The Blue Stockings

Love_poem_400x400Nicola here, wishing you a very Happy March! March is Women’s History Month, which pays tribute to the generations of women who have contributed to events in history and contemporary society. Andrea/Cara, Anne and I will taking part in the month long celebration over on the Read A Romance site where each day you can read an inspiring piece about women, romance and history. Find out more here!

As part of the celebration I thought I would blog today about my favourite type of historical romance heroines – the bluestockings. I love a bluestocking character. She’s the sort of woman who isn’t afraid to be intelligent in a world that generally prizes beauty over brains, she is clever enough to intrigue the hero and she would probably choose his library over his pecs any day. I've also spotted the bluestocking cropping up in contemporary romance as that geeky girl who gets the best grades – and the hot guy!

When I was talking about the bluestockings with a couple of author friends, one of them asked whether bluestockings actually wore Blue stockings National Trust blue stockings. It seems obvious to me that they would, or at least that that would be the uniform of the famous Blue Stocking Society founded by Elizabeth Montagu in the 1750s. As it turned out, I was wrong. The members of the Bluestocking Society actually wore the formal black silk stockings that were fashionable at the time. It was a gentleman called Benjamin Stillingfleet, a member of the society, who apparently turned up to meetings in blue woollen worsted stockings and from this derived the name; the society, like the stockings, were informal. The group put more emphasis on conversation than fashion.

The Blue Stocking Society was established as a literary discussion group. Politics were banned and debate about the arts encouraged.
 
 A fair proportion of the membership was men, including Samuel Johnson and Edmund Burke. Popular opinion at the time suggested that women did not need to go to university or engage in study and debate; if they wanted to learn they would benefit most from conversation with their male relatives. Elizabeth Montagu, a strong supporter of education for women, commented on this view: “In a woman's education little but outward accomplishments is regarded … sure the men are very imprudent to endeavour to make fools of those to whom they so much trust their honour and fortune, but it is in the nature of mankind to hazard their peace to secure power, and they know fools make the best slaves.”

Rowlandson-BluestockingsLate in the 18th century the word bluestocking did become synonymous with an educated intellectual woman but it also developed negative implications with women being stereotyped as frumpy because they cared more about learning than they did about their appearance. At the extreme it was used disagreeably to describe a woman of decided opinions (for which read inappropriate and unfeminine.) Rowlandson’s cartoons made fun of the bluestockings as did an 1811 comic opera by Moore and Horn, which featured a character called Lady Bab Blue who was a parody of a bluestocking. This hostility reflected the views of both men and women who objected to female education.

I first came across the bluestocking character in a Regency romance when I read “The Beau and the Bluestocking” by Alice Chetwynd Ley. It’s still one of my favourite traditional Regencies. I love that the heroine, Alethea, has been Beau brought up in a family that values education for all their children and that when she goes into society she doesn’t try to hide her interest in learning. Most of all I love that the hero James, after years as a bored if fashionable gentleman, rediscovers his interest in philosophy and culture, and thoroughly enjoys his conversations with Alethea. She’s different and she fascinates him. Not just that; she also helps him realise that he can be interested in both the style of his neck cloth and the writings of Sophocles.

Another of my favourites is Hester in Sylvia Andrew’s An Unreasonable Match. Hester is a code breaker. For a long time the hero thinks it is Hester’s brother who is the mathematician in the house and he is totally blindsided when he realises his mistake. I love it.

MISTRESS BY MIDNIGHT - UKI have even written my own series of Bluestocking Brides, and I find the bluestocking heroine cropping up quite a bit in my writing. Perhaps I have a soft spot for her because I’ve been considered something of a bluestocking myself, and not always as a compliment! The members of the Bluestocking Society, amongst them Frances Burney, Ada Lovelace and Hester Thrale, were considered feminists in their own time. So let’s celebrate their contribution to women in history and raise a cup of tea (their preferred beverage) to the bluestockings!

Do you enjoy bluestocking characters or have a favourite bluestocking book, either historical or contemporary? I’m offering a copy of Mistress by Midnight, with its bluestocking heroine, to one commenter who recommends a bluestocking between now and midnight Thursday!

185 thoughts on “The Blue Stockings”

  1. DANGEROUS WORKS by Caroline Warfield. Ms. Warfield was a new author to me. The heroine in this book has suffered much because of her quest for knowledge – and much of that at the hands of her own powerful family. Really good read.

    Reply
  2. DANGEROUS WORKS by Caroline Warfield. Ms. Warfield was a new author to me. The heroine in this book has suffered much because of her quest for knowledge – and much of that at the hands of her own powerful family. Really good read.

    Reply
  3. DANGEROUS WORKS by Caroline Warfield. Ms. Warfield was a new author to me. The heroine in this book has suffered much because of her quest for knowledge – and much of that at the hands of her own powerful family. Really good read.

    Reply
  4. DANGEROUS WORKS by Caroline Warfield. Ms. Warfield was a new author to me. The heroine in this book has suffered much because of her quest for knowledge – and much of that at the hands of her own powerful family. Really good read.

    Reply
  5. DANGEROUS WORKS by Caroline Warfield. Ms. Warfield was a new author to me. The heroine in this book has suffered much because of her quest for knowledge – and much of that at the hands of her own powerful family. Really good read.

    Reply
  6. I have a pet peeve which is showing up more in romance. It is the use of prone and supine. One is face down and the other is back to the surface. Please be careful.

    Reply
  7. I have a pet peeve which is showing up more in romance. It is the use of prone and supine. One is face down and the other is back to the surface. Please be careful.

    Reply
  8. I have a pet peeve which is showing up more in romance. It is the use of prone and supine. One is face down and the other is back to the surface. Please be careful.

    Reply
  9. I have a pet peeve which is showing up more in romance. It is the use of prone and supine. One is face down and the other is back to the surface. Please be careful.

    Reply
  10. I have a pet peeve which is showing up more in romance. It is the use of prone and supine. One is face down and the other is back to the surface. Please be careful.

    Reply
  11. Thanks you for the comment, Frances. This is a point very appropriate for a bluestocking discussion!
    I must admit I didn’t realise that supine meant lying face upwards; I’ve never used it in that context, only in the sense of being indolent, for which it is one of my favourite words. My understanding of prone is that the medical definition is to lie face down but it has a secondary definition as being prostrate or flat. As with all vocabulary it’s excellent to learn new things!

    Reply
  12. Thanks you for the comment, Frances. This is a point very appropriate for a bluestocking discussion!
    I must admit I didn’t realise that supine meant lying face upwards; I’ve never used it in that context, only in the sense of being indolent, for which it is one of my favourite words. My understanding of prone is that the medical definition is to lie face down but it has a secondary definition as being prostrate or flat. As with all vocabulary it’s excellent to learn new things!

    Reply
  13. Thanks you for the comment, Frances. This is a point very appropriate for a bluestocking discussion!
    I must admit I didn’t realise that supine meant lying face upwards; I’ve never used it in that context, only in the sense of being indolent, for which it is one of my favourite words. My understanding of prone is that the medical definition is to lie face down but it has a secondary definition as being prostrate or flat. As with all vocabulary it’s excellent to learn new things!

    Reply
  14. Thanks you for the comment, Frances. This is a point very appropriate for a bluestocking discussion!
    I must admit I didn’t realise that supine meant lying face upwards; I’ve never used it in that context, only in the sense of being indolent, for which it is one of my favourite words. My understanding of prone is that the medical definition is to lie face down but it has a secondary definition as being prostrate or flat. As with all vocabulary it’s excellent to learn new things!

    Reply
  15. Thanks you for the comment, Frances. This is a point very appropriate for a bluestocking discussion!
    I must admit I didn’t realise that supine meant lying face upwards; I’ve never used it in that context, only in the sense of being indolent, for which it is one of my favourite words. My understanding of prone is that the medical definition is to lie face down but it has a secondary definition as being prostrate or flat. As with all vocabulary it’s excellent to learn new things!

    Reply
  16. I don’t come up with a bluestocking heroine at the moment, although I probably do have some favorites in some Jayne Anne Krentz (Amanda Quick) novels.
    I know I like them. Strong women, educated, interesting to talk to, love books ∏ what’s not to like?! I think that I simply do not stop to label these women as blue stockings.

    Reply
  17. I don’t come up with a bluestocking heroine at the moment, although I probably do have some favorites in some Jayne Anne Krentz (Amanda Quick) novels.
    I know I like them. Strong women, educated, interesting to talk to, love books ∏ what’s not to like?! I think that I simply do not stop to label these women as blue stockings.

    Reply
  18. I don’t come up with a bluestocking heroine at the moment, although I probably do have some favorites in some Jayne Anne Krentz (Amanda Quick) novels.
    I know I like them. Strong women, educated, interesting to talk to, love books ∏ what’s not to like?! I think that I simply do not stop to label these women as blue stockings.

    Reply
  19. I don’t come up with a bluestocking heroine at the moment, although I probably do have some favorites in some Jayne Anne Krentz (Amanda Quick) novels.
    I know I like them. Strong women, educated, interesting to talk to, love books ∏ what’s not to like?! I think that I simply do not stop to label these women as blue stockings.

    Reply
  20. I don’t come up with a bluestocking heroine at the moment, although I probably do have some favorites in some Jayne Anne Krentz (Amanda Quick) novels.
    I know I like them. Strong women, educated, interesting to talk to, love books ∏ what’s not to like?! I think that I simply do not stop to label these women as blue stockings.

    Reply
  21. My subconscious has been working on this ever since I posted.
    — AS to modern “bluestockings” I surely DO have a favorite (or more than one); just consider Ana of Patricia Rice’s Evil Genius, and even EG herself when she grows up, and perhaps the rest of this complicated family?!

    Reply
  22. My subconscious has been working on this ever since I posted.
    — AS to modern “bluestockings” I surely DO have a favorite (or more than one); just consider Ana of Patricia Rice’s Evil Genius, and even EG herself when she grows up, and perhaps the rest of this complicated family?!

    Reply
  23. My subconscious has been working on this ever since I posted.
    — AS to modern “bluestockings” I surely DO have a favorite (or more than one); just consider Ana of Patricia Rice’s Evil Genius, and even EG herself when she grows up, and perhaps the rest of this complicated family?!

    Reply
  24. My subconscious has been working on this ever since I posted.
    — AS to modern “bluestockings” I surely DO have a favorite (or more than one); just consider Ana of Patricia Rice’s Evil Genius, and even EG herself when she grows up, and perhaps the rest of this complicated family?!

    Reply
  25. My subconscious has been working on this ever since I posted.
    — AS to modern “bluestockings” I surely DO have a favorite (or more than one); just consider Ana of Patricia Rice’s Evil Genius, and even EG herself when she grows up, and perhaps the rest of this complicated family?!

    Reply
  26. Interesting, Nicola! “Bluestocking” and “feminist” are both word that celebrate female intelligence and empowerment, so naturally sexists use them in a pejorative sense. I think that we writers, being book lovers and generally well-educated ourselves, have a natural preference for bluestocking heroines!
    One that came to mind is Drusilla in Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMEN. I’ve always been amused by the fact that both her parents are very scholarly, but her mother swiftly realizes that that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t be a fine thing for her daughter to marry an earl!

    Reply
  27. Interesting, Nicola! “Bluestocking” and “feminist” are both word that celebrate female intelligence and empowerment, so naturally sexists use them in a pejorative sense. I think that we writers, being book lovers and generally well-educated ourselves, have a natural preference for bluestocking heroines!
    One that came to mind is Drusilla in Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMEN. I’ve always been amused by the fact that both her parents are very scholarly, but her mother swiftly realizes that that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t be a fine thing for her daughter to marry an earl!

    Reply
  28. Interesting, Nicola! “Bluestocking” and “feminist” are both word that celebrate female intelligence and empowerment, so naturally sexists use them in a pejorative sense. I think that we writers, being book lovers and generally well-educated ourselves, have a natural preference for bluestocking heroines!
    One that came to mind is Drusilla in Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMEN. I’ve always been amused by the fact that both her parents are very scholarly, but her mother swiftly realizes that that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t be a fine thing for her daughter to marry an earl!

    Reply
  29. Interesting, Nicola! “Bluestocking” and “feminist” are both word that celebrate female intelligence and empowerment, so naturally sexists use them in a pejorative sense. I think that we writers, being book lovers and generally well-educated ourselves, have a natural preference for bluestocking heroines!
    One that came to mind is Drusilla in Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMEN. I’ve always been amused by the fact that both her parents are very scholarly, but her mother swiftly realizes that that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t be a fine thing for her daughter to marry an earl!

    Reply
  30. Interesting, Nicola! “Bluestocking” and “feminist” are both word that celebrate female intelligence and empowerment, so naturally sexists use them in a pejorative sense. I think that we writers, being book lovers and generally well-educated ourselves, have a natural preference for bluestocking heroines!
    One that came to mind is Drusilla in Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMEN. I’ve always been amused by the fact that both her parents are very scholarly, but her mother swiftly realizes that that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t be a fine thing for her daughter to marry an earl!

    Reply
  31. Daphne, the heroine in Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase is a bluestocking. She’s the scholar who can speak Coptic and decipher Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, but they pretend it’s her brother otherwise she wouldn’t be taken seriously. I adored Daphne and the hero, Rupert, who has cultivated the art of appearing to be stupid. It’s kind of role-reversal story with adventure and family thrown in. I loved it!

    Reply
  32. Daphne, the heroine in Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase is a bluestocking. She’s the scholar who can speak Coptic and decipher Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, but they pretend it’s her brother otherwise she wouldn’t be taken seriously. I adored Daphne and the hero, Rupert, who has cultivated the art of appearing to be stupid. It’s kind of role-reversal story with adventure and family thrown in. I loved it!

    Reply
  33. Daphne, the heroine in Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase is a bluestocking. She’s the scholar who can speak Coptic and decipher Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, but they pretend it’s her brother otherwise she wouldn’t be taken seriously. I adored Daphne and the hero, Rupert, who has cultivated the art of appearing to be stupid. It’s kind of role-reversal story with adventure and family thrown in. I loved it!

    Reply
  34. Daphne, the heroine in Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase is a bluestocking. She’s the scholar who can speak Coptic and decipher Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, but they pretend it’s her brother otherwise she wouldn’t be taken seriously. I adored Daphne and the hero, Rupert, who has cultivated the art of appearing to be stupid. It’s kind of role-reversal story with adventure and family thrown in. I loved it!

    Reply
  35. Daphne, the heroine in Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase is a bluestocking. She’s the scholar who can speak Coptic and decipher Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, but they pretend it’s her brother otherwise she wouldn’t be taken seriously. I adored Daphne and the hero, Rupert, who has cultivated the art of appearing to be stupid. It’s kind of role-reversal story with adventure and family thrown in. I loved it!

    Reply
  36. Rats, Laura got to Daphne first. 🙂 She’s one of my favorites. A lot of Amanda Quick’s heroines are scholarly. A particular favorite of mine is the heroine of Scandal, who has a talent for studying and investing in the stock market.
    Add me to the list of authors who have used prone meaning flat or laid out, though not face down, but I was corrected by a reader — possibly Frances — and now I notice prone everywhere.

    Reply
  37. Rats, Laura got to Daphne first. 🙂 She’s one of my favorites. A lot of Amanda Quick’s heroines are scholarly. A particular favorite of mine is the heroine of Scandal, who has a talent for studying and investing in the stock market.
    Add me to the list of authors who have used prone meaning flat or laid out, though not face down, but I was corrected by a reader — possibly Frances — and now I notice prone everywhere.

    Reply
  38. Rats, Laura got to Daphne first. 🙂 She’s one of my favorites. A lot of Amanda Quick’s heroines are scholarly. A particular favorite of mine is the heroine of Scandal, who has a talent for studying and investing in the stock market.
    Add me to the list of authors who have used prone meaning flat or laid out, though not face down, but I was corrected by a reader — possibly Frances — and now I notice prone everywhere.

    Reply
  39. Rats, Laura got to Daphne first. 🙂 She’s one of my favorites. A lot of Amanda Quick’s heroines are scholarly. A particular favorite of mine is the heroine of Scandal, who has a talent for studying and investing in the stock market.
    Add me to the list of authors who have used prone meaning flat or laid out, though not face down, but I was corrected by a reader — possibly Frances — and now I notice prone everywhere.

    Reply
  40. Rats, Laura got to Daphne first. 🙂 She’s one of my favorites. A lot of Amanda Quick’s heroines are scholarly. A particular favorite of mine is the heroine of Scandal, who has a talent for studying and investing in the stock market.
    Add me to the list of authors who have used prone meaning flat or laid out, though not face down, but I was corrected by a reader — possibly Frances — and now I notice prone everywhere.

    Reply
  41. “she would probably choose his library over his pecs any day.” Me, too! (In fact, I did … twice. They call that “sapiosexual,” lol.)
    And I love a pair of socks that make a fashion statement, even if (maybe especially if) it’s “I ♥ books.”
    I really can’t see Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace in that Rowlandson cartoon. (Those caricaturists were deadly.) I would love to have sat in on a Bluestocking session. Bring those ladies on, Wenches. Their heroes are the ones I sigh for.

    Reply
  42. “she would probably choose his library over his pecs any day.” Me, too! (In fact, I did … twice. They call that “sapiosexual,” lol.)
    And I love a pair of socks that make a fashion statement, even if (maybe especially if) it’s “I ♥ books.”
    I really can’t see Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace in that Rowlandson cartoon. (Those caricaturists were deadly.) I would love to have sat in on a Bluestocking session. Bring those ladies on, Wenches. Their heroes are the ones I sigh for.

    Reply
  43. “she would probably choose his library over his pecs any day.” Me, too! (In fact, I did … twice. They call that “sapiosexual,” lol.)
    And I love a pair of socks that make a fashion statement, even if (maybe especially if) it’s “I ♥ books.”
    I really can’t see Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace in that Rowlandson cartoon. (Those caricaturists were deadly.) I would love to have sat in on a Bluestocking session. Bring those ladies on, Wenches. Their heroes are the ones I sigh for.

    Reply
  44. “she would probably choose his library over his pecs any day.” Me, too! (In fact, I did … twice. They call that “sapiosexual,” lol.)
    And I love a pair of socks that make a fashion statement, even if (maybe especially if) it’s “I ♥ books.”
    I really can’t see Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace in that Rowlandson cartoon. (Those caricaturists were deadly.) I would love to have sat in on a Bluestocking session. Bring those ladies on, Wenches. Their heroes are the ones I sigh for.

    Reply
  45. “she would probably choose his library over his pecs any day.” Me, too! (In fact, I did … twice. They call that “sapiosexual,” lol.)
    And I love a pair of socks that make a fashion statement, even if (maybe especially if) it’s “I ♥ books.”
    I really can’t see Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace in that Rowlandson cartoon. (Those caricaturists were deadly.) I would love to have sat in on a Bluestocking session. Bring those ladies on, Wenches. Their heroes are the ones I sigh for.

    Reply
  46. Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace were more than a generation apart. I do like Ana in Pat’s genius series and the heroine of Amanda Quick’s Ravished– the girl studies fossils. I don’t much care for some of the heroines touted as feminists because they are often shrill and often so determined to do things their way they are more TSTL than bright and independent. Also, unless they stick to some of the causes of the day, they are anachronistic.
    Maria Edgeworth has a woman named something like FREK who is a bluestocking and some would say feminists though the woman is not shown in a good light.

    Reply
  47. Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace were more than a generation apart. I do like Ana in Pat’s genius series and the heroine of Amanda Quick’s Ravished– the girl studies fossils. I don’t much care for some of the heroines touted as feminists because they are often shrill and often so determined to do things their way they are more TSTL than bright and independent. Also, unless they stick to some of the causes of the day, they are anachronistic.
    Maria Edgeworth has a woman named something like FREK who is a bluestocking and some would say feminists though the woman is not shown in a good light.

    Reply
  48. Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace were more than a generation apart. I do like Ana in Pat’s genius series and the heroine of Amanda Quick’s Ravished– the girl studies fossils. I don’t much care for some of the heroines touted as feminists because they are often shrill and often so determined to do things their way they are more TSTL than bright and independent. Also, unless they stick to some of the causes of the day, they are anachronistic.
    Maria Edgeworth has a woman named something like FREK who is a bluestocking and some would say feminists though the woman is not shown in a good light.

    Reply
  49. Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace were more than a generation apart. I do like Ana in Pat’s genius series and the heroine of Amanda Quick’s Ravished– the girl studies fossils. I don’t much care for some of the heroines touted as feminists because they are often shrill and often so determined to do things their way they are more TSTL than bright and independent. Also, unless they stick to some of the causes of the day, they are anachronistic.
    Maria Edgeworth has a woman named something like FREK who is a bluestocking and some would say feminists though the woman is not shown in a good light.

    Reply
  50. Fanny Burney and Ada Lovelace were more than a generation apart. I do like Ana in Pat’s genius series and the heroine of Amanda Quick’s Ravished– the girl studies fossils. I don’t much care for some of the heroines touted as feminists because they are often shrill and often so determined to do things their way they are more TSTL than bright and independent. Also, unless they stick to some of the causes of the day, they are anachronistic.
    Maria Edgeworth has a woman named something like FREK who is a bluestocking and some would say feminists though the woman is not shown in a good light.

    Reply
  51. Hi Nancy. Yes, indeed they were. I hadn’t realised until I read up on the Blue Stocking Club that it continued for about 50 years.
    That is a very good point about embracing a contemporary cause. We cannot go putting modern feminists in Regency dress and calling them feminists.
    I hadn’t come across the Maria Edgeworth character. I will search that out. Thank you!

    Reply
  52. Hi Nancy. Yes, indeed they were. I hadn’t realised until I read up on the Blue Stocking Club that it continued for about 50 years.
    That is a very good point about embracing a contemporary cause. We cannot go putting modern feminists in Regency dress and calling them feminists.
    I hadn’t come across the Maria Edgeworth character. I will search that out. Thank you!

    Reply
  53. Hi Nancy. Yes, indeed they were. I hadn’t realised until I read up on the Blue Stocking Club that it continued for about 50 years.
    That is a very good point about embracing a contemporary cause. We cannot go putting modern feminists in Regency dress and calling them feminists.
    I hadn’t come across the Maria Edgeworth character. I will search that out. Thank you!

    Reply
  54. Hi Nancy. Yes, indeed they were. I hadn’t realised until I read up on the Blue Stocking Club that it continued for about 50 years.
    That is a very good point about embracing a contemporary cause. We cannot go putting modern feminists in Regency dress and calling them feminists.
    I hadn’t come across the Maria Edgeworth character. I will search that out. Thank you!

    Reply
  55. Hi Nancy. Yes, indeed they were. I hadn’t realised until I read up on the Blue Stocking Club that it continued for about 50 years.
    That is a very good point about embracing a contemporary cause. We cannot go putting modern feminists in Regency dress and calling them feminists.
    I hadn’t come across the Maria Edgeworth character. I will search that out. Thank you!

    Reply
  56. This morning, Sue, as I wrap up the 4th Genius book, you are one of my favorite people. 😉 Thank you.
    I think in today’s world, bluestockings may be called geeks and nerds!

    Reply
  57. This morning, Sue, as I wrap up the 4th Genius book, you are one of my favorite people. 😉 Thank you.
    I think in today’s world, bluestockings may be called geeks and nerds!

    Reply
  58. This morning, Sue, as I wrap up the 4th Genius book, you are one of my favorite people. 😉 Thank you.
    I think in today’s world, bluestockings may be called geeks and nerds!

    Reply
  59. This morning, Sue, as I wrap up the 4th Genius book, you are one of my favorite people. 😉 Thank you.
    I think in today’s world, bluestockings may be called geeks and nerds!

    Reply
  60. This morning, Sue, as I wrap up the 4th Genius book, you are one of my favorite people. 😉 Thank you.
    I think in today’s world, bluestockings may be called geeks and nerds!

    Reply
  61. Thank you! I don’t think I’d equate bluestockings with feminists so much (the suffragettes, yes!) as I would with women of intelligence who aren’t ashamed to show that they’re smart. I’m pretty certain there were lots of smart women in Regency times who hid their brains under bonnets, at least, until after they were married!

    Reply
  62. Thank you! I don’t think I’d equate bluestockings with feminists so much (the suffragettes, yes!) as I would with women of intelligence who aren’t ashamed to show that they’re smart. I’m pretty certain there were lots of smart women in Regency times who hid their brains under bonnets, at least, until after they were married!

    Reply
  63. Thank you! I don’t think I’d equate bluestockings with feminists so much (the suffragettes, yes!) as I would with women of intelligence who aren’t ashamed to show that they’re smart. I’m pretty certain there were lots of smart women in Regency times who hid their brains under bonnets, at least, until after they were married!

    Reply
  64. Thank you! I don’t think I’d equate bluestockings with feminists so much (the suffragettes, yes!) as I would with women of intelligence who aren’t ashamed to show that they’re smart. I’m pretty certain there were lots of smart women in Regency times who hid their brains under bonnets, at least, until after they were married!

    Reply
  65. Thank you! I don’t think I’d equate bluestockings with feminists so much (the suffragettes, yes!) as I would with women of intelligence who aren’t ashamed to show that they’re smart. I’m pretty certain there were lots of smart women in Regency times who hid their brains under bonnets, at least, until after they were married!

    Reply
  66. I think that Amanda Quick had a few blue stocking novels. One of my favourites is ‘Ravished’ where Harriet is a fossil collector who clashes with viscount Gideon when enlisting his aid to scupper ‘fossil thieves’. I think this is one of JAKs best. Its full of humour,adventure and romance …. of course!

    Reply
  67. I think that Amanda Quick had a few blue stocking novels. One of my favourites is ‘Ravished’ where Harriet is a fossil collector who clashes with viscount Gideon when enlisting his aid to scupper ‘fossil thieves’. I think this is one of JAKs best. Its full of humour,adventure and romance …. of course!

    Reply
  68. I think that Amanda Quick had a few blue stocking novels. One of my favourites is ‘Ravished’ where Harriet is a fossil collector who clashes with viscount Gideon when enlisting his aid to scupper ‘fossil thieves’. I think this is one of JAKs best. Its full of humour,adventure and romance …. of course!

    Reply
  69. I think that Amanda Quick had a few blue stocking novels. One of my favourites is ‘Ravished’ where Harriet is a fossil collector who clashes with viscount Gideon when enlisting his aid to scupper ‘fossil thieves’. I think this is one of JAKs best. Its full of humour,adventure and romance …. of course!

    Reply
  70. I think that Amanda Quick had a few blue stocking novels. One of my favourites is ‘Ravished’ where Harriet is a fossil collector who clashes with viscount Gideon when enlisting his aid to scupper ‘fossil thieves’. I think this is one of JAKs best. Its full of humour,adventure and romance …. of course!

    Reply
  71. Gail Ranstrom’s series has bluestockings galore known as The Wednesday Club. Brave intelligent women not afraid to take on the world.
    On another note Nicola, I’ve just ordered Beau and the Bluestocking after seeing it here. Blast!! Another one for the TBR pile, as if it wasn’t high enough already!!

    Reply
  72. Gail Ranstrom’s series has bluestockings galore known as The Wednesday Club. Brave intelligent women not afraid to take on the world.
    On another note Nicola, I’ve just ordered Beau and the Bluestocking after seeing it here. Blast!! Another one for the TBR pile, as if it wasn’t high enough already!!

    Reply
  73. Gail Ranstrom’s series has bluestockings galore known as The Wednesday Club. Brave intelligent women not afraid to take on the world.
    On another note Nicola, I’ve just ordered Beau and the Bluestocking after seeing it here. Blast!! Another one for the TBR pile, as if it wasn’t high enough already!!

    Reply
  74. Gail Ranstrom’s series has bluestockings galore known as The Wednesday Club. Brave intelligent women not afraid to take on the world.
    On another note Nicola, I’ve just ordered Beau and the Bluestocking after seeing it here. Blast!! Another one for the TBR pile, as if it wasn’t high enough already!!

    Reply
  75. Gail Ranstrom’s series has bluestockings galore known as The Wednesday Club. Brave intelligent women not afraid to take on the world.
    On another note Nicola, I’ve just ordered Beau and the Bluestocking after seeing it here. Blast!! Another one for the TBR pile, as if it wasn’t high enough already!!

    Reply
  76. Well someone already grabbed Amanda Quick’s Ravished, but I also enjoyed her Deception with Olympia Wingfield, and the Perfect Poison with Lucinda – love her knowledge of plants.

    Reply
  77. Well someone already grabbed Amanda Quick’s Ravished, but I also enjoyed her Deception with Olympia Wingfield, and the Perfect Poison with Lucinda – love her knowledge of plants.

    Reply
  78. Well someone already grabbed Amanda Quick’s Ravished, but I also enjoyed her Deception with Olympia Wingfield, and the Perfect Poison with Lucinda – love her knowledge of plants.

    Reply
  79. Well someone already grabbed Amanda Quick’s Ravished, but I also enjoyed her Deception with Olympia Wingfield, and the Perfect Poison with Lucinda – love her knowledge of plants.

    Reply
  80. Well someone already grabbed Amanda Quick’s Ravished, but I also enjoyed her Deception with Olympia Wingfield, and the Perfect Poison with Lucinda – love her knowledge of plants.

    Reply
  81. Heather Snow’s first three books had ‘bluestocking’ heroines – I especially liked her lady chemist in the first book.

    Reply
  82. Heather Snow’s first three books had ‘bluestocking’ heroines – I especially liked her lady chemist in the first book.

    Reply
  83. Heather Snow’s first three books had ‘bluestocking’ heroines – I especially liked her lady chemist in the first book.

    Reply
  84. Heather Snow’s first three books had ‘bluestocking’ heroines – I especially liked her lady chemist in the first book.

    Reply
  85. Heather Snow’s first three books had ‘bluestocking’ heroines – I especially liked her lady chemist in the first book.

    Reply
  86. “A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.” — Jane Austen. Thank God Miss Austen did not live by that precept herself 🙂

    Reply
  87. “A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.” — Jane Austen. Thank God Miss Austen did not live by that precept herself 🙂

    Reply
  88. “A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.” — Jane Austen. Thank God Miss Austen did not live by that precept herself 🙂

    Reply
  89. “A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.” — Jane Austen. Thank God Miss Austen did not live by that precept herself 🙂

    Reply
  90. “A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.” — Jane Austen. Thank God Miss Austen did not live by that precept herself 🙂

    Reply
  91. I haven’t seen Lady Elizabeth’s Comet by Sheila Simonson mentioned yet, in which the hero, unlike others, does not disparage his lady’s astronomical interests, but is genuinely interested in them.
    I loved Mr. Impossible too because its hero Rupert doesn’t just tolerate his lady’s intellectual interests because she’s hot, he is *proud* of her for being smart.

    Reply
  92. I haven’t seen Lady Elizabeth’s Comet by Sheila Simonson mentioned yet, in which the hero, unlike others, does not disparage his lady’s astronomical interests, but is genuinely interested in them.
    I loved Mr. Impossible too because its hero Rupert doesn’t just tolerate his lady’s intellectual interests because she’s hot, he is *proud* of her for being smart.

    Reply
  93. I haven’t seen Lady Elizabeth’s Comet by Sheila Simonson mentioned yet, in which the hero, unlike others, does not disparage his lady’s astronomical interests, but is genuinely interested in them.
    I loved Mr. Impossible too because its hero Rupert doesn’t just tolerate his lady’s intellectual interests because she’s hot, he is *proud* of her for being smart.

    Reply
  94. I haven’t seen Lady Elizabeth’s Comet by Sheila Simonson mentioned yet, in which the hero, unlike others, does not disparage his lady’s astronomical interests, but is genuinely interested in them.
    I loved Mr. Impossible too because its hero Rupert doesn’t just tolerate his lady’s intellectual interests because she’s hot, he is *proud* of her for being smart.

    Reply
  95. I haven’t seen Lady Elizabeth’s Comet by Sheila Simonson mentioned yet, in which the hero, unlike others, does not disparage his lady’s astronomical interests, but is genuinely interested in them.
    I loved Mr. Impossible too because its hero Rupert doesn’t just tolerate his lady’s intellectual interests because she’s hot, he is *proud* of her for being smart.

    Reply
  96. Sorry, Teresa! That’s the trouble with the Wenches – so many book recommendations! I’m really pleased The Beau and the Bluestocking is still available.
    I like the sound of the Wednesday Club.

    Reply
  97. Sorry, Teresa! That’s the trouble with the Wenches – so many book recommendations! I’m really pleased The Beau and the Bluestocking is still available.
    I like the sound of the Wednesday Club.

    Reply
  98. Sorry, Teresa! That’s the trouble with the Wenches – so many book recommendations! I’m really pleased The Beau and the Bluestocking is still available.
    I like the sound of the Wednesday Club.

    Reply
  99. Sorry, Teresa! That’s the trouble with the Wenches – so many book recommendations! I’m really pleased The Beau and the Bluestocking is still available.
    I like the sound of the Wednesday Club.

    Reply
  100. Sorry, Teresa! That’s the trouble with the Wenches – so many book recommendations! I’m really pleased The Beau and the Bluestocking is still available.
    I like the sound of the Wednesday Club.

    Reply
  101. Yes, Lady Elizabeth’s Comet is a book I enjoyed too. That’s the best thing about a hero who deserves a bluestocking, isn’t it. He doesn’t feel threatened by her knowledge but is proud of her!

    Reply
  102. Yes, Lady Elizabeth’s Comet is a book I enjoyed too. That’s the best thing about a hero who deserves a bluestocking, isn’t it. He doesn’t feel threatened by her knowledge but is proud of her!

    Reply
  103. Yes, Lady Elizabeth’s Comet is a book I enjoyed too. That’s the best thing about a hero who deserves a bluestocking, isn’t it. He doesn’t feel threatened by her knowledge but is proud of her!

    Reply
  104. Yes, Lady Elizabeth’s Comet is a book I enjoyed too. That’s the best thing about a hero who deserves a bluestocking, isn’t it. He doesn’t feel threatened by her knowledge but is proud of her!

    Reply
  105. Yes, Lady Elizabeth’s Comet is a book I enjoyed too. That’s the best thing about a hero who deserves a bluestocking, isn’t it. He doesn’t feel threatened by her knowledge but is proud of her!

    Reply
  106. Oh dear Laura, youre in for a fun time — there are lots of wonderful Amanda Quick books — go to Goodreads to see what her most popular titles are. I also like her Jayne Ann Krentz contemporary stories. Have fun.

    Reply
  107. Oh dear Laura, youre in for a fun time — there are lots of wonderful Amanda Quick books — go to Goodreads to see what her most popular titles are. I also like her Jayne Ann Krentz contemporary stories. Have fun.

    Reply
  108. Oh dear Laura, youre in for a fun time — there are lots of wonderful Amanda Quick books — go to Goodreads to see what her most popular titles are. I also like her Jayne Ann Krentz contemporary stories. Have fun.

    Reply
  109. Oh dear Laura, youre in for a fun time — there are lots of wonderful Amanda Quick books — go to Goodreads to see what her most popular titles are. I also like her Jayne Ann Krentz contemporary stories. Have fun.

    Reply
  110. Oh dear Laura, youre in for a fun time — there are lots of wonderful Amanda Quick books — go to Goodreads to see what her most popular titles are. I also like her Jayne Ann Krentz contemporary stories. Have fun.

    Reply

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