The Author’s Note—Yes or No?

A_practical_treatise_on_rail-roads _1825 _Plate_6Andrea here, musing today on that oft-overlooked part of a book: the Author’s Note. I’m one of those readers who really likes getting an inside peek at what information an author thinks will enhance the enjoyment of the main text. The dreaded “info dump” that can often bog down the actual storytelling tends to shine in its own special place, and I, for one, find that understanding elements like the facts behind some of the plot twists, or the inspiration behind the book really does add to my appreciation of the author’s creation.



Battle 1But it wasn’t until I started writing historical mysteries that I thought about doing an Author’s Note for my own fictional works. I weave in a lot of early scientific developments from the Regency era, most of which are not familiar to many readers (me included until I started going down research rabbit holes!) Now, I do try to give enough of an explanation in the text so that readers aren’t lost. (Having the elderly Dowager Countess of Peake as part of my ongoing cast of characters gives me a good foil for asking questions on how all the various “thingamabobs” work!)
 
CongreveMaybe it’s because of my own curiosity, but I also found that I often wanted to explain the history of, say, a voltaic battery and why it was important. And then, as I often weave in real-life inventors or notable politicians and military men from the era—like Sir William Congreve, creator of the Congreve Rocket—I felt they deserved a little background information to help them come alive!
 
My first few Author’s Notes were pretty short, but then, I started to get really into the explanations, though I did wonder whether I was going a little over the top. But to my surprise, I began getting fan mail for them! I have to say, it’s quite fun to see reader reviews mention them in their main reviews, especially when they encourage other readers not to miss the Author’s Notes because they are really interesting.  So I thought I would share a few of those exchanges.
 
Portrait_of_Midshipman_John_Windham_Dalling _RN_(c_1800)_by_George_Henry_HarlowI like to think I’m fairly thorough in explaining things that might baffle readers, but in my upcoming book, Murder at the Merton Library which is available to some reviewers through Netgalley before its September release, I was mortified to see that I left something out! Several reviewers were puzzled by my having a 13-year-old midshipman in the Royal Navy commanding a group of hard-bitten sailors in some of the scenes of the book. The comments were, “I wish Penrose had addressed that in her Author’s Note!”
 
I confess, I have read so much about the Royal Navy during the Regency that I had forgotten how that might strike readers as implausible. I guess it was a good thing I didn’t have a 10-year-old commanding a fireship— which was used to attack enemy warships—even though I discovered that was an actual fact during the course of my research. I will post a short essay on my website about midshipmen when the book releases. But I’ve also made a note to myself to be more diligent in explaining conventions of Regency life.
 
William_HedleyOn a more upbeat note, I recently came across a reviewer who husband’s family is directly descended from William Hedley, a Regency inventor/engineer who built “Puffing Billy,” the first steam locomotive ,and whom I have featured in several books as one of Lord Wrexford’s friends. She was delighted see him in the stories, and gave her mother-in-law a copy of the book where he’s first mentioned, which apparently was very well-received by the family!
 
Another very fun moment involved my college roommate, a brilliant lawyer who spent many years at the Federal Communications Commission helping to oversee how regional communications rights are auctioned to television and radio stations. She worked closely with a famous economist named Paul Milgrom, who won the 2020 Nobel in Economics for his work on “improvements in auction theory and invention of new auction formats. Well, I used an auction theory now known as a Vickrey auction as a main part of my plot in Murder at the Serpentine Bridge.
 
GoetheFirst of all, she was flabbergasted that I had even heard of a Vickrey auction, much less had discovered that the legendary German author Goethe used the precursor of it with his publisher in trying to wangle a bigger advance. She showed my book all around to fellow economic geeks (gaining me some new readers!) and paid me the ultimate compliment of say that they all agreed that I had written the clearest layman’s explanation of a Vickrey auction that they have ever read. That was fun! (I only later fessed up to her that a very smart mutual friend had tutored me on the subject.)
 
So what about you? Do you read the Author’s Note if there is one at the back of a book? Do you enjoy them . . . or find that it’s too much information?

235 thoughts on “The Author’s Note—Yes or No?”

  1. I always read the author’s notes even if I don’t finish the book. If they were too much information, I’d skip them, but I like history and so I always read them. The author often brings out fascinating stuff that for whatever reason didn’t fit into her story.
    I expecially appreciate the notes that tell me where the author departed from historical fact for storytelling purposes – so I know that I won’t remember a false fact.
    I’m guessing that this group will come down heavily on the side of having author’s notes and reading them and often wishing they were longer!

    Reply
  2. I always read the author’s notes even if I don’t finish the book. If they were too much information, I’d skip them, but I like history and so I always read them. The author often brings out fascinating stuff that for whatever reason didn’t fit into her story.
    I expecially appreciate the notes that tell me where the author departed from historical fact for storytelling purposes – so I know that I won’t remember a false fact.
    I’m guessing that this group will come down heavily on the side of having author’s notes and reading them and often wishing they were longer!

    Reply
  3. I always read the author’s notes even if I don’t finish the book. If they were too much information, I’d skip them, but I like history and so I always read them. The author often brings out fascinating stuff that for whatever reason didn’t fit into her story.
    I expecially appreciate the notes that tell me where the author departed from historical fact for storytelling purposes – so I know that I won’t remember a false fact.
    I’m guessing that this group will come down heavily on the side of having author’s notes and reading them and often wishing they were longer!

    Reply
  4. I always read the author’s notes even if I don’t finish the book. If they were too much information, I’d skip them, but I like history and so I always read them. The author often brings out fascinating stuff that for whatever reason didn’t fit into her story.
    I expecially appreciate the notes that tell me where the author departed from historical fact for storytelling purposes – so I know that I won’t remember a false fact.
    I’m guessing that this group will come down heavily on the side of having author’s notes and reading them and often wishing they were longer!

    Reply
  5. I always read the author’s notes even if I don’t finish the book. If they were too much information, I’d skip them, but I like history and so I always read them. The author often brings out fascinating stuff that for whatever reason didn’t fit into her story.
    I expecially appreciate the notes that tell me where the author departed from historical fact for storytelling purposes – so I know that I won’t remember a false fact.
    I’m guessing that this group will come down heavily on the side of having author’s notes and reading them and often wishing they were longer!

    Reply
  6. I don’t think that footnotes or appendices are always included in audio books though I would like the option to include them. I’m a bit of a philistine about general historical detail in novels. As long as the ‘flavor’ of the period is captured I don’t bother too much about minutia … unless I have a particular interest, especially on scientific or technical issues. References to the authors sources would be useful though. In general, I find that historical accuracy in novels tends to overlook scientific accuracy (present author notably excepted!) so that there may be fretting over whether ladies in remote country estates wore britches in the Regency but total oblivion over the functioning of a steam engine governor (or the functioning of a photo-voltaic cell). As long as the plot is gripping, the characters inspiring, the dialogue absorbing and love emerges as the most powerful force around, then I usually think Ive had my money’s worth!

    Reply
  7. I don’t think that footnotes or appendices are always included in audio books though I would like the option to include them. I’m a bit of a philistine about general historical detail in novels. As long as the ‘flavor’ of the period is captured I don’t bother too much about minutia … unless I have a particular interest, especially on scientific or technical issues. References to the authors sources would be useful though. In general, I find that historical accuracy in novels tends to overlook scientific accuracy (present author notably excepted!) so that there may be fretting over whether ladies in remote country estates wore britches in the Regency but total oblivion over the functioning of a steam engine governor (or the functioning of a photo-voltaic cell). As long as the plot is gripping, the characters inspiring, the dialogue absorbing and love emerges as the most powerful force around, then I usually think Ive had my money’s worth!

    Reply
  8. I don’t think that footnotes or appendices are always included in audio books though I would like the option to include them. I’m a bit of a philistine about general historical detail in novels. As long as the ‘flavor’ of the period is captured I don’t bother too much about minutia … unless I have a particular interest, especially on scientific or technical issues. References to the authors sources would be useful though. In general, I find that historical accuracy in novels tends to overlook scientific accuracy (present author notably excepted!) so that there may be fretting over whether ladies in remote country estates wore britches in the Regency but total oblivion over the functioning of a steam engine governor (or the functioning of a photo-voltaic cell). As long as the plot is gripping, the characters inspiring, the dialogue absorbing and love emerges as the most powerful force around, then I usually think Ive had my money’s worth!

    Reply
  9. I don’t think that footnotes or appendices are always included in audio books though I would like the option to include them. I’m a bit of a philistine about general historical detail in novels. As long as the ‘flavor’ of the period is captured I don’t bother too much about minutia … unless I have a particular interest, especially on scientific or technical issues. References to the authors sources would be useful though. In general, I find that historical accuracy in novels tends to overlook scientific accuracy (present author notably excepted!) so that there may be fretting over whether ladies in remote country estates wore britches in the Regency but total oblivion over the functioning of a steam engine governor (or the functioning of a photo-voltaic cell). As long as the plot is gripping, the characters inspiring, the dialogue absorbing and love emerges as the most powerful force around, then I usually think Ive had my money’s worth!

    Reply
  10. I don’t think that footnotes or appendices are always included in audio books though I would like the option to include them. I’m a bit of a philistine about general historical detail in novels. As long as the ‘flavor’ of the period is captured I don’t bother too much about minutia … unless I have a particular interest, especially on scientific or technical issues. References to the authors sources would be useful though. In general, I find that historical accuracy in novels tends to overlook scientific accuracy (present author notably excepted!) so that there may be fretting over whether ladies in remote country estates wore britches in the Regency but total oblivion over the functioning of a steam engine governor (or the functioning of a photo-voltaic cell). As long as the plot is gripping, the characters inspiring, the dialogue absorbing and love emerges as the most powerful force around, then I usually think Ive had my money’s worth!

    Reply
  11. I love author’s notes. I love discovering odd bits of information that someone else has carefully uncovered for me. I think of them as the author sharing with me her fascination with the details of the past.

    Reply
  12. I love author’s notes. I love discovering odd bits of information that someone else has carefully uncovered for me. I think of them as the author sharing with me her fascination with the details of the past.

    Reply
  13. I love author’s notes. I love discovering odd bits of information that someone else has carefully uncovered for me. I think of them as the author sharing with me her fascination with the details of the past.

    Reply
  14. I love author’s notes. I love discovering odd bits of information that someone else has carefully uncovered for me. I think of them as the author sharing with me her fascination with the details of the past.

    Reply
  15. I love author’s notes. I love discovering odd bits of information that someone else has carefully uncovered for me. I think of them as the author sharing with me her fascination with the details of the past.

    Reply
  16. So glad to hear you enjoy them. I feel the same way—the longer, the better.
    And I totally agree on learning we here an author takes artistic liberties with actual history. I always try to make it clear when when I tweak any details.

    Reply
  17. So glad to hear you enjoy them. I feel the same way—the longer, the better.
    And I totally agree on learning we here an author takes artistic liberties with actual history. I always try to make it clear when when I tweak any details.

    Reply
  18. So glad to hear you enjoy them. I feel the same way—the longer, the better.
    And I totally agree on learning we here an author takes artistic liberties with actual history. I always try to make it clear when when I tweak any details.

    Reply
  19. So glad to hear you enjoy them. I feel the same way—the longer, the better.
    And I totally agree on learning we here an author takes artistic liberties with actual history. I always try to make it clear when when I tweak any details.

    Reply
  20. So glad to hear you enjoy them. I feel the same way—the longer, the better.
    And I totally agree on learning we here an author takes artistic liberties with actual history. I always try to make it clear when when I tweak any details.

    Reply
  21. Quantum, I’m one of those people who don’t listen to audiobooks, so I’m dismayed to hear they don’t include the Author’s Note. It really should be be part of the book, as the author intended!
    I agree on not being extremely fussy when it comes to fiction. As long as an author keeps me in the story with plausible explanations of action, I’m fine. (And thank you for the nice comments on scientific accuracy. I try to understand how things work and convey the info to readers . . .because I find that stuff fascinating, even though I’m a layman!)

    Reply
  22. Quantum, I’m one of those people who don’t listen to audiobooks, so I’m dismayed to hear they don’t include the Author’s Note. It really should be be part of the book, as the author intended!
    I agree on not being extremely fussy when it comes to fiction. As long as an author keeps me in the story with plausible explanations of action, I’m fine. (And thank you for the nice comments on scientific accuracy. I try to understand how things work and convey the info to readers . . .because I find that stuff fascinating, even though I’m a layman!)

    Reply
  23. Quantum, I’m one of those people who don’t listen to audiobooks, so I’m dismayed to hear they don’t include the Author’s Note. It really should be be part of the book, as the author intended!
    I agree on not being extremely fussy when it comes to fiction. As long as an author keeps me in the story with plausible explanations of action, I’m fine. (And thank you for the nice comments on scientific accuracy. I try to understand how things work and convey the info to readers . . .because I find that stuff fascinating, even though I’m a layman!)

    Reply
  24. Quantum, I’m one of those people who don’t listen to audiobooks, so I’m dismayed to hear they don’t include the Author’s Note. It really should be be part of the book, as the author intended!
    I agree on not being extremely fussy when it comes to fiction. As long as an author keeps me in the story with plausible explanations of action, I’m fine. (And thank you for the nice comments on scientific accuracy. I try to understand how things work and convey the info to readers . . .because I find that stuff fascinating, even though I’m a layman!)

    Reply
  25. Quantum, I’m one of those people who don’t listen to audiobooks, so I’m dismayed to hear they don’t include the Author’s Note. It really should be be part of the book, as the author intended!
    I agree on not being extremely fussy when it comes to fiction. As long as an author keeps me in the story with plausible explanations of action, I’m fine. (And thank you for the nice comments on scientific accuracy. I try to understand how things work and convey the info to readers . . .because I find that stuff fascinating, even though I’m a layman!)

    Reply
  26. Glad to hear that, Lil. I know that I get excited about sharing all the arcane facts and details I’ve discovered while going down the research rabbit holes. I figure that readers are free to skip it if the info doesn’t interest them. But it does seem that a lot of people enjoy hearing that stuff.

    Reply
  27. Glad to hear that, Lil. I know that I get excited about sharing all the arcane facts and details I’ve discovered while going down the research rabbit holes. I figure that readers are free to skip it if the info doesn’t interest them. But it does seem that a lot of people enjoy hearing that stuff.

    Reply
  28. Glad to hear that, Lil. I know that I get excited about sharing all the arcane facts and details I’ve discovered while going down the research rabbit holes. I figure that readers are free to skip it if the info doesn’t interest them. But it does seem that a lot of people enjoy hearing that stuff.

    Reply
  29. Glad to hear that, Lil. I know that I get excited about sharing all the arcane facts and details I’ve discovered while going down the research rabbit holes. I figure that readers are free to skip it if the info doesn’t interest them. But it does seem that a lot of people enjoy hearing that stuff.

    Reply
  30. Glad to hear that, Lil. I know that I get excited about sharing all the arcane facts and details I’ve discovered while going down the research rabbit holes. I figure that readers are free to skip it if the info doesn’t interest them. But it does seem that a lot of people enjoy hearing that stuff.

    Reply
  31. I love authors notes. I almost always find them very interesting. I especially love it when the author admits fudging the facts a little for the sake of the story. Also, knowing the background of something that was happening during the time of the story really does help me appreciate it all the more.
    Great post.

    Reply
  32. I love authors notes. I almost always find them very interesting. I especially love it when the author admits fudging the facts a little for the sake of the story. Also, knowing the background of something that was happening during the time of the story really does help me appreciate it all the more.
    Great post.

    Reply
  33. I love authors notes. I almost always find them very interesting. I especially love it when the author admits fudging the facts a little for the sake of the story. Also, knowing the background of something that was happening during the time of the story really does help me appreciate it all the more.
    Great post.

    Reply
  34. I love authors notes. I almost always find them very interesting. I especially love it when the author admits fudging the facts a little for the sake of the story. Also, knowing the background of something that was happening during the time of the story really does help me appreciate it all the more.
    Great post.

    Reply
  35. I love authors notes. I almost always find them very interesting. I especially love it when the author admits fudging the facts a little for the sake of the story. Also, knowing the background of something that was happening during the time of the story really does help me appreciate it all the more.
    Great post.

    Reply
  36. Many people sneer at the books of Dame Barbara Cartland but it was the author’s notes in many of her regency set books that led me to researching the era. I like author’s notes.Though I have several books on scientific advances of the day, I know less about them.Your blog today made me look at Vickery auctions. Where can I find the information about the 13 year old midshipman?

    Reply
  37. Many people sneer at the books of Dame Barbara Cartland but it was the author’s notes in many of her regency set books that led me to researching the era. I like author’s notes.Though I have several books on scientific advances of the day, I know less about them.Your blog today made me look at Vickery auctions. Where can I find the information about the 13 year old midshipman?

    Reply
  38. Many people sneer at the books of Dame Barbara Cartland but it was the author’s notes in many of her regency set books that led me to researching the era. I like author’s notes.Though I have several books on scientific advances of the day, I know less about them.Your blog today made me look at Vickery auctions. Where can I find the information about the 13 year old midshipman?

    Reply
  39. Many people sneer at the books of Dame Barbara Cartland but it was the author’s notes in many of her regency set books that led me to researching the era. I like author’s notes.Though I have several books on scientific advances of the day, I know less about them.Your blog today made me look at Vickery auctions. Where can I find the information about the 13 year old midshipman?

    Reply
  40. Many people sneer at the books of Dame Barbara Cartland but it was the author’s notes in many of her regency set books that led me to researching the era. I like author’s notes.Though I have several books on scientific advances of the day, I know less about them.Your blog today made me look at Vickery auctions. Where can I find the information about the 13 year old midshipman?

    Reply
  41. I agree with what everyone here has said. I love the author’s notes. They make me feel a little bit smarter at the end of the day and I find they are essential for that, because sometimes I am so involved in the story that I don’t fully absorb the facts.
    Thank you for including them.

    Reply
  42. I agree with what everyone here has said. I love the author’s notes. They make me feel a little bit smarter at the end of the day and I find they are essential for that, because sometimes I am so involved in the story that I don’t fully absorb the facts.
    Thank you for including them.

    Reply
  43. I agree with what everyone here has said. I love the author’s notes. They make me feel a little bit smarter at the end of the day and I find they are essential for that, because sometimes I am so involved in the story that I don’t fully absorb the facts.
    Thank you for including them.

    Reply
  44. I agree with what everyone here has said. I love the author’s notes. They make me feel a little bit smarter at the end of the day and I find they are essential for that, because sometimes I am so involved in the story that I don’t fully absorb the facts.
    Thank you for including them.

    Reply
  45. I agree with what everyone here has said. I love the author’s notes. They make me feel a little bit smarter at the end of the day and I find they are essential for that, because sometimes I am so involved in the story that I don’t fully absorb the facts.
    Thank you for including them.

    Reply
  46. I too love the Author’s Note. I read them before I start the book & then again when I finish. I also love reading on my iPad / kindle because I can immediately do a search on something in the book, be it a character, place, pronunciation etc.

    Reply
  47. I too love the Author’s Note. I read them before I start the book & then again when I finish. I also love reading on my iPad / kindle because I can immediately do a search on something in the book, be it a character, place, pronunciation etc.

    Reply
  48. I too love the Author’s Note. I read them before I start the book & then again when I finish. I also love reading on my iPad / kindle because I can immediately do a search on something in the book, be it a character, place, pronunciation etc.

    Reply
  49. I too love the Author’s Note. I read them before I start the book & then again when I finish. I also love reading on my iPad / kindle because I can immediately do a search on something in the book, be it a character, place, pronunciation etc.

    Reply
  50. I too love the Author’s Note. I read them before I start the book & then again when I finish. I also love reading on my iPad / kindle because I can immediately do a search on something in the book, be it a character, place, pronunciation etc.

    Reply
  51. Add me into the YES group, Andrea. I always read authors’ notes, even when they’re just a list of unknown-to-me people they’re thanking. But it’s especially interesting if they’re explaining some historical background thing or confessing that they’ve moved this historical incident to fit better with the story, or something like that.

    Reply
  52. Add me into the YES group, Andrea. I always read authors’ notes, even when they’re just a list of unknown-to-me people they’re thanking. But it’s especially interesting if they’re explaining some historical background thing or confessing that they’ve moved this historical incident to fit better with the story, or something like that.

    Reply
  53. Add me into the YES group, Andrea. I always read authors’ notes, even when they’re just a list of unknown-to-me people they’re thanking. But it’s especially interesting if they’re explaining some historical background thing or confessing that they’ve moved this historical incident to fit better with the story, or something like that.

    Reply
  54. Add me into the YES group, Andrea. I always read authors’ notes, even when they’re just a list of unknown-to-me people they’re thanking. But it’s especially interesting if they’re explaining some historical background thing or confessing that they’ve moved this historical incident to fit better with the story, or something like that.

    Reply
  55. Add me into the YES group, Andrea. I always read authors’ notes, even when they’re just a list of unknown-to-me people they’re thanking. But it’s especially interesting if they’re explaining some historical background thing or confessing that they’ve moved this historical incident to fit better with the story, or something like that.

    Reply
  56. I am yet another who reads an author’s note. As @Janice J. mentioned above, I appreciate hearing where an author has taken liberty with the facts.
    I do a lot of my reading on a Kindle. Since Kindle books generally open at Chapter 1, I spend a good bit of time going to the front cover so that I can read all that comes before the story begins (dedication, list of characters, table of contents, maps, and the like).
    Thank you for your post, Andrea!

    Reply
  57. I am yet another who reads an author’s note. As @Janice J. mentioned above, I appreciate hearing where an author has taken liberty with the facts.
    I do a lot of my reading on a Kindle. Since Kindle books generally open at Chapter 1, I spend a good bit of time going to the front cover so that I can read all that comes before the story begins (dedication, list of characters, table of contents, maps, and the like).
    Thank you for your post, Andrea!

    Reply
  58. I am yet another who reads an author’s note. As @Janice J. mentioned above, I appreciate hearing where an author has taken liberty with the facts.
    I do a lot of my reading on a Kindle. Since Kindle books generally open at Chapter 1, I spend a good bit of time going to the front cover so that I can read all that comes before the story begins (dedication, list of characters, table of contents, maps, and the like).
    Thank you for your post, Andrea!

    Reply
  59. I am yet another who reads an author’s note. As @Janice J. mentioned above, I appreciate hearing where an author has taken liberty with the facts.
    I do a lot of my reading on a Kindle. Since Kindle books generally open at Chapter 1, I spend a good bit of time going to the front cover so that I can read all that comes before the story begins (dedication, list of characters, table of contents, maps, and the like).
    Thank you for your post, Andrea!

    Reply
  60. I am yet another who reads an author’s note. As @Janice J. mentioned above, I appreciate hearing where an author has taken liberty with the facts.
    I do a lot of my reading on a Kindle. Since Kindle books generally open at Chapter 1, I spend a good bit of time going to the front cover so that I can read all that comes before the story begins (dedication, list of characters, table of contents, maps, and the like).
    Thank you for your post, Andrea!

    Reply
  61. “List of characters” — I do often wish authors would include a list of characters, especially in historical novels, because with their titles, names and nicknames all being used in the book, it can be confusing and it gets a little hard to keep track of them all. When I make my notes I try to write them down but I still sometimes get pulled out of the story going who is that? Am I supposed to know who that is? Dramatis personae used to be pretty common (especially in mysteries) but I don’t see that anymore except in very old books.
    I don’t especially want a family tree (although with these seven book series we get now, it would be useful and I do look at it when furnished), but a quick reference would be appreciated.

    Reply
  62. “List of characters” — I do often wish authors would include a list of characters, especially in historical novels, because with their titles, names and nicknames all being used in the book, it can be confusing and it gets a little hard to keep track of them all. When I make my notes I try to write them down but I still sometimes get pulled out of the story going who is that? Am I supposed to know who that is? Dramatis personae used to be pretty common (especially in mysteries) but I don’t see that anymore except in very old books.
    I don’t especially want a family tree (although with these seven book series we get now, it would be useful and I do look at it when furnished), but a quick reference would be appreciated.

    Reply
  63. “List of characters” — I do often wish authors would include a list of characters, especially in historical novels, because with their titles, names and nicknames all being used in the book, it can be confusing and it gets a little hard to keep track of them all. When I make my notes I try to write them down but I still sometimes get pulled out of the story going who is that? Am I supposed to know who that is? Dramatis personae used to be pretty common (especially in mysteries) but I don’t see that anymore except in very old books.
    I don’t especially want a family tree (although with these seven book series we get now, it would be useful and I do look at it when furnished), but a quick reference would be appreciated.

    Reply
  64. “List of characters” — I do often wish authors would include a list of characters, especially in historical novels, because with their titles, names and nicknames all being used in the book, it can be confusing and it gets a little hard to keep track of them all. When I make my notes I try to write them down but I still sometimes get pulled out of the story going who is that? Am I supposed to know who that is? Dramatis personae used to be pretty common (especially in mysteries) but I don’t see that anymore except in very old books.
    I don’t especially want a family tree (although with these seven book series we get now, it would be useful and I do look at it when furnished), but a quick reference would be appreciated.

    Reply
  65. “List of characters” — I do often wish authors would include a list of characters, especially in historical novels, because with their titles, names and nicknames all being used in the book, it can be confusing and it gets a little hard to keep track of them all. When I make my notes I try to write them down but I still sometimes get pulled out of the story going who is that? Am I supposed to know who that is? Dramatis personae used to be pretty common (especially in mysteries) but I don’t see that anymore except in very old books.
    I don’t especially want a family tree (although with these seven book series we get now, it would be useful and I do look at it when furnished), but a quick reference would be appreciated.

    Reply
  66. I like the information and support of the author’s note in understanding more of the story.
    Keep the notes coming!

    Reply
  67. I like the information and support of the author’s note in understanding more of the story.
    Keep the notes coming!

    Reply
  68. I like the information and support of the author’s note in understanding more of the story.
    Keep the notes coming!

    Reply
  69. I like the information and support of the author’s note in understanding more of the story.
    Keep the notes coming!

    Reply
  70. I like the information and support of the author’s note in understanding more of the story.
    Keep the notes coming!

    Reply
  71. Thanks, Mary! So glad you enjoyed it.
    I, too, love knowing all the background details and always appreciate a story more knowing some of the background and the author’s process. I’ve found that I really enjoy writing my Author’s Note when I finish a book because I love sharing all the details I’ve discovered.

    Reply
  72. Thanks, Mary! So glad you enjoyed it.
    I, too, love knowing all the background details and always appreciate a story more knowing some of the background and the author’s process. I’ve found that I really enjoy writing my Author’s Note when I finish a book because I love sharing all the details I’ve discovered.

    Reply
  73. Thanks, Mary! So glad you enjoyed it.
    I, too, love knowing all the background details and always appreciate a story more knowing some of the background and the author’s process. I’ve found that I really enjoy writing my Author’s Note when I finish a book because I love sharing all the details I’ve discovered.

    Reply
  74. Thanks, Mary! So glad you enjoyed it.
    I, too, love knowing all the background details and always appreciate a story more knowing some of the background and the author’s process. I’ve found that I really enjoy writing my Author’s Note when I finish a book because I love sharing all the details I’ve discovered.

    Reply
  75. Thanks, Mary! So glad you enjoyed it.
    I, too, love knowing all the background details and always appreciate a story more knowing some of the background and the author’s process. I’ve found that I really enjoy writing my Author’s Note when I finish a book because I love sharing all the details I’ve discovered.

    Reply
  76. That’s a great story about Barbara Cartland’s Author’s Notes. I often end up doing more research on something I see in an Author’s Note.
    I’ve done a lot of reading on the Royal Nay vy and midshipmen. I think the mention of the 10-yr. old midshipmen was in a gar graduate thesis from 2006 entitled, “Playing at command: midshipmen and quarterdeck boys in the
    Royal Navy, 1793-1815” I found it online a while bacl. i don’t have the link at hand.

    Reply
  77. That’s a great story about Barbara Cartland’s Author’s Notes. I often end up doing more research on something I see in an Author’s Note.
    I’ve done a lot of reading on the Royal Nay vy and midshipmen. I think the mention of the 10-yr. old midshipmen was in a gar graduate thesis from 2006 entitled, “Playing at command: midshipmen and quarterdeck boys in the
    Royal Navy, 1793-1815” I found it online a while bacl. i don’t have the link at hand.

    Reply
  78. That’s a great story about Barbara Cartland’s Author’s Notes. I often end up doing more research on something I see in an Author’s Note.
    I’ve done a lot of reading on the Royal Nay vy and midshipmen. I think the mention of the 10-yr. old midshipmen was in a gar graduate thesis from 2006 entitled, “Playing at command: midshipmen and quarterdeck boys in the
    Royal Navy, 1793-1815” I found it online a while bacl. i don’t have the link at hand.

    Reply
  79. That’s a great story about Barbara Cartland’s Author’s Notes. I often end up doing more research on something I see in an Author’s Note.
    I’ve done a lot of reading on the Royal Nay vy and midshipmen. I think the mention of the 10-yr. old midshipmen was in a gar graduate thesis from 2006 entitled, “Playing at command: midshipmen and quarterdeck boys in the
    Royal Navy, 1793-1815” I found it online a while bacl. i don’t have the link at hand.

    Reply
  80. That’s a great story about Barbara Cartland’s Author’s Notes. I often end up doing more research on something I see in an Author’s Note.
    I’ve done a lot of reading on the Royal Nay vy and midshipmen. I think the mention of the 10-yr. old midshipmen was in a gar graduate thesis from 2006 entitled, “Playing at command: midshipmen and quarterdeck boys in the
    Royal Navy, 1793-1815” I found it online a while bacl. i don’t have the link at hand.

    Reply
  81. Anne, I’m always fascinated by an author explaining why certain events were “reshaped” to fit the fictional narrative. I like accuracy, and it’s always nice to understand when artistic license has been used, even if you o don’t know the subject well enough to spot it.

    Reply
  82. Anne, I’m always fascinated by an author explaining why certain events were “reshaped” to fit the fictional narrative. I like accuracy, and it’s always nice to understand when artistic license has been used, even if you o don’t know the subject well enough to spot it.

    Reply
  83. Anne, I’m always fascinated by an author explaining why certain events were “reshaped” to fit the fictional narrative. I like accuracy, and it’s always nice to understand when artistic license has been used, even if you o don’t know the subject well enough to spot it.

    Reply
  84. Anne, I’m always fascinated by an author explaining why certain events were “reshaped” to fit the fictional narrative. I like accuracy, and it’s always nice to understand when artistic license has been used, even if you o don’t know the subject well enough to spot it.

    Reply
  85. Anne, I’m always fascinated by an author explaining why certain events were “reshaped” to fit the fictional narrative. I like accuracy, and it’s always nice to understand when artistic license has been used, even if you o don’t know the subject well enough to spot it.

    Reply
  86. Janice, that’s a VERY good point. I run into that sometimes, too, especially deep in a series, where the cast has expanded. I find myself flipping back to re-check who is who! I guess it’s just become a modern convention not to do it.
    Hmm, will ponder.

    Reply
  87. Janice, that’s a VERY good point. I run into that sometimes, too, especially deep in a series, where the cast has expanded. I find myself flipping back to re-check who is who! I guess it’s just become a modern convention not to do it.
    Hmm, will ponder.

    Reply
  88. Janice, that’s a VERY good point. I run into that sometimes, too, especially deep in a series, where the cast has expanded. I find myself flipping back to re-check who is who! I guess it’s just become a modern convention not to do it.
    Hmm, will ponder.

    Reply
  89. Janice, that’s a VERY good point. I run into that sometimes, too, especially deep in a series, where the cast has expanded. I find myself flipping back to re-check who is who! I guess it’s just become a modern convention not to do it.
    Hmm, will ponder.

    Reply
  90. Janice, that’s a VERY good point. I run into that sometimes, too, especially deep in a series, where the cast has expanded. I find myself flipping back to re-check who is who! I guess it’s just become a modern convention not to do it.
    Hmm, will ponder.

    Reply
  91. Great post, Andrea! I am am an avid consumer and writer of author’s notes. Mine tend to be shorter because I don’t do deep dives into technology, though I’ve done some long notes when writing about the Silk Road or other exotic destinations. Since I’m interested in backgrounds, I assume that at least some readers will be also. So I like to say things like ‘yes, that really happened!’ or ‘I invented this for the sake of the story, but it does make sense in the context of the times.’ I don’t usually read acknowledgements, though.

    Reply
  92. Great post, Andrea! I am am an avid consumer and writer of author’s notes. Mine tend to be shorter because I don’t do deep dives into technology, though I’ve done some long notes when writing about the Silk Road or other exotic destinations. Since I’m interested in backgrounds, I assume that at least some readers will be also. So I like to say things like ‘yes, that really happened!’ or ‘I invented this for the sake of the story, but it does make sense in the context of the times.’ I don’t usually read acknowledgements, though.

    Reply
  93. Great post, Andrea! I am am an avid consumer and writer of author’s notes. Mine tend to be shorter because I don’t do deep dives into technology, though I’ve done some long notes when writing about the Silk Road or other exotic destinations. Since I’m interested in backgrounds, I assume that at least some readers will be also. So I like to say things like ‘yes, that really happened!’ or ‘I invented this for the sake of the story, but it does make sense in the context of the times.’ I don’t usually read acknowledgements, though.

    Reply
  94. Great post, Andrea! I am am an avid consumer and writer of author’s notes. Mine tend to be shorter because I don’t do deep dives into technology, though I’ve done some long notes when writing about the Silk Road or other exotic destinations. Since I’m interested in backgrounds, I assume that at least some readers will be also. So I like to say things like ‘yes, that really happened!’ or ‘I invented this for the sake of the story, but it does make sense in the context of the times.’ I don’t usually read acknowledgements, though.

    Reply
  95. Great post, Andrea! I am am an avid consumer and writer of author’s notes. Mine tend to be shorter because I don’t do deep dives into technology, though I’ve done some long notes when writing about the Silk Road or other exotic destinations. Since I’m interested in backgrounds, I assume that at least some readers will be also. So I like to say things like ‘yes, that really happened!’ or ‘I invented this for the sake of the story, but it does make sense in the context of the times.’ I don’t usually read acknowledgements, though.

    Reply
  96. LOL—great minds think alike
    I love an Author’s Note, and I ,too, figure that other readers are curious about the sorts of things that tickle my fancy, so I really enjoy sharing them. I know I always appreciate knowing what is real, and what is artistic license, so I try to make that clear in my Note, too.

    Reply
  97. LOL—great minds think alike
    I love an Author’s Note, and I ,too, figure that other readers are curious about the sorts of things that tickle my fancy, so I really enjoy sharing them. I know I always appreciate knowing what is real, and what is artistic license, so I try to make that clear in my Note, too.

    Reply
  98. LOL—great minds think alike
    I love an Author’s Note, and I ,too, figure that other readers are curious about the sorts of things that tickle my fancy, so I really enjoy sharing them. I know I always appreciate knowing what is real, and what is artistic license, so I try to make that clear in my Note, too.

    Reply
  99. LOL—great minds think alike
    I love an Author’s Note, and I ,too, figure that other readers are curious about the sorts of things that tickle my fancy, so I really enjoy sharing them. I know I always appreciate knowing what is real, and what is artistic license, so I try to make that clear in my Note, too.

    Reply
  100. LOL—great minds think alike
    I love an Author’s Note, and I ,too, figure that other readers are curious about the sorts of things that tickle my fancy, so I really enjoy sharing them. I know I always appreciate knowing what is real, and what is artistic license, so I try to make that clear in my Note, too.

    Reply
  101. Andrea, by nature of the fact that we’re here, reading the thoughts of authors we love, I think it’s a safe best that everyone one of us is a reader who loves authors’ notes! But I think you’re right in thinking not every reader is like all of us who hang out at WordWenches. My husband is a voracious reader, and we often discuss what we’re reading. I’m constantly asking him questions about the author, the circumstances around the writing of the book, etc., and he looks at me with incomprehension, telling me that it’s the book he cares about, none of the rest of all that! He also tends not to read introductions, etc., but he DOES mine the bibliographies at the end of nonfiction books for more books to add to our overflowing library.

    Reply
  102. Andrea, by nature of the fact that we’re here, reading the thoughts of authors we love, I think it’s a safe best that everyone one of us is a reader who loves authors’ notes! But I think you’re right in thinking not every reader is like all of us who hang out at WordWenches. My husband is a voracious reader, and we often discuss what we’re reading. I’m constantly asking him questions about the author, the circumstances around the writing of the book, etc., and he looks at me with incomprehension, telling me that it’s the book he cares about, none of the rest of all that! He also tends not to read introductions, etc., but he DOES mine the bibliographies at the end of nonfiction books for more books to add to our overflowing library.

    Reply
  103. Andrea, by nature of the fact that we’re here, reading the thoughts of authors we love, I think it’s a safe best that everyone one of us is a reader who loves authors’ notes! But I think you’re right in thinking not every reader is like all of us who hang out at WordWenches. My husband is a voracious reader, and we often discuss what we’re reading. I’m constantly asking him questions about the author, the circumstances around the writing of the book, etc., and he looks at me with incomprehension, telling me that it’s the book he cares about, none of the rest of all that! He also tends not to read introductions, etc., but he DOES mine the bibliographies at the end of nonfiction books for more books to add to our overflowing library.

    Reply
  104. Andrea, by nature of the fact that we’re here, reading the thoughts of authors we love, I think it’s a safe best that everyone one of us is a reader who loves authors’ notes! But I think you’re right in thinking not every reader is like all of us who hang out at WordWenches. My husband is a voracious reader, and we often discuss what we’re reading. I’m constantly asking him questions about the author, the circumstances around the writing of the book, etc., and he looks at me with incomprehension, telling me that it’s the book he cares about, none of the rest of all that! He also tends not to read introductions, etc., but he DOES mine the bibliographies at the end of nonfiction books for more books to add to our overflowing library.

    Reply
  105. Andrea, by nature of the fact that we’re here, reading the thoughts of authors we love, I think it’s a safe best that everyone one of us is a reader who loves authors’ notes! But I think you’re right in thinking not every reader is like all of us who hang out at WordWenches. My husband is a voracious reader, and we often discuss what we’re reading. I’m constantly asking him questions about the author, the circumstances around the writing of the book, etc., and he looks at me with incomprehension, telling me that it’s the book he cares about, none of the rest of all that! He also tends not to read introductions, etc., but he DOES mine the bibliographies at the end of nonfiction books for more books to add to our overflowing library.

    Reply
  106. Great post, Andrea! I usually read the Author’s note as I’m always curious to see how much of the details in a story are actual facts. And if not, how they deviate. I only write one for my own books if I have taken liberties with real history or historical figures, or if (like you) I want to explain something a bit further. It’s great for readers to have the option to learn more I think!

    Reply
  107. Great post, Andrea! I usually read the Author’s note as I’m always curious to see how much of the details in a story are actual facts. And if not, how they deviate. I only write one for my own books if I have taken liberties with real history or historical figures, or if (like you) I want to explain something a bit further. It’s great for readers to have the option to learn more I think!

    Reply
  108. Great post, Andrea! I usually read the Author’s note as I’m always curious to see how much of the details in a story are actual facts. And if not, how they deviate. I only write one for my own books if I have taken liberties with real history or historical figures, or if (like you) I want to explain something a bit further. It’s great for readers to have the option to learn more I think!

    Reply
  109. Great post, Andrea! I usually read the Author’s note as I’m always curious to see how much of the details in a story are actual facts. And if not, how they deviate. I only write one for my own books if I have taken liberties with real history or historical figures, or if (like you) I want to explain something a bit further. It’s great for readers to have the option to learn more I think!

    Reply
  110. Great post, Andrea! I usually read the Author’s note as I’m always curious to see how much of the details in a story are actual facts. And if not, how they deviate. I only write one for my own books if I have taken liberties with real history or historical figures, or if (like you) I want to explain something a bit further. It’s great for readers to have the option to learn more I think!

    Reply
  111. Yes, we’re definitely on the same page! It’s fun to explain arcane details that come up in researching, as I really do think readers enjoy learning about these things. I know that as a reader, an Author’s Note always helps me appreciate a story even more!

    Reply
  112. Yes, we’re definitely on the same page! It’s fun to explain arcane details that come up in researching, as I really do think readers enjoy learning about these things. I know that as a reader, an Author’s Note always helps me appreciate a story even more!

    Reply
  113. Yes, we’re definitely on the same page! It’s fun to explain arcane details that come up in researching, as I really do think readers enjoy learning about these things. I know that as a reader, an Author’s Note always helps me appreciate a story even more!

    Reply
  114. Yes, we’re definitely on the same page! It’s fun to explain arcane details that come up in researching, as I really do think readers enjoy learning about these things. I know that as a reader, an Author’s Note always helps me appreciate a story even more!

    Reply
  115. Yes, we’re definitely on the same page! It’s fun to explain arcane details that come up in researching, as I really do think readers enjoy learning about these things. I know that as a reader, an Author’s Note always helps me appreciate a story even more!

    Reply
  116. Yes! to all of the above, Andrea. I’ve read probably 1,500+ Regencies over the decades, and what keep them fresh are the Regency rabbit holes: history, geography, politics, social culture, science, the military, the arts, and more. Same for other eras, but the Regency period was something special, jam-packed with interesting content. Sock it to me!

    Reply
  117. Yes! to all of the above, Andrea. I’ve read probably 1,500+ Regencies over the decades, and what keep them fresh are the Regency rabbit holes: history, geography, politics, social culture, science, the military, the arts, and more. Same for other eras, but the Regency period was something special, jam-packed with interesting content. Sock it to me!

    Reply
  118. Yes! to all of the above, Andrea. I’ve read probably 1,500+ Regencies over the decades, and what keep them fresh are the Regency rabbit holes: history, geography, politics, social culture, science, the military, the arts, and more. Same for other eras, but the Regency period was something special, jam-packed with interesting content. Sock it to me!

    Reply
  119. Yes! to all of the above, Andrea. I’ve read probably 1,500+ Regencies over the decades, and what keep them fresh are the Regency rabbit holes: history, geography, politics, social culture, science, the military, the arts, and more. Same for other eras, but the Regency period was something special, jam-packed with interesting content. Sock it to me!

    Reply
  120. Yes! to all of the above, Andrea. I’ve read probably 1,500+ Regencies over the decades, and what keep them fresh are the Regency rabbit holes: history, geography, politics, social culture, science, the military, the arts, and more. Same for other eras, but the Regency period was something special, jam-packed with interesting content. Sock it to me!

    Reply
  121. I am glad to see all the wonderful comments posted so far. I think that most who read here do so because we like to hear from the authors in the group. This blog in a way is like an author’s note.
    For me reading the authors note shows they have done their research and have done their best to be accurate. I enjoy stories that include what is currently happening at that time. (as Mary M above put it so well). There probably are many readers who do not read beyond the story, they are missing an important part of the book.

    Reply
  122. I am glad to see all the wonderful comments posted so far. I think that most who read here do so because we like to hear from the authors in the group. This blog in a way is like an author’s note.
    For me reading the authors note shows they have done their research and have done their best to be accurate. I enjoy stories that include what is currently happening at that time. (as Mary M above put it so well). There probably are many readers who do not read beyond the story, they are missing an important part of the book.

    Reply
  123. I am glad to see all the wonderful comments posted so far. I think that most who read here do so because we like to hear from the authors in the group. This blog in a way is like an author’s note.
    For me reading the authors note shows they have done their research and have done their best to be accurate. I enjoy stories that include what is currently happening at that time. (as Mary M above put it so well). There probably are many readers who do not read beyond the story, they are missing an important part of the book.

    Reply
  124. I am glad to see all the wonderful comments posted so far. I think that most who read here do so because we like to hear from the authors in the group. This blog in a way is like an author’s note.
    For me reading the authors note shows they have done their research and have done their best to be accurate. I enjoy stories that include what is currently happening at that time. (as Mary M above put it so well). There probably are many readers who do not read beyond the story, they are missing an important part of the book.

    Reply
  125. I am glad to see all the wonderful comments posted so far. I think that most who read here do so because we like to hear from the authors in the group. This blog in a way is like an author’s note.
    For me reading the authors note shows they have done their research and have done their best to be accurate. I enjoy stories that include what is currently happening at that time. (as Mary M above put it so well). There probably are many readers who do not read beyond the story, they are missing an important part of the book.

    Reply
  126. OK, I am following this crowd. I read author’s notes. And I like them, partly because I am a reading nerd who wants to know how a story got to be that story. I am a history fan because I want to know those stories too.
    I have a lot of information about my ancestors and when I read those family trees, I want to know what they thought and why they did what they did. Who were they really?
    So of course when I can take advantage of the hard work an author has done, I certainly will do that. I am one of those people who is addicted to finding the next fact. The internet has become a place where I fall into it and two days later realize I needed to eat two days ago.
    So, when anyone wants to give me an author’s note, I genuflect and say thank you.
    As far as skimming history at times in a fictional story, that is OK. As long as some nice young man from the nineteenth century does not whip out his I-Pad to make a dinner reservation, I’m good.
    I think others have mentioned, we are here at this blog site because we are all similar people. Absolutely weird and strange, but in a good curious way.
    We are here because we love what you do and the way you do it.

    Reply
  127. OK, I am following this crowd. I read author’s notes. And I like them, partly because I am a reading nerd who wants to know how a story got to be that story. I am a history fan because I want to know those stories too.
    I have a lot of information about my ancestors and when I read those family trees, I want to know what they thought and why they did what they did. Who were they really?
    So of course when I can take advantage of the hard work an author has done, I certainly will do that. I am one of those people who is addicted to finding the next fact. The internet has become a place where I fall into it and two days later realize I needed to eat two days ago.
    So, when anyone wants to give me an author’s note, I genuflect and say thank you.
    As far as skimming history at times in a fictional story, that is OK. As long as some nice young man from the nineteenth century does not whip out his I-Pad to make a dinner reservation, I’m good.
    I think others have mentioned, we are here at this blog site because we are all similar people. Absolutely weird and strange, but in a good curious way.
    We are here because we love what you do and the way you do it.

    Reply
  128. OK, I am following this crowd. I read author’s notes. And I like them, partly because I am a reading nerd who wants to know how a story got to be that story. I am a history fan because I want to know those stories too.
    I have a lot of information about my ancestors and when I read those family trees, I want to know what they thought and why they did what they did. Who were they really?
    So of course when I can take advantage of the hard work an author has done, I certainly will do that. I am one of those people who is addicted to finding the next fact. The internet has become a place where I fall into it and two days later realize I needed to eat two days ago.
    So, when anyone wants to give me an author’s note, I genuflect and say thank you.
    As far as skimming history at times in a fictional story, that is OK. As long as some nice young man from the nineteenth century does not whip out his I-Pad to make a dinner reservation, I’m good.
    I think others have mentioned, we are here at this blog site because we are all similar people. Absolutely weird and strange, but in a good curious way.
    We are here because we love what you do and the way you do it.

    Reply
  129. OK, I am following this crowd. I read author’s notes. And I like them, partly because I am a reading nerd who wants to know how a story got to be that story. I am a history fan because I want to know those stories too.
    I have a lot of information about my ancestors and when I read those family trees, I want to know what they thought and why they did what they did. Who were they really?
    So of course when I can take advantage of the hard work an author has done, I certainly will do that. I am one of those people who is addicted to finding the next fact. The internet has become a place where I fall into it and two days later realize I needed to eat two days ago.
    So, when anyone wants to give me an author’s note, I genuflect and say thank you.
    As far as skimming history at times in a fictional story, that is OK. As long as some nice young man from the nineteenth century does not whip out his I-Pad to make a dinner reservation, I’m good.
    I think others have mentioned, we are here at this blog site because we are all similar people. Absolutely weird and strange, but in a good curious way.
    We are here because we love what you do and the way you do it.

    Reply
  130. OK, I am following this crowd. I read author’s notes. And I like them, partly because I am a reading nerd who wants to know how a story got to be that story. I am a history fan because I want to know those stories too.
    I have a lot of information about my ancestors and when I read those family trees, I want to know what they thought and why they did what they did. Who were they really?
    So of course when I can take advantage of the hard work an author has done, I certainly will do that. I am one of those people who is addicted to finding the next fact. The internet has become a place where I fall into it and two days later realize I needed to eat two days ago.
    So, when anyone wants to give me an author’s note, I genuflect and say thank you.
    As far as skimming history at times in a fictional story, that is OK. As long as some nice young man from the nineteenth century does not whip out his I-Pad to make a dinner reservation, I’m good.
    I think others have mentioned, we are here at this blog site because we are all similar people. Absolutely weird and strange, but in a good curious way.
    We are here because we love what you do and the way you do it.

    Reply
  131. Ha, ha, yes I figured that I might be preaching to the choir. But so glad to hear that so many people really enjoy an Author’s Note.
    You’re right, though, plenty of avid readers are happy just with the story and don’t feel the need of knowing more. It’s all good!

    Reply
  132. Ha, ha, yes I figured that I might be preaching to the choir. But so glad to hear that so many people really enjoy an Author’s Note.
    You’re right, though, plenty of avid readers are happy just with the story and don’t feel the need of knowing more. It’s all good!

    Reply
  133. Ha, ha, yes I figured that I might be preaching to the choir. But so glad to hear that so many people really enjoy an Author’s Note.
    You’re right, though, plenty of avid readers are happy just with the story and don’t feel the need of knowing more. It’s all good!

    Reply
  134. Ha, ha, yes I figured that I might be preaching to the choir. But so glad to hear that so many people really enjoy an Author’s Note.
    You’re right, though, plenty of avid readers are happy just with the story and don’t feel the need of knowing more. It’s all good!

    Reply
  135. Ha, ha, yes I figured that I might be preaching to the choir. But so glad to hear that so many people really enjoy an Author’s Note.
    You’re right, though, plenty of avid readers are happy just with the story and don’t feel the need of knowing more. It’s all good!

    Reply
  136. So glad so many of you find the Author’s Note interesting! Your comment on the blog being an Author’s Note is wonderful! It’s true. we all tend to muse on the history, craft and quirky facts that we find interesting and inspiring. We feel very lucky to have such a great community who appreciates our musings!

    Reply
  137. So glad so many of you find the Author’s Note interesting! Your comment on the blog being an Author’s Note is wonderful! It’s true. we all tend to muse on the history, craft and quirky facts that we find interesting and inspiring. We feel very lucky to have such a great community who appreciates our musings!

    Reply
  138. So glad so many of you find the Author’s Note interesting! Your comment on the blog being an Author’s Note is wonderful! It’s true. we all tend to muse on the history, craft and quirky facts that we find interesting and inspiring. We feel very lucky to have such a great community who appreciates our musings!

    Reply
  139. So glad so many of you find the Author’s Note interesting! Your comment on the blog being an Author’s Note is wonderful! It’s true. we all tend to muse on the history, craft and quirky facts that we find interesting and inspiring. We feel very lucky to have such a great community who appreciates our musings!

    Reply
  140. So glad so many of you find the Author’s Note interesting! Your comment on the blog being an Author’s Note is wonderful! It’s true. we all tend to muse on the history, craft and quirky facts that we find interesting and inspiring. We feel very lucky to have such a great community who appreciates our musings!

    Reply
  141. So beautifully said, Annette! We are indeed, a tribe! In a very good way.
    i promise you will never see a Regency buck in my stories pull out an i-pad . . .though he might fiddle with Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, which was its precursor!

    Reply
  142. So beautifully said, Annette! We are indeed, a tribe! In a very good way.
    i promise you will never see a Regency buck in my stories pull out an i-pad . . .though he might fiddle with Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, which was its precursor!

    Reply
  143. So beautifully said, Annette! We are indeed, a tribe! In a very good way.
    i promise you will never see a Regency buck in my stories pull out an i-pad . . .though he might fiddle with Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, which was its precursor!

    Reply
  144. So beautifully said, Annette! We are indeed, a tribe! In a very good way.
    i promise you will never see a Regency buck in my stories pull out an i-pad . . .though he might fiddle with Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, which was its precursor!

    Reply
  145. So beautifully said, Annette! We are indeed, a tribe! In a very good way.
    i promise you will never see a Regency buck in my stories pull out an i-pad . . .though he might fiddle with Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, which was its precursor!

    Reply
  146. Add me to the group on the side of author’s notes. I’ve looked at some & said that really did happen! Or that person really existed! Oh, she’s adapted the history a bit so that didn’t happen that way, but it was a possibility!
    As to the family trees–some series are so large & on-going (Lauren’s Cynster Next Gen. comes to mind!) that I need it trying to figure out who these kids belong to of those wonderful folks! On a couple other series, I’ve created a very long list of the titles, the main characters & the branch of the family to which they belong & attached it as a note (via Kindle) at the beginning of the 1st book of the series! (Lorelei James’ Rough Rider series–sure helps with that family!)

    Reply
  147. Add me to the group on the side of author’s notes. I’ve looked at some & said that really did happen! Or that person really existed! Oh, she’s adapted the history a bit so that didn’t happen that way, but it was a possibility!
    As to the family trees–some series are so large & on-going (Lauren’s Cynster Next Gen. comes to mind!) that I need it trying to figure out who these kids belong to of those wonderful folks! On a couple other series, I’ve created a very long list of the titles, the main characters & the branch of the family to which they belong & attached it as a note (via Kindle) at the beginning of the 1st book of the series! (Lorelei James’ Rough Rider series–sure helps with that family!)

    Reply
  148. Add me to the group on the side of author’s notes. I’ve looked at some & said that really did happen! Or that person really existed! Oh, she’s adapted the history a bit so that didn’t happen that way, but it was a possibility!
    As to the family trees–some series are so large & on-going (Lauren’s Cynster Next Gen. comes to mind!) that I need it trying to figure out who these kids belong to of those wonderful folks! On a couple other series, I’ve created a very long list of the titles, the main characters & the branch of the family to which they belong & attached it as a note (via Kindle) at the beginning of the 1st book of the series! (Lorelei James’ Rough Rider series–sure helps with that family!)

    Reply
  149. Add me to the group on the side of author’s notes. I’ve looked at some & said that really did happen! Or that person really existed! Oh, she’s adapted the history a bit so that didn’t happen that way, but it was a possibility!
    As to the family trees–some series are so large & on-going (Lauren’s Cynster Next Gen. comes to mind!) that I need it trying to figure out who these kids belong to of those wonderful folks! On a couple other series, I’ve created a very long list of the titles, the main characters & the branch of the family to which they belong & attached it as a note (via Kindle) at the beginning of the 1st book of the series! (Lorelei James’ Rough Rider series–sure helps with that family!)

    Reply
  150. Add me to the group on the side of author’s notes. I’ve looked at some & said that really did happen! Or that person really existed! Oh, she’s adapted the history a bit so that didn’t happen that way, but it was a possibility!
    As to the family trees–some series are so large & on-going (Lauren’s Cynster Next Gen. comes to mind!) that I need it trying to figure out who these kids belong to of those wonderful folks! On a couple other series, I’ve created a very long list of the titles, the main characters & the branch of the family to which they belong & attached it as a note (via Kindle) at the beginning of the 1st book of the series! (Lorelei James’ Rough Rider series–sure helps with that family!)

    Reply
  151. I too vote for Author’s notes. Margot is so right, this blog is in a way an in-depth author’s note. An interactive author’s note because we all contribute.
    So yes. Please continue author notes. Feel free to expand them as the book demands (grin). There is so much history (people, place, events) that I’ve never run across.

    Reply
  152. I too vote for Author’s notes. Margot is so right, this blog is in a way an in-depth author’s note. An interactive author’s note because we all contribute.
    So yes. Please continue author notes. Feel free to expand them as the book demands (grin). There is so much history (people, place, events) that I’ve never run across.

    Reply
  153. I too vote for Author’s notes. Margot is so right, this blog is in a way an in-depth author’s note. An interactive author’s note because we all contribute.
    So yes. Please continue author notes. Feel free to expand them as the book demands (grin). There is so much history (people, place, events) that I’ve never run across.

    Reply
  154. I too vote for Author’s notes. Margot is so right, this blog is in a way an in-depth author’s note. An interactive author’s note because we all contribute.
    So yes. Please continue author notes. Feel free to expand them as the book demands (grin). There is so much history (people, place, events) that I’ve never run across.

    Reply
  155. I too vote for Author’s notes. Margot is so right, this blog is in a way an in-depth author’s note. An interactive author’s note because we all contribute.
    So yes. Please continue author notes. Feel free to expand them as the book demands (grin). There is so much history (people, place, events) that I’ve never run across.

    Reply
  156. Not an answer to your question, but somewhat related: I am a faithful listener to 2 programs on CBC Radio here in Canada: Writers and Company, and The Next Chapter. (They can both be heard on the free CBC Listen app, by the way). Both shows interview authors about their lives and their books, and often on the strength of the interview I immediately order the books from my library, which has a wonderful interlibrary loan system that provides most any book I can ever dream of. Anyway, just as often I find myself disappointed in the book itself. It’s the individual author’s ideas about and description of it that are more interesting!
    And then, to answer your question, but briefly: I always read an author’s notes, even if the book itself hasn’t held my interest.
    -Kate

    Reply
  157. Not an answer to your question, but somewhat related: I am a faithful listener to 2 programs on CBC Radio here in Canada: Writers and Company, and The Next Chapter. (They can both be heard on the free CBC Listen app, by the way). Both shows interview authors about their lives and their books, and often on the strength of the interview I immediately order the books from my library, which has a wonderful interlibrary loan system that provides most any book I can ever dream of. Anyway, just as often I find myself disappointed in the book itself. It’s the individual author’s ideas about and description of it that are more interesting!
    And then, to answer your question, but briefly: I always read an author’s notes, even if the book itself hasn’t held my interest.
    -Kate

    Reply
  158. Not an answer to your question, but somewhat related: I am a faithful listener to 2 programs on CBC Radio here in Canada: Writers and Company, and The Next Chapter. (They can both be heard on the free CBC Listen app, by the way). Both shows interview authors about their lives and their books, and often on the strength of the interview I immediately order the books from my library, which has a wonderful interlibrary loan system that provides most any book I can ever dream of. Anyway, just as often I find myself disappointed in the book itself. It’s the individual author’s ideas about and description of it that are more interesting!
    And then, to answer your question, but briefly: I always read an author’s notes, even if the book itself hasn’t held my interest.
    -Kate

    Reply
  159. Not an answer to your question, but somewhat related: I am a faithful listener to 2 programs on CBC Radio here in Canada: Writers and Company, and The Next Chapter. (They can both be heard on the free CBC Listen app, by the way). Both shows interview authors about their lives and their books, and often on the strength of the interview I immediately order the books from my library, which has a wonderful interlibrary loan system that provides most any book I can ever dream of. Anyway, just as often I find myself disappointed in the book itself. It’s the individual author’s ideas about and description of it that are more interesting!
    And then, to answer your question, but briefly: I always read an author’s notes, even if the book itself hasn’t held my interest.
    -Kate

    Reply
  160. Not an answer to your question, but somewhat related: I am a faithful listener to 2 programs on CBC Radio here in Canada: Writers and Company, and The Next Chapter. (They can both be heard on the free CBC Listen app, by the way). Both shows interview authors about their lives and their books, and often on the strength of the interview I immediately order the books from my library, which has a wonderful interlibrary loan system that provides most any book I can ever dream of. Anyway, just as often I find myself disappointed in the book itself. It’s the individual author’s ideas about and description of it that are more interesting!
    And then, to answer your question, but briefly: I always read an author’s notes, even if the book itself hasn’t held my interest.
    -Kate

    Reply
  161. Very clever, Karen. Yes, I sometimes get lost deep into a series, especially as it’s often a year between books. I have to think hard or go back tot he promo blurbs of earlier books to refresh myself on charccters. I like your system better

    Reply
  162. Very clever, Karen. Yes, I sometimes get lost deep into a series, especially as it’s often a year between books. I have to think hard or go back tot he promo blurbs of earlier books to refresh myself on charccters. I like your system better

    Reply
  163. Very clever, Karen. Yes, I sometimes get lost deep into a series, especially as it’s often a year between books. I have to think hard or go back tot he promo blurbs of earlier books to refresh myself on charccters. I like your system better

    Reply
  164. Very clever, Karen. Yes, I sometimes get lost deep into a series, especially as it’s often a year between books. I have to think hard or go back tot he promo blurbs of earlier books to refresh myself on charccters. I like your system better

    Reply
  165. Very clever, Karen. Yes, I sometimes get lost deep into a series, especially as it’s often a year between books. I have to think hard or go back tot he promo blurbs of earlier books to refresh myself on charccters. I like your system better

    Reply
  166. Vicki, I love that—our interactive author’s note here. It’s wonderful. I learn a lot from our readers, so it’s really a terrific community. So fun to share our love of history.

    Reply
  167. Vicki, I love that—our interactive author’s note here. It’s wonderful. I learn a lot from our readers, so it’s really a terrific community. So fun to share our love of history.

    Reply
  168. Vicki, I love that—our interactive author’s note here. It’s wonderful. I learn a lot from our readers, so it’s really a terrific community. So fun to share our love of history.

    Reply
  169. Vicki, I love that—our interactive author’s note here. It’s wonderful. I learn a lot from our readers, so it’s really a terrific community. So fun to share our love of history.

    Reply
  170. Vicki, I love that—our interactive author’s note here. It’s wonderful. I learn a lot from our readers, so it’s really a terrific community. So fun to share our love of history.

    Reply
  171. Kate, listening to authors talk about their lives/inspiration is always fascinating, and yes, I, too, often run out to read one of their books. Sometimes it’s a disappointment, but mostly I discover a wonderful new-to-me author.
    And so glad to see your shout-out to libraries. They are such a treasure for all of us.

    Reply
  172. Kate, listening to authors talk about their lives/inspiration is always fascinating, and yes, I, too, often run out to read one of their books. Sometimes it’s a disappointment, but mostly I discover a wonderful new-to-me author.
    And so glad to see your shout-out to libraries. They are such a treasure for all of us.

    Reply
  173. Kate, listening to authors talk about their lives/inspiration is always fascinating, and yes, I, too, often run out to read one of their books. Sometimes it’s a disappointment, but mostly I discover a wonderful new-to-me author.
    And so glad to see your shout-out to libraries. They are such a treasure for all of us.

    Reply
  174. Kate, listening to authors talk about their lives/inspiration is always fascinating, and yes, I, too, often run out to read one of their books. Sometimes it’s a disappointment, but mostly I discover a wonderful new-to-me author.
    And so glad to see your shout-out to libraries. They are such a treasure for all of us.

    Reply
  175. Kate, listening to authors talk about their lives/inspiration is always fascinating, and yes, I, too, often run out to read one of their books. Sometimes it’s a disappointment, but mostly I discover a wonderful new-to-me author.
    And so glad to see your shout-out to libraries. They are such a treasure for all of us.

    Reply
  176. I always read and enjoy the author’s notes. I’m often surprised by the unlikely bits of history that turn out to be true, and not the author’s imagination!

    Reply
  177. I always read and enjoy the author’s notes. I’m often surprised by the unlikely bits of history that turn out to be true, and not the author’s imagination!

    Reply
  178. I always read and enjoy the author’s notes. I’m often surprised by the unlikely bits of history that turn out to be true, and not the author’s imagination!

    Reply
  179. I always read and enjoy the author’s notes. I’m often surprised by the unlikely bits of history that turn out to be true, and not the author’s imagination!

    Reply
  180. I always read and enjoy the author’s notes. I’m often surprised by the unlikely bits of history that turn out to be true, and not the author’s imagination!

    Reply
  181. I concur with everything written thus far: I love, love, LOVE authors notes! I, too, read them before and after. I, in fact, read cover to cover. Many dedications are touching, or surprising. The authors notes save me from stopping reading to look up subjects that peak my interest (and just about everything does–I love to read and learn).
    Did you know one of Patrick O’Brian’s books has a young midshipman who lost an arm in a naval battle and later was given command of a captured ship to sail back to England? I often discuss Regency books with my husband, who portrays James Madison. He was president in America during the English Regency period so he too can give me background. You mentioned
    “American Eden” by David Hosack as one of your sources and when I asked my husband if he was familiar with it, he replied he was actually reading it at that time!
    Can’t wait for your next book–I love libraries too!

    Reply
  182. I concur with everything written thus far: I love, love, LOVE authors notes! I, too, read them before and after. I, in fact, read cover to cover. Many dedications are touching, or surprising. The authors notes save me from stopping reading to look up subjects that peak my interest (and just about everything does–I love to read and learn).
    Did you know one of Patrick O’Brian’s books has a young midshipman who lost an arm in a naval battle and later was given command of a captured ship to sail back to England? I often discuss Regency books with my husband, who portrays James Madison. He was president in America during the English Regency period so he too can give me background. You mentioned
    “American Eden” by David Hosack as one of your sources and when I asked my husband if he was familiar with it, he replied he was actually reading it at that time!
    Can’t wait for your next book–I love libraries too!

    Reply
  183. I concur with everything written thus far: I love, love, LOVE authors notes! I, too, read them before and after. I, in fact, read cover to cover. Many dedications are touching, or surprising. The authors notes save me from stopping reading to look up subjects that peak my interest (and just about everything does–I love to read and learn).
    Did you know one of Patrick O’Brian’s books has a young midshipman who lost an arm in a naval battle and later was given command of a captured ship to sail back to England? I often discuss Regency books with my husband, who portrays James Madison. He was president in America during the English Regency period so he too can give me background. You mentioned
    “American Eden” by David Hosack as one of your sources and when I asked my husband if he was familiar with it, he replied he was actually reading it at that time!
    Can’t wait for your next book–I love libraries too!

    Reply
  184. I concur with everything written thus far: I love, love, LOVE authors notes! I, too, read them before and after. I, in fact, read cover to cover. Many dedications are touching, or surprising. The authors notes save me from stopping reading to look up subjects that peak my interest (and just about everything does–I love to read and learn).
    Did you know one of Patrick O’Brian’s books has a young midshipman who lost an arm in a naval battle and later was given command of a captured ship to sail back to England? I often discuss Regency books with my husband, who portrays James Madison. He was president in America during the English Regency period so he too can give me background. You mentioned
    “American Eden” by David Hosack as one of your sources and when I asked my husband if he was familiar with it, he replied he was actually reading it at that time!
    Can’t wait for your next book–I love libraries too!

    Reply
  185. I concur with everything written thus far: I love, love, LOVE authors notes! I, too, read them before and after. I, in fact, read cover to cover. Many dedications are touching, or surprising. The authors notes save me from stopping reading to look up subjects that peak my interest (and just about everything does–I love to read and learn).
    Did you know one of Patrick O’Brian’s books has a young midshipman who lost an arm in a naval battle and later was given command of a captured ship to sail back to England? I often discuss Regency books with my husband, who portrays James Madison. He was president in America during the English Regency period so he too can give me background. You mentioned
    “American Eden” by David Hosack as one of your sources and when I asked my husband if he was familiar with it, he replied he was actually reading it at that time!
    Can’t wait for your next book–I love libraries too!

    Reply
  186. So glad you are another readers who loves Author Notes!
    Yes, Patrick O’Brian writes so beautifully about the navy. Those poor midshipmen—at 12 and 13 they were expected to be “men!” Some of them rose to the occasion, and some of them were traumatized by the responsibilities. In the movie of of one of the books, a midshipman commits suicide.
    How very cool that your husband portrays James Madison! He must be VERY knowledgeable on the era. I hope he enjoyed Garden of Eden. Davis Hosack is such an interesting story, and I enjoyed weaving him into my books.
    Hope you enjoy next Wrexford & Sloane!

    Reply
  187. So glad you are another readers who loves Author Notes!
    Yes, Patrick O’Brian writes so beautifully about the navy. Those poor midshipmen—at 12 and 13 they were expected to be “men!” Some of them rose to the occasion, and some of them were traumatized by the responsibilities. In the movie of of one of the books, a midshipman commits suicide.
    How very cool that your husband portrays James Madison! He must be VERY knowledgeable on the era. I hope he enjoyed Garden of Eden. Davis Hosack is such an interesting story, and I enjoyed weaving him into my books.
    Hope you enjoy next Wrexford & Sloane!

    Reply
  188. So glad you are another readers who loves Author Notes!
    Yes, Patrick O’Brian writes so beautifully about the navy. Those poor midshipmen—at 12 and 13 they were expected to be “men!” Some of them rose to the occasion, and some of them were traumatized by the responsibilities. In the movie of of one of the books, a midshipman commits suicide.
    How very cool that your husband portrays James Madison! He must be VERY knowledgeable on the era. I hope he enjoyed Garden of Eden. Davis Hosack is such an interesting story, and I enjoyed weaving him into my books.
    Hope you enjoy next Wrexford & Sloane!

    Reply
  189. So glad you are another readers who loves Author Notes!
    Yes, Patrick O’Brian writes so beautifully about the navy. Those poor midshipmen—at 12 and 13 they were expected to be “men!” Some of them rose to the occasion, and some of them were traumatized by the responsibilities. In the movie of of one of the books, a midshipman commits suicide.
    How very cool that your husband portrays James Madison! He must be VERY knowledgeable on the era. I hope he enjoyed Garden of Eden. Davis Hosack is such an interesting story, and I enjoyed weaving him into my books.
    Hope you enjoy next Wrexford & Sloane!

    Reply
  190. So glad you are another readers who loves Author Notes!
    Yes, Patrick O’Brian writes so beautifully about the navy. Those poor midshipmen—at 12 and 13 they were expected to be “men!” Some of them rose to the occasion, and some of them were traumatized by the responsibilities. In the movie of of one of the books, a midshipman commits suicide.
    How very cool that your husband portrays James Madison! He must be VERY knowledgeable on the era. I hope he enjoyed Garden of Eden. Davis Hosack is such an interesting story, and I enjoyed weaving him into my books.
    Hope you enjoy next Wrexford & Sloane!

    Reply

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