Heyer characters, especially Mary who is my favourite heroine as well!

    Reply
  112. It is a wonderful book isn’t it, Meg, and a very accurately researched story as well. I like the fact that you get glimpses of other Heyer characters, especially Mary who is my favourite heroine as well!

    Reply
  113. It is a wonderful book isn’t it, Meg, and a very accurately researched story as well. I like the fact that you get glimpses of other Heyer characters, especially Mary who is my favourite heroine as well!

    Reply
  114. It is a wonderful book isn’t it, Meg, and a very accurately researched story as well. I like the fact that you get glimpses of other Heyer characters, especially Mary who is my favourite heroine as well!

    Reply
  115. It is a wonderful book isn’t it, Meg, and a very accurately researched story as well. I like the fact that you get glimpses of other Heyer characters, especially Mary who is my favourite heroine as well!

    Reply
  116. That’s a great idea, Mary Jo – so far all I’ve done is have postcards made of the three covers as giveaways, though you can be sure I will be hanging onto at least one as a memento. x

    Reply
  117. That’s a great idea, Mary Jo – so far all I’ve done is have postcards made of the three covers as giveaways, though you can be sure I will be hanging onto at least one as a memento. x

    Reply
  118. That’s a great idea, Mary Jo – so far all I’ve done is have postcards made of the three covers as giveaways, though you can be sure I will be hanging onto at least one as a memento. x

    Reply
  119. That’s a great idea, Mary Jo – so far all I’ve done is have postcards made of the three covers as giveaways, though you can be sure I will be hanging onto at least one as a memento. x

    Reply
  120. That’s a great idea, Mary Jo – so far all I’ve done is have postcards made of the three covers as giveaways, though you can be sure I will be hanging onto at least one as a memento. x

    Reply
  121. Duly noted Patricia – yet another hero I hadn’t heard of. Honestly, my wish list is growing at a rate of knots as you let me know about your delicious sounding favourite Regency heroes.

    Reply
  122. Duly noted Patricia – yet another hero I hadn’t heard of. Honestly, my wish list is growing at a rate of knots as you let me know about your delicious sounding favourite Regency heroes.

    Reply
  123. Duly noted Patricia – yet another hero I hadn’t heard of. Honestly, my wish list is growing at a rate of knots as you let me know about your delicious sounding favourite Regency heroes.

    Reply
  124. Duly noted Patricia – yet another hero I hadn’t heard of. Honestly, my wish list is growing at a rate of knots as you let me know about your delicious sounding favourite Regency heroes.

    Reply
  125. Duly noted Patricia – yet another hero I hadn’t heard of. Honestly, my wish list is growing at a rate of knots as you let me know about your delicious sounding favourite Regency heroes.

    Reply
  126. Coming in rather late on this, I’m afraid. Thanks everyone for fascinating comments. For those who love a naval hero can I recommend a non-fiction book – A Miller Dressed to Kill: British naval uniform, masculinity & contemporary fashions 1748-1857 (2007) Fabulous illustrations

    Reply
  127. Coming in rather late on this, I’m afraid. Thanks everyone for fascinating comments. For those who love a naval hero can I recommend a non-fiction book – A Miller Dressed to Kill: British naval uniform, masculinity & contemporary fashions 1748-1857 (2007) Fabulous illustrations

    Reply
  128. Coming in rather late on this, I’m afraid. Thanks everyone for fascinating comments. For those who love a naval hero can I recommend a non-fiction book – A Miller Dressed to Kill: British naval uniform, masculinity & contemporary fashions 1748-1857 (2007) Fabulous illustrations

    Reply
  129. Coming in rather late on this, I’m afraid. Thanks everyone for fascinating comments. For those who love a naval hero can I recommend a non-fiction book – A Miller Dressed to Kill: British naval uniform, masculinity & contemporary fashions 1748-1857 (2007) Fabulous illustrations

    Reply
  130. Coming in rather late on this, I’m afraid. Thanks everyone for fascinating comments. For those who love a naval hero can I recommend a non-fiction book – A Miller Dressed to Kill: British naval uniform, masculinity & contemporary fashions 1748-1857 (2007) Fabulous illustrations

    Reply
  131. This is so timely, because I have been reading the Brides of Waterloo, and I just finished the last one yesterday! I loved all of them, but I have to confess that Major Adam Flint, in Louise Allen’s book was my favorite. He’s so honorable and stoic! And I loved the way the stories tied together, and the various characters crossed each other’s paths in all three books. I can just imagine the kind of flow-charting you had to do to keep everybody’s actions and locations straight, because the 3 books take place simultaneously. The covers really are gorgeous, too.
    It’s hard to pick an all-time favorite military hero, there are so many. But besides the ones already mentioned, I’ll add Rafael Dalton from Edith Layton’s “The Chance”, Harry Morant from “His Captive Lady”, Cyn Malloren from “My Lady Notorious”, Aidan Bedwyn from Mary Balogh’s “Slightly Married”, and Jasper Renshaw from Elizabeth Hoyt’s “To Seduce a Sinner”. None of these books take place on a battlefield, but the fact that they were soldiers form a big part of the characters of all these heroes.

    Reply
  132. This is so timely, because I have been reading the Brides of Waterloo, and I just finished the last one yesterday! I loved all of them, but I have to confess that Major Adam Flint, in Louise Allen’s book was my favorite. He’s so honorable and stoic! And I loved the way the stories tied together, and the various characters crossed each other’s paths in all three books. I can just imagine the kind of flow-charting you had to do to keep everybody’s actions and locations straight, because the 3 books take place simultaneously. The covers really are gorgeous, too.
    It’s hard to pick an all-time favorite military hero, there are so many. But besides the ones already mentioned, I’ll add Rafael Dalton from Edith Layton’s “The Chance”, Harry Morant from “His Captive Lady”, Cyn Malloren from “My Lady Notorious”, Aidan Bedwyn from Mary Balogh’s “Slightly Married”, and Jasper Renshaw from Elizabeth Hoyt’s “To Seduce a Sinner”. None of these books take place on a battlefield, but the fact that they were soldiers form a big part of the characters of all these heroes.

    Reply
  133. This is so timely, because I have been reading the Brides of Waterloo, and I just finished the last one yesterday! I loved all of them, but I have to confess that Major Adam Flint, in Louise Allen’s book was my favorite. He’s so honorable and stoic! And I loved the way the stories tied together, and the various characters crossed each other’s paths in all three books. I can just imagine the kind of flow-charting you had to do to keep everybody’s actions and locations straight, because the 3 books take place simultaneously. The covers really are gorgeous, too.
    It’s hard to pick an all-time favorite military hero, there are so many. But besides the ones already mentioned, I’ll add Rafael Dalton from Edith Layton’s “The Chance”, Harry Morant from “His Captive Lady”, Cyn Malloren from “My Lady Notorious”, Aidan Bedwyn from Mary Balogh’s “Slightly Married”, and Jasper Renshaw from Elizabeth Hoyt’s “To Seduce a Sinner”. None of these books take place on a battlefield, but the fact that they were soldiers form a big part of the characters of all these heroes.

    Reply
  134. This is so timely, because I have been reading the Brides of Waterloo, and I just finished the last one yesterday! I loved all of them, but I have to confess that Major Adam Flint, in Louise Allen’s book was my favorite. He’s so honorable and stoic! And I loved the way the stories tied together, and the various characters crossed each other’s paths in all three books. I can just imagine the kind of flow-charting you had to do to keep everybody’s actions and locations straight, because the 3 books take place simultaneously. The covers really are gorgeous, too.
    It’s hard to pick an all-time favorite military hero, there are so many. But besides the ones already mentioned, I’ll add Rafael Dalton from Edith Layton’s “The Chance”, Harry Morant from “His Captive Lady”, Cyn Malloren from “My Lady Notorious”, Aidan Bedwyn from Mary Balogh’s “Slightly Married”, and Jasper Renshaw from Elizabeth Hoyt’s “To Seduce a Sinner”. None of these books take place on a battlefield, but the fact that they were soldiers form a big part of the characters of all these heroes.

    Reply
  135. This is so timely, because I have been reading the Brides of Waterloo, and I just finished the last one yesterday! I loved all of them, but I have to confess that Major Adam Flint, in Louise Allen’s book was my favorite. He’s so honorable and stoic! And I loved the way the stories tied together, and the various characters crossed each other’s paths in all three books. I can just imagine the kind of flow-charting you had to do to keep everybody’s actions and locations straight, because the 3 books take place simultaneously. The covers really are gorgeous, too.
    It’s hard to pick an all-time favorite military hero, there are so many. But besides the ones already mentioned, I’ll add Rafael Dalton from Edith Layton’s “The Chance”, Harry Morant from “His Captive Lady”, Cyn Malloren from “My Lady Notorious”, Aidan Bedwyn from Mary Balogh’s “Slightly Married”, and Jasper Renshaw from Elizabeth Hoyt’s “To Seduce a Sinner”. None of these books take place on a battlefield, but the fact that they were soldiers form a big part of the characters of all these heroes.

    Reply
  136. Randall is a great one. Jo Beverley has several and the best cover in Three Men named George. I much prefer a man in full uniform on the cover rather than one facing court martial for having his shirt torn down the front and looking sloppy.
    men in uniforms always seem attractive and I do like them on the cover of books. I once went to a ball where the guests were cadets from West Point. Almost made my teenage self swoon.

    Reply
  137. Randall is a great one. Jo Beverley has several and the best cover in Three Men named George. I much prefer a man in full uniform on the cover rather than one facing court martial for having his shirt torn down the front and looking sloppy.
    men in uniforms always seem attractive and I do like them on the cover of books. I once went to a ball where the guests were cadets from West Point. Almost made my teenage self swoon.

    Reply
  138. Randall is a great one. Jo Beverley has several and the best cover in Three Men named George. I much prefer a man in full uniform on the cover rather than one facing court martial for having his shirt torn down the front and looking sloppy.
    men in uniforms always seem attractive and I do like them on the cover of books. I once went to a ball where the guests were cadets from West Point. Almost made my teenage self swoon.

    Reply
  139. Randall is a great one. Jo Beverley has several and the best cover in Three Men named George. I much prefer a man in full uniform on the cover rather than one facing court martial for having his shirt torn down the front and looking sloppy.
    men in uniforms always seem attractive and I do like them on the cover of books. I once went to a ball where the guests were cadets from West Point. Almost made my teenage self swoon.

    Reply
  140. Randall is a great one. Jo Beverley has several and the best cover in Three Men named George. I much prefer a man in full uniform on the cover rather than one facing court martial for having his shirt torn down the front and looking sloppy.
    men in uniforms always seem attractive and I do like them on the cover of books. I once went to a ball where the guests were cadets from West Point. Almost made my teenage self swoon.

    Reply
  141. I just bought all three of the “Waterloo Brides” so still have that to look forward to but I do have quite a few military heroes that I love. I love contemporaries with SEALs in them but my heart belongs to historical romance novels. The best ones are: Captain Christopher Phelan in Love in the Afternoon by Losa Kleypas, Damien Knight in Lord of Ice by Gaelen Foley, Valentine Clement in A Reckless Beauty by Kasey Micheals, and any of the last three heroes in Elizabeth Hoyt’s Legend of the Four Soldiers. My favourite of all time is Drake, Earl of Westwood in My Ruthless Prince by Gaelen Foley – he’s a spy but he’s still fighting for King and Country!

    Reply
  142. I just bought all three of the “Waterloo Brides” so still have that to look forward to but I do have quite a few military heroes that I love. I love contemporaries with SEALs in them but my heart belongs to historical romance novels. The best ones are: Captain Christopher Phelan in Love in the Afternoon by Losa Kleypas, Damien Knight in Lord of Ice by Gaelen Foley, Valentine Clement in A Reckless Beauty by Kasey Micheals, and any of the last three heroes in Elizabeth Hoyt’s Legend of the Four Soldiers. My favourite of all time is Drake, Earl of Westwood in My Ruthless Prince by Gaelen Foley – he’s a spy but he’s still fighting for King and Country!

    Reply
  143. I just bought all three of the “Waterloo Brides” so still have that to look forward to but I do have quite a few military heroes that I love. I love contemporaries with SEALs in them but my heart belongs to historical romance novels. The best ones are: Captain Christopher Phelan in Love in the Afternoon by Losa Kleypas, Damien Knight in Lord of Ice by Gaelen Foley, Valentine Clement in A Reckless Beauty by Kasey Micheals, and any of the last three heroes in Elizabeth Hoyt’s Legend of the Four Soldiers. My favourite of all time is Drake, Earl of Westwood in My Ruthless Prince by Gaelen Foley – he’s a spy but he’s still fighting for King and Country!

    Reply
  144. I just bought all three of the “Waterloo Brides” so still have that to look forward to but I do have quite a few military heroes that I love. I love contemporaries with SEALs in them but my heart belongs to historical romance novels. The best ones are: Captain Christopher Phelan in Love in the Afternoon by Losa Kleypas, Damien Knight in Lord of Ice by Gaelen Foley, Valentine Clement in A Reckless Beauty by Kasey Micheals, and any of the last three heroes in Elizabeth Hoyt’s Legend of the Four Soldiers. My favourite of all time is Drake, Earl of Westwood in My Ruthless Prince by Gaelen Foley – he’s a spy but he’s still fighting for King and Country!

    Reply
  145. I just bought all three of the “Waterloo Brides” so still have that to look forward to but I do have quite a few military heroes that I love. I love contemporaries with SEALs in them but my heart belongs to historical romance novels. The best ones are: Captain Christopher Phelan in Love in the Afternoon by Losa Kleypas, Damien Knight in Lord of Ice by Gaelen Foley, Valentine Clement in A Reckless Beauty by Kasey Micheals, and any of the last three heroes in Elizabeth Hoyt’s Legend of the Four Soldiers. My favourite of all time is Drake, Earl of Westwood in My Ruthless Prince by Gaelen Foley – he’s a spy but he’s still fighting for King and Country!

    Reply
  146. I have to admit, I love military heroes too… Any book by Grace Burrowes, Mary Jo. JoAnna’s spies.
    Some of my Favorites that haven’t been mentioned yet: Hugo from The Toll Booth (Georgette Heyer), Robin – The Rake and the Runaway (Mary Jo Putney). True Robin wasn’t a soldier but he was a spy and was very much a soul tortured person. (Many of the books listed above are ones I’ve enjoyed and still have in my keepers.)
    Modern ones – Zane – Mackenzie’s Pleasure (Linda Howard.) Actually all of the Mackenzie series the heroes have a military background – Wolf is a great one in Mackenzie’s Mountain.
    Robyn Carr – Virgin River Series (tons of military heroes in that series). My favorites are Jack, Preacher, Mike, Ian, Luke and Aiden.
    Two new modern series that have great military heroes – Alexis Morgan – Snowberry Creek and JoAnn Ross – Shelter Bay.
    From WWII – Anne McCaffrey’s The Mark of Merlin – Major Regan Laird.
    I’m really not particular as to which era…I like them all. Grin.

    Reply
  147. I have to admit, I love military heroes too… Any book by Grace Burrowes, Mary Jo. JoAnna’s spies.
    Some of my Favorites that haven’t been mentioned yet: Hugo from The Toll Booth (Georgette Heyer), Robin – The Rake and the Runaway (Mary Jo Putney). True Robin wasn’t a soldier but he was a spy and was very much a soul tortured person. (Many of the books listed above are ones I’ve enjoyed and still have in my keepers.)
    Modern ones – Zane – Mackenzie’s Pleasure (Linda Howard.) Actually all of the Mackenzie series the heroes have a military background – Wolf is a great one in Mackenzie’s Mountain.
    Robyn Carr – Virgin River Series (tons of military heroes in that series). My favorites are Jack, Preacher, Mike, Ian, Luke and Aiden.
    Two new modern series that have great military heroes – Alexis Morgan – Snowberry Creek and JoAnn Ross – Shelter Bay.
    From WWII – Anne McCaffrey’s The Mark of Merlin – Major Regan Laird.
    I’m really not particular as to which era…I like them all. Grin.

    Reply
  148. I have to admit, I love military heroes too… Any book by Grace Burrowes, Mary Jo. JoAnna’s spies.
    Some of my Favorites that haven’t been mentioned yet: Hugo from The Toll Booth (Georgette Heyer), Robin – The Rake and the Runaway (Mary Jo Putney). True Robin wasn’t a soldier but he was a spy and was very much a soul tortured person. (Many of the books listed above are ones I’ve enjoyed and still have in my keepers.)
    Modern ones – Zane – Mackenzie’s Pleasure (Linda Howard.) Actually all of the Mackenzie series the heroes have a military background – Wolf is a great one in Mackenzie’s Mountain.
    Robyn Carr – Virgin River Series (tons of military heroes in that series). My favorites are Jack, Preacher, Mike, Ian, Luke and Aiden.
    Two new modern series that have great military heroes – Alexis Morgan – Snowberry Creek and JoAnn Ross – Shelter Bay.
    From WWII – Anne McCaffrey’s The Mark of Merlin – Major Regan Laird.
    I’m really not particular as to which era…I like them all. Grin.

    Reply
  149. I have to admit, I love military heroes too… Any book by Grace Burrowes, Mary Jo. JoAnna’s spies.
    Some of my Favorites that haven’t been mentioned yet: Hugo from The Toll Booth (Georgette Heyer), Robin – The Rake and the Runaway (Mary Jo Putney). True Robin wasn’t a soldier but he was a spy and was very much a soul tortured person. (Many of the books listed above are ones I’ve enjoyed and still have in my keepers.)
    Modern ones – Zane – Mackenzie’s Pleasure (Linda Howard.) Actually all of the Mackenzie series the heroes have a military background – Wolf is a great one in Mackenzie’s Mountain.
    Robyn Carr – Virgin River Series (tons of military heroes in that series). My favorites are Jack, Preacher, Mike, Ian, Luke and Aiden.
    Two new modern series that have great military heroes – Alexis Morgan – Snowberry Creek and JoAnn Ross – Shelter Bay.
    From WWII – Anne McCaffrey’s The Mark of Merlin – Major Regan Laird.
    I’m really not particular as to which era…I like them all. Grin.

    Reply
  150. I have to admit, I love military heroes too… Any book by Grace Burrowes, Mary Jo. JoAnna’s spies.
    Some of my Favorites that haven’t been mentioned yet: Hugo from The Toll Booth (Georgette Heyer), Robin – The Rake and the Runaway (Mary Jo Putney). True Robin wasn’t a soldier but he was a spy and was very much a soul tortured person. (Many of the books listed above are ones I’ve enjoyed and still have in my keepers.)
    Modern ones – Zane – Mackenzie’s Pleasure (Linda Howard.) Actually all of the Mackenzie series the heroes have a military background – Wolf is a great one in Mackenzie’s Mountain.
    Robyn Carr – Virgin River Series (tons of military heroes in that series). My favorites are Jack, Preacher, Mike, Ian, Luke and Aiden.
    Two new modern series that have great military heroes – Alexis Morgan – Snowberry Creek and JoAnn Ross – Shelter Bay.
    From WWII – Anne McCaffrey’s The Mark of Merlin – Major Regan Laird.
    I’m really not particular as to which era…I like them all. Grin.

    Reply
  151. Yes, transfusions were sometimes done as a last ditch effort, but remember that “cupping” (bleeding a patient) was still considered standard therapy at the time of the regency for almost every condition including wounds. And since blood types were not discovered until the 20th century it was extremely dangerous. If the patient lived it was probably because type O is the most common and least likely to react badly with another type.

    Reply
  152. Yes, transfusions were sometimes done as a last ditch effort, but remember that “cupping” (bleeding a patient) was still considered standard therapy at the time of the regency for almost every condition including wounds. And since blood types were not discovered until the 20th century it was extremely dangerous. If the patient lived it was probably because type O is the most common and least likely to react badly with another type.

    Reply
  153. Yes, transfusions were sometimes done as a last ditch effort, but remember that “cupping” (bleeding a patient) was still considered standard therapy at the time of the regency for almost every condition including wounds. And since blood types were not discovered until the 20th century it was extremely dangerous. If the patient lived it was probably because type O is the most common and least likely to react badly with another type.

    Reply
  154. Yes, transfusions were sometimes done as a last ditch effort, but remember that “cupping” (bleeding a patient) was still considered standard therapy at the time of the regency for almost every condition including wounds. And since blood types were not discovered until the 20th century it was extremely dangerous. If the patient lived it was probably because type O is the most common and least likely to react badly with another type.

    Reply
  155. Yes, transfusions were sometimes done as a last ditch effort, but remember that “cupping” (bleeding a patient) was still considered standard therapy at the time of the regency for almost every condition including wounds. And since blood types were not discovered until the 20th century it was extremely dangerous. If the patient lived it was probably because type O is the most common and least likely to react badly with another type.

    Reply
  156. Oh Thank you Anne Hoilie for mentioning Grace Burrowe’s Devlin St. Just! Big Burrowes fan here. I haven’t read Marrying the Royal Marine yet, though I do enjoy Carla Kelly. So thank you for mentioning her book too.

    Reply
  157. Oh Thank you Anne Hoilie for mentioning Grace Burrowe’s Devlin St. Just! Big Burrowes fan here. I haven’t read Marrying the Royal Marine yet, though I do enjoy Carla Kelly. So thank you for mentioning her book too.

    Reply
  158. Oh Thank you Anne Hoilie for mentioning Grace Burrowe’s Devlin St. Just! Big Burrowes fan here. I haven’t read Marrying the Royal Marine yet, though I do enjoy Carla Kelly. So thank you for mentioning her book too.

    Reply
  159. Oh Thank you Anne Hoilie for mentioning Grace Burrowe’s Devlin St. Just! Big Burrowes fan here. I haven’t read Marrying the Royal Marine yet, though I do enjoy Carla Kelly. So thank you for mentioning her book too.

    Reply
  160. Oh Thank you Anne Hoilie for mentioning Grace Burrowe’s Devlin St. Just! Big Burrowes fan here. I haven’t read Marrying the Royal Marine yet, though I do enjoy Carla Kelly. So thank you for mentioning her book too.

    Reply
  161. This web site is just THE BEST. Just when I think I can skim the subject, add a new book of interest to my TBR stack and move on I’m stopped in my tracks and have to delve into the subject in detail. But yes, these books go right onto my TBR stack.
    I always learn something fascinating in these entries. And today I have been enticed to explore more book titles, (and ideas and subjects to research) than I could read in a month or more. The details that a fan of Regency Romance might not think of as they enjoy the exciting plot are just wonderful to learn and I always think it adds great depth and realism. I want that more and more in my reading Regencies, as well as heart and intelligence.
    Very lucky for me I’ve already read some of Mary Jo Putney’s swoon worthy, honorable military heroes. But I’m more than happy to read more. Great one Nicola. And thank you to the other ladies commenting today too.

    Reply
  162. This web site is just THE BEST. Just when I think I can skim the subject, add a new book of interest to my TBR stack and move on I’m stopped in my tracks and have to delve into the subject in detail. But yes, these books go right onto my TBR stack.
    I always learn something fascinating in these entries. And today I have been enticed to explore more book titles, (and ideas and subjects to research) than I could read in a month or more. The details that a fan of Regency Romance might not think of as they enjoy the exciting plot are just wonderful to learn and I always think it adds great depth and realism. I want that more and more in my reading Regencies, as well as heart and intelligence.
    Very lucky for me I’ve already read some of Mary Jo Putney’s swoon worthy, honorable military heroes. But I’m more than happy to read more. Great one Nicola. And thank you to the other ladies commenting today too.

    Reply
  163. This web site is just THE BEST. Just when I think I can skim the subject, add a new book of interest to my TBR stack and move on I’m stopped in my tracks and have to delve into the subject in detail. But yes, these books go right onto my TBR stack.
    I always learn something fascinating in these entries. And today I have been enticed to explore more book titles, (and ideas and subjects to research) than I could read in a month or more. The details that a fan of Regency Romance might not think of as they enjoy the exciting plot are just wonderful to learn and I always think it adds great depth and realism. I want that more and more in my reading Regencies, as well as heart and intelligence.
    Very lucky for me I’ve already read some of Mary Jo Putney’s swoon worthy, honorable military heroes. But I’m more than happy to read more. Great one Nicola. And thank you to the other ladies commenting today too.

    Reply
  164. This web site is just THE BEST. Just when I think I can skim the subject, add a new book of interest to my TBR stack and move on I’m stopped in my tracks and have to delve into the subject in detail. But yes, these books go right onto my TBR stack.
    I always learn something fascinating in these entries. And today I have been enticed to explore more book titles, (and ideas and subjects to research) than I could read in a month or more. The details that a fan of Regency Romance might not think of as they enjoy the exciting plot are just wonderful to learn and I always think it adds great depth and realism. I want that more and more in my reading Regencies, as well as heart and intelligence.
    Very lucky for me I’ve already read some of Mary Jo Putney’s swoon worthy, honorable military heroes. But I’m more than happy to read more. Great one Nicola. And thank you to the other ladies commenting today too.

    Reply
  165. This web site is just THE BEST. Just when I think I can skim the subject, add a new book of interest to my TBR stack and move on I’m stopped in my tracks and have to delve into the subject in detail. But yes, these books go right onto my TBR stack.
    I always learn something fascinating in these entries. And today I have been enticed to explore more book titles, (and ideas and subjects to research) than I could read in a month or more. The details that a fan of Regency Romance might not think of as they enjoy the exciting plot are just wonderful to learn and I always think it adds great depth and realism. I want that more and more in my reading Regencies, as well as heart and intelligence.
    Very lucky for me I’ve already read some of Mary Jo Putney’s swoon worthy, honorable military heroes. But I’m more than happy to read more. Great one Nicola. And thank you to the other ladies commenting today too.

    Reply
  166. Favourite fictional military hero? Can’t think of any particular one, but I like the heroes written by Merline Lovelace and Lisa Marie Rice.

    Reply
  167. Favourite fictional military hero? Can’t think of any particular one, but I like the heroes written by Merline Lovelace and Lisa Marie Rice.

    Reply
  168. Favourite fictional military hero? Can’t think of any particular one, but I like the heroes written by Merline Lovelace and Lisa Marie Rice.

    Reply
  169. Favourite fictional military hero? Can’t think of any particular one, but I like the heroes written by Merline Lovelace and Lisa Marie Rice.

    Reply
  170. Favourite fictional military hero? Can’t think of any particular one, but I like the heroes written by Merline Lovelace and Lisa Marie Rice.

    Reply
  171. Kathy, my hero was clearly just about bled out, and his innovative Scottish surgeon (a regular character of mine)was willing to try it when the heroine, an experienced nurse, offered her own blood. Yes, she’s type O, and I figured he might have been AB positive. She literally gives her heart’s blood to save him. (Yes, I’m wildly sentimental. )

    Reply
  172. Kathy, my hero was clearly just about bled out, and his innovative Scottish surgeon (a regular character of mine)was willing to try it when the heroine, an experienced nurse, offered her own blood. Yes, she’s type O, and I figured he might have been AB positive. She literally gives her heart’s blood to save him. (Yes, I’m wildly sentimental. )

    Reply
  173. Kathy, my hero was clearly just about bled out, and his innovative Scottish surgeon (a regular character of mine)was willing to try it when the heroine, an experienced nurse, offered her own blood. Yes, she’s type O, and I figured he might have been AB positive. She literally gives her heart’s blood to save him. (Yes, I’m wildly sentimental. )

    Reply
  174. Kathy, my hero was clearly just about bled out, and his innovative Scottish surgeon (a regular character of mine)was willing to try it when the heroine, an experienced nurse, offered her own blood. Yes, she’s type O, and I figured he might have been AB positive. She literally gives her heart’s blood to save him. (Yes, I’m wildly sentimental. )

    Reply
  175. Kathy, my hero was clearly just about bled out, and his innovative Scottish surgeon (a regular character of mine)was willing to try it when the heroine, an experienced nurse, offered her own blood. Yes, she’s type O, and I figured he might have been AB positive. She literally gives her heart’s blood to save him. (Yes, I’m wildly sentimental. )

    Reply
  176. I love Merline Lovelace, too Minna – have you caught her historicals? There was one set in Ancient Egypt with a truly hunky military hero, and a heroine who was priestess of Bast…

    Reply
  177. I love Merline Lovelace, too Minna – have you caught her historicals? There was one set in Ancient Egypt with a truly hunky military hero, and a heroine who was priestess of Bast…

    Reply
  178. I love Merline Lovelace, too Minna – have you caught her historicals? There was one set in Ancient Egypt with a truly hunky military hero, and a heroine who was priestess of Bast…

    Reply
  179. I love Merline Lovelace, too Minna – have you caught her historicals? There was one set in Ancient Egypt with a truly hunky military hero, and a heroine who was priestess of Bast…

    Reply
  180. I love Merline Lovelace, too Minna – have you caught her historicals? There was one set in Ancient Egypt with a truly hunky military hero, and a heroine who was priestess of Bast…

    Reply
  181. Thank you very much for all the wonderful comments and hero recommendations, and thank you to Annie and Sarah and Louise for visiting the Word Wenches and for such a great blog!

    Reply
  182. Thank you very much for all the wonderful comments and hero recommendations, and thank you to Annie and Sarah and Louise for visiting the Word Wenches and for such a great blog!

    Reply
  183. Thank you very much for all the wonderful comments and hero recommendations, and thank you to Annie and Sarah and Louise for visiting the Word Wenches and for such a great blog!

    Reply
  184. Thank you very much for all the wonderful comments and hero recommendations, and thank you to Annie and Sarah and Louise for visiting the Word Wenches and for such a great blog!

    Reply
  185. Thank you very much for all the wonderful comments and hero recommendations, and thank you to Annie and Sarah and Louise for visiting the Word Wenches and for such a great blog!

    Reply

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