The Bargain: And the Wheel Comes Round Again!

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo

I love it when a good story comes around again.  <g>  Every now and then, a really good, high concept plot idea strikes, and I had one quite early in my career:

The High Concept

Heroine’s father stipulates in his will that she must marry by age 25, or the bulk of her fortune will pass to her uncle.  Heroine is NOT pleased, so she goes to a military hospital, finds an officer dying of his Waterloo wounds, and makes him a proposition. 

TheBargain--Kim K She’ll settle a comfortable income on his governess sister, and in return, the heroine has a husband by the deadline.  Her husband will quietly expire when he meets his own deadline, leaving the heroine a widow in control of her fortune and the hero’s sister set for life. 

Then her husband hasn’t the grace to die, and they’re stuck with each other. <G>  It’s a classic marriage of convenience set-up, and my editor loved it.  So The Would Be Widow was published back in 1988.  The title is pretty much the plot.  (I was told several times that it resembled the plot of Kathleen Woodiwiss’s’ Shanna, a book I’ve never read.  But we all know there are no truly original ideas.) 

The Would Be Widow was the third book I wrote, the second published, and drafting this blog started me thinking about the writing of it. 

Lessons Learned

I was a very new writer, going mostly on instinct, still working as a freelance graphic designer.  TWBW was the only book where I ever kept track of the time.  I fit writing time around graphics, but I wrote the book in the equivalent of three months of 40 hour weeks.  Ah, those were the days!  I’ve never been as efficient since.

Chelsea Hospital This is also the book where I realized that no matter how light-hearted the synopsis I sent to my editor, I would never be a comedy writer.  The book was moving along well plot-wise, but it wasn’t quite working until I gave the heroine some painful back story.  Instantly the story fell into place.  <G> 

Lesson learned: My characters won’t get their happy ending without much wailing and gnashing of teeth.  Many years and books have come and gone since, and that is still the case with my stories. <G>

Would Be Widow I also learned lessons in research.  In those distant pre-internet days, I would take a very large tote bag down to Baltimore’s Enoch Pratt city library and pile in possibly relevant books until I couldn’t lift the bag.  Then I’d removed the most recent book so I could lift the bag <g> and stagger home to find nuggets of useful information.  Bibliographies were mined for books that I could send for through Inter-Library Loan. 

Research Then and Now

For TWBW, I researched military hospitals (the picture above is the Chelsea Military Hospital, where Lady Jocelyn found Major David Lancaster) and laudanum and Shropshire and multi-shot pistols, among other things.  In the days of the internet, this kind of research has the quaint quality of walking to school ten miles through the snow and it was uphill both ways. <G> 

Shropshire hills Google has put worlds of information at our fingertips.  (That's Shropshire to the left.) But for research books that contribute heavily toward a story, I still want hard copy. 

Good stories have staying power.  When I was doing well with my historical romances, my editor suggested that some of my early Signet Regencies could be revised and expanded into historicals.  Hence, The Would-Be Widow because The Bargain, with more words and more subplot and a bit more sex.  (A very little bit more. <G>) 

Revising a Regency into a Historical Romance

Here’s a little known fact: editing an early book doesn’t make it longer, it makes it shorter as the more experienced author cuts out a lot of the extra words she doesn’t really need.   (Quite possibly swearing under her breath at her previous shortcomings of craft.)  When I revised The Rake and The Reformer, a Super Regency, into The Rake, it ended up 4000 words shorter.  (BTW, Kensington will reissue The Rake next spring.)

Bargain--300 dpi Turning TWBW into The Bargain meant cutting extra words and adding ones that enriched the story.  I added a prologue, fleshed out a secondary romance, and added another romantic scene or two. 

That version of the book did well, but it has been out of print for years.  So now The Bargain is back again with a new publisher and a gorgeous, romantic new cover.  The previous cover had a rather pretty bouquet on gold foil, but I like the pensive quality of this new cover.  (Though the hero’s gold epaulet suggests Ruritania rather than the 95th Rifles. <g> )  This time there was no revision, though I’m sure there are still more words than the story needs. <G>

I revised five traditional Regencies into historical romances, and I learned a lot in the process about viewpoint and story structure.  In traditional Regency, I used a lot of different viewpoints.  This made for a lighter touch.  When I revised the books, I narrowed the points of view sharply to two or three characters.  This increases intensity. 

In order to write a book, I have to love the characters and the story, so I also love seeing my book babies come around again.  Here’s part of a review from the original publication, done by Kathe Robin of Romantic Times:

“With several wonderful secondary characters and a lovely romance between David’s sister and his doctor, The Bargain will delight Mary Jo Putney’s fans, new and old.  There is a warmth and charm to this story that will melt your heart and make it sing.  Sheer reading pleasure.”

And here’s an excerpt.

TheBargain I’ll be giving away a copy of the book to someone who leaves a comment on this post between now and midnight Friday.  It will be a bargain Bargain.  <G> 

Mary Jo

245 thoughts on “The Bargain: And the Wheel Comes Round Again!”

  1. I’m so glad this is back in print! It was among the first romances I read and I haven’t seen it in a while and wanted to read it again 🙂

    Reply
  2. I’m so glad this is back in print! It was among the first romances I read and I haven’t seen it in a while and wanted to read it again 🙂

    Reply
  3. I’m so glad this is back in print! It was among the first romances I read and I haven’t seen it in a while and wanted to read it again 🙂

    Reply
  4. I’m so glad this is back in print! It was among the first romances I read and I haven’t seen it in a while and wanted to read it again 🙂

    Reply
  5. I’m so glad this is back in print! It was among the first romances I read and I haven’t seen it in a while and wanted to read it again 🙂

    Reply
  6. I can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”.
    Marriage of convenience stories are some of my favorites so I will definitely put this on the list!

    Reply
  7. I can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”.
    Marriage of convenience stories are some of my favorites so I will definitely put this on the list!

    Reply
  8. I can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”.
    Marriage of convenience stories are some of my favorites so I will definitely put this on the list!

    Reply
  9. I can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”.
    Marriage of convenience stories are some of my favorites so I will definitely put this on the list!

    Reply
  10. I can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”.
    Marriage of convenience stories are some of my favorites so I will definitely put this on the list!

    Reply
  11. I still have my copy of The Would Be Widow. I like it a bit better than The Bargain, which I also read; the earlier version seems more intense and is more to my taste. I also like the first cover better; I like the colors. But either way it’s a classic and it’s nice that it will be back in print again because there’s a whole new audience out there for it.

    Reply
  12. I still have my copy of The Would Be Widow. I like it a bit better than The Bargain, which I also read; the earlier version seems more intense and is more to my taste. I also like the first cover better; I like the colors. But either way it’s a classic and it’s nice that it will be back in print again because there’s a whole new audience out there for it.

    Reply
  13. I still have my copy of The Would Be Widow. I like it a bit better than The Bargain, which I also read; the earlier version seems more intense and is more to my taste. I also like the first cover better; I like the colors. But either way it’s a classic and it’s nice that it will be back in print again because there’s a whole new audience out there for it.

    Reply
  14. I still have my copy of The Would Be Widow. I like it a bit better than The Bargain, which I also read; the earlier version seems more intense and is more to my taste. I also like the first cover better; I like the colors. But either way it’s a classic and it’s nice that it will be back in print again because there’s a whole new audience out there for it.

    Reply
  15. I still have my copy of The Would Be Widow. I like it a bit better than The Bargain, which I also read; the earlier version seems more intense and is more to my taste. I also like the first cover better; I like the colors. But either way it’s a classic and it’s nice that it will be back in print again because there’s a whole new audience out there for it.

    Reply
  16. Mary Jo
    This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  17. Mary Jo
    This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  18. Mary Jo
    This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  19. Mary Jo
    This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  20. Mary Jo
    This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  21. Mary Jo, I’m so glad The Bargain is being reissued – my copy is about to disintigrate from being re-read so often! I absolutely love the story, and the new cover is lovely.
    As for revisiting old characters, I think I can relate a little. When I started writing, I penned a massive, multi-generational “family saga” that was about 800 pages long, set in Ireland during the Easter Rising of 1916. When I finally saw my book published, I’d changed the setting (Ireland, 1850) and aged the characters (they’d originally started out as children). Just about the only thing I kept was the names of the hero and heroine!

    Reply
  22. Mary Jo, I’m so glad The Bargain is being reissued – my copy is about to disintigrate from being re-read so often! I absolutely love the story, and the new cover is lovely.
    As for revisiting old characters, I think I can relate a little. When I started writing, I penned a massive, multi-generational “family saga” that was about 800 pages long, set in Ireland during the Easter Rising of 1916. When I finally saw my book published, I’d changed the setting (Ireland, 1850) and aged the characters (they’d originally started out as children). Just about the only thing I kept was the names of the hero and heroine!

    Reply
  23. Mary Jo, I’m so glad The Bargain is being reissued – my copy is about to disintigrate from being re-read so often! I absolutely love the story, and the new cover is lovely.
    As for revisiting old characters, I think I can relate a little. When I started writing, I penned a massive, multi-generational “family saga” that was about 800 pages long, set in Ireland during the Easter Rising of 1916. When I finally saw my book published, I’d changed the setting (Ireland, 1850) and aged the characters (they’d originally started out as children). Just about the only thing I kept was the names of the hero and heroine!

    Reply
  24. Mary Jo, I’m so glad The Bargain is being reissued – my copy is about to disintigrate from being re-read so often! I absolutely love the story, and the new cover is lovely.
    As for revisiting old characters, I think I can relate a little. When I started writing, I penned a massive, multi-generational “family saga” that was about 800 pages long, set in Ireland during the Easter Rising of 1916. When I finally saw my book published, I’d changed the setting (Ireland, 1850) and aged the characters (they’d originally started out as children). Just about the only thing I kept was the names of the hero and heroine!

    Reply
  25. Mary Jo, I’m so glad The Bargain is being reissued – my copy is about to disintigrate from being re-read so often! I absolutely love the story, and the new cover is lovely.
    As for revisiting old characters, I think I can relate a little. When I started writing, I penned a massive, multi-generational “family saga” that was about 800 pages long, set in Ireland during the Easter Rising of 1916. When I finally saw my book published, I’d changed the setting (Ireland, 1850) and aged the characters (they’d originally started out as children). Just about the only thing I kept was the names of the hero and heroine!

    Reply
  26. I read the original “Bargain” years ago, but I look forward to rereading this version. I am pleased to find out that older books such as yours are being redone and rereleased although I enjoy the treasure hunt aspect of finding out of print copies of my favorite authors’ books.

    Reply
  27. I read the original “Bargain” years ago, but I look forward to rereading this version. I am pleased to find out that older books such as yours are being redone and rereleased although I enjoy the treasure hunt aspect of finding out of print copies of my favorite authors’ books.

    Reply
  28. I read the original “Bargain” years ago, but I look forward to rereading this version. I am pleased to find out that older books such as yours are being redone and rereleased although I enjoy the treasure hunt aspect of finding out of print copies of my favorite authors’ books.

    Reply
  29. I read the original “Bargain” years ago, but I look forward to rereading this version. I am pleased to find out that older books such as yours are being redone and rereleased although I enjoy the treasure hunt aspect of finding out of print copies of my favorite authors’ books.

    Reply
  30. I read the original “Bargain” years ago, but I look forward to rereading this version. I am pleased to find out that older books such as yours are being redone and rereleased although I enjoy the treasure hunt aspect of finding out of print copies of my favorite authors’ books.

    Reply
  31. It’s lovely to have gems from the past reissued. I’m looking forward to The Rake as well as The Bargain.
    As for research, yes , the internet is useful, but never as enjoyable as the library!

    Reply
  32. It’s lovely to have gems from the past reissued. I’m looking forward to The Rake as well as The Bargain.
    As for research, yes , the internet is useful, but never as enjoyable as the library!

    Reply
  33. It’s lovely to have gems from the past reissued. I’m looking forward to The Rake as well as The Bargain.
    As for research, yes , the internet is useful, but never as enjoyable as the library!

    Reply
  34. It’s lovely to have gems from the past reissued. I’m looking forward to The Rake as well as The Bargain.
    As for research, yes , the internet is useful, but never as enjoyable as the library!

    Reply
  35. It’s lovely to have gems from the past reissued. I’m looking forward to The Rake as well as The Bargain.
    As for research, yes , the internet is useful, but never as enjoyable as the library!

    Reply
  36. Phyllis–
    You read this post when I was still correcting and updating the typos! The fastest response a post of mine has ever received. I do hope you enjoy The Bargain as much if you read it again.

    Reply
  37. Phyllis–
    You read this post when I was still correcting and updating the typos! The fastest response a post of mine has ever received. I do hope you enjoy The Bargain as much if you read it again.

    Reply
  38. Phyllis–
    You read this post when I was still correcting and updating the typos! The fastest response a post of mine has ever received. I do hope you enjoy The Bargain as much if you read it again.

    Reply
  39. Phyllis–
    You read this post when I was still correcting and updating the typos! The fastest response a post of mine has ever received. I do hope you enjoy The Bargain as much if you read it again.

    Reply
  40. Phyllis–
    You read this post when I was still correcting and updating the typos! The fastest response a post of mine has ever received. I do hope you enjoy The Bargain as much if you read it again.

    Reply
  41. ** can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”**
    Amy Kathryn, you’re right–it’s healthiest to accept that a book was as good as I could make it then and not make myself nuts! When I had the chance to revise, I did, and I like the historical version. But I don’t have a need to fuss with it any more. I have current books to fuss with. *g*

    Reply
  42. ** can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”**
    Amy Kathryn, you’re right–it’s healthiest to accept that a book was as good as I could make it then and not make myself nuts! When I had the chance to revise, I did, and I like the historical version. But I don’t have a need to fuss with it any more. I have current books to fuss with. *g*

    Reply
  43. ** can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”**
    Amy Kathryn, you’re right–it’s healthiest to accept that a book was as good as I could make it then and not make myself nuts! When I had the chance to revise, I did, and I like the historical version. But I don’t have a need to fuss with it any more. I have current books to fuss with. *g*

    Reply
  44. ** can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”**
    Amy Kathryn, you’re right–it’s healthiest to accept that a book was as good as I could make it then and not make myself nuts! When I had the chance to revise, I did, and I like the historical version. But I don’t have a need to fuss with it any more. I have current books to fuss with. *g*

    Reply
  45. ** can’t imagine what it must feel like to revisit and rework something you created years ago. With it being a very early work, it is probably easier to accept necessary changes and forgive yourself for “mistakes”**
    Amy Kathryn, you’re right–it’s healthiest to accept that a book was as good as I could make it then and not make myself nuts! When I had the chance to revise, I did, and I like the historical version. But I don’t have a need to fuss with it any more. I have current books to fuss with. *g*

    Reply
  46. >>Mary Jo, I loved this book when I first read it. The hero is just gorgeous! It’s fabulous when good books come back into print. << This is the nice thing about writing historicals, Anne--they don't age like contemporaries. Remember that I recently read your first book and loved it? You might have seen things you'd do differently now that you have mre experience, but it's still a delightful story.

    Reply
  47. >>Mary Jo, I loved this book when I first read it. The hero is just gorgeous! It’s fabulous when good books come back into print. << This is the nice thing about writing historicals, Anne--they don't age like contemporaries. Remember that I recently read your first book and loved it? You might have seen things you'd do differently now that you have mre experience, but it's still a delightful story.

    Reply
  48. >>Mary Jo, I loved this book when I first read it. The hero is just gorgeous! It’s fabulous when good books come back into print. << This is the nice thing about writing historicals, Anne--they don't age like contemporaries. Remember that I recently read your first book and loved it? You might have seen things you'd do differently now that you have mre experience, but it's still a delightful story.

    Reply
  49. >>Mary Jo, I loved this book when I first read it. The hero is just gorgeous! It’s fabulous when good books come back into print. << This is the nice thing about writing historicals, Anne--they don't age like contemporaries. Remember that I recently read your first book and loved it? You might have seen things you'd do differently now that you have mre experience, but it's still a delightful story.

    Reply
  50. >>Mary Jo, I loved this book when I first read it. The hero is just gorgeous! It’s fabulous when good books come back into print. << This is the nice thing about writing historicals, Anne--they don't age like contemporaries. Remember that I recently read your first book and loved it? You might have seen things you'd do differently now that you have mre experience, but it's still a delightful story.

    Reply
  51. I have to say this is one book that I haven’t read! I read the first part of the posting and was saying “I just have to read this”, then I find out that its already been out there!?!?! Where have I been? Looks like a great read, and everyone so far seems to agree – so its a buy!

    Reply
  52. I have to say this is one book that I haven’t read! I read the first part of the posting and was saying “I just have to read this”, then I find out that its already been out there!?!?! Where have I been? Looks like a great read, and everyone so far seems to agree – so its a buy!

    Reply
  53. I have to say this is one book that I haven’t read! I read the first part of the posting and was saying “I just have to read this”, then I find out that its already been out there!?!?! Where have I been? Looks like a great read, and everyone so far seems to agree – so its a buy!

    Reply
  54. I have to say this is one book that I haven’t read! I read the first part of the posting and was saying “I just have to read this”, then I find out that its already been out there!?!?! Where have I been? Looks like a great read, and everyone so far seems to agree – so its a buy!

    Reply
  55. I have to say this is one book that I haven’t read! I read the first part of the posting and was saying “I just have to read this”, then I find out that its already been out there!?!?! Where have I been? Looks like a great read, and everyone so far seems to agree – so its a buy!

    Reply
  56. **This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it**
    Helen, it’s been a long time since 1999! As a historical, The Bargain is a bit lighter than a lot of my books. Except for the dying hero, of course. *g* I hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  57. **This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it**
    Helen, it’s been a long time since 1999! As a historical, The Bargain is a bit lighter than a lot of my books. Except for the dying hero, of course. *g* I hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  58. **This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it**
    Helen, it’s been a long time since 1999! As a historical, The Bargain is a bit lighter than a lot of my books. Except for the dying hero, of course. *g* I hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  59. **This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it**
    Helen, it’s been a long time since 1999! As a historical, The Bargain is a bit lighter than a lot of my books. Except for the dying hero, of course. *g* I hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  60. **This book sounds so good and I honestly don’t know where I have been because I haven’t read it yet. But I have now added it to my must have list and am really looking forward to reading it**
    Helen, it’s been a long time since 1999! As a historical, The Bargain is a bit lighter than a lot of my books. Except for the dying hero, of course. *g* I hope you enjoy it!

    Reply
  61. I agree with other comments- where have I been that I missed this? How fun to be reissuing a traditional regency. And, definitely adding this to my tbr list as marriage of convenience is one of my favorites (it’s always nice going in knowing it will have to work out!).

    Reply
  62. I agree with other comments- where have I been that I missed this? How fun to be reissuing a traditional regency. And, definitely adding this to my tbr list as marriage of convenience is one of my favorites (it’s always nice going in knowing it will have to work out!).

    Reply
  63. I agree with other comments- where have I been that I missed this? How fun to be reissuing a traditional regency. And, definitely adding this to my tbr list as marriage of convenience is one of my favorites (it’s always nice going in knowing it will have to work out!).

    Reply
  64. I agree with other comments- where have I been that I missed this? How fun to be reissuing a traditional regency. And, definitely adding this to my tbr list as marriage of convenience is one of my favorites (it’s always nice going in knowing it will have to work out!).

    Reply
  65. I agree with other comments- where have I been that I missed this? How fun to be reissuing a traditional regency. And, definitely adding this to my tbr list as marriage of convenience is one of my favorites (it’s always nice going in knowing it will have to work out!).

    Reply
  66. My copy of the “The Would-be Widow” sits happily on my bookshelf beside my copy of “The Rake and the Reformer”. However, like Cynthia, I think I’ll buy a copy of the new edition because I do not want to think about what would happen should that treasured copy disintegrate for whatever reason (much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth would definitely ensure).
    I love many of the old Signet covers because they feel far more authentic to the time than recent ones. All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead, and I’ve never understood why I, a heterosexual romance-reading female, am supposed to be attracted to a picture of another female with her dress falling off. In contrast, the new cover for “The Bargain” is lovely. Mary Jo’s descriptor, pensive, fits it exactly.

    Reply
  67. My copy of the “The Would-be Widow” sits happily on my bookshelf beside my copy of “The Rake and the Reformer”. However, like Cynthia, I think I’ll buy a copy of the new edition because I do not want to think about what would happen should that treasured copy disintegrate for whatever reason (much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth would definitely ensure).
    I love many of the old Signet covers because they feel far more authentic to the time than recent ones. All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead, and I’ve never understood why I, a heterosexual romance-reading female, am supposed to be attracted to a picture of another female with her dress falling off. In contrast, the new cover for “The Bargain” is lovely. Mary Jo’s descriptor, pensive, fits it exactly.

    Reply
  68. My copy of the “The Would-be Widow” sits happily on my bookshelf beside my copy of “The Rake and the Reformer”. However, like Cynthia, I think I’ll buy a copy of the new edition because I do not want to think about what would happen should that treasured copy disintegrate for whatever reason (much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth would definitely ensure).
    I love many of the old Signet covers because they feel far more authentic to the time than recent ones. All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead, and I’ve never understood why I, a heterosexual romance-reading female, am supposed to be attracted to a picture of another female with her dress falling off. In contrast, the new cover for “The Bargain” is lovely. Mary Jo’s descriptor, pensive, fits it exactly.

    Reply
  69. My copy of the “The Would-be Widow” sits happily on my bookshelf beside my copy of “The Rake and the Reformer”. However, like Cynthia, I think I’ll buy a copy of the new edition because I do not want to think about what would happen should that treasured copy disintegrate for whatever reason (much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth would definitely ensure).
    I love many of the old Signet covers because they feel far more authentic to the time than recent ones. All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead, and I’ve never understood why I, a heterosexual romance-reading female, am supposed to be attracted to a picture of another female with her dress falling off. In contrast, the new cover for “The Bargain” is lovely. Mary Jo’s descriptor, pensive, fits it exactly.

    Reply
  70. My copy of the “The Would-be Widow” sits happily on my bookshelf beside my copy of “The Rake and the Reformer”. However, like Cynthia, I think I’ll buy a copy of the new edition because I do not want to think about what would happen should that treasured copy disintegrate for whatever reason (much tearing of hair and gnashing of teeth would definitely ensure).
    I love many of the old Signet covers because they feel far more authentic to the time than recent ones. All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead, and I’ve never understood why I, a heterosexual romance-reading female, am supposed to be attracted to a picture of another female with her dress falling off. In contrast, the new cover for “The Bargain” is lovely. Mary Jo’s descriptor, pensive, fits it exactly.

    Reply
  71. This is my favorite of your books! I have it as the gold cover version, and it’s on my keeper shelf.
    And yes, I love comedy, but laughter is richer if you know the pain as well. Makes the laughter more meaningful I guess. At least for me. If you can laugh again after suffering such heartache, you more deserve your happy ending perhaps?

    Reply
  72. This is my favorite of your books! I have it as the gold cover version, and it’s on my keeper shelf.
    And yes, I love comedy, but laughter is richer if you know the pain as well. Makes the laughter more meaningful I guess. At least for me. If you can laugh again after suffering such heartache, you more deserve your happy ending perhaps?

    Reply
  73. This is my favorite of your books! I have it as the gold cover version, and it’s on my keeper shelf.
    And yes, I love comedy, but laughter is richer if you know the pain as well. Makes the laughter more meaningful I guess. At least for me. If you can laugh again after suffering such heartache, you more deserve your happy ending perhaps?

    Reply
  74. This is my favorite of your books! I have it as the gold cover version, and it’s on my keeper shelf.
    And yes, I love comedy, but laughter is richer if you know the pain as well. Makes the laughter more meaningful I guess. At least for me. If you can laugh again after suffering such heartache, you more deserve your happy ending perhaps?

    Reply
  75. This is my favorite of your books! I have it as the gold cover version, and it’s on my keeper shelf.
    And yes, I love comedy, but laughter is richer if you know the pain as well. Makes the laughter more meaningful I guess. At least for me. If you can laugh again after suffering such heartache, you more deserve your happy ending perhaps?

    Reply
  76. Cynthia, I’m laughing at the evolution of your Irish family saga! I’ll bet that revising and restructuring is how you learned to write. There isn’t any easy way, is there> *g*

    Reply
  77. Cynthia, I’m laughing at the evolution of your Irish family saga! I’ll bet that revising and restructuring is how you learned to write. There isn’t any easy way, is there> *g*

    Reply
  78. Cynthia, I’m laughing at the evolution of your Irish family saga! I’ll bet that revising and restructuring is how you learned to write. There isn’t any easy way, is there> *g*

    Reply
  79. Cynthia, I’m laughing at the evolution of your Irish family saga! I’ll bet that revising and restructuring is how you learned to write. There isn’t any easy way, is there> *g*

    Reply
  80. Cynthia, I’m laughing at the evolution of your Irish family saga! I’ll bet that revising and restructuring is how you learned to write. There isn’t any easy way, is there> *g*

    Reply
  81. Dee–
    This version of THE BARGAIN is the same as the 1999 version. I figure that major revisions on the book once were enough. *g*
    Jane O, it’s great when publishers reissue the books we love. Like you, I love print and libraries, but it is great that the e-book revolution is making it possible for authors to make their backlists available again. But I’m not taking my e-reader into the bathtub with me!

    Reply
  82. Dee–
    This version of THE BARGAIN is the same as the 1999 version. I figure that major revisions on the book once were enough. *g*
    Jane O, it’s great when publishers reissue the books we love. Like you, I love print and libraries, but it is great that the e-book revolution is making it possible for authors to make their backlists available again. But I’m not taking my e-reader into the bathtub with me!

    Reply
  83. Dee–
    This version of THE BARGAIN is the same as the 1999 version. I figure that major revisions on the book once were enough. *g*
    Jane O, it’s great when publishers reissue the books we love. Like you, I love print and libraries, but it is great that the e-book revolution is making it possible for authors to make their backlists available again. But I’m not taking my e-reader into the bathtub with me!

    Reply
  84. Dee–
    This version of THE BARGAIN is the same as the 1999 version. I figure that major revisions on the book once were enough. *g*
    Jane O, it’s great when publishers reissue the books we love. Like you, I love print and libraries, but it is great that the e-book revolution is making it possible for authors to make their backlists available again. But I’m not taking my e-reader into the bathtub with me!

    Reply
  85. Dee–
    This version of THE BARGAIN is the same as the 1999 version. I figure that major revisions on the book once were enough. *g*
    Jane O, it’s great when publishers reissue the books we love. Like you, I love print and libraries, but it is great that the e-book revolution is making it possible for authors to make their backlists available again. But I’m not taking my e-reader into the bathtub with me!

    Reply
  86. *** I downloaded this in glee just last night on my Nook. We’re going to England/Wales (for research! Beats the library or the Internet *g*) on Sunday and it will be my travel read. Can’t wait!<< Perfect, Maggie! Trips like this are why e-books were invented. (If you like the tradtional Regencies, my CAROUSEL OF HEARTS is available in e-book form, and so are three Christmas novellas under the title CHRISTMAS MISCHIEF.) Have a wonderful, wonderful trip. Did you time it to see Wales covered with daffodils? It will be beautifu.

    Reply
  87. *** I downloaded this in glee just last night on my Nook. We’re going to England/Wales (for research! Beats the library or the Internet *g*) on Sunday and it will be my travel read. Can’t wait!<< Perfect, Maggie! Trips like this are why e-books were invented. (If you like the tradtional Regencies, my CAROUSEL OF HEARTS is available in e-book form, and so are three Christmas novellas under the title CHRISTMAS MISCHIEF.) Have a wonderful, wonderful trip. Did you time it to see Wales covered with daffodils? It will be beautifu.

    Reply
  88. *** I downloaded this in glee just last night on my Nook. We’re going to England/Wales (for research! Beats the library or the Internet *g*) on Sunday and it will be my travel read. Can’t wait!<< Perfect, Maggie! Trips like this are why e-books were invented. (If you like the tradtional Regencies, my CAROUSEL OF HEARTS is available in e-book form, and so are three Christmas novellas under the title CHRISTMAS MISCHIEF.) Have a wonderful, wonderful trip. Did you time it to see Wales covered with daffodils? It will be beautifu.

    Reply
  89. *** I downloaded this in glee just last night on my Nook. We’re going to England/Wales (for research! Beats the library or the Internet *g*) on Sunday and it will be my travel read. Can’t wait!<< Perfect, Maggie! Trips like this are why e-books were invented. (If you like the tradtional Regencies, my CAROUSEL OF HEARTS is available in e-book form, and so are three Christmas novellas under the title CHRISTMAS MISCHIEF.) Have a wonderful, wonderful trip. Did you time it to see Wales covered with daffodils? It will be beautifu.

    Reply
  90. *** I downloaded this in glee just last night on my Nook. We’re going to England/Wales (for research! Beats the library or the Internet *g*) on Sunday and it will be my travel read. Can’t wait!<< Perfect, Maggie! Trips like this are why e-books were invented. (If you like the tradtional Regencies, my CAROUSEL OF HEARTS is available in e-book form, and so are three Christmas novellas under the title CHRISTMAS MISCHIEF.) Have a wonderful, wonderful trip. Did you time it to see Wales covered with daffodils? It will be beautifu.

    Reply
  91. Susan/DC–
    I agree that the Signet Regency covers captured the era better. They tended to have a broader view–a culture as well as a relationship–while Regency historical concentrate on the courtships aspect.
    **All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead**
    LOL!

    Reply
  92. Susan/DC–
    I agree that the Signet Regency covers captured the era better. They tended to have a broader view–a culture as well as a relationship–while Regency historical concentrate on the courtships aspect.
    **All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead**
    LOL!

    Reply
  93. Susan/DC–
    I agree that the Signet Regency covers captured the era better. They tended to have a broader view–a culture as well as a relationship–while Regency historical concentrate on the courtships aspect.
    **All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead**
    LOL!

    Reply
  94. Susan/DC–
    I agree that the Signet Regency covers captured the era better. They tended to have a broader view–a culture as well as a relationship–while Regency historical concentrate on the courtships aspect.
    **All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead**
    LOL!

    Reply
  95. Susan/DC–
    I agree that the Signet Regency covers captured the era better. They tended to have a broader view–a culture as well as a relationship–while Regency historical concentrate on the courtships aspect.
    **All too often the art director is going for impassioned but winds up with dyspeptic instead**
    LOL!

    Reply
  96. I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!

    Reply
  97. I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!

    Reply
  98. I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!

    Reply
  99. I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!

    Reply
  100. I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!

    Reply
  101. Like many posters here – I have both the Would Be Widow and the Bargain on my shelves. I liked the Bargain a little better because I liked the secondary romance for the very unhappy sister. And I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains!
    Digressing, sorry! Yes, I love the new cover because the story is about the couple and while much of this one does take place while the hero is in bed… okay, digressing again and don’t want to ruin anything for readers who haven’t read it yet! Looking forward to a new copy! cheers!

    Reply
  102. Like many posters here – I have both the Would Be Widow and the Bargain on my shelves. I liked the Bargain a little better because I liked the secondary romance for the very unhappy sister. And I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains!
    Digressing, sorry! Yes, I love the new cover because the story is about the couple and while much of this one does take place while the hero is in bed… okay, digressing again and don’t want to ruin anything for readers who haven’t read it yet! Looking forward to a new copy! cheers!

    Reply
  103. Like many posters here – I have both the Would Be Widow and the Bargain on my shelves. I liked the Bargain a little better because I liked the secondary romance for the very unhappy sister. And I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains!
    Digressing, sorry! Yes, I love the new cover because the story is about the couple and while much of this one does take place while the hero is in bed… okay, digressing again and don’t want to ruin anything for readers who haven’t read it yet! Looking forward to a new copy! cheers!

    Reply
  104. Like many posters here – I have both the Would Be Widow and the Bargain on my shelves. I liked the Bargain a little better because I liked the secondary romance for the very unhappy sister. And I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains!
    Digressing, sorry! Yes, I love the new cover because the story is about the couple and while much of this one does take place while the hero is in bed… okay, digressing again and don’t want to ruin anything for readers who haven’t read it yet! Looking forward to a new copy! cheers!

    Reply
  105. Like many posters here – I have both the Would Be Widow and the Bargain on my shelves. I liked the Bargain a little better because I liked the secondary romance for the very unhappy sister. And I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains!
    Digressing, sorry! Yes, I love the new cover because the story is about the couple and while much of this one does take place while the hero is in bed… okay, digressing again and don’t want to ruin anything for readers who haven’t read it yet! Looking forward to a new copy! cheers!

    Reply
  106. I am SO glad this book came out! I know I have copies of it in its previous incarnations, but I can’t find them! And when I saw it on the shelves at our local Walmart I had that instant “Oh! I want to read that again!” moment. I came home, searched the house for any of my copies and NOTHING! Eeek! So I snatched up a copy at Walmart the next day, which invariably means I’ll find my others in the next week or so. However, if the usual suspect has it I will have to pay a visit to my mother to retrieve it! She is a notorious book thief!
    I really do love this story and the hero is definitely swoon-worthy. I would even go so far as to say he is double dip swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  107. I am SO glad this book came out! I know I have copies of it in its previous incarnations, but I can’t find them! And when I saw it on the shelves at our local Walmart I had that instant “Oh! I want to read that again!” moment. I came home, searched the house for any of my copies and NOTHING! Eeek! So I snatched up a copy at Walmart the next day, which invariably means I’ll find my others in the next week or so. However, if the usual suspect has it I will have to pay a visit to my mother to retrieve it! She is a notorious book thief!
    I really do love this story and the hero is definitely swoon-worthy. I would even go so far as to say he is double dip swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  108. I am SO glad this book came out! I know I have copies of it in its previous incarnations, but I can’t find them! And when I saw it on the shelves at our local Walmart I had that instant “Oh! I want to read that again!” moment. I came home, searched the house for any of my copies and NOTHING! Eeek! So I snatched up a copy at Walmart the next day, which invariably means I’ll find my others in the next week or so. However, if the usual suspect has it I will have to pay a visit to my mother to retrieve it! She is a notorious book thief!
    I really do love this story and the hero is definitely swoon-worthy. I would even go so far as to say he is double dip swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  109. I am SO glad this book came out! I know I have copies of it in its previous incarnations, but I can’t find them! And when I saw it on the shelves at our local Walmart I had that instant “Oh! I want to read that again!” moment. I came home, searched the house for any of my copies and NOTHING! Eeek! So I snatched up a copy at Walmart the next day, which invariably means I’ll find my others in the next week or so. However, if the usual suspect has it I will have to pay a visit to my mother to retrieve it! She is a notorious book thief!
    I really do love this story and the hero is definitely swoon-worthy. I would even go so far as to say he is double dip swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  110. I am SO glad this book came out! I know I have copies of it in its previous incarnations, but I can’t find them! And when I saw it on the shelves at our local Walmart I had that instant “Oh! I want to read that again!” moment. I came home, searched the house for any of my copies and NOTHING! Eeek! So I snatched up a copy at Walmart the next day, which invariably means I’ll find my others in the next week or so. However, if the usual suspect has it I will have to pay a visit to my mother to retrieve it! She is a notorious book thief!
    I really do love this story and the hero is definitely swoon-worthy. I would even go so far as to say he is double dip swoon-worthy!

    Reply
  111. Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) However, the expanded historicals are great because they flesh out the stories so nicely.

    Reply
  112. Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) However, the expanded historicals are great because they flesh out the stories so nicely.

    Reply
  113. Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) However, the expanded historicals are great because they flesh out the stories so nicely.

    Reply
  114. Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) However, the expanded historicals are great because they flesh out the stories so nicely.

    Reply
  115. Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) However, the expanded historicals are great because they flesh out the stories so nicely.

    Reply
  116. The new cover is lovely. I know I picked this one up somewhere, but can’t find it. I sure it is buried in my TBR mountain. I will read the blurb, fall in love with a book, get it, then not have the time to read it. I am making headway on the pile, though, and enjoying all these great stories.
    I think it is kind of nice that you are getting the opportunity to revisit your earlier stories and “flesh them out” a bit. I am sure experience has given you many ideas of how you would like to expand the stories and make your characters better known to us.
    I have got to track this one down.

    Reply
  117. The new cover is lovely. I know I picked this one up somewhere, but can’t find it. I sure it is buried in my TBR mountain. I will read the blurb, fall in love with a book, get it, then not have the time to read it. I am making headway on the pile, though, and enjoying all these great stories.
    I think it is kind of nice that you are getting the opportunity to revisit your earlier stories and “flesh them out” a bit. I am sure experience has given you many ideas of how you would like to expand the stories and make your characters better known to us.
    I have got to track this one down.

    Reply
  118. The new cover is lovely. I know I picked this one up somewhere, but can’t find it. I sure it is buried in my TBR mountain. I will read the blurb, fall in love with a book, get it, then not have the time to read it. I am making headway on the pile, though, and enjoying all these great stories.
    I think it is kind of nice that you are getting the opportunity to revisit your earlier stories and “flesh them out” a bit. I am sure experience has given you many ideas of how you would like to expand the stories and make your characters better known to us.
    I have got to track this one down.

    Reply
  119. The new cover is lovely. I know I picked this one up somewhere, but can’t find it. I sure it is buried in my TBR mountain. I will read the blurb, fall in love with a book, get it, then not have the time to read it. I am making headway on the pile, though, and enjoying all these great stories.
    I think it is kind of nice that you are getting the opportunity to revisit your earlier stories and “flesh them out” a bit. I am sure experience has given you many ideas of how you would like to expand the stories and make your characters better known to us.
    I have got to track this one down.

    Reply
  120. The new cover is lovely. I know I picked this one up somewhere, but can’t find it. I sure it is buried in my TBR mountain. I will read the blurb, fall in love with a book, get it, then not have the time to read it. I am making headway on the pile, though, and enjoying all these great stories.
    I think it is kind of nice that you are getting the opportunity to revisit your earlier stories and “flesh them out” a bit. I am sure experience has given you many ideas of how you would like to expand the stories and make your characters better known to us.
    I have got to track this one down.

    Reply
  121. I recently read The Would-be Widow and enjoyed it a lot. It’s fun to read the early works of authors I have discovered after they have established themselves, and this one was no exception.
    I would love to have a copy of the new version.

    Reply
  122. I recently read The Would-be Widow and enjoyed it a lot. It’s fun to read the early works of authors I have discovered after they have established themselves, and this one was no exception.
    I would love to have a copy of the new version.

    Reply
  123. I recently read The Would-be Widow and enjoyed it a lot. It’s fun to read the early works of authors I have discovered after they have established themselves, and this one was no exception.
    I would love to have a copy of the new version.

    Reply
  124. I recently read The Would-be Widow and enjoyed it a lot. It’s fun to read the early works of authors I have discovered after they have established themselves, and this one was no exception.
    I would love to have a copy of the new version.

    Reply
  125. I recently read The Would-be Widow and enjoyed it a lot. It’s fun to read the early works of authors I have discovered after they have established themselves, and this one was no exception.
    I would love to have a copy of the new version.

    Reply
  126. **I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!
    ++
    Julie–I always want potential readers to know what they’re getting so they won’t be disappointed! If you reread, I hope you still find it fun.

    Reply
  127. **I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!
    ++
    Julie–I always want potential readers to know what they’re getting so they won’t be disappointed! If you reread, I hope you still find it fun.

    Reply
  128. **I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!
    ++
    Julie–I always want potential readers to know what they’re getting so they won’t be disappointed! If you reread, I hope you still find it fun.

    Reply
  129. **I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!
    ++
    Julie–I always want potential readers to know what they’re getting so they won’t be disappointed! If you reread, I hope you still find it fun.

    Reply
  130. **I loved “The Bargain” and really like the new cover. Thanks for letting me know there aren’t any revisions this time, though. I’m going to go back and read this again!
    ++
    Julie–I always want potential readers to know what they’re getting so they won’t be disappointed! If you reread, I hope you still find it fun.

    Reply
  131. **I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains! Digressing, sorry! **
    JPoorman–feel free to digress anytime. *g* Digressing is one of my favorite pastimes. I agree with you about covers. My favorites show real feeing between the two people. I want warmth and tenderness more than generic passion.

    Reply
  132. **I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains! Digressing, sorry! **
    JPoorman–feel free to digress anytime. *g* Digressing is one of my favorite pastimes. I agree with you about covers. My favorites show real feeing between the two people. I want warmth and tenderness more than generic passion.

    Reply
  133. **I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains! Digressing, sorry! **
    JPoorman–feel free to digress anytime. *g* Digressing is one of my favorite pastimes. I agree with you about covers. My favorites show real feeing between the two people. I want warmth and tenderness more than generic passion.

    Reply
  134. **I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains! Digressing, sorry! **
    JPoorman–feel free to digress anytime. *g* Digressing is one of my favorite pastimes. I agree with you about covers. My favorites show real feeing between the two people. I want warmth and tenderness more than generic passion.

    Reply
  135. **I agree about the cover art – very tired of ‘respectable’ women in disheveled dresses – especially the outdoor one’s. Maybe sneaking outside to find some privacy happened – but I generally think of maids & grooms – not ladies & gents. The ladies would be in a world of hurt if they couldn’t explain those pesky grass stains! Digressing, sorry! **
    JPoorman–feel free to digress anytime. *g* Digressing is one of my favorite pastimes. I agree with you about covers. My favorites show real feeing between the two people. I want warmth and tenderness more than generic passion.

    Reply
  136. +++Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) +++
    Peggy, you’re the first person EVER to mention those little light hearted wrap-ups I did at the end of my Regencies! They didn’t seem quite right for the historicals, but I did keep that wrap up in THE BARGAIN. (I had to check the new book to be sure. *g*)

    Reply
  137. +++Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) +++
    Peggy, you’re the first person EVER to mention those little light hearted wrap-ups I did at the end of my Regencies! They didn’t seem quite right for the historicals, but I did keep that wrap up in THE BARGAIN. (I had to check the new book to be sure. *g*)

    Reply
  138. +++Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) +++
    Peggy, you’re the first person EVER to mention those little light hearted wrap-ups I did at the end of my Regencies! They didn’t seem quite right for the historicals, but I did keep that wrap up in THE BARGAIN. (I had to check the new book to be sure. *g*)

    Reply
  139. +++Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) +++
    Peggy, you’re the first person EVER to mention those little light hearted wrap-ups I did at the end of my Regencies! They didn’t seem quite right for the historicals, but I did keep that wrap up in THE BARGAIN. (I had to check the new book to be sure. *g*)

    Reply
  140. +++Gorgeous new cover. I do love the older Regencies in some ways more, purely because of the “epilogues” at the end. (“Epilogues” in quotes because they are not extra chapters but lovely, arch wrap-ups.) +++
    Peggy, you’re the first person EVER to mention those little light hearted wrap-ups I did at the end of my Regencies! They didn’t seem quite right for the historicals, but I did keep that wrap up in THE BARGAIN. (I had to check the new book to be sure. *g*)

    Reply
  141. Bibliophile–
    If you read the two versions of the story close together, you’d probably notice the additions, but my hope is that people who read them further apart won’t really notice. They’ll just find THE BARGAIN a satisfying read with nothing extraneous.

    Reply
  142. Bibliophile–
    If you read the two versions of the story close together, you’d probably notice the additions, but my hope is that people who read them further apart won’t really notice. They’ll just find THE BARGAIN a satisfying read with nothing extraneous.

    Reply
  143. Bibliophile–
    If you read the two versions of the story close together, you’d probably notice the additions, but my hope is that people who read them further apart won’t really notice. They’ll just find THE BARGAIN a satisfying read with nothing extraneous.

    Reply
  144. Bibliophile–
    If you read the two versions of the story close together, you’d probably notice the additions, but my hope is that people who read them further apart won’t really notice. They’ll just find THE BARGAIN a satisfying read with nothing extraneous.

    Reply
  145. Bibliophile–
    If you read the two versions of the story close together, you’d probably notice the additions, but my hope is that people who read them further apart won’t really notice. They’ll just find THE BARGAIN a satisfying read with nothing extraneous.

    Reply
  146. I read the book a while back and I loved it. In general, I don’t like people on covers. Mainly because they’re usually half naked men and women (although we can all use a few gorgeous men in our lives *g*) and the covers look contrived.
    But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it.

    Reply
  147. I read the book a while back and I loved it. In general, I don’t like people on covers. Mainly because they’re usually half naked men and women (although we can all use a few gorgeous men in our lives *g*) and the covers look contrived.
    But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it.

    Reply
  148. I read the book a while back and I loved it. In general, I don’t like people on covers. Mainly because they’re usually half naked men and women (although we can all use a few gorgeous men in our lives *g*) and the covers look contrived.
    But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it.

    Reply
  149. I read the book a while back and I loved it. In general, I don’t like people on covers. Mainly because they’re usually half naked men and women (although we can all use a few gorgeous men in our lives *g*) and the covers look contrived.
    But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it.

    Reply
  150. I read the book a while back and I loved it. In general, I don’t like people on covers. Mainly because they’re usually half naked men and women (although we can all use a few gorgeous men in our lives *g*) and the covers look contrived.
    But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it.

    Reply
  151. **But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it. **
    Linda, I’ll pass on your remark and others to my editor, who works hard to get me great covers. Maybe the idea of tenderness over crazed lust will spread. *g*

    Reply
  152. **But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it. **
    Linda, I’ll pass on your remark and others to my editor, who works hard to get me great covers. Maybe the idea of tenderness over crazed lust will spread. *g*

    Reply
  153. **But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it. **
    Linda, I’ll pass on your remark and others to my editor, who works hard to get me great covers. Maybe the idea of tenderness over crazed lust will spread. *g*

    Reply
  154. **But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it. **
    Linda, I’ll pass on your remark and others to my editor, who works hard to get me great covers. Maybe the idea of tenderness over crazed lust will spread. *g*

    Reply
  155. **But your new cover is gorgeous. I wish more romances had covers like it. **
    Linda, I’ll pass on your remark and others to my editor, who works hard to get me great covers. Maybe the idea of tenderness over crazed lust will spread. *g*

    Reply
  156. Mary Jo,
    I thought I had read all your books but I never read this one and don’t know how I missed it. I love the new cover in any of it’s version.
    I also think that the The Bargain and a much better fit for the story. I’m so glad it’s being released again so I can finally read it!

    Reply
  157. Mary Jo,
    I thought I had read all your books but I never read this one and don’t know how I missed it. I love the new cover in any of it’s version.
    I also think that the The Bargain and a much better fit for the story. I’m so glad it’s being released again so I can finally read it!

    Reply
  158. Mary Jo,
    I thought I had read all your books but I never read this one and don’t know how I missed it. I love the new cover in any of it’s version.
    I also think that the The Bargain and a much better fit for the story. I’m so glad it’s being released again so I can finally read it!

    Reply
  159. Mary Jo,
    I thought I had read all your books but I never read this one and don’t know how I missed it. I love the new cover in any of it’s version.
    I also think that the The Bargain and a much better fit for the story. I’m so glad it’s being released again so I can finally read it!

    Reply
  160. Mary Jo,
    I thought I had read all your books but I never read this one and don’t know how I missed it. I love the new cover in any of it’s version.
    I also think that the The Bargain and a much better fit for the story. I’m so glad it’s being released again so I can finally read it!

    Reply
  161. Jeanne, I hope you enjoy THE BARGAIN. Even with its historical revision, it’s a little lighter than most of my historicals, but a good story is a good story, and this one is fun. *g*
    I’m passing all these comments on the cover along to my editor. She done good!

    Reply
  162. Jeanne, I hope you enjoy THE BARGAIN. Even with its historical revision, it’s a little lighter than most of my historicals, but a good story is a good story, and this one is fun. *g*
    I’m passing all these comments on the cover along to my editor. She done good!

    Reply
  163. Jeanne, I hope you enjoy THE BARGAIN. Even with its historical revision, it’s a little lighter than most of my historicals, but a good story is a good story, and this one is fun. *g*
    I’m passing all these comments on the cover along to my editor. She done good!

    Reply
  164. Jeanne, I hope you enjoy THE BARGAIN. Even with its historical revision, it’s a little lighter than most of my historicals, but a good story is a good story, and this one is fun. *g*
    I’m passing all these comments on the cover along to my editor. She done good!

    Reply
  165. Jeanne, I hope you enjoy THE BARGAIN. Even with its historical revision, it’s a little lighter than most of my historicals, but a good story is a good story, and this one is fun. *g*
    I’m passing all these comments on the cover along to my editor. She done good!

    Reply
  166. Oooh! Mary Jo, how did I miss this one? Thanks for the heads-up; putting in an order card right now for the library and adding it to my personal must-buy list.

    Reply
  167. Oooh! Mary Jo, how did I miss this one? Thanks for the heads-up; putting in an order card right now for the library and adding it to my personal must-buy list.

    Reply
  168. Oooh! Mary Jo, how did I miss this one? Thanks for the heads-up; putting in an order card right now for the library and adding it to my personal must-buy list.

    Reply
  169. Oooh! Mary Jo, how did I miss this one? Thanks for the heads-up; putting in an order card right now for the library and adding it to my personal must-buy list.

    Reply
  170. Oooh! Mary Jo, how did I miss this one? Thanks for the heads-up; putting in an order card right now for the library and adding it to my personal must-buy list.

    Reply
  171. Marriage of convenience stories are a favorite of mine and I like how you explained it with the hero not conveniently dying.

    Reply
  172. Marriage of convenience stories are a favorite of mine and I like how you explained it with the hero not conveniently dying.

    Reply
  173. Marriage of convenience stories are a favorite of mine and I like how you explained it with the hero not conveniently dying.

    Reply
  174. Marriage of convenience stories are a favorite of mine and I like how you explained it with the hero not conveniently dying.

    Reply
  175. Marriage of convenience stories are a favorite of mine and I like how you explained it with the hero not conveniently dying.

    Reply
  176. I’ve been looking for this book for ages! ^.^ Now I’ve just ordered it and it’s supposed to arrive to my home in Italy before the end of april… I can’t wait for it!
    I’ve been a “shameful” romance reader for some times in my youth: I used to buy love books in distant shops (not in the same in wich I used to buy “serious” books) and then read them in my bed, dropping it in the covers when my mother or my father came in my room. I was ashemed of these lectures and i didn’t tell anyone about it. But then… one day I found a romance that changed my mind: that was “silk and secrets” by Mary Jo Putney (my very first book by you!) and I found it so GOOD, so beautiful, that I became a proud romance reader: I started reading without hiding myself. I started talking about good books. I started collecting all yours books! 😀
    But “the bargain” was missing, and now I’m very happy I’ll be able to read it! I can’t wait for it, and I’m very happy it will tell about doctor Ian too: he was a very charismatic character in your books (the one with Michael and the one with Stephen) and I fell in love with him everytime.
    Thank you!
    giovanna

    Reply
  177. I’ve been looking for this book for ages! ^.^ Now I’ve just ordered it and it’s supposed to arrive to my home in Italy before the end of april… I can’t wait for it!
    I’ve been a “shameful” romance reader for some times in my youth: I used to buy love books in distant shops (not in the same in wich I used to buy “serious” books) and then read them in my bed, dropping it in the covers when my mother or my father came in my room. I was ashemed of these lectures and i didn’t tell anyone about it. But then… one day I found a romance that changed my mind: that was “silk and secrets” by Mary Jo Putney (my very first book by you!) and I found it so GOOD, so beautiful, that I became a proud romance reader: I started reading without hiding myself. I started talking about good books. I started collecting all yours books! 😀
    But “the bargain” was missing, and now I’m very happy I’ll be able to read it! I can’t wait for it, and I’m very happy it will tell about doctor Ian too: he was a very charismatic character in your books (the one with Michael and the one with Stephen) and I fell in love with him everytime.
    Thank you!
    giovanna

    Reply
  178. I’ve been looking for this book for ages! ^.^ Now I’ve just ordered it and it’s supposed to arrive to my home in Italy before the end of april… I can’t wait for it!
    I’ve been a “shameful” romance reader for some times in my youth: I used to buy love books in distant shops (not in the same in wich I used to buy “serious” books) and then read them in my bed, dropping it in the covers when my mother or my father came in my room. I was ashemed of these lectures and i didn’t tell anyone about it. But then… one day I found a romance that changed my mind: that was “silk and secrets” by Mary Jo Putney (my very first book by you!) and I found it so GOOD, so beautiful, that I became a proud romance reader: I started reading without hiding myself. I started talking about good books. I started collecting all yours books! 😀
    But “the bargain” was missing, and now I’m very happy I’ll be able to read it! I can’t wait for it, and I’m very happy it will tell about doctor Ian too: he was a very charismatic character in your books (the one with Michael and the one with Stephen) and I fell in love with him everytime.
    Thank you!
    giovanna

    Reply
  179. I’ve been looking for this book for ages! ^.^ Now I’ve just ordered it and it’s supposed to arrive to my home in Italy before the end of april… I can’t wait for it!
    I’ve been a “shameful” romance reader for some times in my youth: I used to buy love books in distant shops (not in the same in wich I used to buy “serious” books) and then read them in my bed, dropping it in the covers when my mother or my father came in my room. I was ashemed of these lectures and i didn’t tell anyone about it. But then… one day I found a romance that changed my mind: that was “silk and secrets” by Mary Jo Putney (my very first book by you!) and I found it so GOOD, so beautiful, that I became a proud romance reader: I started reading without hiding myself. I started talking about good books. I started collecting all yours books! 😀
    But “the bargain” was missing, and now I’m very happy I’ll be able to read it! I can’t wait for it, and I’m very happy it will tell about doctor Ian too: he was a very charismatic character in your books (the one with Michael and the one with Stephen) and I fell in love with him everytime.
    Thank you!
    giovanna

    Reply
  180. I’ve been looking for this book for ages! ^.^ Now I’ve just ordered it and it’s supposed to arrive to my home in Italy before the end of april… I can’t wait for it!
    I’ve been a “shameful” romance reader for some times in my youth: I used to buy love books in distant shops (not in the same in wich I used to buy “serious” books) and then read them in my bed, dropping it in the covers when my mother or my father came in my room. I was ashemed of these lectures and i didn’t tell anyone about it. But then… one day I found a romance that changed my mind: that was “silk and secrets” by Mary Jo Putney (my very first book by you!) and I found it so GOOD, so beautiful, that I became a proud romance reader: I started reading without hiding myself. I started talking about good books. I started collecting all yours books! 😀
    But “the bargain” was missing, and now I’m very happy I’ll be able to read it! I can’t wait for it, and I’m very happy it will tell about doctor Ian too: he was a very charismatic character in your books (the one with Michael and the one with Stephen) and I fell in love with him everytime.
    Thank you!
    giovanna

    Reply
  181. Giovanna–
    I’m so glad that now your collection will be complete! I’m also glad to know that your romance reading habit is out of the bedcovers and into the open air. *g*
    Happy reading always–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  182. Giovanna–
    I’m so glad that now your collection will be complete! I’m also glad to know that your romance reading habit is out of the bedcovers and into the open air. *g*
    Happy reading always–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  183. Giovanna–
    I’m so glad that now your collection will be complete! I’m also glad to know that your romance reading habit is out of the bedcovers and into the open air. *g*
    Happy reading always–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  184. Giovanna–
    I’m so glad that now your collection will be complete! I’m also glad to know that your romance reading habit is out of the bedcovers and into the open air. *g*
    Happy reading always–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  185. Giovanna–
    I’m so glad that now your collection will be complete! I’m also glad to know that your romance reading habit is out of the bedcovers and into the open air. *g*
    Happy reading always–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  186. I’m reading it now and I really like it! 🙂 having read all the others fallen angel’s books I already Know that Candover will choose another girl in the end… ^.^ and I suppose that David and Jocelyn will have an happy ending (how clever of me! :-P) but I don’t know HOW Jocelyn is going to change her mind… and I’m loving the book!
    I was looking forward the Ian Kinlock story too, he’s a favourite of mine, and I began wondering about medical issue in historical books: I can only imagine how much researches were nedeed for these medical and surgical scenes… I remember a beautiful “author’s note” on the issue of bloods transfusion’s techniques in the book of Chaterine and Michael.
    In your books there are quite often issues related to medicine, and I would be very curious to know what kind of research and difficulties did you face writing them. The knowledge and standards of those times are far away from us, and even the best doctor in nineteenth-century makes us shudder in present days. Yet the reality was that, and you authors rightly try to be credible writing about medicine … so in the books (of many authors) we read of bloodletting that are rejected, of physicians engaged in cleaning unusual for the era and about ante-litteram antibiotics… must really be a touchy subject! To be accurate and correct, yet not to “shock” the reader (who can not accept that his hero is too ignorant or that his doctors make too serious mistakes …)
    May that be the subject of a future post? 🙂
    thank you
    giovanna
    (as always forgive my English: I’m italian and reading is so much easier than writing)

    Reply
  187. I’m reading it now and I really like it! 🙂 having read all the others fallen angel’s books I already Know that Candover will choose another girl in the end… ^.^ and I suppose that David and Jocelyn will have an happy ending (how clever of me! :-P) but I don’t know HOW Jocelyn is going to change her mind… and I’m loving the book!
    I was looking forward the Ian Kinlock story too, he’s a favourite of mine, and I began wondering about medical issue in historical books: I can only imagine how much researches were nedeed for these medical and surgical scenes… I remember a beautiful “author’s note” on the issue of bloods transfusion’s techniques in the book of Chaterine and Michael.
    In your books there are quite often issues related to medicine, and I would be very curious to know what kind of research and difficulties did you face writing them. The knowledge and standards of those times are far away from us, and even the best doctor in nineteenth-century makes us shudder in present days. Yet the reality was that, and you authors rightly try to be credible writing about medicine … so in the books (of many authors) we read of bloodletting that are rejected, of physicians engaged in cleaning unusual for the era and about ante-litteram antibiotics… must really be a touchy subject! To be accurate and correct, yet not to “shock” the reader (who can not accept that his hero is too ignorant or that his doctors make too serious mistakes …)
    May that be the subject of a future post? 🙂
    thank you
    giovanna
    (as always forgive my English: I’m italian and reading is so much easier than writing)

    Reply
  188. I’m reading it now and I really like it! 🙂 having read all the others fallen angel’s books I already Know that Candover will choose another girl in the end… ^.^ and I suppose that David and Jocelyn will have an happy ending (how clever of me! :-P) but I don’t know HOW Jocelyn is going to change her mind… and I’m loving the book!
    I was looking forward the Ian Kinlock story too, he’s a favourite of mine, and I began wondering about medical issue in historical books: I can only imagine how much researches were nedeed for these medical and surgical scenes… I remember a beautiful “author’s note” on the issue of bloods transfusion’s techniques in the book of Chaterine and Michael.
    In your books there are quite often issues related to medicine, and I would be very curious to know what kind of research and difficulties did you face writing them. The knowledge and standards of those times are far away from us, and even the best doctor in nineteenth-century makes us shudder in present days. Yet the reality was that, and you authors rightly try to be credible writing about medicine … so in the books (of many authors) we read of bloodletting that are rejected, of physicians engaged in cleaning unusual for the era and about ante-litteram antibiotics… must really be a touchy subject! To be accurate and correct, yet not to “shock” the reader (who can not accept that his hero is too ignorant or that his doctors make too serious mistakes …)
    May that be the subject of a future post? 🙂
    thank you
    giovanna
    (as always forgive my English: I’m italian and reading is so much easier than writing)

    Reply
  189. I’m reading it now and I really like it! 🙂 having read all the others fallen angel’s books I already Know that Candover will choose another girl in the end… ^.^ and I suppose that David and Jocelyn will have an happy ending (how clever of me! :-P) but I don’t know HOW Jocelyn is going to change her mind… and I’m loving the book!
    I was looking forward the Ian Kinlock story too, he’s a favourite of mine, and I began wondering about medical issue in historical books: I can only imagine how much researches were nedeed for these medical and surgical scenes… I remember a beautiful “author’s note” on the issue of bloods transfusion’s techniques in the book of Chaterine and Michael.
    In your books there are quite often issues related to medicine, and I would be very curious to know what kind of research and difficulties did you face writing them. The knowledge and standards of those times are far away from us, and even the best doctor in nineteenth-century makes us shudder in present days. Yet the reality was that, and you authors rightly try to be credible writing about medicine … so in the books (of many authors) we read of bloodletting that are rejected, of physicians engaged in cleaning unusual for the era and about ante-litteram antibiotics… must really be a touchy subject! To be accurate and correct, yet not to “shock” the reader (who can not accept that his hero is too ignorant or that his doctors make too serious mistakes …)
    May that be the subject of a future post? 🙂
    thank you
    giovanna
    (as always forgive my English: I’m italian and reading is so much easier than writing)

    Reply
  190. I’m reading it now and I really like it! 🙂 having read all the others fallen angel’s books I already Know that Candover will choose another girl in the end… ^.^ and I suppose that David and Jocelyn will have an happy ending (how clever of me! :-P) but I don’t know HOW Jocelyn is going to change her mind… and I’m loving the book!
    I was looking forward the Ian Kinlock story too, he’s a favourite of mine, and I began wondering about medical issue in historical books: I can only imagine how much researches were nedeed for these medical and surgical scenes… I remember a beautiful “author’s note” on the issue of bloods transfusion’s techniques in the book of Chaterine and Michael.
    In your books there are quite often issues related to medicine, and I would be very curious to know what kind of research and difficulties did you face writing them. The knowledge and standards of those times are far away from us, and even the best doctor in nineteenth-century makes us shudder in present days. Yet the reality was that, and you authors rightly try to be credible writing about medicine … so in the books (of many authors) we read of bloodletting that are rejected, of physicians engaged in cleaning unusual for the era and about ante-litteram antibiotics… must really be a touchy subject! To be accurate and correct, yet not to “shock” the reader (who can not accept that his hero is too ignorant or that his doctors make too serious mistakes …)
    May that be the subject of a future post? 🙂
    thank you
    giovanna
    (as always forgive my English: I’m italian and reading is so much easier than writing)

    Reply
  191. Giovanna, your English is excellent!
    As you say, it’s tricky to balance the reality of medical treatment of the time and what will look plausible to readers now. I do think there have always been very smart people who were very good at observing the world, so cleanliness isn’t too much of a stretch. That’s the sort of doctor Ian Kinlock is–smart and observant and has learned a lot over the years.
    But it wasn’t the 21st century, either! As you say, I did much research, mostly plowing through books to find any useful tidbits I could. For the blood transfusion in SHATTERED RAINBOWS, I went down to the Maryland medical society library and research in some of the older books.
    I also discussed historical transfusions with two doctors, who were utterly horrified. *G* With justice.
    I hope you enjoy the rest of The Bargain! I maybe have stretched medical realities a bit, but not to the breaking point, I think.
    *g*

    Reply
  192. Giovanna, your English is excellent!
    As you say, it’s tricky to balance the reality of medical treatment of the time and what will look plausible to readers now. I do think there have always been very smart people who were very good at observing the world, so cleanliness isn’t too much of a stretch. That’s the sort of doctor Ian Kinlock is–smart and observant and has learned a lot over the years.
    But it wasn’t the 21st century, either! As you say, I did much research, mostly plowing through books to find any useful tidbits I could. For the blood transfusion in SHATTERED RAINBOWS, I went down to the Maryland medical society library and research in some of the older books.
    I also discussed historical transfusions with two doctors, who were utterly horrified. *G* With justice.
    I hope you enjoy the rest of The Bargain! I maybe have stretched medical realities a bit, but not to the breaking point, I think.
    *g*

    Reply
  193. Giovanna, your English is excellent!
    As you say, it’s tricky to balance the reality of medical treatment of the time and what will look plausible to readers now. I do think there have always been very smart people who were very good at observing the world, so cleanliness isn’t too much of a stretch. That’s the sort of doctor Ian Kinlock is–smart and observant and has learned a lot over the years.
    But it wasn’t the 21st century, either! As you say, I did much research, mostly plowing through books to find any useful tidbits I could. For the blood transfusion in SHATTERED RAINBOWS, I went down to the Maryland medical society library and research in some of the older books.
    I also discussed historical transfusions with two doctors, who were utterly horrified. *G* With justice.
    I hope you enjoy the rest of The Bargain! I maybe have stretched medical realities a bit, but not to the breaking point, I think.
    *g*

    Reply
  194. Giovanna, your English is excellent!
    As you say, it’s tricky to balance the reality of medical treatment of the time and what will look plausible to readers now. I do think there have always been very smart people who were very good at observing the world, so cleanliness isn’t too much of a stretch. That’s the sort of doctor Ian Kinlock is–smart and observant and has learned a lot over the years.
    But it wasn’t the 21st century, either! As you say, I did much research, mostly plowing through books to find any useful tidbits I could. For the blood transfusion in SHATTERED RAINBOWS, I went down to the Maryland medical society library and research in some of the older books.
    I also discussed historical transfusions with two doctors, who were utterly horrified. *G* With justice.
    I hope you enjoy the rest of The Bargain! I maybe have stretched medical realities a bit, but not to the breaking point, I think.
    *g*

    Reply
  195. Giovanna, your English is excellent!
    As you say, it’s tricky to balance the reality of medical treatment of the time and what will look plausible to readers now. I do think there have always been very smart people who were very good at observing the world, so cleanliness isn’t too much of a stretch. That’s the sort of doctor Ian Kinlock is–smart and observant and has learned a lot over the years.
    But it wasn’t the 21st century, either! As you say, I did much research, mostly plowing through books to find any useful tidbits I could. For the blood transfusion in SHATTERED RAINBOWS, I went down to the Maryland medical society library and research in some of the older books.
    I also discussed historical transfusions with two doctors, who were utterly horrified. *G* With justice.
    I hope you enjoy the rest of The Bargain! I maybe have stretched medical realities a bit, but not to the breaking point, I think.
    *g*

    Reply

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