The Australian Romance Readers Convention

Anne here, just back from the Australian Romance Readers Convention in Melbourne, my home town. PP-Colin-Firth-200

It was a lovely convention — nowhere near as big as RT in the USA — more like 200 avid romance readers and a large group of romance authors flying in from all corners of Australia, and a few from other countries.

There were three keynote speakers, Courtney Milan and Kristen Callihan from the USA and Kylie Scott, from Queensland, who each delivered speeches on their journey to publication, and gave their view on why romance matters. It was interesting, as they each came up with the topic independently, and the three very different speeches had much in common.

PP-Laurence-Olivier-200First up for me was a "speed dating" session, where ten authors in a room met ten readers — for four minutes each. It was fun, frantic and deafening, and no sooner had the conversation started to get really interesting than it was time for the readers to move on to the next author. Then it was time for me to play time-keeper for another session of speed dating — ten fresh authors and another group of readers. It was fun, trying to keep people up to schedule, using my phone's timer facility, and calling out "Time to move on, ladies!" over the din. CupCakes@ARRA

After that we broke for morning tea. Australian conferences are big on feeding people — morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea — and this convention was no exception. Cupcakes and cookies in the morning, rice paper rolls and fruit in the afternoon, plus of course, a variety of teas, coffee or cold water.

I was on two panels. For the first, I moderated a discussion on "Book Boyfriends", asking the four panellists who were the their book boyfriends, what male characters would they choose to be stranded on a desert island with, and what would make them break up with a book boyfriend? One topic we didn't get time to explore was about book boyfriends who'd made it onto the screen. Who, for instance was the best Darcy in the various versions of Pride and Prejudice? (I've shown the main ones here, but there are many more versions — see this post if you're interested.) PP-David-Rintoul-200

My second panel was as a participant, discussing whether feminism conflicted with romance. We agreed emphatically that there's no conflict. We all write about strong women. Steampunk/fantasy author Erica Hayes, who also writes as Viola Carr summed it up well: "We wouldn’t be here if we didn’t believe it. We know women should be equal. Romance is read, written and published by women. It’s a simple idea – that people respect each other as humans. Society doesn’t act like that, but we write it. It’s aspirational." (quoted in Renée Dahlia's blog)

One panel I wasn't able to get to was "Dukes Need Not Apply" — about non-traditional historicals. There's a report on the discussion here:

 I like this quote from Courtney Milan, replying to a question from the floor: “I’ve never read an historical novel, because I don’t care for the damsel in distress trope. How do you get beyond real history and create strong women?
Courtney Milan responded – “History has lied to you.” We aren’t damsels in distress. We’ve always been strong. We just get erased from history told by men. Our stories exist, you just have to hunt for them." (quoted in Renée Dahlia's blog.)

McFaydenDarcyAnother panel I couldn't get to was "Regular Joes" — about heroes who aren't dukes, millionaires or royal. I confess, I like both.

The full program is here, if you're curious.  It was enlightening, inspiring and a lot of fun, and for me, the convention was topped off when my books won a number of awards at the awards night, and I was awarded "Favourite Australian Romance Author." Thank you to all the volunteer members who worked so hard to put this excellent convention together, and who donate their time, energy and skills to make ARRA the organization it is.

So, over to you readers now: What ARRC panels would you have liked to attend? What's your view on feminism and romance? Do you have any "book boyfriends?"  Do you like dukes or "ordinary Joes"? And which is your favorite version of Darcy?

135 thoughts on “The Australian Romance Readers Convention”

  1. I remember back in the day, at the height of the feminist movement, there were many women who were quite contemptuous of the movement. I remember watching a panel discussion (on TV) and one of the panelist saying that if you scratched any woman deep enough you would find a feminist. I think that stuck with me because I believe it. They may not call it feminism. They may even fight the movement, but I think every woman knows her lot in life is still not equal to a man.
    This was even more painfully evident in the past when women had even fewer choices in life. Her best bet in life was to make a good marriage. A woman who was alone was in a fearful position. I think women in the past had to be even stronger (mentally and physically) just to exist.
    I don’t have a book boyfriend. I like all kinds of heroes – both alpha and beta. It also doesn’t matter to me if the hero is a duke or an ordinary joe. The important thing is how well the character is drawn by the author. I love every Darcy I have ever seen on film, but Colin Firth beats them all in my opinion.
    And by the way, congrats to you on the Favorite Australian Romance Author Award. Good on you.

    Reply
  2. I remember back in the day, at the height of the feminist movement, there were many women who were quite contemptuous of the movement. I remember watching a panel discussion (on TV) and one of the panelist saying that if you scratched any woman deep enough you would find a feminist. I think that stuck with me because I believe it. They may not call it feminism. They may even fight the movement, but I think every woman knows her lot in life is still not equal to a man.
    This was even more painfully evident in the past when women had even fewer choices in life. Her best bet in life was to make a good marriage. A woman who was alone was in a fearful position. I think women in the past had to be even stronger (mentally and physically) just to exist.
    I don’t have a book boyfriend. I like all kinds of heroes – both alpha and beta. It also doesn’t matter to me if the hero is a duke or an ordinary joe. The important thing is how well the character is drawn by the author. I love every Darcy I have ever seen on film, but Colin Firth beats them all in my opinion.
    And by the way, congrats to you on the Favorite Australian Romance Author Award. Good on you.

    Reply
  3. I remember back in the day, at the height of the feminist movement, there were many women who were quite contemptuous of the movement. I remember watching a panel discussion (on TV) and one of the panelist saying that if you scratched any woman deep enough you would find a feminist. I think that stuck with me because I believe it. They may not call it feminism. They may even fight the movement, but I think every woman knows her lot in life is still not equal to a man.
    This was even more painfully evident in the past when women had even fewer choices in life. Her best bet in life was to make a good marriage. A woman who was alone was in a fearful position. I think women in the past had to be even stronger (mentally and physically) just to exist.
    I don’t have a book boyfriend. I like all kinds of heroes – both alpha and beta. It also doesn’t matter to me if the hero is a duke or an ordinary joe. The important thing is how well the character is drawn by the author. I love every Darcy I have ever seen on film, but Colin Firth beats them all in my opinion.
    And by the way, congrats to you on the Favorite Australian Romance Author Award. Good on you.

    Reply
  4. I remember back in the day, at the height of the feminist movement, there were many women who were quite contemptuous of the movement. I remember watching a panel discussion (on TV) and one of the panelist saying that if you scratched any woman deep enough you would find a feminist. I think that stuck with me because I believe it. They may not call it feminism. They may even fight the movement, but I think every woman knows her lot in life is still not equal to a man.
    This was even more painfully evident in the past when women had even fewer choices in life. Her best bet in life was to make a good marriage. A woman who was alone was in a fearful position. I think women in the past had to be even stronger (mentally and physically) just to exist.
    I don’t have a book boyfriend. I like all kinds of heroes – both alpha and beta. It also doesn’t matter to me if the hero is a duke or an ordinary joe. The important thing is how well the character is drawn by the author. I love every Darcy I have ever seen on film, but Colin Firth beats them all in my opinion.
    And by the way, congrats to you on the Favorite Australian Romance Author Award. Good on you.

    Reply
  5. I remember back in the day, at the height of the feminist movement, there were many women who were quite contemptuous of the movement. I remember watching a panel discussion (on TV) and one of the panelist saying that if you scratched any woman deep enough you would find a feminist. I think that stuck with me because I believe it. They may not call it feminism. They may even fight the movement, but I think every woman knows her lot in life is still not equal to a man.
    This was even more painfully evident in the past when women had even fewer choices in life. Her best bet in life was to make a good marriage. A woman who was alone was in a fearful position. I think women in the past had to be even stronger (mentally and physically) just to exist.
    I don’t have a book boyfriend. I like all kinds of heroes – both alpha and beta. It also doesn’t matter to me if the hero is a duke or an ordinary joe. The important thing is how well the character is drawn by the author. I love every Darcy I have ever seen on film, but Colin Firth beats them all in my opinion.
    And by the way, congrats to you on the Favorite Australian Romance Author Award. Good on you.

    Reply
  6. I’m a bit of a Janite so I own every version of P&P (as well as the rest of Austen’s novel adaptations) LOL Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy. There are positives in most of the others (Poor Rintoul is just terrible) but Firth takes the best of show for me.
    I think the book boyfriend panel would be fun! As someone who reads voraciously the choices are endless. I always enjoy to hear what someone else sees in characters. I have no preference for duke or average joe. They all have positives and negatives.
    I am young enough that for the most part feminism as a movement was already part of the landscape by the time I was old enough to conceptualize, however it made a big impact on my life because my mother has told me several times that she never wanted to be a mother but had to be because that’s what women did. As a career woman with strong opinions and no children, I am thankful that I have the option to be me unapologetically.
    Some day I hope to get to one of these conferences! They always sound like so much fun. Few get very close to Oklahoma though so it would take planning and foresight…LOL

    Reply
  7. I’m a bit of a Janite so I own every version of P&P (as well as the rest of Austen’s novel adaptations) LOL Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy. There are positives in most of the others (Poor Rintoul is just terrible) but Firth takes the best of show for me.
    I think the book boyfriend panel would be fun! As someone who reads voraciously the choices are endless. I always enjoy to hear what someone else sees in characters. I have no preference for duke or average joe. They all have positives and negatives.
    I am young enough that for the most part feminism as a movement was already part of the landscape by the time I was old enough to conceptualize, however it made a big impact on my life because my mother has told me several times that she never wanted to be a mother but had to be because that’s what women did. As a career woman with strong opinions and no children, I am thankful that I have the option to be me unapologetically.
    Some day I hope to get to one of these conferences! They always sound like so much fun. Few get very close to Oklahoma though so it would take planning and foresight…LOL

    Reply
  8. I’m a bit of a Janite so I own every version of P&P (as well as the rest of Austen’s novel adaptations) LOL Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy. There are positives in most of the others (Poor Rintoul is just terrible) but Firth takes the best of show for me.
    I think the book boyfriend panel would be fun! As someone who reads voraciously the choices are endless. I always enjoy to hear what someone else sees in characters. I have no preference for duke or average joe. They all have positives and negatives.
    I am young enough that for the most part feminism as a movement was already part of the landscape by the time I was old enough to conceptualize, however it made a big impact on my life because my mother has told me several times that she never wanted to be a mother but had to be because that’s what women did. As a career woman with strong opinions and no children, I am thankful that I have the option to be me unapologetically.
    Some day I hope to get to one of these conferences! They always sound like so much fun. Few get very close to Oklahoma though so it would take planning and foresight…LOL

    Reply
  9. I’m a bit of a Janite so I own every version of P&P (as well as the rest of Austen’s novel adaptations) LOL Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy. There are positives in most of the others (Poor Rintoul is just terrible) but Firth takes the best of show for me.
    I think the book boyfriend panel would be fun! As someone who reads voraciously the choices are endless. I always enjoy to hear what someone else sees in characters. I have no preference for duke or average joe. They all have positives and negatives.
    I am young enough that for the most part feminism as a movement was already part of the landscape by the time I was old enough to conceptualize, however it made a big impact on my life because my mother has told me several times that she never wanted to be a mother but had to be because that’s what women did. As a career woman with strong opinions and no children, I am thankful that I have the option to be me unapologetically.
    Some day I hope to get to one of these conferences! They always sound like so much fun. Few get very close to Oklahoma though so it would take planning and foresight…LOL

    Reply
  10. I’m a bit of a Janite so I own every version of P&P (as well as the rest of Austen’s novel adaptations) LOL Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy. There are positives in most of the others (Poor Rintoul is just terrible) but Firth takes the best of show for me.
    I think the book boyfriend panel would be fun! As someone who reads voraciously the choices are endless. I always enjoy to hear what someone else sees in characters. I have no preference for duke or average joe. They all have positives and negatives.
    I am young enough that for the most part feminism as a movement was already part of the landscape by the time I was old enough to conceptualize, however it made a big impact on my life because my mother has told me several times that she never wanted to be a mother but had to be because that’s what women did. As a career woman with strong opinions and no children, I am thankful that I have the option to be me unapologetically.
    Some day I hope to get to one of these conferences! They always sound like so much fun. Few get very close to Oklahoma though so it would take planning and foresight…LOL

    Reply
  11. ++“I’ve never read an historical novel, because I don’t care for the damsel in distress trope. How do you get beyond real history and create strong women?”
    Courtney Milan responded – “History has lied to you.” ++
    LOL! Yep, dead on, and very Courtney Milan. *G* It sounds like a wonderful conference, and worth traveling halfway around the world for. Even without the cupcakes!

    Reply
  12. ++“I’ve never read an historical novel, because I don’t care for the damsel in distress trope. How do you get beyond real history and create strong women?”
    Courtney Milan responded – “History has lied to you.” ++
    LOL! Yep, dead on, and very Courtney Milan. *G* It sounds like a wonderful conference, and worth traveling halfway around the world for. Even without the cupcakes!

    Reply
  13. ++“I’ve never read an historical novel, because I don’t care for the damsel in distress trope. How do you get beyond real history and create strong women?”
    Courtney Milan responded – “History has lied to you.” ++
    LOL! Yep, dead on, and very Courtney Milan. *G* It sounds like a wonderful conference, and worth traveling halfway around the world for. Even without the cupcakes!

    Reply
  14. ++“I’ve never read an historical novel, because I don’t care for the damsel in distress trope. How do you get beyond real history and create strong women?”
    Courtney Milan responded – “History has lied to you.” ++
    LOL! Yep, dead on, and very Courtney Milan. *G* It sounds like a wonderful conference, and worth traveling halfway around the world for. Even without the cupcakes!

    Reply
  15. ++“I’ve never read an historical novel, because I don’t care for the damsel in distress trope. How do you get beyond real history and create strong women?”
    Courtney Milan responded – “History has lied to you.” ++
    LOL! Yep, dead on, and very Courtney Milan. *G* It sounds like a wonderful conference, and worth traveling halfway around the world for. Even without the cupcakes!

    Reply
  16. For a reader, I love to talk to books with people who write, live, or love books. But I’m enough of an introvert, that I’d be exhausted. The size of this conference seems a lot more manageable than others that I have attended.
    I don’t really have book boyfriends. I like so many of the heroes that are in my favorite books. How can one have dozens of boyfriends?
    As for the Dukes, I love when writers capture the immense power and influence that so many of them have had. (Of course some were idiots and financial disasters.) But I adore those writers whose dukes live and breathe in their exclusive roles. All that said, there’s just too many Dukes on the shelves.
    As for ordinary Joes, some of those are my favorite heroes. Who cannot remember Turnip in the Mischief of the Mistletoe without a smile? Carla Kelly’s sailors, soldiers, marines, and doctors are memorable. But it is hard to make an ordinary man extraordinary enough that he does leap off the page into a reader’s heart.
    I am so sad that I could not attend the Steampunk panel.
    Congratulations on your accolades–they are well deserved.

    Reply
  17. For a reader, I love to talk to books with people who write, live, or love books. But I’m enough of an introvert, that I’d be exhausted. The size of this conference seems a lot more manageable than others that I have attended.
    I don’t really have book boyfriends. I like so many of the heroes that are in my favorite books. How can one have dozens of boyfriends?
    As for the Dukes, I love when writers capture the immense power and influence that so many of them have had. (Of course some were idiots and financial disasters.) But I adore those writers whose dukes live and breathe in their exclusive roles. All that said, there’s just too many Dukes on the shelves.
    As for ordinary Joes, some of those are my favorite heroes. Who cannot remember Turnip in the Mischief of the Mistletoe without a smile? Carla Kelly’s sailors, soldiers, marines, and doctors are memorable. But it is hard to make an ordinary man extraordinary enough that he does leap off the page into a reader’s heart.
    I am so sad that I could not attend the Steampunk panel.
    Congratulations on your accolades–they are well deserved.

    Reply
  18. For a reader, I love to talk to books with people who write, live, or love books. But I’m enough of an introvert, that I’d be exhausted. The size of this conference seems a lot more manageable than others that I have attended.
    I don’t really have book boyfriends. I like so many of the heroes that are in my favorite books. How can one have dozens of boyfriends?
    As for the Dukes, I love when writers capture the immense power and influence that so many of them have had. (Of course some were idiots and financial disasters.) But I adore those writers whose dukes live and breathe in their exclusive roles. All that said, there’s just too many Dukes on the shelves.
    As for ordinary Joes, some of those are my favorite heroes. Who cannot remember Turnip in the Mischief of the Mistletoe without a smile? Carla Kelly’s sailors, soldiers, marines, and doctors are memorable. But it is hard to make an ordinary man extraordinary enough that he does leap off the page into a reader’s heart.
    I am so sad that I could not attend the Steampunk panel.
    Congratulations on your accolades–they are well deserved.

    Reply
  19. For a reader, I love to talk to books with people who write, live, or love books. But I’m enough of an introvert, that I’d be exhausted. The size of this conference seems a lot more manageable than others that I have attended.
    I don’t really have book boyfriends. I like so many of the heroes that are in my favorite books. How can one have dozens of boyfriends?
    As for the Dukes, I love when writers capture the immense power and influence that so many of them have had. (Of course some were idiots and financial disasters.) But I adore those writers whose dukes live and breathe in their exclusive roles. All that said, there’s just too many Dukes on the shelves.
    As for ordinary Joes, some of those are my favorite heroes. Who cannot remember Turnip in the Mischief of the Mistletoe without a smile? Carla Kelly’s sailors, soldiers, marines, and doctors are memorable. But it is hard to make an ordinary man extraordinary enough that he does leap off the page into a reader’s heart.
    I am so sad that I could not attend the Steampunk panel.
    Congratulations on your accolades–they are well deserved.

    Reply
  20. For a reader, I love to talk to books with people who write, live, or love books. But I’m enough of an introvert, that I’d be exhausted. The size of this conference seems a lot more manageable than others that I have attended.
    I don’t really have book boyfriends. I like so many of the heroes that are in my favorite books. How can one have dozens of boyfriends?
    As for the Dukes, I love when writers capture the immense power and influence that so many of them have had. (Of course some were idiots and financial disasters.) But I adore those writers whose dukes live and breathe in their exclusive roles. All that said, there’s just too many Dukes on the shelves.
    As for ordinary Joes, some of those are my favorite heroes. Who cannot remember Turnip in the Mischief of the Mistletoe without a smile? Carla Kelly’s sailors, soldiers, marines, and doctors are memorable. But it is hard to make an ordinary man extraordinary enough that he does leap off the page into a reader’s heart.
    I am so sad that I could not attend the Steampunk panel.
    Congratulations on your accolades–they are well deserved.

    Reply
  21. Looking over the program I like the following: “Who do you think they are? Where do characters come from”; “Building the perfect villain”; “Feminism vs romance”; “Dukes need not apply”.
    I see no problem joining feminism and romance. The stronger the woman the more interesting the story.
    I have many favorite book boyfriends, but my all-time favorite is, of course, Mr. Darcy, after Elizabeth tells him off. Then, he’s less pompous.
    As far as liking dukes or ordinary Joes it depends on the personality of either. A duke or Joe can go through all sorts of conflict and tragedy. The person can end up being empathetic to others or hateful to everyone.
    Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy, but I also liked David Rintoul (third from the top in this blog) as well. Elizabeth Garvie played Elizabeth in that series. They were great together.
    Lawrence Olivier was stiff as Darcy. He was not a great screen actor. His forte was, of course, the stage. In this movie they brought up the time to the 1840s because the fashions were more interesting than the Regency. Hollywood skewered this version of P&P, even having Lady Debourg be the matchmaker between Elizabeth and Darcy and being happy they marry.
    Matthew MacFayden (pictured last) was, for me, too weak as Darcy. He was not forceful and defensive enough in the argument scene when he proposes to Elizabeth. I also did not like Kiera Knightly. She was too skinny for the more voluptuous Elizabeth.

    Reply
  22. Looking over the program I like the following: “Who do you think they are? Where do characters come from”; “Building the perfect villain”; “Feminism vs romance”; “Dukes need not apply”.
    I see no problem joining feminism and romance. The stronger the woman the more interesting the story.
    I have many favorite book boyfriends, but my all-time favorite is, of course, Mr. Darcy, after Elizabeth tells him off. Then, he’s less pompous.
    As far as liking dukes or ordinary Joes it depends on the personality of either. A duke or Joe can go through all sorts of conflict and tragedy. The person can end up being empathetic to others or hateful to everyone.
    Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy, but I also liked David Rintoul (third from the top in this blog) as well. Elizabeth Garvie played Elizabeth in that series. They were great together.
    Lawrence Olivier was stiff as Darcy. He was not a great screen actor. His forte was, of course, the stage. In this movie they brought up the time to the 1840s because the fashions were more interesting than the Regency. Hollywood skewered this version of P&P, even having Lady Debourg be the matchmaker between Elizabeth and Darcy and being happy they marry.
    Matthew MacFayden (pictured last) was, for me, too weak as Darcy. He was not forceful and defensive enough in the argument scene when he proposes to Elizabeth. I also did not like Kiera Knightly. She was too skinny for the more voluptuous Elizabeth.

    Reply
  23. Looking over the program I like the following: “Who do you think they are? Where do characters come from”; “Building the perfect villain”; “Feminism vs romance”; “Dukes need not apply”.
    I see no problem joining feminism and romance. The stronger the woman the more interesting the story.
    I have many favorite book boyfriends, but my all-time favorite is, of course, Mr. Darcy, after Elizabeth tells him off. Then, he’s less pompous.
    As far as liking dukes or ordinary Joes it depends on the personality of either. A duke or Joe can go through all sorts of conflict and tragedy. The person can end up being empathetic to others or hateful to everyone.
    Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy, but I also liked David Rintoul (third from the top in this blog) as well. Elizabeth Garvie played Elizabeth in that series. They were great together.
    Lawrence Olivier was stiff as Darcy. He was not a great screen actor. His forte was, of course, the stage. In this movie they brought up the time to the 1840s because the fashions were more interesting than the Regency. Hollywood skewered this version of P&P, even having Lady Debourg be the matchmaker between Elizabeth and Darcy and being happy they marry.
    Matthew MacFayden (pictured last) was, for me, too weak as Darcy. He was not forceful and defensive enough in the argument scene when he proposes to Elizabeth. I also did not like Kiera Knightly. She was too skinny for the more voluptuous Elizabeth.

    Reply
  24. Looking over the program I like the following: “Who do you think they are? Where do characters come from”; “Building the perfect villain”; “Feminism vs romance”; “Dukes need not apply”.
    I see no problem joining feminism and romance. The stronger the woman the more interesting the story.
    I have many favorite book boyfriends, but my all-time favorite is, of course, Mr. Darcy, after Elizabeth tells him off. Then, he’s less pompous.
    As far as liking dukes or ordinary Joes it depends on the personality of either. A duke or Joe can go through all sorts of conflict and tragedy. The person can end up being empathetic to others or hateful to everyone.
    Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy, but I also liked David Rintoul (third from the top in this blog) as well. Elizabeth Garvie played Elizabeth in that series. They were great together.
    Lawrence Olivier was stiff as Darcy. He was not a great screen actor. His forte was, of course, the stage. In this movie they brought up the time to the 1840s because the fashions were more interesting than the Regency. Hollywood skewered this version of P&P, even having Lady Debourg be the matchmaker between Elizabeth and Darcy and being happy they marry.
    Matthew MacFayden (pictured last) was, for me, too weak as Darcy. He was not forceful and defensive enough in the argument scene when he proposes to Elizabeth. I also did not like Kiera Knightly. She was too skinny for the more voluptuous Elizabeth.

    Reply
  25. Looking over the program I like the following: “Who do you think they are? Where do characters come from”; “Building the perfect villain”; “Feminism vs romance”; “Dukes need not apply”.
    I see no problem joining feminism and romance. The stronger the woman the more interesting the story.
    I have many favorite book boyfriends, but my all-time favorite is, of course, Mr. Darcy, after Elizabeth tells him off. Then, he’s less pompous.
    As far as liking dukes or ordinary Joes it depends on the personality of either. A duke or Joe can go through all sorts of conflict and tragedy. The person can end up being empathetic to others or hateful to everyone.
    Colin Firth is my favorite Darcy, but I also liked David Rintoul (third from the top in this blog) as well. Elizabeth Garvie played Elizabeth in that series. They were great together.
    Lawrence Olivier was stiff as Darcy. He was not a great screen actor. His forte was, of course, the stage. In this movie they brought up the time to the 1840s because the fashions were more interesting than the Regency. Hollywood skewered this version of P&P, even having Lady Debourg be the matchmaker between Elizabeth and Darcy and being happy they marry.
    Matthew MacFayden (pictured last) was, for me, too weak as Darcy. He was not forceful and defensive enough in the argument scene when he proposes to Elizabeth. I also did not like Kiera Knightly. She was too skinny for the more voluptuous Elizabeth.

    Reply
  26. I seem to be with the majority as to heroes of any rank; if the character is well written, I do not care about rank. I also agree with the majority as to Colin Firth. In my opinion this version of P&P is the best on all counts.
    I would love to attend one of your romance conventions. They sound so cosy! The Science Fiction Convention we attend each fall has at least 1000 attendees each year; frequently more. It is not TOO big, but your size seems much cozier!

    Reply
  27. I seem to be with the majority as to heroes of any rank; if the character is well written, I do not care about rank. I also agree with the majority as to Colin Firth. In my opinion this version of P&P is the best on all counts.
    I would love to attend one of your romance conventions. They sound so cosy! The Science Fiction Convention we attend each fall has at least 1000 attendees each year; frequently more. It is not TOO big, but your size seems much cozier!

    Reply
  28. I seem to be with the majority as to heroes of any rank; if the character is well written, I do not care about rank. I also agree with the majority as to Colin Firth. In my opinion this version of P&P is the best on all counts.
    I would love to attend one of your romance conventions. They sound so cosy! The Science Fiction Convention we attend each fall has at least 1000 attendees each year; frequently more. It is not TOO big, but your size seems much cozier!

    Reply
  29. I seem to be with the majority as to heroes of any rank; if the character is well written, I do not care about rank. I also agree with the majority as to Colin Firth. In my opinion this version of P&P is the best on all counts.
    I would love to attend one of your romance conventions. They sound so cosy! The Science Fiction Convention we attend each fall has at least 1000 attendees each year; frequently more. It is not TOO big, but your size seems much cozier!

    Reply
  30. I seem to be with the majority as to heroes of any rank; if the character is well written, I do not care about rank. I also agree with the majority as to Colin Firth. In my opinion this version of P&P is the best on all counts.
    I would love to attend one of your romance conventions. They sound so cosy! The Science Fiction Convention we attend each fall has at least 1000 attendees each year; frequently more. It is not TOO big, but your size seems much cozier!

    Reply
  31. I 2nd, 3rd, 4th all the congrats to Anne for her many deserved awards. Very exciting!
    Shannon said it perfectly I really, really like too many to have just A book boyfriend. Grin.
    As for Dukes or Joe’s….I like both just not a steady diet of Dukes! Right now there are just a few too many Dukes/Earls for my taste. But since that is what the publishers want, that is what we get.
    Definitely women were strong…they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.
    Don’t forget farmers and pioneers of all stripes from all countries. Farming and pioneering wasn’t for sissies or weak women. You had to be mentally strong to survive and preserve.
    True that doesn’t come across in the historical accounts since women weren’t the ones writing history but….. when tested most women passed with flying colors no matter what level of society they were in/at/from.
    The best Romance writing is when the characters are put to the test….will they meet it? Hurdle past the problem? Slog their way through until suddenly they realize YES! I overcame it. I succeeded.
    The test can be anything – emotional, financial, physical, intellectual, circumstances… where in the end the main characters realize yes, I AM worthy and equal and deserve to be loved for myself.

    Reply
  32. I 2nd, 3rd, 4th all the congrats to Anne for her many deserved awards. Very exciting!
    Shannon said it perfectly I really, really like too many to have just A book boyfriend. Grin.
    As for Dukes or Joe’s….I like both just not a steady diet of Dukes! Right now there are just a few too many Dukes/Earls for my taste. But since that is what the publishers want, that is what we get.
    Definitely women were strong…they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.
    Don’t forget farmers and pioneers of all stripes from all countries. Farming and pioneering wasn’t for sissies or weak women. You had to be mentally strong to survive and preserve.
    True that doesn’t come across in the historical accounts since women weren’t the ones writing history but….. when tested most women passed with flying colors no matter what level of society they were in/at/from.
    The best Romance writing is when the characters are put to the test….will they meet it? Hurdle past the problem? Slog their way through until suddenly they realize YES! I overcame it. I succeeded.
    The test can be anything – emotional, financial, physical, intellectual, circumstances… where in the end the main characters realize yes, I AM worthy and equal and deserve to be loved for myself.

    Reply
  33. I 2nd, 3rd, 4th all the congrats to Anne for her many deserved awards. Very exciting!
    Shannon said it perfectly I really, really like too many to have just A book boyfriend. Grin.
    As for Dukes or Joe’s….I like both just not a steady diet of Dukes! Right now there are just a few too many Dukes/Earls for my taste. But since that is what the publishers want, that is what we get.
    Definitely women were strong…they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.
    Don’t forget farmers and pioneers of all stripes from all countries. Farming and pioneering wasn’t for sissies or weak women. You had to be mentally strong to survive and preserve.
    True that doesn’t come across in the historical accounts since women weren’t the ones writing history but….. when tested most women passed with flying colors no matter what level of society they were in/at/from.
    The best Romance writing is when the characters are put to the test….will they meet it? Hurdle past the problem? Slog their way through until suddenly they realize YES! I overcame it. I succeeded.
    The test can be anything – emotional, financial, physical, intellectual, circumstances… where in the end the main characters realize yes, I AM worthy and equal and deserve to be loved for myself.

    Reply
  34. I 2nd, 3rd, 4th all the congrats to Anne for her many deserved awards. Very exciting!
    Shannon said it perfectly I really, really like too many to have just A book boyfriend. Grin.
    As for Dukes or Joe’s….I like both just not a steady diet of Dukes! Right now there are just a few too many Dukes/Earls for my taste. But since that is what the publishers want, that is what we get.
    Definitely women were strong…they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.
    Don’t forget farmers and pioneers of all stripes from all countries. Farming and pioneering wasn’t for sissies or weak women. You had to be mentally strong to survive and preserve.
    True that doesn’t come across in the historical accounts since women weren’t the ones writing history but….. when tested most women passed with flying colors no matter what level of society they were in/at/from.
    The best Romance writing is when the characters are put to the test….will they meet it? Hurdle past the problem? Slog their way through until suddenly they realize YES! I overcame it. I succeeded.
    The test can be anything – emotional, financial, physical, intellectual, circumstances… where in the end the main characters realize yes, I AM worthy and equal and deserve to be loved for myself.

    Reply
  35. I 2nd, 3rd, 4th all the congrats to Anne for her many deserved awards. Very exciting!
    Shannon said it perfectly I really, really like too many to have just A book boyfriend. Grin.
    As for Dukes or Joe’s….I like both just not a steady diet of Dukes! Right now there are just a few too many Dukes/Earls for my taste. But since that is what the publishers want, that is what we get.
    Definitely women were strong…they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.
    Don’t forget farmers and pioneers of all stripes from all countries. Farming and pioneering wasn’t for sissies or weak women. You had to be mentally strong to survive and preserve.
    True that doesn’t come across in the historical accounts since women weren’t the ones writing history but….. when tested most women passed with flying colors no matter what level of society they were in/at/from.
    The best Romance writing is when the characters are put to the test….will they meet it? Hurdle past the problem? Slog their way through until suddenly they realize YES! I overcame it. I succeeded.
    The test can be anything – emotional, financial, physical, intellectual, circumstances… where in the end the main characters realize yes, I AM worthy and equal and deserve to be loved for myself.

    Reply
  36. Thanks so much for those kind words, Mary — I was thrilled with my awards.
    I’m always surprised when I hear a woman state emphatically that she is NOT a feminist — it seems so strange to me that you wouldn’t want equality or as fair a deal as a man, if not for yourself, then certainly for your daughter. But each to her own, I suppose.
    I’m with you on the book boyfriends — I like all sorts of heroes, too. But I did have fun trawling through photos of movie and TV heroes for the powerpoint presentation that helped illustrate the discussion.

    Reply
  37. Thanks so much for those kind words, Mary — I was thrilled with my awards.
    I’m always surprised when I hear a woman state emphatically that she is NOT a feminist — it seems so strange to me that you wouldn’t want equality or as fair a deal as a man, if not for yourself, then certainly for your daughter. But each to her own, I suppose.
    I’m with you on the book boyfriends — I like all sorts of heroes, too. But I did have fun trawling through photos of movie and TV heroes for the powerpoint presentation that helped illustrate the discussion.

    Reply
  38. Thanks so much for those kind words, Mary — I was thrilled with my awards.
    I’m always surprised when I hear a woman state emphatically that she is NOT a feminist — it seems so strange to me that you wouldn’t want equality or as fair a deal as a man, if not for yourself, then certainly for your daughter. But each to her own, I suppose.
    I’m with you on the book boyfriends — I like all sorts of heroes, too. But I did have fun trawling through photos of movie and TV heroes for the powerpoint presentation that helped illustrate the discussion.

    Reply
  39. Thanks so much for those kind words, Mary — I was thrilled with my awards.
    I’m always surprised when I hear a woman state emphatically that she is NOT a feminist — it seems so strange to me that you wouldn’t want equality or as fair a deal as a man, if not for yourself, then certainly for your daughter. But each to her own, I suppose.
    I’m with you on the book boyfriends — I like all sorts of heroes, too. But I did have fun trawling through photos of movie and TV heroes for the powerpoint presentation that helped illustrate the discussion.

    Reply
  40. Thanks so much for those kind words, Mary — I was thrilled with my awards.
    I’m always surprised when I hear a woman state emphatically that she is NOT a feminist — it seems so strange to me that you wouldn’t want equality or as fair a deal as a man, if not for yourself, then certainly for your daughter. But each to her own, I suppose.
    I’m with you on the book boyfriends — I like all sorts of heroes, too. But I did have fun trawling through photos of movie and TV heroes for the powerpoint presentation that helped illustrate the discussion.

    Reply
  41. Stephanie, did you click on the link to the other Darcy versions? I confess I had no idea there were so many. The Firth Darcy is from the very best adaptation, IMO, but I do have a soft spot for the old Laurence Olivier Darcy — so beautifully buttoned up and yet conveying such emotion beneath it all. I think to play a very reserved character like Darcy an actor needs to be very good. I’ve liked Rintoul in other things he did, but he was just a little too stiff as Darcy, I agree. As for feminism, I think it’s constantly evolving.

    Reply
  42. Stephanie, did you click on the link to the other Darcy versions? I confess I had no idea there were so many. The Firth Darcy is from the very best adaptation, IMO, but I do have a soft spot for the old Laurence Olivier Darcy — so beautifully buttoned up and yet conveying such emotion beneath it all. I think to play a very reserved character like Darcy an actor needs to be very good. I’ve liked Rintoul in other things he did, but he was just a little too stiff as Darcy, I agree. As for feminism, I think it’s constantly evolving.

    Reply
  43. Stephanie, did you click on the link to the other Darcy versions? I confess I had no idea there were so many. The Firth Darcy is from the very best adaptation, IMO, but I do have a soft spot for the old Laurence Olivier Darcy — so beautifully buttoned up and yet conveying such emotion beneath it all. I think to play a very reserved character like Darcy an actor needs to be very good. I’ve liked Rintoul in other things he did, but he was just a little too stiff as Darcy, I agree. As for feminism, I think it’s constantly evolving.

    Reply
  44. Stephanie, did you click on the link to the other Darcy versions? I confess I had no idea there were so many. The Firth Darcy is from the very best adaptation, IMO, but I do have a soft spot for the old Laurence Olivier Darcy — so beautifully buttoned up and yet conveying such emotion beneath it all. I think to play a very reserved character like Darcy an actor needs to be very good. I’ve liked Rintoul in other things he did, but he was just a little too stiff as Darcy, I agree. As for feminism, I think it’s constantly evolving.

    Reply
  45. Stephanie, did you click on the link to the other Darcy versions? I confess I had no idea there were so many. The Firth Darcy is from the very best adaptation, IMO, but I do have a soft spot for the old Laurence Olivier Darcy — so beautifully buttoned up and yet conveying such emotion beneath it all. I think to play a very reserved character like Darcy an actor needs to be very good. I’ve liked Rintoul in other things he did, but he was just a little too stiff as Darcy, I agree. As for feminism, I think it’s constantly evolving.

    Reply
  46. Shannon, Australia’s population is so small, comparatively, that all our conferences and conventions tend to be smaller than the US ones. Our annual national RWA conference is about the same size as some of the US chapters with about 350 delegates. NZ is even smaller, with about 200. But I confess I do enjoy the way you really can get to meet people at a smaller conference.
    As for the plethora of dukes — Im sadly aware of just how many dukes there are on bookshelves these days, but I’m afraid I’m going to add to them in the future. I have a duke hero on the horizon — not for a few books yet, but he’s coming.
    The steampunk panel was excellent. I’m a huge fan of BecMcMasters books, and I’ve only just started reading Kristen Callihan (because she was coming to the convention) and I really like her books as well. The panel moderator was Erica Hayes (who also writes as Viola Carr) and she was excellent — articulate, lively and knowledgable — and dressed for the part in boots, leather skirt, laced bodice, top hat and steampunk goggles.
    Thanks so much for the congratulations — it was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  47. Shannon, Australia’s population is so small, comparatively, that all our conferences and conventions tend to be smaller than the US ones. Our annual national RWA conference is about the same size as some of the US chapters with about 350 delegates. NZ is even smaller, with about 200. But I confess I do enjoy the way you really can get to meet people at a smaller conference.
    As for the plethora of dukes — Im sadly aware of just how many dukes there are on bookshelves these days, but I’m afraid I’m going to add to them in the future. I have a duke hero on the horizon — not for a few books yet, but he’s coming.
    The steampunk panel was excellent. I’m a huge fan of BecMcMasters books, and I’ve only just started reading Kristen Callihan (because she was coming to the convention) and I really like her books as well. The panel moderator was Erica Hayes (who also writes as Viola Carr) and she was excellent — articulate, lively and knowledgable — and dressed for the part in boots, leather skirt, laced bodice, top hat and steampunk goggles.
    Thanks so much for the congratulations — it was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  48. Shannon, Australia’s population is so small, comparatively, that all our conferences and conventions tend to be smaller than the US ones. Our annual national RWA conference is about the same size as some of the US chapters with about 350 delegates. NZ is even smaller, with about 200. But I confess I do enjoy the way you really can get to meet people at a smaller conference.
    As for the plethora of dukes — Im sadly aware of just how many dukes there are on bookshelves these days, but I’m afraid I’m going to add to them in the future. I have a duke hero on the horizon — not for a few books yet, but he’s coming.
    The steampunk panel was excellent. I’m a huge fan of BecMcMasters books, and I’ve only just started reading Kristen Callihan (because she was coming to the convention) and I really like her books as well. The panel moderator was Erica Hayes (who also writes as Viola Carr) and she was excellent — articulate, lively and knowledgable — and dressed for the part in boots, leather skirt, laced bodice, top hat and steampunk goggles.
    Thanks so much for the congratulations — it was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  49. Shannon, Australia’s population is so small, comparatively, that all our conferences and conventions tend to be smaller than the US ones. Our annual national RWA conference is about the same size as some of the US chapters with about 350 delegates. NZ is even smaller, with about 200. But I confess I do enjoy the way you really can get to meet people at a smaller conference.
    As for the plethora of dukes — Im sadly aware of just how many dukes there are on bookshelves these days, but I’m afraid I’m going to add to them in the future. I have a duke hero on the horizon — not for a few books yet, but he’s coming.
    The steampunk panel was excellent. I’m a huge fan of BecMcMasters books, and I’ve only just started reading Kristen Callihan (because she was coming to the convention) and I really like her books as well. The panel moderator was Erica Hayes (who also writes as Viola Carr) and she was excellent — articulate, lively and knowledgable — and dressed for the part in boots, leather skirt, laced bodice, top hat and steampunk goggles.
    Thanks so much for the congratulations — it was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  50. Shannon, Australia’s population is so small, comparatively, that all our conferences and conventions tend to be smaller than the US ones. Our annual national RWA conference is about the same size as some of the US chapters with about 350 delegates. NZ is even smaller, with about 200. But I confess I do enjoy the way you really can get to meet people at a smaller conference.
    As for the plethora of dukes — Im sadly aware of just how many dukes there are on bookshelves these days, but I’m afraid I’m going to add to them in the future. I have a duke hero on the horizon — not for a few books yet, but he’s coming.
    The steampunk panel was excellent. I’m a huge fan of BecMcMasters books, and I’ve only just started reading Kristen Callihan (because she was coming to the convention) and I really like her books as well. The panel moderator was Erica Hayes (who also writes as Viola Carr) and she was excellent — articulate, lively and knowledgable — and dressed for the part in boots, leather skirt, laced bodice, top hat and steampunk goggles.
    Thanks so much for the congratulations — it was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  51. Thanks for those thoughts, Patricia. I think you would have enjoyed the convention and the panels you chose. I agree with you about dukes or ordinary Joes — it all depends on the character and the story and what they have to go through. We do like our heroes to suffer, dont we?
    I was thinking after the feminism panel, that Georgette Heyer would probably have rejected feminism as a political movement, but she herself was a strong and independent woman and all her heroines are strong, lively and courageous — even, I think, those heroines who were young, and inexperienced, like Hero (in Fridays Child) and Horatia (in The Convenient Marriage.)

    Reply
  52. Thanks for those thoughts, Patricia. I think you would have enjoyed the convention and the panels you chose. I agree with you about dukes or ordinary Joes — it all depends on the character and the story and what they have to go through. We do like our heroes to suffer, dont we?
    I was thinking after the feminism panel, that Georgette Heyer would probably have rejected feminism as a political movement, but she herself was a strong and independent woman and all her heroines are strong, lively and courageous — even, I think, those heroines who were young, and inexperienced, like Hero (in Fridays Child) and Horatia (in The Convenient Marriage.)

    Reply
  53. Thanks for those thoughts, Patricia. I think you would have enjoyed the convention and the panels you chose. I agree with you about dukes or ordinary Joes — it all depends on the character and the story and what they have to go through. We do like our heroes to suffer, dont we?
    I was thinking after the feminism panel, that Georgette Heyer would probably have rejected feminism as a political movement, but she herself was a strong and independent woman and all her heroines are strong, lively and courageous — even, I think, those heroines who were young, and inexperienced, like Hero (in Fridays Child) and Horatia (in The Convenient Marriage.)

    Reply
  54. Thanks for those thoughts, Patricia. I think you would have enjoyed the convention and the panels you chose. I agree with you about dukes or ordinary Joes — it all depends on the character and the story and what they have to go through. We do like our heroes to suffer, dont we?
    I was thinking after the feminism panel, that Georgette Heyer would probably have rejected feminism as a political movement, but she herself was a strong and independent woman and all her heroines are strong, lively and courageous — even, I think, those heroines who were young, and inexperienced, like Hero (in Fridays Child) and Horatia (in The Convenient Marriage.)

    Reply
  55. Thanks for those thoughts, Patricia. I think you would have enjoyed the convention and the panels you chose. I agree with you about dukes or ordinary Joes — it all depends on the character and the story and what they have to go through. We do like our heroes to suffer, dont we?
    I was thinking after the feminism panel, that Georgette Heyer would probably have rejected feminism as a political movement, but she herself was a strong and independent woman and all her heroines are strong, lively and courageous — even, I think, those heroines who were young, and inexperienced, like Hero (in Fridays Child) and Horatia (in The Convenient Marriage.)

    Reply
  56. Sue, the Firth P&P is the only one that is faithful to the original book, and that’s because it has so much time, as a TV series, that it can include all the scenes. It would be interesting to see another version as long and detailed to compare.
    Not that I want any more versions of P&P — I want some Heyers, and an Eva Ibbotson or two, and she MJPs to be adapted for the screen.
    I think you’d love our conventions here — they are smaller and more intimate. Tone honest, I was bit lost at RT, it was sooooo huge. Thank goodness I had Mary Jo and Pat and Susanna and a couple of Aussie friends to play with.

    Reply
  57. Sue, the Firth P&P is the only one that is faithful to the original book, and that’s because it has so much time, as a TV series, that it can include all the scenes. It would be interesting to see another version as long and detailed to compare.
    Not that I want any more versions of P&P — I want some Heyers, and an Eva Ibbotson or two, and she MJPs to be adapted for the screen.
    I think you’d love our conventions here — they are smaller and more intimate. Tone honest, I was bit lost at RT, it was sooooo huge. Thank goodness I had Mary Jo and Pat and Susanna and a couple of Aussie friends to play with.

    Reply
  58. Sue, the Firth P&P is the only one that is faithful to the original book, and that’s because it has so much time, as a TV series, that it can include all the scenes. It would be interesting to see another version as long and detailed to compare.
    Not that I want any more versions of P&P — I want some Heyers, and an Eva Ibbotson or two, and she MJPs to be adapted for the screen.
    I think you’d love our conventions here — they are smaller and more intimate. Tone honest, I was bit lost at RT, it was sooooo huge. Thank goodness I had Mary Jo and Pat and Susanna and a couple of Aussie friends to play with.

    Reply
  59. Sue, the Firth P&P is the only one that is faithful to the original book, and that’s because it has so much time, as a TV series, that it can include all the scenes. It would be interesting to see another version as long and detailed to compare.
    Not that I want any more versions of P&P — I want some Heyers, and an Eva Ibbotson or two, and she MJPs to be adapted for the screen.
    I think you’d love our conventions here — they are smaller and more intimate. Tone honest, I was bit lost at RT, it was sooooo huge. Thank goodness I had Mary Jo and Pat and Susanna and a couple of Aussie friends to play with.

    Reply
  60. Sue, the Firth P&P is the only one that is faithful to the original book, and that’s because it has so much time, as a TV series, that it can include all the scenes. It would be interesting to see another version as long and detailed to compare.
    Not that I want any more versions of P&P — I want some Heyers, and an Eva Ibbotson or two, and she MJPs to be adapted for the screen.
    I think you’d love our conventions here — they are smaller and more intimate. Tone honest, I was bit lost at RT, it was sooooo huge. Thank goodness I had Mary Jo and Pat and Susanna and a couple of Aussie friends to play with.

    Reply
  61. Thanks so much, Vicki -it was a pretty special night for me. A bit overwhelming, actually.
    “they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.”
    This is so true. And not just wars and revolutions — colonisation and pioneer settlement revealed just how strong women could be. My g-g-g-grandmother lived in the middle of nowhere in the early days of Australian colonization, a young bride of 16, who bore 10 kids and became de facto midwife to the women who followed her to the district. Lived to a ripe old age, too. Amazing stories, too, that one day I would like to write.
    I love the way romance characters earn their happily ever afters.

    Reply
  62. Thanks so much, Vicki -it was a pretty special night for me. A bit overwhelming, actually.
    “they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.”
    This is so true. And not just wars and revolutions — colonisation and pioneer settlement revealed just how strong women could be. My g-g-g-grandmother lived in the middle of nowhere in the early days of Australian colonization, a young bride of 16, who bore 10 kids and became de facto midwife to the women who followed her to the district. Lived to a ripe old age, too. Amazing stories, too, that one day I would like to write.
    I love the way romance characters earn their happily ever afters.

    Reply
  63. Thanks so much, Vicki -it was a pretty special night for me. A bit overwhelming, actually.
    “they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.”
    This is so true. And not just wars and revolutions — colonisation and pioneer settlement revealed just how strong women could be. My g-g-g-grandmother lived in the middle of nowhere in the early days of Australian colonization, a young bride of 16, who bore 10 kids and became de facto midwife to the women who followed her to the district. Lived to a ripe old age, too. Amazing stories, too, that one day I would like to write.
    I love the way romance characters earn their happily ever afters.

    Reply
  64. Thanks so much, Vicki -it was a pretty special night for me. A bit overwhelming, actually.
    “they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.”
    This is so true. And not just wars and revolutions — colonisation and pioneer settlement revealed just how strong women could be. My g-g-g-grandmother lived in the middle of nowhere in the early days of Australian colonization, a young bride of 16, who bore 10 kids and became de facto midwife to the women who followed her to the district. Lived to a ripe old age, too. Amazing stories, too, that one day I would like to write.
    I love the way romance characters earn their happily ever afters.

    Reply
  65. Thanks so much, Vicki -it was a pretty special night for me. A bit overwhelming, actually.
    “they just didn’t always know they were strong until they were compelled to be. Which is what all the wars and revolutions revealed.”
    This is so true. And not just wars and revolutions — colonisation and pioneer settlement revealed just how strong women could be. My g-g-g-grandmother lived in the middle of nowhere in the early days of Australian colonization, a young bride of 16, who bore 10 kids and became de facto midwife to the women who followed her to the district. Lived to a ripe old age, too. Amazing stories, too, that one day I would like to write.
    I love the way romance characters earn their happily ever afters.

    Reply
  66. 200 romance fans getting together sounds lovely, Anne. That gives people a chance to talk to each other. I’ve been to ComicCon and the like back in the day but I quit going because the crowds became so large it was a bit scary to me. I wanted security and an escort 🙂
    I don’t have any book boyfriends, nor any film or TV boyfriends either. However as a young teen my hero was Lord Sheftu in Mara, Daughter of the Nile (starting off with the Lords even that young 🙂
    As I have aged, I have been content to let them be them and I will be me. The notion of trailing along as a perpetual Indian to somebody’s Chief has palled quite a bit. The men I have known back in the day, well, my idea of 50-50 (love that line in Pat and Mike – this man-woman thing has to be 50-50 – and it was the hero who said it!) was their idea of 60-40, or worse, with them on the short end.
    Last night I was watching Gangster Squad, which I thought would be a fun noir pastiche, but it was released in 2013, and I suspect they felt they had to change the role of the wife of the central character. Connie O’Mara is very pregnant, and she’s the brains of the pair; her husband John, an LAPD detective (with hat) is the brawn. She helps him with his research, keeps him focused and makes clever suggestions that put him on the right track. It made the movie more appealing, but it sure wasn’t accurate to 1949 — at least not the way it was presented.
    They were a great couple though.
    Peter Cushing played Darcy in an early (1952) BBC production of P&P. I’ve seen photos but perhaps the tapes no longer exist. BBC threw out a lot of tapes they now wish they had kept. A couple of years later he played Beau Brummel. He wouldn’t have been my choice for either part, but I bet he was terrific.

    Reply
  67. 200 romance fans getting together sounds lovely, Anne. That gives people a chance to talk to each other. I’ve been to ComicCon and the like back in the day but I quit going because the crowds became so large it was a bit scary to me. I wanted security and an escort 🙂
    I don’t have any book boyfriends, nor any film or TV boyfriends either. However as a young teen my hero was Lord Sheftu in Mara, Daughter of the Nile (starting off with the Lords even that young 🙂
    As I have aged, I have been content to let them be them and I will be me. The notion of trailing along as a perpetual Indian to somebody’s Chief has palled quite a bit. The men I have known back in the day, well, my idea of 50-50 (love that line in Pat and Mike – this man-woman thing has to be 50-50 – and it was the hero who said it!) was their idea of 60-40, or worse, with them on the short end.
    Last night I was watching Gangster Squad, which I thought would be a fun noir pastiche, but it was released in 2013, and I suspect they felt they had to change the role of the wife of the central character. Connie O’Mara is very pregnant, and she’s the brains of the pair; her husband John, an LAPD detective (with hat) is the brawn. She helps him with his research, keeps him focused and makes clever suggestions that put him on the right track. It made the movie more appealing, but it sure wasn’t accurate to 1949 — at least not the way it was presented.
    They were a great couple though.
    Peter Cushing played Darcy in an early (1952) BBC production of P&P. I’ve seen photos but perhaps the tapes no longer exist. BBC threw out a lot of tapes they now wish they had kept. A couple of years later he played Beau Brummel. He wouldn’t have been my choice for either part, but I bet he was terrific.

    Reply
  68. 200 romance fans getting together sounds lovely, Anne. That gives people a chance to talk to each other. I’ve been to ComicCon and the like back in the day but I quit going because the crowds became so large it was a bit scary to me. I wanted security and an escort 🙂
    I don’t have any book boyfriends, nor any film or TV boyfriends either. However as a young teen my hero was Lord Sheftu in Mara, Daughter of the Nile (starting off with the Lords even that young 🙂
    As I have aged, I have been content to let them be them and I will be me. The notion of trailing along as a perpetual Indian to somebody’s Chief has palled quite a bit. The men I have known back in the day, well, my idea of 50-50 (love that line in Pat and Mike – this man-woman thing has to be 50-50 – and it was the hero who said it!) was their idea of 60-40, or worse, with them on the short end.
    Last night I was watching Gangster Squad, which I thought would be a fun noir pastiche, but it was released in 2013, and I suspect they felt they had to change the role of the wife of the central character. Connie O’Mara is very pregnant, and she’s the brains of the pair; her husband John, an LAPD detective (with hat) is the brawn. She helps him with his research, keeps him focused and makes clever suggestions that put him on the right track. It made the movie more appealing, but it sure wasn’t accurate to 1949 — at least not the way it was presented.
    They were a great couple though.
    Peter Cushing played Darcy in an early (1952) BBC production of P&P. I’ve seen photos but perhaps the tapes no longer exist. BBC threw out a lot of tapes they now wish they had kept. A couple of years later he played Beau Brummel. He wouldn’t have been my choice for either part, but I bet he was terrific.

    Reply
  69. 200 romance fans getting together sounds lovely, Anne. That gives people a chance to talk to each other. I’ve been to ComicCon and the like back in the day but I quit going because the crowds became so large it was a bit scary to me. I wanted security and an escort 🙂
    I don’t have any book boyfriends, nor any film or TV boyfriends either. However as a young teen my hero was Lord Sheftu in Mara, Daughter of the Nile (starting off with the Lords even that young 🙂
    As I have aged, I have been content to let them be them and I will be me. The notion of trailing along as a perpetual Indian to somebody’s Chief has palled quite a bit. The men I have known back in the day, well, my idea of 50-50 (love that line in Pat and Mike – this man-woman thing has to be 50-50 – and it was the hero who said it!) was their idea of 60-40, or worse, with them on the short end.
    Last night I was watching Gangster Squad, which I thought would be a fun noir pastiche, but it was released in 2013, and I suspect they felt they had to change the role of the wife of the central character. Connie O’Mara is very pregnant, and she’s the brains of the pair; her husband John, an LAPD detective (with hat) is the brawn. She helps him with his research, keeps him focused and makes clever suggestions that put him on the right track. It made the movie more appealing, but it sure wasn’t accurate to 1949 — at least not the way it was presented.
    They were a great couple though.
    Peter Cushing played Darcy in an early (1952) BBC production of P&P. I’ve seen photos but perhaps the tapes no longer exist. BBC threw out a lot of tapes they now wish they had kept. A couple of years later he played Beau Brummel. He wouldn’t have been my choice for either part, but I bet he was terrific.

    Reply
  70. 200 romance fans getting together sounds lovely, Anne. That gives people a chance to talk to each other. I’ve been to ComicCon and the like back in the day but I quit going because the crowds became so large it was a bit scary to me. I wanted security and an escort 🙂
    I don’t have any book boyfriends, nor any film or TV boyfriends either. However as a young teen my hero was Lord Sheftu in Mara, Daughter of the Nile (starting off with the Lords even that young 🙂
    As I have aged, I have been content to let them be them and I will be me. The notion of trailing along as a perpetual Indian to somebody’s Chief has palled quite a bit. The men I have known back in the day, well, my idea of 50-50 (love that line in Pat and Mike – this man-woman thing has to be 50-50 – and it was the hero who said it!) was their idea of 60-40, or worse, with them on the short end.
    Last night I was watching Gangster Squad, which I thought would be a fun noir pastiche, but it was released in 2013, and I suspect they felt they had to change the role of the wife of the central character. Connie O’Mara is very pregnant, and she’s the brains of the pair; her husband John, an LAPD detective (with hat) is the brawn. She helps him with his research, keeps him focused and makes clever suggestions that put him on the right track. It made the movie more appealing, but it sure wasn’t accurate to 1949 — at least not the way it was presented.
    They were a great couple though.
    Peter Cushing played Darcy in an early (1952) BBC production of P&P. I’ve seen photos but perhaps the tapes no longer exist. BBC threw out a lot of tapes they now wish they had kept. A couple of years later he played Beau Brummel. He wouldn’t have been my choice for either part, but I bet he was terrific.

    Reply
  71. Congratulations Anne on all your wonderful achievements!
    I have to agree with Patricia above, I thought David Rintoul gave a great performance as Darcy. Yes a tad stiff but if you watch any of the BBC versions at the time they were all acted like this. I too loved the chemistry between Rintoul and Garvie.
    The Olivier one is a travesty imo. Couldn’t be doing with it. Lovely enjoyable post.

    Reply
  72. Congratulations Anne on all your wonderful achievements!
    I have to agree with Patricia above, I thought David Rintoul gave a great performance as Darcy. Yes a tad stiff but if you watch any of the BBC versions at the time they were all acted like this. I too loved the chemistry between Rintoul and Garvie.
    The Olivier one is a travesty imo. Couldn’t be doing with it. Lovely enjoyable post.

    Reply
  73. Congratulations Anne on all your wonderful achievements!
    I have to agree with Patricia above, I thought David Rintoul gave a great performance as Darcy. Yes a tad stiff but if you watch any of the BBC versions at the time they were all acted like this. I too loved the chemistry between Rintoul and Garvie.
    The Olivier one is a travesty imo. Couldn’t be doing with it. Lovely enjoyable post.

    Reply
  74. Congratulations Anne on all your wonderful achievements!
    I have to agree with Patricia above, I thought David Rintoul gave a great performance as Darcy. Yes a tad stiff but if you watch any of the BBC versions at the time they were all acted like this. I too loved the chemistry between Rintoul and Garvie.
    The Olivier one is a travesty imo. Couldn’t be doing with it. Lovely enjoyable post.

    Reply
  75. Congratulations Anne on all your wonderful achievements!
    I have to agree with Patricia above, I thought David Rintoul gave a great performance as Darcy. Yes a tad stiff but if you watch any of the BBC versions at the time they were all acted like this. I too loved the chemistry between Rintoul and Garvie.
    The Olivier one is a travesty imo. Couldn’t be doing with it. Lovely enjoyable post.

    Reply
  76. Ms Gracie, it is lovely that you have been recognized for what we already knew – you are a darn good writer.
    I agree – Colin Firth was terrific as Darcy. And the fact the mini-series had the time to provide the story as I believe it was meant to be seen. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could see that kind of production value in Heyer’s stories?
    I would have enjoyed any of the panels in fact I would have enjoyed being able to see and hear everything.
    Finally, as to feminism, I have read some books which show a woman being forced into sexual activity. I am not crazy about those books. But, generally, I like to believe that strong women from any era are interesting women. And I know from my own family history that there are different ways for women to show their power. One of my great-grandmothers sailed from Wales with 7 of her 9 children (two weren’t born yet) to a new world. To follow her husband on a journey like that, is a prime example of strength and courage.
    Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.

    Reply
  77. Ms Gracie, it is lovely that you have been recognized for what we already knew – you are a darn good writer.
    I agree – Colin Firth was terrific as Darcy. And the fact the mini-series had the time to provide the story as I believe it was meant to be seen. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could see that kind of production value in Heyer’s stories?
    I would have enjoyed any of the panels in fact I would have enjoyed being able to see and hear everything.
    Finally, as to feminism, I have read some books which show a woman being forced into sexual activity. I am not crazy about those books. But, generally, I like to believe that strong women from any era are interesting women. And I know from my own family history that there are different ways for women to show their power. One of my great-grandmothers sailed from Wales with 7 of her 9 children (two weren’t born yet) to a new world. To follow her husband on a journey like that, is a prime example of strength and courage.
    Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.

    Reply
  78. Ms Gracie, it is lovely that you have been recognized for what we already knew – you are a darn good writer.
    I agree – Colin Firth was terrific as Darcy. And the fact the mini-series had the time to provide the story as I believe it was meant to be seen. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could see that kind of production value in Heyer’s stories?
    I would have enjoyed any of the panels in fact I would have enjoyed being able to see and hear everything.
    Finally, as to feminism, I have read some books which show a woman being forced into sexual activity. I am not crazy about those books. But, generally, I like to believe that strong women from any era are interesting women. And I know from my own family history that there are different ways for women to show their power. One of my great-grandmothers sailed from Wales with 7 of her 9 children (two weren’t born yet) to a new world. To follow her husband on a journey like that, is a prime example of strength and courage.
    Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.

    Reply
  79. Ms Gracie, it is lovely that you have been recognized for what we already knew – you are a darn good writer.
    I agree – Colin Firth was terrific as Darcy. And the fact the mini-series had the time to provide the story as I believe it was meant to be seen. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could see that kind of production value in Heyer’s stories?
    I would have enjoyed any of the panels in fact I would have enjoyed being able to see and hear everything.
    Finally, as to feminism, I have read some books which show a woman being forced into sexual activity. I am not crazy about those books. But, generally, I like to believe that strong women from any era are interesting women. And I know from my own family history that there are different ways for women to show their power. One of my great-grandmothers sailed from Wales with 7 of her 9 children (two weren’t born yet) to a new world. To follow her husband on a journey like that, is a prime example of strength and courage.
    Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.

    Reply
  80. Ms Gracie, it is lovely that you have been recognized for what we already knew – you are a darn good writer.
    I agree – Colin Firth was terrific as Darcy. And the fact the mini-series had the time to provide the story as I believe it was meant to be seen. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could see that kind of production value in Heyer’s stories?
    I would have enjoyed any of the panels in fact I would have enjoyed being able to see and hear everything.
    Finally, as to feminism, I have read some books which show a woman being forced into sexual activity. I am not crazy about those books. But, generally, I like to believe that strong women from any era are interesting women. And I know from my own family history that there are different ways for women to show their power. One of my great-grandmothers sailed from Wales with 7 of her 9 children (two weren’t born yet) to a new world. To follow her husband on a journey like that, is a prime example of strength and courage.
    Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.

    Reply
  81. Thanks, Janice. Very interesting comments. The Peter Cushing P&P is listed on the site I linked to with the various Darcy interpretations — it was a 1952 production. I’ve never seen it, and have no idea if the tapes survived or not. That site made me realise there were even more versions of P&P than I thought.
    As for the 60/40, 50-50 thing — I doubt whether people thought in those terms in the ’40’s, too.

    Reply
  82. Thanks, Janice. Very interesting comments. The Peter Cushing P&P is listed on the site I linked to with the various Darcy interpretations — it was a 1952 production. I’ve never seen it, and have no idea if the tapes survived or not. That site made me realise there were even more versions of P&P than I thought.
    As for the 60/40, 50-50 thing — I doubt whether people thought in those terms in the ’40’s, too.

    Reply
  83. Thanks, Janice. Very interesting comments. The Peter Cushing P&P is listed on the site I linked to with the various Darcy interpretations — it was a 1952 production. I’ve never seen it, and have no idea if the tapes survived or not. That site made me realise there were even more versions of P&P than I thought.
    As for the 60/40, 50-50 thing — I doubt whether people thought in those terms in the ’40’s, too.

    Reply
  84. Thanks, Janice. Very interesting comments. The Peter Cushing P&P is listed on the site I linked to with the various Darcy interpretations — it was a 1952 production. I’ve never seen it, and have no idea if the tapes survived or not. That site made me realise there were even more versions of P&P than I thought.
    As for the 60/40, 50-50 thing — I doubt whether people thought in those terms in the ’40’s, too.

    Reply
  85. Thanks, Janice. Very interesting comments. The Peter Cushing P&P is listed on the site I linked to with the various Darcy interpretations — it was a 1952 production. I’ve never seen it, and have no idea if the tapes survived or not. That site made me realise there were even more versions of P&P than I thought.
    As for the 60/40, 50-50 thing — I doubt whether people thought in those terms in the ’40’s, too.

    Reply
  86. Thanks for your kind words, Teresa. Maybe I should watch that Rintoul version again. I loved him in Dr Findlay, and maybe I was carrying that over to his Darcy.
    I’m fond of that Olivier interpretation, even though the actual movie was so not the Regency-era, because it was the only copy I could get when I showed the movie to a group of girls I was teaching. They loved the book and utterly adored the movie, even though it was black and white and the girls tended to disdain “old movies.”

    Reply
  87. Thanks for your kind words, Teresa. Maybe I should watch that Rintoul version again. I loved him in Dr Findlay, and maybe I was carrying that over to his Darcy.
    I’m fond of that Olivier interpretation, even though the actual movie was so not the Regency-era, because it was the only copy I could get when I showed the movie to a group of girls I was teaching. They loved the book and utterly adored the movie, even though it was black and white and the girls tended to disdain “old movies.”

    Reply
  88. Thanks for your kind words, Teresa. Maybe I should watch that Rintoul version again. I loved him in Dr Findlay, and maybe I was carrying that over to his Darcy.
    I’m fond of that Olivier interpretation, even though the actual movie was so not the Regency-era, because it was the only copy I could get when I showed the movie to a group of girls I was teaching. They loved the book and utterly adored the movie, even though it was black and white and the girls tended to disdain “old movies.”

    Reply
  89. Thanks for your kind words, Teresa. Maybe I should watch that Rintoul version again. I loved him in Dr Findlay, and maybe I was carrying that over to his Darcy.
    I’m fond of that Olivier interpretation, even though the actual movie was so not the Regency-era, because it was the only copy I could get when I showed the movie to a group of girls I was teaching. They loved the book and utterly adored the movie, even though it was black and white and the girls tended to disdain “old movies.”

    Reply
  90. Thanks for your kind words, Teresa. Maybe I should watch that Rintoul version again. I loved him in Dr Findlay, and maybe I was carrying that over to his Darcy.
    I’m fond of that Olivier interpretation, even though the actual movie was so not the Regency-era, because it was the only copy I could get when I showed the movie to a group of girls I was teaching. They loved the book and utterly adored the movie, even though it was black and white and the girls tended to disdain “old movies.”

    Reply
  91. Thanks for your congratulations, Annette. And yes, I, too, would love to see a full-length TV adaption of one of Heyer’s books.
    We did discuss the books where “forced seduction” takes place, but didn’t dwell on it. I dislike them myself, and take issue with the term “forced seduction” as in my view “seduction” means a coaxing, a lulling of anxieties, a gentle convincing of someone to do something that at first they were unwilling to do. “Forced” completely changes that.
    I agree with you about our female forebears. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to sail from Wales to the US with 7 kids. And then start a new life away from everyone she knew. “Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.” Exactly.

    Reply
  92. Thanks for your congratulations, Annette. And yes, I, too, would love to see a full-length TV adaption of one of Heyer’s books.
    We did discuss the books where “forced seduction” takes place, but didn’t dwell on it. I dislike them myself, and take issue with the term “forced seduction” as in my view “seduction” means a coaxing, a lulling of anxieties, a gentle convincing of someone to do something that at first they were unwilling to do. “Forced” completely changes that.
    I agree with you about our female forebears. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to sail from Wales to the US with 7 kids. And then start a new life away from everyone she knew. “Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.” Exactly.

    Reply
  93. Thanks for your congratulations, Annette. And yes, I, too, would love to see a full-length TV adaption of one of Heyer’s books.
    We did discuss the books where “forced seduction” takes place, but didn’t dwell on it. I dislike them myself, and take issue with the term “forced seduction” as in my view “seduction” means a coaxing, a lulling of anxieties, a gentle convincing of someone to do something that at first they were unwilling to do. “Forced” completely changes that.
    I agree with you about our female forebears. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to sail from Wales to the US with 7 kids. And then start a new life away from everyone she knew. “Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.” Exactly.

    Reply
  94. Thanks for your congratulations, Annette. And yes, I, too, would love to see a full-length TV adaption of one of Heyer’s books.
    We did discuss the books where “forced seduction” takes place, but didn’t dwell on it. I dislike them myself, and take issue with the term “forced seduction” as in my view “seduction” means a coaxing, a lulling of anxieties, a gentle convincing of someone to do something that at first they were unwilling to do. “Forced” completely changes that.
    I agree with you about our female forebears. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to sail from Wales to the US with 7 kids. And then start a new life away from everyone she knew. “Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.” Exactly.

    Reply
  95. Thanks for your congratulations, Annette. And yes, I, too, would love to see a full-length TV adaption of one of Heyer’s books.
    We did discuss the books where “forced seduction” takes place, but didn’t dwell on it. I dislike them myself, and take issue with the term “forced seduction” as in my view “seduction” means a coaxing, a lulling of anxieties, a gentle convincing of someone to do something that at first they were unwilling to do. “Forced” completely changes that.
    I agree with you about our female forebears. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to sail from Wales to the US with 7 kids. And then start a new life away from everyone she knew. “Women did not have opportunities which are available now, but that does not mean they were weak, it simply means they had to be more inventive than men to succeed.” Exactly.

    Reply
  96. congrats on the awards! The conference sounds lovely, wish I could have gone. I like the idea of the speed “dating” though 4min doesn’t sound like nearly enough time, think would need about twice that. love Courtney’s response re: strong women. YES! 🙂 I’ve been lucky enough to go to a couple small conference/conventions the past few years and they are often so much fun and the various forum topics are almost always interesting & fun.

    Reply
  97. congrats on the awards! The conference sounds lovely, wish I could have gone. I like the idea of the speed “dating” though 4min doesn’t sound like nearly enough time, think would need about twice that. love Courtney’s response re: strong women. YES! 🙂 I’ve been lucky enough to go to a couple small conference/conventions the past few years and they are often so much fun and the various forum topics are almost always interesting & fun.

    Reply
  98. congrats on the awards! The conference sounds lovely, wish I could have gone. I like the idea of the speed “dating” though 4min doesn’t sound like nearly enough time, think would need about twice that. love Courtney’s response re: strong women. YES! 🙂 I’ve been lucky enough to go to a couple small conference/conventions the past few years and they are often so much fun and the various forum topics are almost always interesting & fun.

    Reply
  99. congrats on the awards! The conference sounds lovely, wish I could have gone. I like the idea of the speed “dating” though 4min doesn’t sound like nearly enough time, think would need about twice that. love Courtney’s response re: strong women. YES! 🙂 I’ve been lucky enough to go to a couple small conference/conventions the past few years and they are often so much fun and the various forum topics are almost always interesting & fun.

    Reply
  100. congrats on the awards! The conference sounds lovely, wish I could have gone. I like the idea of the speed “dating” though 4min doesn’t sound like nearly enough time, think would need about twice that. love Courtney’s response re: strong women. YES! 🙂 I’ve been lucky enough to go to a couple small conference/conventions the past few years and they are often so much fun and the various forum topics are almost always interesting & fun.

    Reply
  101. They did, I think. Pat and Mike was a 1952 release, so the concept was around before then. Probably since WW2 when women filled jobs previously held by men. But it had gathered some steam by the 60s-70s.

    Reply
  102. They did, I think. Pat and Mike was a 1952 release, so the concept was around before then. Probably since WW2 when women filled jobs previously held by men. But it had gathered some steam by the 60s-70s.

    Reply
  103. They did, I think. Pat and Mike was a 1952 release, so the concept was around before then. Probably since WW2 when women filled jobs previously held by men. But it had gathered some steam by the 60s-70s.

    Reply
  104. They did, I think. Pat and Mike was a 1952 release, so the concept was around before then. Probably since WW2 when women filled jobs previously held by men. But it had gathered some steam by the 60s-70s.

    Reply
  105. They did, I think. Pat and Mike was a 1952 release, so the concept was around before then. Probably since WW2 when women filled jobs previously held by men. But it had gathered some steam by the 60s-70s.

    Reply
  106. Yes, I hadn’t thought about the effect of WW2 where women were enticed into “male” jobs during the war and then “encouraged” out of those jobs and back to the housewife image afterward. Regardless of whether they needed to support a family or wanted a career or not.

    Reply
  107. Yes, I hadn’t thought about the effect of WW2 where women were enticed into “male” jobs during the war and then “encouraged” out of those jobs and back to the housewife image afterward. Regardless of whether they needed to support a family or wanted a career or not.

    Reply
  108. Yes, I hadn’t thought about the effect of WW2 where women were enticed into “male” jobs during the war and then “encouraged” out of those jobs and back to the housewife image afterward. Regardless of whether they needed to support a family or wanted a career or not.

    Reply
  109. Yes, I hadn’t thought about the effect of WW2 where women were enticed into “male” jobs during the war and then “encouraged” out of those jobs and back to the housewife image afterward. Regardless of whether they needed to support a family or wanted a career or not.

    Reply
  110. Yes, I hadn’t thought about the effect of WW2 where women were enticed into “male” jobs during the war and then “encouraged” out of those jobs and back to the housewife image afterward. Regardless of whether they needed to support a family or wanted a career or not.

    Reply
  111. Thank you gamesmistress. You’re right, the speed dating wasn’t long enough — it was really hard getting people to move on after 4 minutes, when they were really just getting into the conversation. I needed a games mistresses whistle — or a stockman’s whip! *g*

    Reply
  112. Thank you gamesmistress. You’re right, the speed dating wasn’t long enough — it was really hard getting people to move on after 4 minutes, when they were really just getting into the conversation. I needed a games mistresses whistle — or a stockman’s whip! *g*

    Reply
  113. Thank you gamesmistress. You’re right, the speed dating wasn’t long enough — it was really hard getting people to move on after 4 minutes, when they were really just getting into the conversation. I needed a games mistresses whistle — or a stockman’s whip! *g*

    Reply
  114. Thank you gamesmistress. You’re right, the speed dating wasn’t long enough — it was really hard getting people to move on after 4 minutes, when they were really just getting into the conversation. I needed a games mistresses whistle — or a stockman’s whip! *g*

    Reply
  115. Thank you gamesmistress. You’re right, the speed dating wasn’t long enough — it was really hard getting people to move on after 4 minutes, when they were really just getting into the conversation. I needed a games mistresses whistle — or a stockman’s whip! *g*

    Reply
  116. David Rintoul is definitely my favourite Darcy, though he’s hard to track down, and the versions of Pride and Prejudice 1980 on YouTube are nearly impossible to view (they’ve been altered for copyright reasons).
    Though Rintoul’s version version is a little “stagey”, I like the subtlety – and the lack of 2005 Darcy’s “Addams Family” hair!

    Reply
  117. David Rintoul is definitely my favourite Darcy, though he’s hard to track down, and the versions of Pride and Prejudice 1980 on YouTube are nearly impossible to view (they’ve been altered for copyright reasons).
    Though Rintoul’s version version is a little “stagey”, I like the subtlety – and the lack of 2005 Darcy’s “Addams Family” hair!

    Reply
  118. David Rintoul is definitely my favourite Darcy, though he’s hard to track down, and the versions of Pride and Prejudice 1980 on YouTube are nearly impossible to view (they’ve been altered for copyright reasons).
    Though Rintoul’s version version is a little “stagey”, I like the subtlety – and the lack of 2005 Darcy’s “Addams Family” hair!

    Reply
  119. David Rintoul is definitely my favourite Darcy, though he’s hard to track down, and the versions of Pride and Prejudice 1980 on YouTube are nearly impossible to view (they’ve been altered for copyright reasons).
    Though Rintoul’s version version is a little “stagey”, I like the subtlety – and the lack of 2005 Darcy’s “Addams Family” hair!

    Reply
  120. David Rintoul is definitely my favourite Darcy, though he’s hard to track down, and the versions of Pride and Prejudice 1980 on YouTube are nearly impossible to view (they’ve been altered for copyright reasons).
    Though Rintoul’s version version is a little “stagey”, I like the subtlety – and the lack of 2005 Darcy’s “Addams Family” hair!

    Reply
  121. It sounds like a great convention! I would have loved the “No Dukes Need Apply” panel, and the speed dating sounds like great fun too.
    As far as book boyfriends, I think Mr. Darcy would be too high maintenance for me, and not particularly useful. I like a handy, multi-functional hero that can cope with any situation. I’ll take Cyn from My Lady Notorious or Doyle from The Forbidden Rose. They are veritable Swiss Army knives.

    Reply
  122. It sounds like a great convention! I would have loved the “No Dukes Need Apply” panel, and the speed dating sounds like great fun too.
    As far as book boyfriends, I think Mr. Darcy would be too high maintenance for me, and not particularly useful. I like a handy, multi-functional hero that can cope with any situation. I’ll take Cyn from My Lady Notorious or Doyle from The Forbidden Rose. They are veritable Swiss Army knives.

    Reply
  123. It sounds like a great convention! I would have loved the “No Dukes Need Apply” panel, and the speed dating sounds like great fun too.
    As far as book boyfriends, I think Mr. Darcy would be too high maintenance for me, and not particularly useful. I like a handy, multi-functional hero that can cope with any situation. I’ll take Cyn from My Lady Notorious or Doyle from The Forbidden Rose. They are veritable Swiss Army knives.

    Reply
  124. It sounds like a great convention! I would have loved the “No Dukes Need Apply” panel, and the speed dating sounds like great fun too.
    As far as book boyfriends, I think Mr. Darcy would be too high maintenance for me, and not particularly useful. I like a handy, multi-functional hero that can cope with any situation. I’ll take Cyn from My Lady Notorious or Doyle from The Forbidden Rose. They are veritable Swiss Army knives.

    Reply
  125. It sounds like a great convention! I would have loved the “No Dukes Need Apply” panel, and the speed dating sounds like great fun too.
    As far as book boyfriends, I think Mr. Darcy would be too high maintenance for me, and not particularly useful. I like a handy, multi-functional hero that can cope with any situation. I’ll take Cyn from My Lady Notorious or Doyle from The Forbidden Rose. They are veritable Swiss Army knives.

    Reply
  126. Karin, great analogy — I love the Swiss army knife style of hero who can turn his hand to whatevers required. (Auto-correctr just changed that to quatever — really? What sort of a word is that? Bah humbug!)

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  127. Karin, great analogy — I love the Swiss army knife style of hero who can turn his hand to whatevers required. (Auto-correctr just changed that to quatever — really? What sort of a word is that? Bah humbug!)

    Reply
  128. Karin, great analogy — I love the Swiss army knife style of hero who can turn his hand to whatevers required. (Auto-correctr just changed that to quatever — really? What sort of a word is that? Bah humbug!)

    Reply
  129. Karin, great analogy — I love the Swiss army knife style of hero who can turn his hand to whatevers required. (Auto-correctr just changed that to quatever — really? What sort of a word is that? Bah humbug!)

    Reply
  130. Karin, great analogy — I love the Swiss army knife style of hero who can turn his hand to whatevers required. (Auto-correctr just changed that to quatever — really? What sort of a word is that? Bah humbug!)

    Reply

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