The Bargain: “There’s something about that story…”

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

This week, Kensington has reissued my early romance, The Bargain, which got me to thinking about the long journey this story has.  It started life as my third Signet Regency, The Would Be Widow.  I was very much a neophyte at the time, and several of my writing traits first appeared here.  

To begin with, I connected the story to my first book, The Diabolical Baron, by making the hero of The Baron the best friend of the hero of the Widow, and a key player in the story.  Without even realizing it, I had started writing a community, and that has served me well as those books turned into a de facto series, and series are really popular now!

TheBargain CoverSecondly, this was the first book where there was a difficult man who proved unexpectedly interesting at the last moment, so naturally I had to immediately write a book about him. (The man was Rafael Whitbourne, the Duke of Candover, and his book was The Controversial Countess, later revised as Petals in the Storm, about which more anon.  Reggie Davenport in The Diabolical Baron was a similarly problematic character who ended up with his own book: The Rake and the Reformer, now The Rake.  But I didn't write that for another year or two.)

The Would Be Widow is a perfect title for this story: a young woman needs to marry by her 25th birthday in order to secure her inheritance and she doesn't want to marry at random when she has her eye on a man she really wants, and he seems interested in her, too.  It's not long after Waterloo, so she visits a London military hospital to see a friend, and is struck with the brilliant idea of marrying a dying man, which will fulfill the terms of her father's will while soon freeing her to pursue the man she wants.



So she proposes a bargain to the gallant, mortally wounded Major David Lancaster: if he Would Be Widowmarries her, she'll settle an income to his sister, a governess who will be left alone in the world.  David thinks that sounds like a fine idea, they marry–and then he doesn't fulfill his end of the bargain by dying!  So what happens when a marriage of convenience becomes really inconvenient???

I don't recall just where I got the basic idea for the story, but I was vastly pleased with it.  (Much later, I learned that a Kathleen Woodiwiss novel called Shanna had a somewhat similar premise.  Proof that there are no really original ideas.)  

While I felt it was a good story, I never expected it to have such long legs!  It was published and later reissued as a Signet Regency, then I revised and expanded the story into a historical romance that was renamed THE BARGAIN.  

Bargain NALThe story didn't change much in the revision–it got shorter because I was removing excess words, a failing I'm prone to, but I also filled out a secondary romance and some other scenes.  Plus, I added a prologue, and here it is:

Spring 1812
Charlton Abbey

    The fourth Earl of Cromarty was buried with all the pomp and dignity due his rank.  The village church bell tolled solemnly as he was laid to rest in a misty rain, all of the male members of his household dressed in black and suitably somber.  The late earl had been a handsome, forceful man, fair of mind and quick to laugh.  His tenants had all been vastly proud of him.  
    Chief mourner was the earl’s only child, Lady Jocelyn Kendal.  At the post-funeral gathering, she performed her duties with impeccable grace, her pale perfect features still as a marble angel under her sheer black mourning veil.  She and her father had been very close.  
    This would be Lady Jocelyn’s last official act at Charlton Abbey, since her Uncle Willoughby was now the owner.  If she resented the fact that she had been transformed from mistress to guest in her childhood home, she concealed her feelings.
    Though a few elderly ladies might think her independent streak would be considered headstrong in a less well-bred girl, none of the men minded.  At twenty-one she possessed more than her share of beauty and charm, and as she moved about the great hall men looked after her, and briefly dreamed.
    The last ritual of the long day was the reading of the will.  The family lawyer, Mr. Crandall, had come down from London to perform the duty.  It was a lengthy task, with numerous bequests for honored servants and special charities.  
    Lady Jocelyn sat immobile in the crowd of listeners. A mere daughter could not succeed to her father’s honors, but she would still inherit a substantial part of her father’s fortune, enough to be one of England’s greatest heiresses.
    The new earl, a solemn-faced man without a tithe of his late brother’s dash, listened FINAL--TheBargainAudiogravely.  Once it had been assumed that the fourth earl would remarry and get himself a male heir, but his experience of matrimony appeared to have soured him on that state.  He had been content with his only daughter, and Willoughby was the beneficiary of that choice.  Though the new earl sincerely mourned his brother, he was human enough to be glad for his elevation to the title.
    The will presented no surprises—until the end.  Lawyer Crandall cleared his throat, and glanced nervously at the statuesque beauty in the front row before starting to read the final provisions.  “And for my beloved daughter, Jocelyn, I hereby bequeath and ordain…”
    The lawyer’s sonorous voice filled the room, riveting the listeners. When he finished, there was a murmur of startled voices and inhaled breath as heads turned to Lady Jocelyn.
    She sat utterly still for an endless moment.  Then she leaped to her feet, sweeping her black veil from her face to reveal blazing rage in her fine hazel eyes.  “He did WHAT?”

For this reissue, Kensington asked if I could come up with a bit of new content. Editors don't seem to realize how difficult it is to do this if the original story is tightly plotted–it's like grafting peacock feathers on a sheep.  But being an agreeable author, I thought about it, and came up with–an epilogue!  So this edition of The Bargain has an epilogue that adds a bit of follow through.

The BargainBut it continues to surprise me how the story of Jocelyn and David in all its variations resonates so strongly with readers, many of whom have told me the book is on their keeper shelf.  This is part of the mystery of writing: we authors haven't a clue how readers will react to our stories!  I know that some of my books that I love gather no special attention, while some that I think might not be as strong as I'd like are acclaimed.  Definitely a mystery!

I don't worry much about such things–I just keeping inching onward through new stories, hoping for the best.  But if you haven't read The Bargain and are curious, this new edition is available now.  I've illustrated this blog with all of the covers the story has had, including the one for the audiobook version I produced last year.

MaryJoPutney_PetalsintheStorm_200pxAs a special extra, between now and Sunday night, the ebook edition of the book that follows, Petals in the Storm, is sale priced at $1.99 from now through Sunday night at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. This is the story of Rafe Whitbourne, who first appears in The Bargain and became very interesting right at the end.  I love an intriguing man who needs work. <G>

TheBargain CoverI'll be giving away a free copy of The Bargain to one person who comments between now and midnight Sunday.  So comment away!  Have you read the book already?  Do you know why some books resonate wi
th you and others don't?  I'd love to know!

Mary Jo

190 thoughts on “The Bargain: “There’s something about that story…””

  1. Do you know why some books resonate with you and others don’t? I’d love to know!
    I think that knowing that would greatly simplify my search for great fiction …. alas it is like seeking the crock of gold at the end of a rainbow!
    Certain authors have the magic ingredients and become auto-buys while others can produce occasional books that resonate. I like a fast moving plot with adventure and romance. The characters have to interest me with ambitions and desires and situations that fire my imagination.
    MJ, I loved the audio version of ‘The Bargain’ and the blend of romance and adventure in say ‘The Lost Lords’ series really comes close to my ideal.
    Delighted to see that the latest audio addition to this series ‘Not Always a Saint’ is also due to be released shortly. I will be grabbing that one!

    Reply
  2. Do you know why some books resonate with you and others don’t? I’d love to know!
    I think that knowing that would greatly simplify my search for great fiction …. alas it is like seeking the crock of gold at the end of a rainbow!
    Certain authors have the magic ingredients and become auto-buys while others can produce occasional books that resonate. I like a fast moving plot with adventure and romance. The characters have to interest me with ambitions and desires and situations that fire my imagination.
    MJ, I loved the audio version of ‘The Bargain’ and the blend of romance and adventure in say ‘The Lost Lords’ series really comes close to my ideal.
    Delighted to see that the latest audio addition to this series ‘Not Always a Saint’ is also due to be released shortly. I will be grabbing that one!

    Reply
  3. Do you know why some books resonate with you and others don’t? I’d love to know!
    I think that knowing that would greatly simplify my search for great fiction …. alas it is like seeking the crock of gold at the end of a rainbow!
    Certain authors have the magic ingredients and become auto-buys while others can produce occasional books that resonate. I like a fast moving plot with adventure and romance. The characters have to interest me with ambitions and desires and situations that fire my imagination.
    MJ, I loved the audio version of ‘The Bargain’ and the blend of romance and adventure in say ‘The Lost Lords’ series really comes close to my ideal.
    Delighted to see that the latest audio addition to this series ‘Not Always a Saint’ is also due to be released shortly. I will be grabbing that one!

    Reply
  4. Do you know why some books resonate with you and others don’t? I’d love to know!
    I think that knowing that would greatly simplify my search for great fiction …. alas it is like seeking the crock of gold at the end of a rainbow!
    Certain authors have the magic ingredients and become auto-buys while others can produce occasional books that resonate. I like a fast moving plot with adventure and romance. The characters have to interest me with ambitions and desires and situations that fire my imagination.
    MJ, I loved the audio version of ‘The Bargain’ and the blend of romance and adventure in say ‘The Lost Lords’ series really comes close to my ideal.
    Delighted to see that the latest audio addition to this series ‘Not Always a Saint’ is also due to be released shortly. I will be grabbing that one!

    Reply
  5. Do you know why some books resonate with you and others don’t? I’d love to know!
    I think that knowing that would greatly simplify my search for great fiction …. alas it is like seeking the crock of gold at the end of a rainbow!
    Certain authors have the magic ingredients and become auto-buys while others can produce occasional books that resonate. I like a fast moving plot with adventure and romance. The characters have to interest me with ambitions and desires and situations that fire my imagination.
    MJ, I loved the audio version of ‘The Bargain’ and the blend of romance and adventure in say ‘The Lost Lords’ series really comes close to my ideal.
    Delighted to see that the latest audio addition to this series ‘Not Always a Saint’ is also due to be released shortly. I will be grabbing that one!

    Reply
  6. I loved reading about how The Bargain came to be! I love when everyone gets their HEA. I have not read the Bargain but have been when I could, getting your reissues in ebook and it’s great to be able to do that. Thanks for reissueing these. I’m thrilled you and other authors are doing this, so thank you. Often when reading I’d think ‘Did this person have their story in another book?’. I do tend to sticking with reading in order. I shall grab Bargain and hopefully soon Petals in the Storm. Mary Jo, Are there characters yet in these books you didn’t write their HEA yet and want to?. Thanks Cathie
    cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  7. I loved reading about how The Bargain came to be! I love when everyone gets their HEA. I have not read the Bargain but have been when I could, getting your reissues in ebook and it’s great to be able to do that. Thanks for reissueing these. I’m thrilled you and other authors are doing this, so thank you. Often when reading I’d think ‘Did this person have their story in another book?’. I do tend to sticking with reading in order. I shall grab Bargain and hopefully soon Petals in the Storm. Mary Jo, Are there characters yet in these books you didn’t write their HEA yet and want to?. Thanks Cathie
    cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  8. I loved reading about how The Bargain came to be! I love when everyone gets their HEA. I have not read the Bargain but have been when I could, getting your reissues in ebook and it’s great to be able to do that. Thanks for reissueing these. I’m thrilled you and other authors are doing this, so thank you. Often when reading I’d think ‘Did this person have their story in another book?’. I do tend to sticking with reading in order. I shall grab Bargain and hopefully soon Petals in the Storm. Mary Jo, Are there characters yet in these books you didn’t write their HEA yet and want to?. Thanks Cathie
    cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  9. I loved reading about how The Bargain came to be! I love when everyone gets their HEA. I have not read the Bargain but have been when I could, getting your reissues in ebook and it’s great to be able to do that. Thanks for reissueing these. I’m thrilled you and other authors are doing this, so thank you. Often when reading I’d think ‘Did this person have their story in another book?’. I do tend to sticking with reading in order. I shall grab Bargain and hopefully soon Petals in the Storm. Mary Jo, Are there characters yet in these books you didn’t write their HEA yet and want to?. Thanks Cathie
    cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  10. I loved reading about how The Bargain came to be! I love when everyone gets their HEA. I have not read the Bargain but have been when I could, getting your reissues in ebook and it’s great to be able to do that. Thanks for reissueing these. I’m thrilled you and other authors are doing this, so thank you. Often when reading I’d think ‘Did this person have their story in another book?’. I do tend to sticking with reading in order. I shall grab Bargain and hopefully soon Petals in the Storm. Mary Jo, Are there characters yet in these books you didn’t write their HEA yet and want to?. Thanks Cathie
    cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  11. I still have the original Would Be Widow and had no idea that there was extra material in the various later editions of the Bargain . Interesting to hear how the story came to be. I think the sister in law is an interesting character.

    Reply
  12. I still have the original Would Be Widow and had no idea that there was extra material in the various later editions of the Bargain . Interesting to hear how the story came to be. I think the sister in law is an interesting character.

    Reply
  13. I still have the original Would Be Widow and had no idea that there was extra material in the various later editions of the Bargain . Interesting to hear how the story came to be. I think the sister in law is an interesting character.

    Reply
  14. I still have the original Would Be Widow and had no idea that there was extra material in the various later editions of the Bargain . Interesting to hear how the story came to be. I think the sister in law is an interesting character.

    Reply
  15. I still have the original Would Be Widow and had no idea that there was extra material in the various later editions of the Bargain . Interesting to hear how the story came to be. I think the sister in law is an interesting character.

    Reply
  16. I’ve read the original Would-Be Widow but not The Bargain, so I’d love to win it! I like stories that start off with a strong hook, that make you have to keep reading. And I never get tired of any sort of arranged marriage or marriage of convenience plot.
    It’s also been a long time since I read Petals in the Storm, maybe time for a reread of that one too!

    Reply
  17. I’ve read the original Would-Be Widow but not The Bargain, so I’d love to win it! I like stories that start off with a strong hook, that make you have to keep reading. And I never get tired of any sort of arranged marriage or marriage of convenience plot.
    It’s also been a long time since I read Petals in the Storm, maybe time for a reread of that one too!

    Reply
  18. I’ve read the original Would-Be Widow but not The Bargain, so I’d love to win it! I like stories that start off with a strong hook, that make you have to keep reading. And I never get tired of any sort of arranged marriage or marriage of convenience plot.
    It’s also been a long time since I read Petals in the Storm, maybe time for a reread of that one too!

    Reply
  19. I’ve read the original Would-Be Widow but not The Bargain, so I’d love to win it! I like stories that start off with a strong hook, that make you have to keep reading. And I never get tired of any sort of arranged marriage or marriage of convenience plot.
    It’s also been a long time since I read Petals in the Storm, maybe time for a reread of that one too!

    Reply
  20. I’ve read the original Would-Be Widow but not The Bargain, so I’d love to win it! I like stories that start off with a strong hook, that make you have to keep reading. And I never get tired of any sort of arranged marriage or marriage of convenience plot.
    It’s also been a long time since I read Petals in the Storm, maybe time for a reread of that one too!

    Reply
  21. Aiieeeee…so this means I have to find all the other editions of the story to read as well! Indeed, I have ALL your book on my keeper shelf. I even found a copy of Lady’s Fortune at the used book store a couple of months ago. I almost danced with joy – especially since it was “only” $8.50.
    It is odd how some books really hit that “sweet spot” and others don’t. I’ve got this one book I just LOVE but everything else I’ve read by that author is like, oh well…ho hum and I haven’t kept any of those. And I reread Tapestry frequently too – maybe once a year.
    As Quantum said – if only I knew why certain books are so great (to me). And if I only knew WHY certain books of my favorite authors are extra special as compared to the rest of their books.
    Maybe I should devote a day to pulling books off the shelf and making piles between extra special, yes and not so much. Grin. Of course that would turn into a weeks long task as I would have to dip into various books…….

    Reply
  22. Aiieeeee…so this means I have to find all the other editions of the story to read as well! Indeed, I have ALL your book on my keeper shelf. I even found a copy of Lady’s Fortune at the used book store a couple of months ago. I almost danced with joy – especially since it was “only” $8.50.
    It is odd how some books really hit that “sweet spot” and others don’t. I’ve got this one book I just LOVE but everything else I’ve read by that author is like, oh well…ho hum and I haven’t kept any of those. And I reread Tapestry frequently too – maybe once a year.
    As Quantum said – if only I knew why certain books are so great (to me). And if I only knew WHY certain books of my favorite authors are extra special as compared to the rest of their books.
    Maybe I should devote a day to pulling books off the shelf and making piles between extra special, yes and not so much. Grin. Of course that would turn into a weeks long task as I would have to dip into various books…….

    Reply
  23. Aiieeeee…so this means I have to find all the other editions of the story to read as well! Indeed, I have ALL your book on my keeper shelf. I even found a copy of Lady’s Fortune at the used book store a couple of months ago. I almost danced with joy – especially since it was “only” $8.50.
    It is odd how some books really hit that “sweet spot” and others don’t. I’ve got this one book I just LOVE but everything else I’ve read by that author is like, oh well…ho hum and I haven’t kept any of those. And I reread Tapestry frequently too – maybe once a year.
    As Quantum said – if only I knew why certain books are so great (to me). And if I only knew WHY certain books of my favorite authors are extra special as compared to the rest of their books.
    Maybe I should devote a day to pulling books off the shelf and making piles between extra special, yes and not so much. Grin. Of course that would turn into a weeks long task as I would have to dip into various books…….

    Reply
  24. Aiieeeee…so this means I have to find all the other editions of the story to read as well! Indeed, I have ALL your book on my keeper shelf. I even found a copy of Lady’s Fortune at the used book store a couple of months ago. I almost danced with joy – especially since it was “only” $8.50.
    It is odd how some books really hit that “sweet spot” and others don’t. I’ve got this one book I just LOVE but everything else I’ve read by that author is like, oh well…ho hum and I haven’t kept any of those. And I reread Tapestry frequently too – maybe once a year.
    As Quantum said – if only I knew why certain books are so great (to me). And if I only knew WHY certain books of my favorite authors are extra special as compared to the rest of their books.
    Maybe I should devote a day to pulling books off the shelf and making piles between extra special, yes and not so much. Grin. Of course that would turn into a weeks long task as I would have to dip into various books…….

    Reply
  25. Aiieeeee…so this means I have to find all the other editions of the story to read as well! Indeed, I have ALL your book on my keeper shelf. I even found a copy of Lady’s Fortune at the used book store a couple of months ago. I almost danced with joy – especially since it was “only” $8.50.
    It is odd how some books really hit that “sweet spot” and others don’t. I’ve got this one book I just LOVE but everything else I’ve read by that author is like, oh well…ho hum and I haven’t kept any of those. And I reread Tapestry frequently too – maybe once a year.
    As Quantum said – if only I knew why certain books are so great (to me). And if I only knew WHY certain books of my favorite authors are extra special as compared to the rest of their books.
    Maybe I should devote a day to pulling books off the shelf and making piles between extra special, yes and not so much. Grin. Of course that would turn into a weeks long task as I would have to dip into various books…….

    Reply
  26. Quantum–
    While we all have certain types of stories that appeal to us, or don’t, I think that what elevates a book to special is the author’s voice. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me. Or something like that!
    I’m looking forward to hearing the audio of Not Always a Saint, too! Recorded Books has done a good job on my audios, and I like that they distribute to libraries so the audio versions are widely available.

    Reply
  27. Quantum–
    While we all have certain types of stories that appeal to us, or don’t, I think that what elevates a book to special is the author’s voice. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me. Or something like that!
    I’m looking forward to hearing the audio of Not Always a Saint, too! Recorded Books has done a good job on my audios, and I like that they distribute to libraries so the audio versions are widely available.

    Reply
  28. Quantum–
    While we all have certain types of stories that appeal to us, or don’t, I think that what elevates a book to special is the author’s voice. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me. Or something like that!
    I’m looking forward to hearing the audio of Not Always a Saint, too! Recorded Books has done a good job on my audios, and I like that they distribute to libraries so the audio versions are widely available.

    Reply
  29. Quantum–
    While we all have certain types of stories that appeal to us, or don’t, I think that what elevates a book to special is the author’s voice. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me. Or something like that!
    I’m looking forward to hearing the audio of Not Always a Saint, too! Recorded Books has done a good job on my audios, and I like that they distribute to libraries so the audio versions are widely available.

    Reply
  30. Quantum–
    While we all have certain types of stories that appeal to us, or don’t, I think that what elevates a book to special is the author’s voice. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me. Or something like that!
    I’m looking forward to hearing the audio of Not Always a Saint, too! Recorded Books has done a good job on my audios, and I like that they distribute to libraries so the audio versions are widely available.

    Reply
  31. Cathie, I agree–one of the great things about ebooks is that now it’s easy to find those elusive early books. The Bargain was originally written for NAL and I got the rights back when it went out of print. Later I sold the rights to Kensington, so this edition is theirs. But I have the rights to most of my other books that were written for NAL, so the e-edition of Petals in the Storm is from me. To a reader, though, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that the books are readily available!
    I tend to marry characters off with abandon, so I can’t think of anyone who needs a story. BUt if I do think of such a character, I’m sure I’ll write about him!

    Reply
  32. Cathie, I agree–one of the great things about ebooks is that now it’s easy to find those elusive early books. The Bargain was originally written for NAL and I got the rights back when it went out of print. Later I sold the rights to Kensington, so this edition is theirs. But I have the rights to most of my other books that were written for NAL, so the e-edition of Petals in the Storm is from me. To a reader, though, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that the books are readily available!
    I tend to marry characters off with abandon, so I can’t think of anyone who needs a story. BUt if I do think of such a character, I’m sure I’ll write about him!

    Reply
  33. Cathie, I agree–one of the great things about ebooks is that now it’s easy to find those elusive early books. The Bargain was originally written for NAL and I got the rights back when it went out of print. Later I sold the rights to Kensington, so this edition is theirs. But I have the rights to most of my other books that were written for NAL, so the e-edition of Petals in the Storm is from me. To a reader, though, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that the books are readily available!
    I tend to marry characters off with abandon, so I can’t think of anyone who needs a story. BUt if I do think of such a character, I’m sure I’ll write about him!

    Reply
  34. Cathie, I agree–one of the great things about ebooks is that now it’s easy to find those elusive early books. The Bargain was originally written for NAL and I got the rights back when it went out of print. Later I sold the rights to Kensington, so this edition is theirs. But I have the rights to most of my other books that were written for NAL, so the e-edition of Petals in the Storm is from me. To a reader, though, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that the books are readily available!
    I tend to marry characters off with abandon, so I can’t think of anyone who needs a story. BUt if I do think of such a character, I’m sure I’ll write about him!

    Reply
  35. Cathie, I agree–one of the great things about ebooks is that now it’s easy to find those elusive early books. The Bargain was originally written for NAL and I got the rights back when it went out of print. Later I sold the rights to Kensington, so this edition is theirs. But I have the rights to most of my other books that were written for NAL, so the e-edition of Petals in the Storm is from me. To a reader, though, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that the books are readily available!
    I tend to marry characters off with abandon, so I can’t think of anyone who needs a story. BUt if I do think of such a character, I’m sure I’ll write about him!

    Reply
  36. Nancy, I had so much fun with Sally, who was pretty much the antithesis of Jocelyn. It took David to broker peace. *G* There isn’t a huge difference between the original Would Be Widow and the currect version of the Bargain, so there’s no need to buy the new book except for intellectual curiosity. Or because the original version is falling apart!

    Reply
  37. Nancy, I had so much fun with Sally, who was pretty much the antithesis of Jocelyn. It took David to broker peace. *G* There isn’t a huge difference between the original Would Be Widow and the currect version of the Bargain, so there’s no need to buy the new book except for intellectual curiosity. Or because the original version is falling apart!

    Reply
  38. Nancy, I had so much fun with Sally, who was pretty much the antithesis of Jocelyn. It took David to broker peace. *G* There isn’t a huge difference between the original Would Be Widow and the currect version of the Bargain, so there’s no need to buy the new book except for intellectual curiosity. Or because the original version is falling apart!

    Reply
  39. Nancy, I had so much fun with Sally, who was pretty much the antithesis of Jocelyn. It took David to broker peace. *G* There isn’t a huge difference between the original Would Be Widow and the currect version of the Bargain, so there’s no need to buy the new book except for intellectual curiosity. Or because the original version is falling apart!

    Reply
  40. Nancy, I had so much fun with Sally, who was pretty much the antithesis of Jocelyn. It took David to broker peace. *G* There isn’t a huge difference between the original Would Be Widow and the currect version of the Bargain, so there’s no need to buy the new book except for intellectual curiosity. Or because the original version is falling apart!

    Reply
  41. Karin, the almost last scene of The Bargain is the first scene of Petals, but seen from Rafe’s point of view rather than Jocelyn’s. I liked doing that. *G* They really flow together more than any of my other books, I think.

    Reply
  42. Karin, the almost last scene of The Bargain is the first scene of Petals, but seen from Rafe’s point of view rather than Jocelyn’s. I liked doing that. *G* They really flow together more than any of my other books, I think.

    Reply
  43. Karin, the almost last scene of The Bargain is the first scene of Petals, but seen from Rafe’s point of view rather than Jocelyn’s. I liked doing that. *G* They really flow together more than any of my other books, I think.

    Reply
  44. Karin, the almost last scene of The Bargain is the first scene of Petals, but seen from Rafe’s point of view rather than Jocelyn’s. I liked doing that. *G* They really flow together more than any of my other books, I think.

    Reply
  45. Karin, the almost last scene of The Bargain is the first scene of Petals, but seen from Rafe’s point of view rather than Jocelyn’s. I liked doing that. *G* They really flow together more than any of my other books, I think.

    Reply
  46. Vicki–no, you do NOT need to buy all those versions! The Would Be Widow is one version, The Bargain is another–and if you want to read the short new epilogue, you can do it in a bookstore. *G*
    $8.50 is a great price for Lady of Fortune! It’s my scarcest print book, I think. On my list for 2015 is to finish editing and proofing an ebook version, and because it’s so rare, I’ll do a POD version as well for those who want print. But first, I have to finish this new book!

    Reply
  47. Vicki–no, you do NOT need to buy all those versions! The Would Be Widow is one version, The Bargain is another–and if you want to read the short new epilogue, you can do it in a bookstore. *G*
    $8.50 is a great price for Lady of Fortune! It’s my scarcest print book, I think. On my list for 2015 is to finish editing and proofing an ebook version, and because it’s so rare, I’ll do a POD version as well for those who want print. But first, I have to finish this new book!

    Reply
  48. Vicki–no, you do NOT need to buy all those versions! The Would Be Widow is one version, The Bargain is another–and if you want to read the short new epilogue, you can do it in a bookstore. *G*
    $8.50 is a great price for Lady of Fortune! It’s my scarcest print book, I think. On my list for 2015 is to finish editing and proofing an ebook version, and because it’s so rare, I’ll do a POD version as well for those who want print. But first, I have to finish this new book!

    Reply
  49. Vicki–no, you do NOT need to buy all those versions! The Would Be Widow is one version, The Bargain is another–and if you want to read the short new epilogue, you can do it in a bookstore. *G*
    $8.50 is a great price for Lady of Fortune! It’s my scarcest print book, I think. On my list for 2015 is to finish editing and proofing an ebook version, and because it’s so rare, I’ll do a POD version as well for those who want print. But first, I have to finish this new book!

    Reply
  50. Vicki–no, you do NOT need to buy all those versions! The Would Be Widow is one version, The Bargain is another–and if you want to read the short new epilogue, you can do it in a bookstore. *G*
    $8.50 is a great price for Lady of Fortune! It’s my scarcest print book, I think. On my list for 2015 is to finish editing and proofing an ebook version, and because it’s so rare, I’ll do a POD version as well for those who want print. But first, I have to finish this new book!

    Reply
  51. Have I read the book? Sure, just five or six times so far. It’s one of my favorites. Major David Lancaster is an amazing character and I think that’s what makes the book as good as it is. After reading it, I went looking for Candover’s book and also The Rake.

    Reply
  52. Have I read the book? Sure, just five or six times so far. It’s one of my favorites. Major David Lancaster is an amazing character and I think that’s what makes the book as good as it is. After reading it, I went looking for Candover’s book and also The Rake.

    Reply
  53. Have I read the book? Sure, just five or six times so far. It’s one of my favorites. Major David Lancaster is an amazing character and I think that’s what makes the book as good as it is. After reading it, I went looking for Candover’s book and also The Rake.

    Reply
  54. Have I read the book? Sure, just five or six times so far. It’s one of my favorites. Major David Lancaster is an amazing character and I think that’s what makes the book as good as it is. After reading it, I went looking for Candover’s book and also The Rake.

    Reply
  55. Have I read the book? Sure, just five or six times so far. It’s one of my favorites. Major David Lancaster is an amazing character and I think that’s what makes the book as good as it is. After reading it, I went looking for Candover’s book and also The Rake.

    Reply
  56. I remember reading The Would Be Widow! Loved the plot and the excuses she made to herself for her actions. Inner dialogue is part of what will win me. I don’t need plots to be completely plausible but I do need them to fit the context of what a particular character might do when pressed to her limit.
    Another thing that resonates with me is a good setting. In Veils of Silk you caught me with the setting and held my attention with the action and spirit of the characters. Their motivations, all of it — an excellent and riveting book!
    Turn-offs are faulty history, cultural inconsistencies and sloppy language. I recently read a contemporary written by a Kiwi and she had her Montana cowboy hero speaking entirely in New Zealand slang. It was incongruous it seemed she really didn’t know that a Montana cowboy doesn’t say loo, trolley, etc. The book was good otherwise and I was sad that a quick edit would have transformed it.
    Your books are so beautifully written that in the first paragraph I am drawn inside the action and emotions, never an observer with a red pencil. Thank you!

    Reply
  57. I remember reading The Would Be Widow! Loved the plot and the excuses she made to herself for her actions. Inner dialogue is part of what will win me. I don’t need plots to be completely plausible but I do need them to fit the context of what a particular character might do when pressed to her limit.
    Another thing that resonates with me is a good setting. In Veils of Silk you caught me with the setting and held my attention with the action and spirit of the characters. Their motivations, all of it — an excellent and riveting book!
    Turn-offs are faulty history, cultural inconsistencies and sloppy language. I recently read a contemporary written by a Kiwi and she had her Montana cowboy hero speaking entirely in New Zealand slang. It was incongruous it seemed she really didn’t know that a Montana cowboy doesn’t say loo, trolley, etc. The book was good otherwise and I was sad that a quick edit would have transformed it.
    Your books are so beautifully written that in the first paragraph I am drawn inside the action and emotions, never an observer with a red pencil. Thank you!

    Reply
  58. I remember reading The Would Be Widow! Loved the plot and the excuses she made to herself for her actions. Inner dialogue is part of what will win me. I don’t need plots to be completely plausible but I do need them to fit the context of what a particular character might do when pressed to her limit.
    Another thing that resonates with me is a good setting. In Veils of Silk you caught me with the setting and held my attention with the action and spirit of the characters. Their motivations, all of it — an excellent and riveting book!
    Turn-offs are faulty history, cultural inconsistencies and sloppy language. I recently read a contemporary written by a Kiwi and she had her Montana cowboy hero speaking entirely in New Zealand slang. It was incongruous it seemed she really didn’t know that a Montana cowboy doesn’t say loo, trolley, etc. The book was good otherwise and I was sad that a quick edit would have transformed it.
    Your books are so beautifully written that in the first paragraph I am drawn inside the action and emotions, never an observer with a red pencil. Thank you!

    Reply
  59. I remember reading The Would Be Widow! Loved the plot and the excuses she made to herself for her actions. Inner dialogue is part of what will win me. I don’t need plots to be completely plausible but I do need them to fit the context of what a particular character might do when pressed to her limit.
    Another thing that resonates with me is a good setting. In Veils of Silk you caught me with the setting and held my attention with the action and spirit of the characters. Their motivations, all of it — an excellent and riveting book!
    Turn-offs are faulty history, cultural inconsistencies and sloppy language. I recently read a contemporary written by a Kiwi and she had her Montana cowboy hero speaking entirely in New Zealand slang. It was incongruous it seemed she really didn’t know that a Montana cowboy doesn’t say loo, trolley, etc. The book was good otherwise and I was sad that a quick edit would have transformed it.
    Your books are so beautifully written that in the first paragraph I am drawn inside the action and emotions, never an observer with a red pencil. Thank you!

    Reply
  60. I remember reading The Would Be Widow! Loved the plot and the excuses she made to herself for her actions. Inner dialogue is part of what will win me. I don’t need plots to be completely plausible but I do need them to fit the context of what a particular character might do when pressed to her limit.
    Another thing that resonates with me is a good setting. In Veils of Silk you caught me with the setting and held my attention with the action and spirit of the characters. Their motivations, all of it — an excellent and riveting book!
    Turn-offs are faulty history, cultural inconsistencies and sloppy language. I recently read a contemporary written by a Kiwi and she had her Montana cowboy hero speaking entirely in New Zealand slang. It was incongruous it seemed she really didn’t know that a Montana cowboy doesn’t say loo, trolley, etc. The book was good otherwise and I was sad that a quick edit would have transformed it.
    Your books are so beautifully written that in the first paragraph I am drawn inside the action and emotions, never an observer with a red pencil. Thank you!

    Reply
  61. I can tell you what makes me fall in love with a book.
    The People must be like actual human beings. I want them to have flaws (no not being an axe murderer) but not a saint. I want them to have humor. If there is any hope for a relationship, to me it must be that the two people are amusing in their dealings with one another. I like humor in my stories. The people must be smart. I do not want a heroine who is dumber than a box of rocks. And I want my heroine to have a backbone. The hero must be a good guy. No, he does not have to be a superman. Again, I do not expect perfection but I do not want a hero who thinks of women or other human beings as disposable. I would like him to have a set of ethics and integrity. It may be flawed integrity, but I want integrity.
    I like a plot that is semi realistic. I am not going to toss a book if there are minor details which are not accurate, but please do not put Napoleon on Catalina rather than Elba.
    I like a well written book with a story that is interesting but most of all I want people who are interesting. I want people with whom I would be friends.

    Reply
  62. I can tell you what makes me fall in love with a book.
    The People must be like actual human beings. I want them to have flaws (no not being an axe murderer) but not a saint. I want them to have humor. If there is any hope for a relationship, to me it must be that the two people are amusing in their dealings with one another. I like humor in my stories. The people must be smart. I do not want a heroine who is dumber than a box of rocks. And I want my heroine to have a backbone. The hero must be a good guy. No, he does not have to be a superman. Again, I do not expect perfection but I do not want a hero who thinks of women or other human beings as disposable. I would like him to have a set of ethics and integrity. It may be flawed integrity, but I want integrity.
    I like a plot that is semi realistic. I am not going to toss a book if there are minor details which are not accurate, but please do not put Napoleon on Catalina rather than Elba.
    I like a well written book with a story that is interesting but most of all I want people who are interesting. I want people with whom I would be friends.

    Reply
  63. I can tell you what makes me fall in love with a book.
    The People must be like actual human beings. I want them to have flaws (no not being an axe murderer) but not a saint. I want them to have humor. If there is any hope for a relationship, to me it must be that the two people are amusing in their dealings with one another. I like humor in my stories. The people must be smart. I do not want a heroine who is dumber than a box of rocks. And I want my heroine to have a backbone. The hero must be a good guy. No, he does not have to be a superman. Again, I do not expect perfection but I do not want a hero who thinks of women or other human beings as disposable. I would like him to have a set of ethics and integrity. It may be flawed integrity, but I want integrity.
    I like a plot that is semi realistic. I am not going to toss a book if there are minor details which are not accurate, but please do not put Napoleon on Catalina rather than Elba.
    I like a well written book with a story that is interesting but most of all I want people who are interesting. I want people with whom I would be friends.

    Reply
  64. I can tell you what makes me fall in love with a book.
    The People must be like actual human beings. I want them to have flaws (no not being an axe murderer) but not a saint. I want them to have humor. If there is any hope for a relationship, to me it must be that the two people are amusing in their dealings with one another. I like humor in my stories. The people must be smart. I do not want a heroine who is dumber than a box of rocks. And I want my heroine to have a backbone. The hero must be a good guy. No, he does not have to be a superman. Again, I do not expect perfection but I do not want a hero who thinks of women or other human beings as disposable. I would like him to have a set of ethics and integrity. It may be flawed integrity, but I want integrity.
    I like a plot that is semi realistic. I am not going to toss a book if there are minor details which are not accurate, but please do not put Napoleon on Catalina rather than Elba.
    I like a well written book with a story that is interesting but most of all I want people who are interesting. I want people with whom I would be friends.

    Reply
  65. I can tell you what makes me fall in love with a book.
    The People must be like actual human beings. I want them to have flaws (no not being an axe murderer) but not a saint. I want them to have humor. If there is any hope for a relationship, to me it must be that the two people are amusing in their dealings with one another. I like humor in my stories. The people must be smart. I do not want a heroine who is dumber than a box of rocks. And I want my heroine to have a backbone. The hero must be a good guy. No, he does not have to be a superman. Again, I do not expect perfection but I do not want a hero who thinks of women or other human beings as disposable. I would like him to have a set of ethics and integrity. It may be flawed integrity, but I want integrity.
    I like a plot that is semi realistic. I am not going to toss a book if there are minor details which are not accurate, but please do not put Napoleon on Catalina rather than Elba.
    I like a well written book with a story that is interesting but most of all I want people who are interesting. I want people with whom I would be friends.

    Reply
  66. I loved the original and would like to read the updated edition. Do you know when Amazon will either send the update to people who’ve previously purchased it for Kindle or allow us to buy another e-copy? Right now i can’t buy the new version. Thanks.
    Martha

    Reply
  67. I loved the original and would like to read the updated edition. Do you know when Amazon will either send the update to people who’ve previously purchased it for Kindle or allow us to buy another e-copy? Right now i can’t buy the new version. Thanks.
    Martha

    Reply
  68. I loved the original and would like to read the updated edition. Do you know when Amazon will either send the update to people who’ve previously purchased it for Kindle or allow us to buy another e-copy? Right now i can’t buy the new version. Thanks.
    Martha

    Reply
  69. I loved the original and would like to read the updated edition. Do you know when Amazon will either send the update to people who’ve previously purchased it for Kindle or allow us to buy another e-copy? Right now i can’t buy the new version. Thanks.
    Martha

    Reply
  70. I loved the original and would like to read the updated edition. Do you know when Amazon will either send the update to people who’ve previously purchased it for Kindle or allow us to buy another e-copy? Right now i can’t buy the new version. Thanks.
    Martha

    Reply
  71. I loved The Bargain and The Rake two really entrancing heroes .What makes for a keeper book ? For me the story has to be reasonably fast paced but mostly I agree with Annette Naish I want the hero and heroine to be people I both like and whose story I can care about.

    Reply
  72. I loved The Bargain and The Rake two really entrancing heroes .What makes for a keeper book ? For me the story has to be reasonably fast paced but mostly I agree with Annette Naish I want the hero and heroine to be people I both like and whose story I can care about.

    Reply
  73. I loved The Bargain and The Rake two really entrancing heroes .What makes for a keeper book ? For me the story has to be reasonably fast paced but mostly I agree with Annette Naish I want the hero and heroine to be people I both like and whose story I can care about.

    Reply
  74. I loved The Bargain and The Rake two really entrancing heroes .What makes for a keeper book ? For me the story has to be reasonably fast paced but mostly I agree with Annette Naish I want the hero and heroine to be people I both like and whose story I can care about.

    Reply
  75. I loved The Bargain and The Rake two really entrancing heroes .What makes for a keeper book ? For me the story has to be reasonably fast paced but mostly I agree with Annette Naish I want the hero and heroine to be people I both like and whose story I can care about.

    Reply
  76. Why some books resonate with me and others don’t? Well, besides a good story, there needs to be something about the characters I like. And they can’t be idiots or cruel towards each other. That sort of thing makes me put a book down really fast. And that’s why I can’t stand most revenge books.

    Reply
  77. Why some books resonate with me and others don’t? Well, besides a good story, there needs to be something about the characters I like. And they can’t be idiots or cruel towards each other. That sort of thing makes me put a book down really fast. And that’s why I can’t stand most revenge books.

    Reply
  78. Why some books resonate with me and others don’t? Well, besides a good story, there needs to be something about the characters I like. And they can’t be idiots or cruel towards each other. That sort of thing makes me put a book down really fast. And that’s why I can’t stand most revenge books.

    Reply
  79. Why some books resonate with me and others don’t? Well, besides a good story, there needs to be something about the characters I like. And they can’t be idiots or cruel towards each other. That sort of thing makes me put a book down really fast. And that’s why I can’t stand most revenge books.

    Reply
  80. Why some books resonate with me and others don’t? Well, besides a good story, there needs to be something about the characters I like. And they can’t be idiots or cruel towards each other. That sort of thing makes me put a book down really fast. And that’s why I can’t stand most revenge books.

    Reply
  81. Grettel, I’m glad to hear The Bargain is a favorite of yours. I hope you enjoy The Rake and Petals equally. The guys are different from each other, but I like them, of course. *G* I hope you do also.

    Reply
  82. Grettel, I’m glad to hear The Bargain is a favorite of yours. I hope you enjoy The Rake and Petals equally. The guys are different from each other, but I like them, of course. *G* I hope you do also.

    Reply
  83. Grettel, I’m glad to hear The Bargain is a favorite of yours. I hope you enjoy The Rake and Petals equally. The guys are different from each other, but I like them, of course. *G* I hope you do also.

    Reply
  84. Grettel, I’m glad to hear The Bargain is a favorite of yours. I hope you enjoy The Rake and Petals equally. The guys are different from each other, but I like them, of course. *G* I hope you do also.

    Reply
  85. Grettel, I’m glad to hear The Bargain is a favorite of yours. I hope you enjoy The Rake and Petals equally. The guys are different from each other, but I like them, of course. *G* I hope you do also.

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Victoria! My real Waterloo book is Shattered Rainbows, but the battle is an element in a number of my stories. As for the premise–you’re another writer, so you probably have no more idea where these things come from than I do!

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Victoria! My real Waterloo book is Shattered Rainbows, but the battle is an element in a number of my stories. As for the premise–you’re another writer, so you probably have no more idea where these things come from than I do!

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Victoria! My real Waterloo book is Shattered Rainbows, but the battle is an element in a number of my stories. As for the premise–you’re another writer, so you probably have no more idea where these things come from than I do!

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Victoria! My real Waterloo book is Shattered Rainbows, but the battle is an element in a number of my stories. As for the premise–you’re another writer, so you probably have no more idea where these things come from than I do!

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Victoria! My real Waterloo book is Shattered Rainbows, but the battle is an element in a number of my stories. As for the premise–you’re another writer, so you probably have no more idea where these things come from than I do!

    Reply
  91. Sylvia–
    These are all great points. Internal dialogue does so much to define a character. At the beginning of the book, there’s a lot that Jocelyn doesn’t understand about herself. By the end, she knows herself much better, which is why she can finally accept love.
    Veils of Silk was one of the highest research books I’ve ever written because there was so much I needed to know to tell their story. I’m glad that works so well for you.
    Montana cowboys speaking New Zealand slang. That does give one paus. *G*

    Reply
  92. Sylvia–
    These are all great points. Internal dialogue does so much to define a character. At the beginning of the book, there’s a lot that Jocelyn doesn’t understand about herself. By the end, she knows herself much better, which is why she can finally accept love.
    Veils of Silk was one of the highest research books I’ve ever written because there was so much I needed to know to tell their story. I’m glad that works so well for you.
    Montana cowboys speaking New Zealand slang. That does give one paus. *G*

    Reply
  93. Sylvia–
    These are all great points. Internal dialogue does so much to define a character. At the beginning of the book, there’s a lot that Jocelyn doesn’t understand about herself. By the end, she knows herself much better, which is why she can finally accept love.
    Veils of Silk was one of the highest research books I’ve ever written because there was so much I needed to know to tell their story. I’m glad that works so well for you.
    Montana cowboys speaking New Zealand slang. That does give one paus. *G*

    Reply
  94. Sylvia–
    These are all great points. Internal dialogue does so much to define a character. At the beginning of the book, there’s a lot that Jocelyn doesn’t understand about herself. By the end, she knows herself much better, which is why she can finally accept love.
    Veils of Silk was one of the highest research books I’ve ever written because there was so much I needed to know to tell their story. I’m glad that works so well for you.
    Montana cowboys speaking New Zealand slang. That does give one paus. *G*

    Reply
  95. Sylvia–
    These are all great points. Internal dialogue does so much to define a character. At the beginning of the book, there’s a lot that Jocelyn doesn’t understand about herself. By the end, she knows herself much better, which is why she can finally accept love.
    Veils of Silk was one of the highest research books I’ve ever written because there was so much I needed to know to tell their story. I’m glad that works so well for you.
    Montana cowboys speaking New Zealand slang. That does give one paus. *G*

    Reply
  96. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me.
    The physicist in me is beginning to see an analogy between two pendulum clocks hanging on a wall so that they are coupled through the weak vibrations and eventually come into sync.
    If you see the minds of reader and writer becoming coupled through the written word and if they are sufficiently close in ‘frequency’, the reader’s thought ‘frequencies’ can entrain to the writer’s thought frequencies as frozen in the book.
    I like the way that you think MJ …. possibly a budding theoretical physicist is clamouring for expression! 🙂

    Reply
  97. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me.
    The physicist in me is beginning to see an analogy between two pendulum clocks hanging on a wall so that they are coupled through the weak vibrations and eventually come into sync.
    If you see the minds of reader and writer becoming coupled through the written word and if they are sufficiently close in ‘frequency’, the reader’s thought ‘frequencies’ can entrain to the writer’s thought frequencies as frozen in the book.
    I like the way that you think MJ …. possibly a budding theoretical physicist is clamouring for expression! 🙂

    Reply
  98. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me.
    The physicist in me is beginning to see an analogy between two pendulum clocks hanging on a wall so that they are coupled through the weak vibrations and eventually come into sync.
    If you see the minds of reader and writer becoming coupled through the written word and if they are sufficiently close in ‘frequency’, the reader’s thought ‘frequencies’ can entrain to the writer’s thought frequencies as frozen in the book.
    I like the way that you think MJ …. possibly a budding theoretical physicist is clamouring for expression! 🙂

    Reply
  99. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me.
    The physicist in me is beginning to see an analogy between two pendulum clocks hanging on a wall so that they are coupled through the weak vibrations and eventually come into sync.
    If you see the minds of reader and writer becoming coupled through the written word and if they are sufficiently close in ‘frequency’, the reader’s thought ‘frequencies’ can entrain to the writer’s thought frequencies as frozen in the book.
    I like the way that you think MJ …. possibly a budding theoretical physicist is clamouring for expression! 🙂

    Reply
  100. I think there’s a similarity or harmony between author and reader. Her values, her humor, echo in me.
    The physicist in me is beginning to see an analogy between two pendulum clocks hanging on a wall so that they are coupled through the weak vibrations and eventually come into sync.
    If you see the minds of reader and writer becoming coupled through the written word and if they are sufficiently close in ‘frequency’, the reader’s thought ‘frequencies’ can entrain to the writer’s thought frequencies as frozen in the book.
    I like the way that you think MJ …. possibly a budding theoretical physicist is clamouring for expression! 🙂

    Reply
  101. I loved this book when I first read it as The Would-Be Widow and also when I reread it in its next incarnation. Now I’d love to read the latest version!

    Reply
  102. I loved this book when I first read it as The Would-Be Widow and also when I reread it in its next incarnation. Now I’d love to read the latest version!

    Reply
  103. I loved this book when I first read it as The Would-Be Widow and also when I reread it in its next incarnation. Now I’d love to read the latest version!

    Reply
  104. I loved this book when I first read it as The Would-Be Widow and also when I reread it in its next incarnation. Now I’d love to read the latest version!

    Reply
  105. I loved this book when I first read it as The Would-Be Widow and also when I reread it in its next incarnation. Now I’d love to read the latest version!

    Reply
  106. LOL, Quantum! I like your analogy, but physics was my least favorite sciene–I much preferred astronomy and geology, and I’m pretty sure that watching Star Treks did little to improve my general science knowledge. More likely, it subtracted. *G*
    But I do like those pendulum clocks….
    PS: The Mayhem Consultant has been on a kick of reading about dark matter and quantum physics lately, but he’s much more the scientist than I. I was more of an artsy-craftsy. *G*

    Reply
  107. LOL, Quantum! I like your analogy, but physics was my least favorite sciene–I much preferred astronomy and geology, and I’m pretty sure that watching Star Treks did little to improve my general science knowledge. More likely, it subtracted. *G*
    But I do like those pendulum clocks….
    PS: The Mayhem Consultant has been on a kick of reading about dark matter and quantum physics lately, but he’s much more the scientist than I. I was more of an artsy-craftsy. *G*

    Reply
  108. LOL, Quantum! I like your analogy, but physics was my least favorite sciene–I much preferred astronomy and geology, and I’m pretty sure that watching Star Treks did little to improve my general science knowledge. More likely, it subtracted. *G*
    But I do like those pendulum clocks….
    PS: The Mayhem Consultant has been on a kick of reading about dark matter and quantum physics lately, but he’s much more the scientist than I. I was more of an artsy-craftsy. *G*

    Reply
  109. LOL, Quantum! I like your analogy, but physics was my least favorite sciene–I much preferred astronomy and geology, and I’m pretty sure that watching Star Treks did little to improve my general science knowledge. More likely, it subtracted. *G*
    But I do like those pendulum clocks….
    PS: The Mayhem Consultant has been on a kick of reading about dark matter and quantum physics lately, but he’s much more the scientist than I. I was more of an artsy-craftsy. *G*

    Reply
  110. LOL, Quantum! I like your analogy, but physics was my least favorite sciene–I much preferred astronomy and geology, and I’m pretty sure that watching Star Treks did little to improve my general science knowledge. More likely, it subtracted. *G*
    But I do like those pendulum clocks….
    PS: The Mayhem Consultant has been on a kick of reading about dark matter and quantum physics lately, but he’s much more the scientist than I. I was more of an artsy-craftsy. *G*

    Reply
  111. Annette–I agree with all your points, but particularly the need for intelligence, humor, and decency. I want to like the protagonists, even if they have some important learning to do along the way. As for Napoleon on Catalina–imagination boggles. *G*

    Reply
  112. Annette–I agree with all your points, but particularly the need for intelligence, humor, and decency. I want to like the protagonists, even if they have some important learning to do along the way. As for Napoleon on Catalina–imagination boggles. *G*

    Reply
  113. Annette–I agree with all your points, but particularly the need for intelligence, humor, and decency. I want to like the protagonists, even if they have some important learning to do along the way. As for Napoleon on Catalina–imagination boggles. *G*

    Reply
  114. Annette–I agree with all your points, but particularly the need for intelligence, humor, and decency. I want to like the protagonists, even if they have some important learning to do along the way. As for Napoleon on Catalina–imagination boggles. *G*

    Reply
  115. Annette–I agree with all your points, but particularly the need for intelligence, humor, and decency. I want to like the protagonists, even if they have some important learning to do along the way. As for Napoleon on Catalina–imagination boggles. *G*

    Reply
  116. Martha, I hope you enjoy this version. Amazon won’t be updating the files because this is a publisher produced book, not an indie book that the author has tweaked.
    I found myself that because this book has different versions, it can be tricky to find the latest. I’m glad you persisted and managed!

    Reply
  117. Martha, I hope you enjoy this version. Amazon won’t be updating the files because this is a publisher produced book, not an indie book that the author has tweaked.
    I found myself that because this book has different versions, it can be tricky to find the latest. I’m glad you persisted and managed!

    Reply
  118. Martha, I hope you enjoy this version. Amazon won’t be updating the files because this is a publisher produced book, not an indie book that the author has tweaked.
    I found myself that because this book has different versions, it can be tricky to find the latest. I’m glad you persisted and managed!

    Reply
  119. Martha, I hope you enjoy this version. Amazon won’t be updating the files because this is a publisher produced book, not an indie book that the author has tweaked.
    I found myself that because this book has different versions, it can be tricky to find the latest. I’m glad you persisted and managed!

    Reply
  120. Martha, I hope you enjoy this version. Amazon won’t be updating the files because this is a publisher produced book, not an indie book that the author has tweaked.
    I found myself that because this book has different versions, it can be tricky to find the latest. I’m glad you persisted and managed!

    Reply
  121. Minna, like you I really hate when the main characters are cruel to each other. Even if there is strong conflict between, I want them to at least try to behave decently. I’ve only written one revenge book, and it didn’t involve any cruelty between the main characters.

    Reply
  122. Minna, like you I really hate when the main characters are cruel to each other. Even if there is strong conflict between, I want them to at least try to behave decently. I’ve only written one revenge book, and it didn’t involve any cruelty between the main characters.

    Reply
  123. Minna, like you I really hate when the main characters are cruel to each other. Even if there is strong conflict between, I want them to at least try to behave decently. I’ve only written one revenge book, and it didn’t involve any cruelty between the main characters.

    Reply
  124. Minna, like you I really hate when the main characters are cruel to each other. Even if there is strong conflict between, I want them to at least try to behave decently. I’ve only written one revenge book, and it didn’t involve any cruelty between the main characters.

    Reply
  125. Minna, like you I really hate when the main characters are cruel to each other. Even if there is strong conflict between, I want them to at least try to behave decently. I’ve only written one revenge book, and it didn’t involve any cruelty between the main characters.

    Reply
  126. I lived the Bargain on audio! It’s one of my favorites! You never forget your first book with a new author and this one was mine with you.

    Reply
  127. I lived the Bargain on audio! It’s one of my favorites! You never forget your first book with a new author and this one was mine with you.

    Reply
  128. I lived the Bargain on audio! It’s one of my favorites! You never forget your first book with a new author and this one was mine with you.

    Reply
  129. I lived the Bargain on audio! It’s one of my favorites! You never forget your first book with a new author and this one was mine with you.

    Reply
  130. I lived the Bargain on audio! It’s one of my favorites! You never forget your first book with a new author and this one was mine with you.

    Reply
  131. These two are favorites of mine, too. I thnk the depiction of Reggie’s battle with alcoholism in The Rake is an outstanding piece of work. And even though there are “bad guys” in both books, the stories focus on relationships between the characters, and not just the H and h. These books are keepers, for sure!

    Reply
  132. These two are favorites of mine, too. I thnk the depiction of Reggie’s battle with alcoholism in The Rake is an outstanding piece of work. And even though there are “bad guys” in both books, the stories focus on relationships between the characters, and not just the H and h. These books are keepers, for sure!

    Reply
  133. These two are favorites of mine, too. I thnk the depiction of Reggie’s battle with alcoholism in The Rake is an outstanding piece of work. And even though there are “bad guys” in both books, the stories focus on relationships between the characters, and not just the H and h. These books are keepers, for sure!

    Reply
  134. These two are favorites of mine, too. I thnk the depiction of Reggie’s battle with alcoholism in The Rake is an outstanding piece of work. And even though there are “bad guys” in both books, the stories focus on relationships between the characters, and not just the H and h. These books are keepers, for sure!

    Reply
  135. These two are favorites of mine, too. I thnk the depiction of Reggie’s battle with alcoholism in The Rake is an outstanding piece of work. And even though there are “bad guys” in both books, the stories focus on relationships between the characters, and not just the H and h. These books are keepers, for sure!

    Reply
  136. I thought I had The Bargain on my kindle, and was going to pull it up to read before Petals. (Thanks for the sale by the way.) But Amazon says I don’t own it yet. Maybe it was just wishful thinking on my part.

    Reply
  137. I thought I had The Bargain on my kindle, and was going to pull it up to read before Petals. (Thanks for the sale by the way.) But Amazon says I don’t own it yet. Maybe it was just wishful thinking on my part.

    Reply
  138. I thought I had The Bargain on my kindle, and was going to pull it up to read before Petals. (Thanks for the sale by the way.) But Amazon says I don’t own it yet. Maybe it was just wishful thinking on my part.

    Reply
  139. I thought I had The Bargain on my kindle, and was going to pull it up to read before Petals. (Thanks for the sale by the way.) But Amazon says I don’t own it yet. Maybe it was just wishful thinking on my part.

    Reply
  140. I thought I had The Bargain on my kindle, and was going to pull it up to read before Petals. (Thanks for the sale by the way.) But Amazon says I don’t own it yet. Maybe it was just wishful thinking on my part.

    Reply
  141. I have loved The Would-Be Widow since it first came out. My daughter read The Bargain first and prefers that. I wonder if it’s the old “the first is the best” adage that applies to our preferences here…..

    Reply
  142. I have loved The Would-Be Widow since it first came out. My daughter read The Bargain first and prefers that. I wonder if it’s the old “the first is the best” adage that applies to our preferences here…..

    Reply
  143. I have loved The Would-Be Widow since it first came out. My daughter read The Bargain first and prefers that. I wonder if it’s the old “the first is the best” adage that applies to our preferences here…..

    Reply
  144. I have loved The Would-Be Widow since it first came out. My daughter read The Bargain first and prefers that. I wonder if it’s the old “the first is the best” adage that applies to our preferences here…..

    Reply
  145. I have loved The Would-Be Widow since it first came out. My daughter read The Bargain first and prefers that. I wonder if it’s the old “the first is the best” adage that applies to our preferences here…..

    Reply
  146. ML–
    It could be a matter of which version you read first, but there is a difference in the “voice” of the stories. The Would Be Widow is more traditional Regency–more words, more word play, more third person omniscient, more changing around points of view. The changes are subtle, but they would make a difference, with some readers preferring one, and others preferring the historical romance voice.

    Reply
  147. ML–
    It could be a matter of which version you read first, but there is a difference in the “voice” of the stories. The Would Be Widow is more traditional Regency–more words, more word play, more third person omniscient, more changing around points of view. The changes are subtle, but they would make a difference, with some readers preferring one, and others preferring the historical romance voice.

    Reply
  148. ML–
    It could be a matter of which version you read first, but there is a difference in the “voice” of the stories. The Would Be Widow is more traditional Regency–more words, more word play, more third person omniscient, more changing around points of view. The changes are subtle, but they would make a difference, with some readers preferring one, and others preferring the historical romance voice.

    Reply
  149. ML–
    It could be a matter of which version you read first, but there is a difference in the “voice” of the stories. The Would Be Widow is more traditional Regency–more words, more word play, more third person omniscient, more changing around points of view. The changes are subtle, but they would make a difference, with some readers preferring one, and others preferring the historical romance voice.

    Reply
  150. ML–
    It could be a matter of which version you read first, but there is a difference in the “voice” of the stories. The Would Be Widow is more traditional Regency–more words, more word play, more third person omniscient, more changing around points of view. The changes are subtle, but they would make a difference, with some readers preferring one, and others preferring the historical romance voice.

    Reply
  151. Sounds like a great story, Mary Jo, and that’s what gives it “legs.” Plus, there’s a whole new generation of Regency readers … and don’t we just love them?!

    Reply
  152. Sounds like a great story, Mary Jo, and that’s what gives it “legs.” Plus, there’s a whole new generation of Regency readers … and don’t we just love them?!

    Reply
  153. Sounds like a great story, Mary Jo, and that’s what gives it “legs.” Plus, there’s a whole new generation of Regency readers … and don’t we just love them?!

    Reply
  154. Sounds like a great story, Mary Jo, and that’s what gives it “legs.” Plus, there’s a whole new generation of Regency readers … and don’t we just love them?!

    Reply
  155. Sounds like a great story, Mary Jo, and that’s what gives it “legs.” Plus, there’s a whole new generation of Regency readers … and don’t we just love them?!

    Reply

Leave a Comment