The Baronial Hall

Charliebutler
Jo here, with Charlie playing butler in what I’m calling the Baronial Hall. πŸ™‚ More about that later.

I found my fountains and have two going, one outside, one inside. My Woodstock chimes are hanging — inside, but where they can catch a breeze from the sunroom door.

But I still have stuff. A lot less stuff (I’ve been throwing things out. What was I thinking to bring them?) and I’m finding homes for things that I have to keep. Like books. Books aren’t stuff anyway.

First there are my books — my archival copies of my books, plus my extra copies of my books.Mybooks
They used to be on spacious shelves in the basement. Now they’re in bankers boxes against a wall in the sun room. Should I call it the solar?

This baronial hall doesn’t have a basement — the house does, but that’s not the same — but it is spacious.

Why the "baronial hall?" you ask? Because the apartment comprises some modern amenities plus the grand dining room and a semi-grand anteroom of an Edwardian mansion. Here’s a picture of the dining room before the stuff moved in. The dining room is now my main living space.

Fireplace

It’s paneled all around, but some is covered by more books — my wall of research books. I brought the bookcases with me. They’re not quite up to the oak paneling, but what’s a writer to do?Wallofbooks Of course, I trimmed down my collection quite a bit.  That’s painful, but  there’s a lot of material up on the web now, so I  don’t need the text for occasional reference. I also had a lot of books from way-back-when which were fact checkers. Again, so easy to find on the web.

Apartment living. It’s been a while, but if it has to be an apartment, this is the sort for a historical romance author, that’s for sure!

In addition, life’s been quite exciting since arriving here.

First there was a fire in a house across the road. (Can you tell I’ve acquired a new camera? LOL!)8frontonfire2

Then, as if to enhance the old style ambiance, two young deer strolled by my dining bay window yesterday. What’s a baronial hall without deer? But I promise not to try to roast any in the enormous fireplace.

Twodeer

It’s the end of Canada Day here now, so I hope all Canadians had a wonderful one. We walked down to see the fireworks.Fireworksp

To all you Americans here, have a great Fourth of July.

If you’re from another country, what’s your national day, and how do you celebrate it?

Writing? Writing? You expect me to be writing? I’m getting back into the flow of The Secret Wedding and we’ve just come up with the cover, which will be lovely and much in the style of A Lady’s Secret, though different. That won’t be out until next April, however. Believe it or not, a year between books used to be normal. What do you think about frequent publication? I know we all prefer our favourite authors to write a book a month, but really, would you mind waiting a year for most authors to produce a new book?

I know I didn’t pick a winner from last time. None of you really took up my challenge to identify one piece of clutter and, especially, get rid of it! So I’m awarding a book to Lindsay for a second hand sighting of Hugh Laurie. Pity there weren’t pictures — instruct your boyfriend in case of future luck! — but it was worth a prize. Lindsay, e-mail me about it.

Happy celebrations, everyone.

Jo πŸ™‚

100 thoughts on “The Baronial Hall”

  1. I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a book from my favorite author.
    I think authors are writing too fast nowadays, and it shows. I have more than one author who I used to like, but whom I no longer read. I say “used to like” because their books were great when they wrote one a year. Now it’s three a year, they’re rushed, and it shows. Fewer period details and a story that sounds more like a contemporary novel than a period one. That’s a common problem–too many historical novels now sound like contemporaries, only the clothes and the dates are different.
    Could this be the reason contemporaries are more popular now than historicals? Historical writers need more time for research. A contemporary needs less. Maybe that’s also why a lot of historicals are now shorter than they used to be.
    Jo, your books are long and full of period details and I love it. I don’t know how you manage. Please keep it up as long as you can.

    Reply
  2. I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a book from my favorite author.
    I think authors are writing too fast nowadays, and it shows. I have more than one author who I used to like, but whom I no longer read. I say “used to like” because their books were great when they wrote one a year. Now it’s three a year, they’re rushed, and it shows. Fewer period details and a story that sounds more like a contemporary novel than a period one. That’s a common problem–too many historical novels now sound like contemporaries, only the clothes and the dates are different.
    Could this be the reason contemporaries are more popular now than historicals? Historical writers need more time for research. A contemporary needs less. Maybe that’s also why a lot of historicals are now shorter than they used to be.
    Jo, your books are long and full of period details and I love it. I don’t know how you manage. Please keep it up as long as you can.

    Reply
  3. I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a book from my favorite author.
    I think authors are writing too fast nowadays, and it shows. I have more than one author who I used to like, but whom I no longer read. I say “used to like” because their books were great when they wrote one a year. Now it’s three a year, they’re rushed, and it shows. Fewer period details and a story that sounds more like a contemporary novel than a period one. That’s a common problem–too many historical novels now sound like contemporaries, only the clothes and the dates are different.
    Could this be the reason contemporaries are more popular now than historicals? Historical writers need more time for research. A contemporary needs less. Maybe that’s also why a lot of historicals are now shorter than they used to be.
    Jo, your books are long and full of period details and I love it. I don’t know how you manage. Please keep it up as long as you can.

    Reply
  4. I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a book from my favorite author.
    I think authors are writing too fast nowadays, and it shows. I have more than one author who I used to like, but whom I no longer read. I say “used to like” because their books were great when they wrote one a year. Now it’s three a year, they’re rushed, and it shows. Fewer period details and a story that sounds more like a contemporary novel than a period one. That’s a common problem–too many historical novels now sound like contemporaries, only the clothes and the dates are different.
    Could this be the reason contemporaries are more popular now than historicals? Historical writers need more time for research. A contemporary needs less. Maybe that’s also why a lot of historicals are now shorter than they used to be.
    Jo, your books are long and full of period details and I love it. I don’t know how you manage. Please keep it up as long as you can.

    Reply
  5. I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a book from my favorite author.
    I think authors are writing too fast nowadays, and it shows. I have more than one author who I used to like, but whom I no longer read. I say “used to like” because their books were great when they wrote one a year. Now it’s three a year, they’re rushed, and it shows. Fewer period details and a story that sounds more like a contemporary novel than a period one. That’s a common problem–too many historical novels now sound like contemporaries, only the clothes and the dates are different.
    Could this be the reason contemporaries are more popular now than historicals? Historical writers need more time for research. A contemporary needs less. Maybe that’s also why a lot of historicals are now shorter than they used to be.
    Jo, your books are long and full of period details and I love it. I don’t know how you manage. Please keep it up as long as you can.

    Reply
  6. Jo, what a great apartment! And I love the pictures.
    Would I want less than a year between novels? I have to agree with Linda. I think authors are being pressured more and more to ‘produce’ at a rapid pace which doesn’t allow for much more than a cleaned up rough draft in many cases.
    I don’t believe it matters if a novel is packed full of minute historical details or just enough to push the novel forward, it’s also the character development or lack thereof, coupled with a bazillion plot holes that I’m finding now in books that are rushed that make me no longer want to read them. And these are from authors I always loved to read. (Interesting side here, my spell check thinks ‘bazillion’ is a real word! πŸ˜† )
    I would rather have to wait a year for a novel that is full and rich, with well drawn characters and a great story, than get three a year and have them all half finished, poorly written and edited, and less than satisfying.
    So you just take all the time you need πŸ™‚ We can wait.

    Reply
  7. Jo, what a great apartment! And I love the pictures.
    Would I want less than a year between novels? I have to agree with Linda. I think authors are being pressured more and more to ‘produce’ at a rapid pace which doesn’t allow for much more than a cleaned up rough draft in many cases.
    I don’t believe it matters if a novel is packed full of minute historical details or just enough to push the novel forward, it’s also the character development or lack thereof, coupled with a bazillion plot holes that I’m finding now in books that are rushed that make me no longer want to read them. And these are from authors I always loved to read. (Interesting side here, my spell check thinks ‘bazillion’ is a real word! πŸ˜† )
    I would rather have to wait a year for a novel that is full and rich, with well drawn characters and a great story, than get three a year and have them all half finished, poorly written and edited, and less than satisfying.
    So you just take all the time you need πŸ™‚ We can wait.

    Reply
  8. Jo, what a great apartment! And I love the pictures.
    Would I want less than a year between novels? I have to agree with Linda. I think authors are being pressured more and more to ‘produce’ at a rapid pace which doesn’t allow for much more than a cleaned up rough draft in many cases.
    I don’t believe it matters if a novel is packed full of minute historical details or just enough to push the novel forward, it’s also the character development or lack thereof, coupled with a bazillion plot holes that I’m finding now in books that are rushed that make me no longer want to read them. And these are from authors I always loved to read. (Interesting side here, my spell check thinks ‘bazillion’ is a real word! πŸ˜† )
    I would rather have to wait a year for a novel that is full and rich, with well drawn characters and a great story, than get three a year and have them all half finished, poorly written and edited, and less than satisfying.
    So you just take all the time you need πŸ™‚ We can wait.

    Reply
  9. Jo, what a great apartment! And I love the pictures.
    Would I want less than a year between novels? I have to agree with Linda. I think authors are being pressured more and more to ‘produce’ at a rapid pace which doesn’t allow for much more than a cleaned up rough draft in many cases.
    I don’t believe it matters if a novel is packed full of minute historical details or just enough to push the novel forward, it’s also the character development or lack thereof, coupled with a bazillion plot holes that I’m finding now in books that are rushed that make me no longer want to read them. And these are from authors I always loved to read. (Interesting side here, my spell check thinks ‘bazillion’ is a real word! πŸ˜† )
    I would rather have to wait a year for a novel that is full and rich, with well drawn characters and a great story, than get three a year and have them all half finished, poorly written and edited, and less than satisfying.
    So you just take all the time you need πŸ™‚ We can wait.

    Reply
  10. Jo, what a great apartment! And I love the pictures.
    Would I want less than a year between novels? I have to agree with Linda. I think authors are being pressured more and more to ‘produce’ at a rapid pace which doesn’t allow for much more than a cleaned up rough draft in many cases.
    I don’t believe it matters if a novel is packed full of minute historical details or just enough to push the novel forward, it’s also the character development or lack thereof, coupled with a bazillion plot holes that I’m finding now in books that are rushed that make me no longer want to read them. And these are from authors I always loved to read. (Interesting side here, my spell check thinks ‘bazillion’ is a real word! πŸ˜† )
    I would rather have to wait a year for a novel that is full and rich, with well drawn characters and a great story, than get three a year and have them all half finished, poorly written and edited, and less than satisfying.
    So you just take all the time you need πŸ™‚ We can wait.

    Reply
  11. I agree with authors being pressured to produce and the quality suffering. (Not a problem only in historical novels. It seems that greed in publishing industry is less concerned with quality and more with “getting while the getting is good.) This means I buy fewer book in HC, having been burned once too often. Also because of the sheer number of books I buy, if it’s not a “keeper” I’ve wasted money that could have been spent on paperback copies of new-to-me authors. Half Price Books doesn’t give nearly enough for once-read HC books.

    Reply
  12. I agree with authors being pressured to produce and the quality suffering. (Not a problem only in historical novels. It seems that greed in publishing industry is less concerned with quality and more with “getting while the getting is good.) This means I buy fewer book in HC, having been burned once too often. Also because of the sheer number of books I buy, if it’s not a “keeper” I’ve wasted money that could have been spent on paperback copies of new-to-me authors. Half Price Books doesn’t give nearly enough for once-read HC books.

    Reply
  13. I agree with authors being pressured to produce and the quality suffering. (Not a problem only in historical novels. It seems that greed in publishing industry is less concerned with quality and more with “getting while the getting is good.) This means I buy fewer book in HC, having been burned once too often. Also because of the sheer number of books I buy, if it’s not a “keeper” I’ve wasted money that could have been spent on paperback copies of new-to-me authors. Half Price Books doesn’t give nearly enough for once-read HC books.

    Reply
  14. I agree with authors being pressured to produce and the quality suffering. (Not a problem only in historical novels. It seems that greed in publishing industry is less concerned with quality and more with “getting while the getting is good.) This means I buy fewer book in HC, having been burned once too often. Also because of the sheer number of books I buy, if it’s not a “keeper” I’ve wasted money that could have been spent on paperback copies of new-to-me authors. Half Price Books doesn’t give nearly enough for once-read HC books.

    Reply
  15. I agree with authors being pressured to produce and the quality suffering. (Not a problem only in historical novels. It seems that greed in publishing industry is less concerned with quality and more with “getting while the getting is good.) This means I buy fewer book in HC, having been burned once too often. Also because of the sheer number of books I buy, if it’s not a “keeper” I’ve wasted money that could have been spent on paperback copies of new-to-me authors. Half Price Books doesn’t give nearly enough for once-read HC books.

    Reply
  16. BTW: MSN.com has some questions today from the latest citizeship test that they want Americans to answer. They indicate that most Americans have much less knowledge about our own country and its government than many foreign-born citizens.

    Reply
  17. BTW: MSN.com has some questions today from the latest citizeship test that they want Americans to answer. They indicate that most Americans have much less knowledge about our own country and its government than many foreign-born citizens.

    Reply
  18. BTW: MSN.com has some questions today from the latest citizeship test that they want Americans to answer. They indicate that most Americans have much less knowledge about our own country and its government than many foreign-born citizens.

    Reply
  19. BTW: MSN.com has some questions today from the latest citizeship test that they want Americans to answer. They indicate that most Americans have much less knowledge about our own country and its government than many foreign-born citizens.

    Reply
  20. BTW: MSN.com has some questions today from the latest citizeship test that they want Americans to answer. They indicate that most Americans have much less knowledge about our own country and its government than many foreign-born citizens.

    Reply
  21. Kathy,
    Yes, books are too expensive to spend your money on ones you don’t like.
    I try out new authors by reading the library copy. If it’s a keeper, I buy my own copy. I’ve found a lot of authors I like that way, and also discarded a lot of ones I didn’t like.

    Reply
  22. Kathy,
    Yes, books are too expensive to spend your money on ones you don’t like.
    I try out new authors by reading the library copy. If it’s a keeper, I buy my own copy. I’ve found a lot of authors I like that way, and also discarded a lot of ones I didn’t like.

    Reply
  23. Kathy,
    Yes, books are too expensive to spend your money on ones you don’t like.
    I try out new authors by reading the library copy. If it’s a keeper, I buy my own copy. I’ve found a lot of authors I like that way, and also discarded a lot of ones I didn’t like.

    Reply
  24. Kathy,
    Yes, books are too expensive to spend your money on ones you don’t like.
    I try out new authors by reading the library copy. If it’s a keeper, I buy my own copy. I’ve found a lot of authors I like that way, and also discarded a lot of ones I didn’t like.

    Reply
  25. Kathy,
    Yes, books are too expensive to spend your money on ones you don’t like.
    I try out new authors by reading the library copy. If it’s a keeper, I buy my own copy. I’ve found a lot of authors I like that way, and also discarded a lot of ones I didn’t like.

    Reply
  26. What a beautiful apartment, Jo!
    I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a new book by a favorite author. It’s actually the pace I expect, particularly in an ongoing series. But I think every writer has a natural pace, so in my ideal world, the industry would allow for that. I’d rather wait two years for an outstanding book than six months for something hastily written and sloppy.
    In my own writing, until recently I was angry at myself for taking more than a year to finish my WIP, even though I’m not published yet, even though it’s a new genre for me, even though it’s the first book in an alternative history series and therefore requires a lot of research and worldbuilding, even though I work full-time and have a 4-year-old daughter. I finally realized it was more important to write it right than to write it fast, and that if it sells, *then* I can worry about what I need to do to get Book 2 and Book 3 written more quickly. I know I’m capable of writing faster, but not this book, not now. So now I’m working just as hard, but I’m having much more fun, because I’m no longer beating myself up for being “slow” or “unprofessional.”

    Reply
  27. What a beautiful apartment, Jo!
    I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a new book by a favorite author. It’s actually the pace I expect, particularly in an ongoing series. But I think every writer has a natural pace, so in my ideal world, the industry would allow for that. I’d rather wait two years for an outstanding book than six months for something hastily written and sloppy.
    In my own writing, until recently I was angry at myself for taking more than a year to finish my WIP, even though I’m not published yet, even though it’s a new genre for me, even though it’s the first book in an alternative history series and therefore requires a lot of research and worldbuilding, even though I work full-time and have a 4-year-old daughter. I finally realized it was more important to write it right than to write it fast, and that if it sells, *then* I can worry about what I need to do to get Book 2 and Book 3 written more quickly. I know I’m capable of writing faster, but not this book, not now. So now I’m working just as hard, but I’m having much more fun, because I’m no longer beating myself up for being “slow” or “unprofessional.”

    Reply
  28. What a beautiful apartment, Jo!
    I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a new book by a favorite author. It’s actually the pace I expect, particularly in an ongoing series. But I think every writer has a natural pace, so in my ideal world, the industry would allow for that. I’d rather wait two years for an outstanding book than six months for something hastily written and sloppy.
    In my own writing, until recently I was angry at myself for taking more than a year to finish my WIP, even though I’m not published yet, even though it’s a new genre for me, even though it’s the first book in an alternative history series and therefore requires a lot of research and worldbuilding, even though I work full-time and have a 4-year-old daughter. I finally realized it was more important to write it right than to write it fast, and that if it sells, *then* I can worry about what I need to do to get Book 2 and Book 3 written more quickly. I know I’m capable of writing faster, but not this book, not now. So now I’m working just as hard, but I’m having much more fun, because I’m no longer beating myself up for being “slow” or “unprofessional.”

    Reply
  29. What a beautiful apartment, Jo!
    I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a new book by a favorite author. It’s actually the pace I expect, particularly in an ongoing series. But I think every writer has a natural pace, so in my ideal world, the industry would allow for that. I’d rather wait two years for an outstanding book than six months for something hastily written and sloppy.
    In my own writing, until recently I was angry at myself for taking more than a year to finish my WIP, even though I’m not published yet, even though it’s a new genre for me, even though it’s the first book in an alternative history series and therefore requires a lot of research and worldbuilding, even though I work full-time and have a 4-year-old daughter. I finally realized it was more important to write it right than to write it fast, and that if it sells, *then* I can worry about what I need to do to get Book 2 and Book 3 written more quickly. I know I’m capable of writing faster, but not this book, not now. So now I’m working just as hard, but I’m having much more fun, because I’m no longer beating myself up for being “slow” or “unprofessional.”

    Reply
  30. What a beautiful apartment, Jo!
    I wouldn’t mind at all waiting a year for a new book by a favorite author. It’s actually the pace I expect, particularly in an ongoing series. But I think every writer has a natural pace, so in my ideal world, the industry would allow for that. I’d rather wait two years for an outstanding book than six months for something hastily written and sloppy.
    In my own writing, until recently I was angry at myself for taking more than a year to finish my WIP, even though I’m not published yet, even though it’s a new genre for me, even though it’s the first book in an alternative history series and therefore requires a lot of research and worldbuilding, even though I work full-time and have a 4-year-old daughter. I finally realized it was more important to write it right than to write it fast, and that if it sells, *then* I can worry about what I need to do to get Book 2 and Book 3 written more quickly. I know I’m capable of writing faster, but not this book, not now. So now I’m working just as hard, but I’m having much more fun, because I’m no longer beating myself up for being “slow” or “unprofessional.”

    Reply
  31. Interesting that everyone who’s commented is on side with slow publication.
    I think from the publisher angle, they don’t see fast growth in an author that way, and they love fast growth in numbers. Proof that they’ve made a good investment.
    We live in such a short term world, don’t we?
    Jo

    Reply
  32. Interesting that everyone who’s commented is on side with slow publication.
    I think from the publisher angle, they don’t see fast growth in an author that way, and they love fast growth in numbers. Proof that they’ve made a good investment.
    We live in such a short term world, don’t we?
    Jo

    Reply
  33. Interesting that everyone who’s commented is on side with slow publication.
    I think from the publisher angle, they don’t see fast growth in an author that way, and they love fast growth in numbers. Proof that they’ve made a good investment.
    We live in such a short term world, don’t we?
    Jo

    Reply
  34. Interesting that everyone who’s commented is on side with slow publication.
    I think from the publisher angle, they don’t see fast growth in an author that way, and they love fast growth in numbers. Proof that they’ve made a good investment.
    We live in such a short term world, don’t we?
    Jo

    Reply
  35. Interesting that everyone who’s commented is on side with slow publication.
    I think from the publisher angle, they don’t see fast growth in an author that way, and they love fast growth in numbers. Proof that they’ve made a good investment.
    We live in such a short term world, don’t we?
    Jo

    Reply
  36. Well, I suppose a lot of books works from the authors’ view, too. More books out there means more royalties.

    Reply
  37. Well, I suppose a lot of books works from the authors’ view, too. More books out there means more royalties.

    Reply
  38. Well, I suppose a lot of books works from the authors’ view, too. More books out there means more royalties.

    Reply
  39. Well, I suppose a lot of books works from the authors’ view, too. More books out there means more royalties.

    Reply
  40. Well, I suppose a lot of books works from the authors’ view, too. More books out there means more royalties.

    Reply
  41. Yes, we do, Jo. Instant gratification, regardless of how shallow or short term the gratification is. And that’s sad.
    And I didn’t mean to say it’s only historical novels that are suffering now from the write-write-write mentality. I’ve had a couple of contemporary authors I’ve become disappointed in because the drive to get those two or three novels a year out has affected their writing and story-lines as well.
    And Susan Wilbanks (because this seems to be the ‘Susan’ hangout) πŸ™‚ I understand how you feel. I’m not published yet either though I do have the first thirty out to a few places but still, it took me a long time to get the story the way I thought it should be, looking at it from all angles, author, grammarian, reader, historian…I want it right because ultimately, it’s a reflection on ME! My skills, my abilities, my ideas, my world that I create.
    Don’t get me wrong. There is a small handful of authors out there who have an inherent gift for writing and no matter what they do, how fast or slow or how many or few pages, their writing is brilliant. But, the rest of us live in the real world.
    Yup, I’ll wait as long as I have to.

    Reply
  42. Yes, we do, Jo. Instant gratification, regardless of how shallow or short term the gratification is. And that’s sad.
    And I didn’t mean to say it’s only historical novels that are suffering now from the write-write-write mentality. I’ve had a couple of contemporary authors I’ve become disappointed in because the drive to get those two or three novels a year out has affected their writing and story-lines as well.
    And Susan Wilbanks (because this seems to be the ‘Susan’ hangout) πŸ™‚ I understand how you feel. I’m not published yet either though I do have the first thirty out to a few places but still, it took me a long time to get the story the way I thought it should be, looking at it from all angles, author, grammarian, reader, historian…I want it right because ultimately, it’s a reflection on ME! My skills, my abilities, my ideas, my world that I create.
    Don’t get me wrong. There is a small handful of authors out there who have an inherent gift for writing and no matter what they do, how fast or slow or how many or few pages, their writing is brilliant. But, the rest of us live in the real world.
    Yup, I’ll wait as long as I have to.

    Reply
  43. Yes, we do, Jo. Instant gratification, regardless of how shallow or short term the gratification is. And that’s sad.
    And I didn’t mean to say it’s only historical novels that are suffering now from the write-write-write mentality. I’ve had a couple of contemporary authors I’ve become disappointed in because the drive to get those two or three novels a year out has affected their writing and story-lines as well.
    And Susan Wilbanks (because this seems to be the ‘Susan’ hangout) πŸ™‚ I understand how you feel. I’m not published yet either though I do have the first thirty out to a few places but still, it took me a long time to get the story the way I thought it should be, looking at it from all angles, author, grammarian, reader, historian…I want it right because ultimately, it’s a reflection on ME! My skills, my abilities, my ideas, my world that I create.
    Don’t get me wrong. There is a small handful of authors out there who have an inherent gift for writing and no matter what they do, how fast or slow or how many or few pages, their writing is brilliant. But, the rest of us live in the real world.
    Yup, I’ll wait as long as I have to.

    Reply
  44. Yes, we do, Jo. Instant gratification, regardless of how shallow or short term the gratification is. And that’s sad.
    And I didn’t mean to say it’s only historical novels that are suffering now from the write-write-write mentality. I’ve had a couple of contemporary authors I’ve become disappointed in because the drive to get those two or three novels a year out has affected their writing and story-lines as well.
    And Susan Wilbanks (because this seems to be the ‘Susan’ hangout) πŸ™‚ I understand how you feel. I’m not published yet either though I do have the first thirty out to a few places but still, it took me a long time to get the story the way I thought it should be, looking at it from all angles, author, grammarian, reader, historian…I want it right because ultimately, it’s a reflection on ME! My skills, my abilities, my ideas, my world that I create.
    Don’t get me wrong. There is a small handful of authors out there who have an inherent gift for writing and no matter what they do, how fast or slow or how many or few pages, their writing is brilliant. But, the rest of us live in the real world.
    Yup, I’ll wait as long as I have to.

    Reply
  45. Yes, we do, Jo. Instant gratification, regardless of how shallow or short term the gratification is. And that’s sad.
    And I didn’t mean to say it’s only historical novels that are suffering now from the write-write-write mentality. I’ve had a couple of contemporary authors I’ve become disappointed in because the drive to get those two or three novels a year out has affected their writing and story-lines as well.
    And Susan Wilbanks (because this seems to be the ‘Susan’ hangout) πŸ™‚ I understand how you feel. I’m not published yet either though I do have the first thirty out to a few places but still, it took me a long time to get the story the way I thought it should be, looking at it from all angles, author, grammarian, reader, historian…I want it right because ultimately, it’s a reflection on ME! My skills, my abilities, my ideas, my world that I create.
    Don’t get me wrong. There is a small handful of authors out there who have an inherent gift for writing and no matter what they do, how fast or slow or how many or few pages, their writing is brilliant. But, the rest of us live in the real world.
    Yup, I’ll wait as long as I have to.

    Reply
  46. What an amazing apartment! Enjoy.
    I’ll wait a full year – or years -for a book from a favorite author. I’m a voracious reader though, and I do appreciate the authors who can maintain quality while increasing quantity.

    Reply
  47. What an amazing apartment! Enjoy.
    I’ll wait a full year – or years -for a book from a favorite author. I’m a voracious reader though, and I do appreciate the authors who can maintain quality while increasing quantity.

    Reply
  48. What an amazing apartment! Enjoy.
    I’ll wait a full year – or years -for a book from a favorite author. I’m a voracious reader though, and I do appreciate the authors who can maintain quality while increasing quantity.

    Reply
  49. What an amazing apartment! Enjoy.
    I’ll wait a full year – or years -for a book from a favorite author. I’m a voracious reader though, and I do appreciate the authors who can maintain quality while increasing quantity.

    Reply
  50. What an amazing apartment! Enjoy.
    I’ll wait a full year – or years -for a book from a favorite author. I’m a voracious reader though, and I do appreciate the authors who can maintain quality while increasing quantity.

    Reply
  51. On the money side, authors used to do okay on one book a year, but there certainly will be more money with more books.
    But it’s possible that better books will attract more readers, so we’re back to the quality thing.
    Some writers certainly do seem to be able to write good and fast. Others can’t.
    And then there’s life. There’s life interruptions, when crises intervene, but there’s just life.
    Some author are beginning to say that the demands of writing many books a year is lessening their overall life.
    That doesn’t seem a good thing,
    Jo

    Reply
  52. On the money side, authors used to do okay on one book a year, but there certainly will be more money with more books.
    But it’s possible that better books will attract more readers, so we’re back to the quality thing.
    Some writers certainly do seem to be able to write good and fast. Others can’t.
    And then there’s life. There’s life interruptions, when crises intervene, but there’s just life.
    Some author are beginning to say that the demands of writing many books a year is lessening their overall life.
    That doesn’t seem a good thing,
    Jo

    Reply
  53. On the money side, authors used to do okay on one book a year, but there certainly will be more money with more books.
    But it’s possible that better books will attract more readers, so we’re back to the quality thing.
    Some writers certainly do seem to be able to write good and fast. Others can’t.
    And then there’s life. There’s life interruptions, when crises intervene, but there’s just life.
    Some author are beginning to say that the demands of writing many books a year is lessening their overall life.
    That doesn’t seem a good thing,
    Jo

    Reply
  54. On the money side, authors used to do okay on one book a year, but there certainly will be more money with more books.
    But it’s possible that better books will attract more readers, so we’re back to the quality thing.
    Some writers certainly do seem to be able to write good and fast. Others can’t.
    And then there’s life. There’s life interruptions, when crises intervene, but there’s just life.
    Some author are beginning to say that the demands of writing many books a year is lessening their overall life.
    That doesn’t seem a good thing,
    Jo

    Reply
  55. On the money side, authors used to do okay on one book a year, but there certainly will be more money with more books.
    But it’s possible that better books will attract more readers, so we’re back to the quality thing.
    Some writers certainly do seem to be able to write good and fast. Others can’t.
    And then there’s life. There’s life interruptions, when crises intervene, but there’s just life.
    Some author are beginning to say that the demands of writing many books a year is lessening their overall life.
    That doesn’t seem a good thing,
    Jo

    Reply
  56. Some authors naturally write fasters than others, and no matter what an author’s normal pace, I’m sure some stories seem to write themselves while others have long, painful gestation periods. But in the end it comes down to quality, and I’d rather have a good book than a fast book, if the two are mutually exclusive (not always the case).

    Reply
  57. Some authors naturally write fasters than others, and no matter what an author’s normal pace, I’m sure some stories seem to write themselves while others have long, painful gestation periods. But in the end it comes down to quality, and I’d rather have a good book than a fast book, if the two are mutually exclusive (not always the case).

    Reply
  58. Some authors naturally write fasters than others, and no matter what an author’s normal pace, I’m sure some stories seem to write themselves while others have long, painful gestation periods. But in the end it comes down to quality, and I’d rather have a good book than a fast book, if the two are mutually exclusive (not always the case).

    Reply
  59. Some authors naturally write fasters than others, and no matter what an author’s normal pace, I’m sure some stories seem to write themselves while others have long, painful gestation periods. But in the end it comes down to quality, and I’d rather have a good book than a fast book, if the two are mutually exclusive (not always the case).

    Reply
  60. Some authors naturally write fasters than others, and no matter what an author’s normal pace, I’m sure some stories seem to write themselves while others have long, painful gestation periods. But in the end it comes down to quality, and I’d rather have a good book than a fast book, if the two are mutually exclusive (not always the case).

    Reply
  61. Hope you had a nice Canada Day.
    Your new apartment looks fabulous….especially that wall of shelves.
    Nothing like life where one can commune with “‘Ole Mother Nature.”

    Reply
  62. Hope you had a nice Canada Day.
    Your new apartment looks fabulous….especially that wall of shelves.
    Nothing like life where one can commune with “‘Ole Mother Nature.”

    Reply
  63. Hope you had a nice Canada Day.
    Your new apartment looks fabulous….especially that wall of shelves.
    Nothing like life where one can commune with “‘Ole Mother Nature.”

    Reply
  64. Hope you had a nice Canada Day.
    Your new apartment looks fabulous….especially that wall of shelves.
    Nothing like life where one can commune with “‘Ole Mother Nature.”

    Reply
  65. Hope you had a nice Canada Day.
    Your new apartment looks fabulous….especially that wall of shelves.
    Nothing like life where one can commune with “‘Ole Mother Nature.”

    Reply
  66. Your research library looks a lot like mine, Jo, only neater. And yours comes with that lovely oak… Sigh. I lived in an oak faux Tudor for years and dearly adored all that beautiful wood. It requires jewel tones. Check out Oriental rugs!

    Reply
  67. Your research library looks a lot like mine, Jo, only neater. And yours comes with that lovely oak… Sigh. I lived in an oak faux Tudor for years and dearly adored all that beautiful wood. It requires jewel tones. Check out Oriental rugs!

    Reply
  68. Your research library looks a lot like mine, Jo, only neater. And yours comes with that lovely oak… Sigh. I lived in an oak faux Tudor for years and dearly adored all that beautiful wood. It requires jewel tones. Check out Oriental rugs!

    Reply
  69. Your research library looks a lot like mine, Jo, only neater. And yours comes with that lovely oak… Sigh. I lived in an oak faux Tudor for years and dearly adored all that beautiful wood. It requires jewel tones. Check out Oriental rugs!

    Reply
  70. Your research library looks a lot like mine, Jo, only neater. And yours comes with that lovely oak… Sigh. I lived in an oak faux Tudor for years and dearly adored all that beautiful wood. It requires jewel tones. Check out Oriental rugs!

    Reply
  71. I once did a review of three books on writing by Robert A. Heinlein, Annie Dillard, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Dillard felt if at the end of the day she had two paragraphs worth keeping, it had been a remarkably good session. Heinlein boasted of writing STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND in six weeks. And Le Guin talked about trying to write in longhand at the kitchen table in the interstices of “real life” as a faculty wife and mother.

    Reply
  72. I once did a review of three books on writing by Robert A. Heinlein, Annie Dillard, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Dillard felt if at the end of the day she had two paragraphs worth keeping, it had been a remarkably good session. Heinlein boasted of writing STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND in six weeks. And Le Guin talked about trying to write in longhand at the kitchen table in the interstices of “real life” as a faculty wife and mother.

    Reply
  73. I once did a review of three books on writing by Robert A. Heinlein, Annie Dillard, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Dillard felt if at the end of the day she had two paragraphs worth keeping, it had been a remarkably good session. Heinlein boasted of writing STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND in six weeks. And Le Guin talked about trying to write in longhand at the kitchen table in the interstices of “real life” as a faculty wife and mother.

    Reply
  74. I once did a review of three books on writing by Robert A. Heinlein, Annie Dillard, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Dillard felt if at the end of the day she had two paragraphs worth keeping, it had been a remarkably good session. Heinlein boasted of writing STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND in six weeks. And Le Guin talked about trying to write in longhand at the kitchen table in the interstices of “real life” as a faculty wife and mother.

    Reply
  75. I once did a review of three books on writing by Robert A. Heinlein, Annie Dillard, and Ursula K. Le Guin. Dillard felt if at the end of the day she had two paragraphs worth keeping, it had been a remarkably good session. Heinlein boasted of writing STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND in six weeks. And Le Guin talked about trying to write in longhand at the kitchen table in the interstices of “real life” as a faculty wife and mother.

    Reply
  76. At the risk of sounding repetitious, your new apartment is fantastic. Those lovely high ceilings, paneling and huge windows that fill the picture of your sun room with wonderful light. You’ll really appreciate that in the wintertime…letting in the bright white winter light, watching the snowfall, looking at the bright stars in the winter sky. Amazing windows.
    My opinion on the pace of the publishing industry is that a good book is worth waiting for and if it takes several years and is fabulous, it was worth the wait although I am sure that publishers and agents don’t quite agree….maybe your bank book either. There is so much tripe being printed nowdays and nothing makes me angrier than buying a book at full price that is just that, offal. (pun intended).
    Your writing and that of the other wenches is extraordinary in that way; I never doubt that I will be entertained and learn something unique about the period depicted. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  77. At the risk of sounding repetitious, your new apartment is fantastic. Those lovely high ceilings, paneling and huge windows that fill the picture of your sun room with wonderful light. You’ll really appreciate that in the wintertime…letting in the bright white winter light, watching the snowfall, looking at the bright stars in the winter sky. Amazing windows.
    My opinion on the pace of the publishing industry is that a good book is worth waiting for and if it takes several years and is fabulous, it was worth the wait although I am sure that publishers and agents don’t quite agree….maybe your bank book either. There is so much tripe being printed nowdays and nothing makes me angrier than buying a book at full price that is just that, offal. (pun intended).
    Your writing and that of the other wenches is extraordinary in that way; I never doubt that I will be entertained and learn something unique about the period depicted. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  78. At the risk of sounding repetitious, your new apartment is fantastic. Those lovely high ceilings, paneling and huge windows that fill the picture of your sun room with wonderful light. You’ll really appreciate that in the wintertime…letting in the bright white winter light, watching the snowfall, looking at the bright stars in the winter sky. Amazing windows.
    My opinion on the pace of the publishing industry is that a good book is worth waiting for and if it takes several years and is fabulous, it was worth the wait although I am sure that publishers and agents don’t quite agree….maybe your bank book either. There is so much tripe being printed nowdays and nothing makes me angrier than buying a book at full price that is just that, offal. (pun intended).
    Your writing and that of the other wenches is extraordinary in that way; I never doubt that I will be entertained and learn something unique about the period depicted. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  79. At the risk of sounding repetitious, your new apartment is fantastic. Those lovely high ceilings, paneling and huge windows that fill the picture of your sun room with wonderful light. You’ll really appreciate that in the wintertime…letting in the bright white winter light, watching the snowfall, looking at the bright stars in the winter sky. Amazing windows.
    My opinion on the pace of the publishing industry is that a good book is worth waiting for and if it takes several years and is fabulous, it was worth the wait although I am sure that publishers and agents don’t quite agree….maybe your bank book either. There is so much tripe being printed nowdays and nothing makes me angrier than buying a book at full price that is just that, offal. (pun intended).
    Your writing and that of the other wenches is extraordinary in that way; I never doubt that I will be entertained and learn something unique about the period depicted. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  80. At the risk of sounding repetitious, your new apartment is fantastic. Those lovely high ceilings, paneling and huge windows that fill the picture of your sun room with wonderful light. You’ll really appreciate that in the wintertime…letting in the bright white winter light, watching the snowfall, looking at the bright stars in the winter sky. Amazing windows.
    My opinion on the pace of the publishing industry is that a good book is worth waiting for and if it takes several years and is fabulous, it was worth the wait although I am sure that publishers and agents don’t quite agree….maybe your bank book either. There is so much tripe being printed nowdays and nothing makes me angrier than buying a book at full price that is just that, offal. (pun intended).
    Your writing and that of the other wenches is extraordinary in that way; I never doubt that I will be entertained and learn something unique about the period depicted. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  81. Pat, I have an oriental rug! A Bokhara Neva, I gather, a present from my sister when she worked in the middle east. It does fit in nicely, as does my heavy brown leather furniture, which didn’t fit our house, and a number of other items.
    Suzy! Don’t wish snow on me. I agree about the lovely light, but we rarely get snow in Victoria, and I’d rather it stayed that way.
    Thanks for the praise of the Wenches. We are a fine bunch, aren’t we?
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  82. Pat, I have an oriental rug! A Bokhara Neva, I gather, a present from my sister when she worked in the middle east. It does fit in nicely, as does my heavy brown leather furniture, which didn’t fit our house, and a number of other items.
    Suzy! Don’t wish snow on me. I agree about the lovely light, but we rarely get snow in Victoria, and I’d rather it stayed that way.
    Thanks for the praise of the Wenches. We are a fine bunch, aren’t we?
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  83. Pat, I have an oriental rug! A Bokhara Neva, I gather, a present from my sister when she worked in the middle east. It does fit in nicely, as does my heavy brown leather furniture, which didn’t fit our house, and a number of other items.
    Suzy! Don’t wish snow on me. I agree about the lovely light, but we rarely get snow in Victoria, and I’d rather it stayed that way.
    Thanks for the praise of the Wenches. We are a fine bunch, aren’t we?
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  84. Pat, I have an oriental rug! A Bokhara Neva, I gather, a present from my sister when she worked in the middle east. It does fit in nicely, as does my heavy brown leather furniture, which didn’t fit our house, and a number of other items.
    Suzy! Don’t wish snow on me. I agree about the lovely light, but we rarely get snow in Victoria, and I’d rather it stayed that way.
    Thanks for the praise of the Wenches. We are a fine bunch, aren’t we?
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  85. Pat, I have an oriental rug! A Bokhara Neva, I gather, a present from my sister when she worked in the middle east. It does fit in nicely, as does my heavy brown leather furniture, which didn’t fit our house, and a number of other items.
    Suzy! Don’t wish snow on me. I agree about the lovely light, but we rarely get snow in Victoria, and I’d rather it stayed that way.
    Thanks for the praise of the Wenches. We are a fine bunch, aren’t we?
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  86. Well, Jo, if those extra copies are taking up too much space in your lovely new digs, I’d be happy to be “a winner” and take one off your hands. My collection is still missing “Forbidden Magic”… πŸ™‚
    Your apartment is really wonderful. I hope you feel settled in soon.
    I am American so the 4th is my holiday, but my dad was raised in Nebraska and considers himself a true Nebraskan. So, every March 1, he would hang the Nebraska state flag on our front porch and would wax poetic on the beauties of his home state. He’s no Willa Cather, but he did make it sound good. πŸ™‚
    Oh, and I’m willing to wait for a good book. Quality not quantity. BTW, did you know that one may now pre-order The Secret Wedding on Amazon? No pressure there! LOL!

    Reply
  87. Well, Jo, if those extra copies are taking up too much space in your lovely new digs, I’d be happy to be “a winner” and take one off your hands. My collection is still missing “Forbidden Magic”… πŸ™‚
    Your apartment is really wonderful. I hope you feel settled in soon.
    I am American so the 4th is my holiday, but my dad was raised in Nebraska and considers himself a true Nebraskan. So, every March 1, he would hang the Nebraska state flag on our front porch and would wax poetic on the beauties of his home state. He’s no Willa Cather, but he did make it sound good. πŸ™‚
    Oh, and I’m willing to wait for a good book. Quality not quantity. BTW, did you know that one may now pre-order The Secret Wedding on Amazon? No pressure there! LOL!

    Reply
  88. Well, Jo, if those extra copies are taking up too much space in your lovely new digs, I’d be happy to be “a winner” and take one off your hands. My collection is still missing “Forbidden Magic”… πŸ™‚
    Your apartment is really wonderful. I hope you feel settled in soon.
    I am American so the 4th is my holiday, but my dad was raised in Nebraska and considers himself a true Nebraskan. So, every March 1, he would hang the Nebraska state flag on our front porch and would wax poetic on the beauties of his home state. He’s no Willa Cather, but he did make it sound good. πŸ™‚
    Oh, and I’m willing to wait for a good book. Quality not quantity. BTW, did you know that one may now pre-order The Secret Wedding on Amazon? No pressure there! LOL!

    Reply
  89. Well, Jo, if those extra copies are taking up too much space in your lovely new digs, I’d be happy to be “a winner” and take one off your hands. My collection is still missing “Forbidden Magic”… πŸ™‚
    Your apartment is really wonderful. I hope you feel settled in soon.
    I am American so the 4th is my holiday, but my dad was raised in Nebraska and considers himself a true Nebraskan. So, every March 1, he would hang the Nebraska state flag on our front porch and would wax poetic on the beauties of his home state. He’s no Willa Cather, but he did make it sound good. πŸ™‚
    Oh, and I’m willing to wait for a good book. Quality not quantity. BTW, did you know that one may now pre-order The Secret Wedding on Amazon? No pressure there! LOL!

    Reply
  90. Well, Jo, if those extra copies are taking up too much space in your lovely new digs, I’d be happy to be “a winner” and take one off your hands. My collection is still missing “Forbidden Magic”… πŸ™‚
    Your apartment is really wonderful. I hope you feel settled in soon.
    I am American so the 4th is my holiday, but my dad was raised in Nebraska and considers himself a true Nebraskan. So, every March 1, he would hang the Nebraska state flag on our front porch and would wax poetic on the beauties of his home state. He’s no Willa Cather, but he did make it sound good. πŸ™‚
    Oh, and I’m willing to wait for a good book. Quality not quantity. BTW, did you know that one may now pre-order The Secret Wedding on Amazon? No pressure there! LOL!

    Reply
  91. Your digs sound and look impressive, would that I could find the like. I’ll be moving too–sometime at the end of Aug, beginning of Sept.–but into two small rooms. I’m trying to downsize too but I’m not sure I’ll manage to do so very much. I still have a 8’x10′ storage unit which I want to empty as soon as possible. At least my rent will be geared to my income. I’m not certain if I have all of your books; I’ll have to check first.
    I’m watching Wild China, part of “The Nature of Things” on CBC Newsworld right now and saw some of the 400th Anniversary of Quebec celebrations earlier. Love my news channels after having none for over 2 years.
    To all the “Amis”: Have a wonderful 4th of July holiday.

    Reply
  92. Your digs sound and look impressive, would that I could find the like. I’ll be moving too–sometime at the end of Aug, beginning of Sept.–but into two small rooms. I’m trying to downsize too but I’m not sure I’ll manage to do so very much. I still have a 8’x10′ storage unit which I want to empty as soon as possible. At least my rent will be geared to my income. I’m not certain if I have all of your books; I’ll have to check first.
    I’m watching Wild China, part of “The Nature of Things” on CBC Newsworld right now and saw some of the 400th Anniversary of Quebec celebrations earlier. Love my news channels after having none for over 2 years.
    To all the “Amis”: Have a wonderful 4th of July holiday.

    Reply
  93. Your digs sound and look impressive, would that I could find the like. I’ll be moving too–sometime at the end of Aug, beginning of Sept.–but into two small rooms. I’m trying to downsize too but I’m not sure I’ll manage to do so very much. I still have a 8’x10′ storage unit which I want to empty as soon as possible. At least my rent will be geared to my income. I’m not certain if I have all of your books; I’ll have to check first.
    I’m watching Wild China, part of “The Nature of Things” on CBC Newsworld right now and saw some of the 400th Anniversary of Quebec celebrations earlier. Love my news channels after having none for over 2 years.
    To all the “Amis”: Have a wonderful 4th of July holiday.

    Reply
  94. Your digs sound and look impressive, would that I could find the like. I’ll be moving too–sometime at the end of Aug, beginning of Sept.–but into two small rooms. I’m trying to downsize too but I’m not sure I’ll manage to do so very much. I still have a 8’x10′ storage unit which I want to empty as soon as possible. At least my rent will be geared to my income. I’m not certain if I have all of your books; I’ll have to check first.
    I’m watching Wild China, part of “The Nature of Things” on CBC Newsworld right now and saw some of the 400th Anniversary of Quebec celebrations earlier. Love my news channels after having none for over 2 years.
    To all the “Amis”: Have a wonderful 4th of July holiday.

    Reply
  95. Your digs sound and look impressive, would that I could find the like. I’ll be moving too–sometime at the end of Aug, beginning of Sept.–but into two small rooms. I’m trying to downsize too but I’m not sure I’ll manage to do so very much. I still have a 8’x10′ storage unit which I want to empty as soon as possible. At least my rent will be geared to my income. I’m not certain if I have all of your books; I’ll have to check first.
    I’m watching Wild China, part of “The Nature of Things” on CBC Newsworld right now and saw some of the 400th Anniversary of Quebec celebrations earlier. Love my news channels after having none for over 2 years.
    To all the “Amis”: Have a wonderful 4th of July holiday.

    Reply

Leave a Comment