The Address Book’s Tale

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo

At midnight Thursday, I pressed the “Send” key to shoot my fourth Lost Lords book, No Longer a Gentleman, off to New York, so my brain is still rather fried.  Hence, my post today is a (very) modest meditation on address books.

Humankind is a social species.  Even dedicated introverts like writers usually want some people around at least some of the time.  As I think about this, a history of communications is a history of the human race. 

In earlier days, when most people could be born, live, and die within a small community, there wouldn’t have been much need for address books since you pretty much knew everyone and their whereabouts already. 

If you were part of a clan of cave dwellers and you wanted to chat with your pal Ugga-Mugga, you’d just call “Ugga!” across the cave.  If you were a 19th century farmer, you knew your cousin Bob lived up the Pike Road ‘cross from the Hales. 

Antique_telephone 1 Widening the social circles

As I started writing this post, it occurred to me that social circles probably widened dramatically with the invention of the telephone. Address books become common about the same time, since phone numbers were another piece of data that needed to be recorded and the more the data, the harder it is to remember it all without assistance.

Methods of communication have been exploding ever since.  These days, a person might list telephone/s, e-mail address, Facebook listing, Twitter handle, etc, etc.

The humble hardcopy address book

It was a humble hardcopy address book that got me to thinking about the genus.  I have a very old, very small address book that probably dates back to immediately post college days.  It has a sewn binding, which suggests that it was intended to be kept and used indefinitely.  It still sits in a corner of my kitchen and contains penciled phone numbers for people I might be inspired to call from my kitchen. 

One thing I learned from that address book was do not write addresses in ink in a permanent address book.  <G>  People, especially young, post college age friends, move a lot.

E-Z Record address book But what really got me thinking was replacement for my fattest, most useful address book, which stems from when I was working as a freelance designer.  These days, most address books have ring binders so pages and can be added and removed, unlike my old sewn address book.

But data still changes, and whole pages can get messy quickly.  So my master address book is the one recommended by a friend of mine many years ago.  It’s a ring binder style with small slips large enough for one entry of name, address, phone numbers and a bit of room for notes like names of husbands and kids, or where one knows the person from.  They were layered in the address book so you could see 7 or 8 at a time.

As my friend said breezily, she was an Aquarian and liked that she could easily add or subtract people.  (And then she bought a new car to drive cross country, stopped in Santa Fe and never left, and has been doing interesting things like professional astrology ever since.  But that’s another story. <G>)

I, however, am not a breezy Aquarian. I am the ‘hang onto things forever because you never know when they might be useful” sort.  After years of this, my address book was on the vergeExploding book  of exploding.  The plastic cover was cracking, and I couldn’t take out old address slips because slips would spill out if I opened the ring binder.  So I put Post-It notes over existing pages. 

The book was a mess, and I didn’t have any luck finding the same kind of address book with individual slips since old fashioned hardcopy address books are a diminishing market. 

Then I got the genius idea (duh!) of Googling, and I found what I wanted right off.  In fact, the E-Z Record company, manufacturer of the sensibly named “Lifetime Address Book” is in Maryland less than an hour away.  I promptly ordered a larger version of what I had, with lots of extra address slips.

Excavation It really got interesting when it came time to transfer needed contact information from the old book to the new.  The address book was like excavating Mediterranean ruins down through the layers of my life.  Lots of business contacts from my designer years for printers and typesetters and silk screeners and sign makers and other designy things.  Restaurants, some of them long vanished. 

Lots of addresses for friends and acquaintances, too.  Some are people who have disappeared from my life. Some, sadly, have died, and even a packrat like me can't think of a good reason to keep the contact information. 

The new connections

And some are people that I don’t need to keep in paper form because my Yahoo logo relationship with them is internet based.  The addresses in my spiffy new address book tend to be personal friends, relatives, and local businesses or doctors or people I might call when I’m not at the computer.  So the address book isn’t likely to explode any year soon.

 

Instead, we have the social networks, the yahoo groups, the address books maintained by our e-mail servers.  Our networks have grown larger while the relationships in the outer circles are far more tenuous.  It’s “Reach out and touch Linkedin logo someone” on steroids.

But the urge to connect is still here, still part of human nature.  How are you connecting with people these days?  Do you still have print address books?  Are all your contacts on your smart phone?  (I have a stupid phone myself. <g>)

Princess phone What ways to you use to stay connected?  And do you remember simpler days with 
fondness or disdain? 

Mary Jo, adding that No Longer a Gentleman will be out from Kensington next May.

95 thoughts on “The Address Book’s Tale”

  1. To quote you, ” I am the ‘hang onto things forever because you never know when they might be useful” sort.” I have been overrun. I have 5 calendars around the house and still manage to forget to do things.
    I have several address books and a 3×5 address card file. It is long past time that I sit down to clean them up and update them. I have not put the info into my “smart phone.” I really didn’t realize you could keep addresses until recently. I still prefer to have a little address book with me when we travel. Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to putting all the information I need in it.
    As for staying connected, the internet is certainly handy. You can send out that message whenever you wish and the person on the other end can get back to you when it is convenient. For those I know personally, however, I still prefer a phone call or a personal visit. We are all too connectedly disconnected nowadays. The type on the computer can not convey what the inflection of a voice or body language can.
    I guess I do remember the simpler days with fondness. We paid more attention to those around us. We got more exercise. We spent more time getting to know people who lived nearby rather than spend hours “conversing” with strangers 1,000 miles away we will most likely never meet. Don’t get me wrong. I am ever so happy with the wonderful blogs, authors, and bloggers I have “met” over the past few years. I have found so many of them, I am finding it difficult to visit their sites very often. The result, I spend too much time on the computer and get too little done. I would miss the internet terribly if it were no longer available, but I would connect the old fashioned way and be healthier for it. In addition, I would have more time to read all your books that are sitting on my TBR shelves.
    Thank you for a thought provoking post. Sorry I rambled on so.

    Reply
  2. To quote you, ” I am the ‘hang onto things forever because you never know when they might be useful” sort.” I have been overrun. I have 5 calendars around the house and still manage to forget to do things.
    I have several address books and a 3×5 address card file. It is long past time that I sit down to clean them up and update them. I have not put the info into my “smart phone.” I really didn’t realize you could keep addresses until recently. I still prefer to have a little address book with me when we travel. Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to putting all the information I need in it.
    As for staying connected, the internet is certainly handy. You can send out that message whenever you wish and the person on the other end can get back to you when it is convenient. For those I know personally, however, I still prefer a phone call or a personal visit. We are all too connectedly disconnected nowadays. The type on the computer can not convey what the inflection of a voice or body language can.
    I guess I do remember the simpler days with fondness. We paid more attention to those around us. We got more exercise. We spent more time getting to know people who lived nearby rather than spend hours “conversing” with strangers 1,000 miles away we will most likely never meet. Don’t get me wrong. I am ever so happy with the wonderful blogs, authors, and bloggers I have “met” over the past few years. I have found so many of them, I am finding it difficult to visit their sites very often. The result, I spend too much time on the computer and get too little done. I would miss the internet terribly if it were no longer available, but I would connect the old fashioned way and be healthier for it. In addition, I would have more time to read all your books that are sitting on my TBR shelves.
    Thank you for a thought provoking post. Sorry I rambled on so.

    Reply
  3. To quote you, ” I am the ‘hang onto things forever because you never know when they might be useful” sort.” I have been overrun. I have 5 calendars around the house and still manage to forget to do things.
    I have several address books and a 3×5 address card file. It is long past time that I sit down to clean them up and update them. I have not put the info into my “smart phone.” I really didn’t realize you could keep addresses until recently. I still prefer to have a little address book with me when we travel. Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to putting all the information I need in it.
    As for staying connected, the internet is certainly handy. You can send out that message whenever you wish and the person on the other end can get back to you when it is convenient. For those I know personally, however, I still prefer a phone call or a personal visit. We are all too connectedly disconnected nowadays. The type on the computer can not convey what the inflection of a voice or body language can.
    I guess I do remember the simpler days with fondness. We paid more attention to those around us. We got more exercise. We spent more time getting to know people who lived nearby rather than spend hours “conversing” with strangers 1,000 miles away we will most likely never meet. Don’t get me wrong. I am ever so happy with the wonderful blogs, authors, and bloggers I have “met” over the past few years. I have found so many of them, I am finding it difficult to visit their sites very often. The result, I spend too much time on the computer and get too little done. I would miss the internet terribly if it were no longer available, but I would connect the old fashioned way and be healthier for it. In addition, I would have more time to read all your books that are sitting on my TBR shelves.
    Thank you for a thought provoking post. Sorry I rambled on so.

    Reply
  4. To quote you, ” I am the ‘hang onto things forever because you never know when they might be useful” sort.” I have been overrun. I have 5 calendars around the house and still manage to forget to do things.
    I have several address books and a 3×5 address card file. It is long past time that I sit down to clean them up and update them. I have not put the info into my “smart phone.” I really didn’t realize you could keep addresses until recently. I still prefer to have a little address book with me when we travel. Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to putting all the information I need in it.
    As for staying connected, the internet is certainly handy. You can send out that message whenever you wish and the person on the other end can get back to you when it is convenient. For those I know personally, however, I still prefer a phone call or a personal visit. We are all too connectedly disconnected nowadays. The type on the computer can not convey what the inflection of a voice or body language can.
    I guess I do remember the simpler days with fondness. We paid more attention to those around us. We got more exercise. We spent more time getting to know people who lived nearby rather than spend hours “conversing” with strangers 1,000 miles away we will most likely never meet. Don’t get me wrong. I am ever so happy with the wonderful blogs, authors, and bloggers I have “met” over the past few years. I have found so many of them, I am finding it difficult to visit their sites very often. The result, I spend too much time on the computer and get too little done. I would miss the internet terribly if it were no longer available, but I would connect the old fashioned way and be healthier for it. In addition, I would have more time to read all your books that are sitting on my TBR shelves.
    Thank you for a thought provoking post. Sorry I rambled on so.

    Reply
  5. To quote you, ” I am the ‘hang onto things forever because you never know when they might be useful” sort.” I have been overrun. I have 5 calendars around the house and still manage to forget to do things.
    I have several address books and a 3×5 address card file. It is long past time that I sit down to clean them up and update them. I have not put the info into my “smart phone.” I really didn’t realize you could keep addresses until recently. I still prefer to have a little address book with me when we travel. Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to putting all the information I need in it.
    As for staying connected, the internet is certainly handy. You can send out that message whenever you wish and the person on the other end can get back to you when it is convenient. For those I know personally, however, I still prefer a phone call or a personal visit. We are all too connectedly disconnected nowadays. The type on the computer can not convey what the inflection of a voice or body language can.
    I guess I do remember the simpler days with fondness. We paid more attention to those around us. We got more exercise. We spent more time getting to know people who lived nearby rather than spend hours “conversing” with strangers 1,000 miles away we will most likely never meet. Don’t get me wrong. I am ever so happy with the wonderful blogs, authors, and bloggers I have “met” over the past few years. I have found so many of them, I am finding it difficult to visit their sites very often. The result, I spend too much time on the computer and get too little done. I would miss the internet terribly if it were no longer available, but I would connect the old fashioned way and be healthier for it. In addition, I would have more time to read all your books that are sitting on my TBR shelves.
    Thank you for a thought provoking post. Sorry I rambled on so.

    Reply
  6. Library Pat–
    Either you and I were separated at birth, or this is a widespread and intractable selt of issues. We are drowning the our communications riches! I agree that the more important a conversation, the more physical the communication should be.

    Reply
  7. Library Pat–
    Either you and I were separated at birth, or this is a widespread and intractable selt of issues. We are drowning the our communications riches! I agree that the more important a conversation, the more physical the communication should be.

    Reply
  8. Library Pat–
    Either you and I were separated at birth, or this is a widespread and intractable selt of issues. We are drowning the our communications riches! I agree that the more important a conversation, the more physical the communication should be.

    Reply
  9. Library Pat–
    Either you and I were separated at birth, or this is a widespread and intractable selt of issues. We are drowning the our communications riches! I agree that the more important a conversation, the more physical the communication should be.

    Reply
  10. Library Pat–
    Either you and I were separated at birth, or this is a widespread and intractable selt of issues. We are drowning the our communications riches! I agree that the more important a conversation, the more physical the communication should be.

    Reply
  11. I have an address book much like yours. I mostly use it when we are traveling. And most of the numbers in it belong to my family.
    I stay connected on FaceBook, on the new Google+, and by email. FaceBook and Google+ keep the connection records for me and my email addresses are (of course) in my computer address book.

    Reply
  12. I have an address book much like yours. I mostly use it when we are traveling. And most of the numbers in it belong to my family.
    I stay connected on FaceBook, on the new Google+, and by email. FaceBook and Google+ keep the connection records for me and my email addresses are (of course) in my computer address book.

    Reply
  13. I have an address book much like yours. I mostly use it when we are traveling. And most of the numbers in it belong to my family.
    I stay connected on FaceBook, on the new Google+, and by email. FaceBook and Google+ keep the connection records for me and my email addresses are (of course) in my computer address book.

    Reply
  14. I have an address book much like yours. I mostly use it when we are traveling. And most of the numbers in it belong to my family.
    I stay connected on FaceBook, on the new Google+, and by email. FaceBook and Google+ keep the connection records for me and my email addresses are (of course) in my computer address book.

    Reply
  15. I have an address book much like yours. I mostly use it when we are traveling. And most of the numbers in it belong to my family.
    I stay connected on FaceBook, on the new Google+, and by email. FaceBook and Google+ keep the connection records for me and my email addresses are (of course) in my computer address book.

    Reply
  16. All my numbers and contacts are in my mobile phone. Since I worry what would happen if I lost it or something got lost I found a phone book in a catalogue with little slips you can slip in/or take out if any information changes. Now I have all the bases covered(maybe?)

    Reply
  17. All my numbers and contacts are in my mobile phone. Since I worry what would happen if I lost it or something got lost I found a phone book in a catalogue with little slips you can slip in/or take out if any information changes. Now I have all the bases covered(maybe?)

    Reply
  18. All my numbers and contacts are in my mobile phone. Since I worry what would happen if I lost it or something got lost I found a phone book in a catalogue with little slips you can slip in/or take out if any information changes. Now I have all the bases covered(maybe?)

    Reply
  19. All my numbers and contacts are in my mobile phone. Since I worry what would happen if I lost it or something got lost I found a phone book in a catalogue with little slips you can slip in/or take out if any information changes. Now I have all the bases covered(maybe?)

    Reply
  20. All my numbers and contacts are in my mobile phone. Since I worry what would happen if I lost it or something got lost I found a phone book in a catalogue with little slips you can slip in/or take out if any information changes. Now I have all the bases covered(maybe?)

    Reply
  21. Sue–
    I figured I should probably list Google+ among the contact methods since I suspect it’s the New New Thing in social networking, but so far, I’ve had no direct contact with it. I’ve heard it both cursed and praised, though. *g*

    Reply
  22. Sue–
    I figured I should probably list Google+ among the contact methods since I suspect it’s the New New Thing in social networking, but so far, I’ve had no direct contact with it. I’ve heard it both cursed and praised, though. *g*

    Reply
  23. Sue–
    I figured I should probably list Google+ among the contact methods since I suspect it’s the New New Thing in social networking, but so far, I’ve had no direct contact with it. I’ve heard it both cursed and praised, though. *g*

    Reply
  24. Sue–
    I figured I should probably list Google+ among the contact methods since I suspect it’s the New New Thing in social networking, but so far, I’ve had no direct contact with it. I’ve heard it both cursed and praised, though. *g*

    Reply
  25. Sue–
    I figured I should probably list Google+ among the contact methods since I suspect it’s the New New Thing in social networking, but so far, I’ve had no direct contact with it. I’ve heard it both cursed and praised, though. *g*

    Reply
  26. Marie–
    It sounds like you reversed engineered my contact keeping system! Electronic devices are great until they get lost, killed, dropped into fish bowls, whatever. There is something comforting and lasting about having the info that matters most in a hard copy form.

    Reply
  27. Marie–
    It sounds like you reversed engineered my contact keeping system! Electronic devices are great until they get lost, killed, dropped into fish bowls, whatever. There is something comforting and lasting about having the info that matters most in a hard copy form.

    Reply
  28. Marie–
    It sounds like you reversed engineered my contact keeping system! Electronic devices are great until they get lost, killed, dropped into fish bowls, whatever. There is something comforting and lasting about having the info that matters most in a hard copy form.

    Reply
  29. Marie–
    It sounds like you reversed engineered my contact keeping system! Electronic devices are great until they get lost, killed, dropped into fish bowls, whatever. There is something comforting and lasting about having the info that matters most in a hard copy form.

    Reply
  30. Marie–
    It sounds like you reversed engineered my contact keeping system! Electronic devices are great until they get lost, killed, dropped into fish bowls, whatever. There is something comforting and lasting about having the info that matters most in a hard copy form.

    Reply
  31. I too have an old, loose-leaf address book. It’s more sentimental now than utilitarian, but I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Even my Christmas card list is on my computer. I love the immediacy of communicating via email and the contacts that are possible with friends and authors around the world on Facebook and Twitter, but I do miss letters–writing them and receiving them. I also wonder about research sources for historians and writers in the next century.

    Reply
  32. I too have an old, loose-leaf address book. It’s more sentimental now than utilitarian, but I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Even my Christmas card list is on my computer. I love the immediacy of communicating via email and the contacts that are possible with friends and authors around the world on Facebook and Twitter, but I do miss letters–writing them and receiving them. I also wonder about research sources for historians and writers in the next century.

    Reply
  33. I too have an old, loose-leaf address book. It’s more sentimental now than utilitarian, but I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Even my Christmas card list is on my computer. I love the immediacy of communicating via email and the contacts that are possible with friends and authors around the world on Facebook and Twitter, but I do miss letters–writing them and receiving them. I also wonder about research sources for historians and writers in the next century.

    Reply
  34. I too have an old, loose-leaf address book. It’s more sentimental now than utilitarian, but I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Even my Christmas card list is on my computer. I love the immediacy of communicating via email and the contacts that are possible with friends and authors around the world on Facebook and Twitter, but I do miss letters–writing them and receiving them. I also wonder about research sources for historians and writers in the next century.

    Reply
  35. I too have an old, loose-leaf address book. It’s more sentimental now than utilitarian, but I can’t bring myself to throw it away. Even my Christmas card list is on my computer. I love the immediacy of communicating via email and the contacts that are possible with friends and authors around the world on Facebook and Twitter, but I do miss letters–writing them and receiving them. I also wonder about research sources for historians and writers in the next century.

    Reply
  36. I hate telephones. I have a paper address book with telephone numbers, and a few emails, and I add names until I run over to the next letter in the alphabet. Good thing I don’t know anyone whose last name begins with J, Q or X so I can run over those letters with impunity. That address book is probably 20 years old.
    I love email. The search function in email is my friend. I can usually find someone easily that way.
    I also have a stupid telephone. It’s also a land line. If someone wants to contact me, they can use email. Then if I have to, I talk later. I’m better at writing messages than talking. I also have no desire to spend mucho money on a cell phone that I won’t use.
    I think people have gone overboard with being connected. I remember the time my husband and I were in Sears, looking for the work pants he wears. They all had cell phone pockets at the knee. He had to find something else. I don’t want a special pocket to carry machinery.
    Yes, I know regency people had pocket watches. But having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me. I also figure if I’m going to be “on” all the time, someone is going to pay me.

    Reply
  37. I hate telephones. I have a paper address book with telephone numbers, and a few emails, and I add names until I run over to the next letter in the alphabet. Good thing I don’t know anyone whose last name begins with J, Q or X so I can run over those letters with impunity. That address book is probably 20 years old.
    I love email. The search function in email is my friend. I can usually find someone easily that way.
    I also have a stupid telephone. It’s also a land line. If someone wants to contact me, they can use email. Then if I have to, I talk later. I’m better at writing messages than talking. I also have no desire to spend mucho money on a cell phone that I won’t use.
    I think people have gone overboard with being connected. I remember the time my husband and I were in Sears, looking for the work pants he wears. They all had cell phone pockets at the knee. He had to find something else. I don’t want a special pocket to carry machinery.
    Yes, I know regency people had pocket watches. But having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me. I also figure if I’m going to be “on” all the time, someone is going to pay me.

    Reply
  38. I hate telephones. I have a paper address book with telephone numbers, and a few emails, and I add names until I run over to the next letter in the alphabet. Good thing I don’t know anyone whose last name begins with J, Q or X so I can run over those letters with impunity. That address book is probably 20 years old.
    I love email. The search function in email is my friend. I can usually find someone easily that way.
    I also have a stupid telephone. It’s also a land line. If someone wants to contact me, they can use email. Then if I have to, I talk later. I’m better at writing messages than talking. I also have no desire to spend mucho money on a cell phone that I won’t use.
    I think people have gone overboard with being connected. I remember the time my husband and I were in Sears, looking for the work pants he wears. They all had cell phone pockets at the knee. He had to find something else. I don’t want a special pocket to carry machinery.
    Yes, I know regency people had pocket watches. But having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me. I also figure if I’m going to be “on” all the time, someone is going to pay me.

    Reply
  39. I hate telephones. I have a paper address book with telephone numbers, and a few emails, and I add names until I run over to the next letter in the alphabet. Good thing I don’t know anyone whose last name begins with J, Q or X so I can run over those letters with impunity. That address book is probably 20 years old.
    I love email. The search function in email is my friend. I can usually find someone easily that way.
    I also have a stupid telephone. It’s also a land line. If someone wants to contact me, they can use email. Then if I have to, I talk later. I’m better at writing messages than talking. I also have no desire to spend mucho money on a cell phone that I won’t use.
    I think people have gone overboard with being connected. I remember the time my husband and I were in Sears, looking for the work pants he wears. They all had cell phone pockets at the knee. He had to find something else. I don’t want a special pocket to carry machinery.
    Yes, I know regency people had pocket watches. But having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me. I also figure if I’m going to be “on” all the time, someone is going to pay me.

    Reply
  40. I hate telephones. I have a paper address book with telephone numbers, and a few emails, and I add names until I run over to the next letter in the alphabet. Good thing I don’t know anyone whose last name begins with J, Q or X so I can run over those letters with impunity. That address book is probably 20 years old.
    I love email. The search function in email is my friend. I can usually find someone easily that way.
    I also have a stupid telephone. It’s also a land line. If someone wants to contact me, they can use email. Then if I have to, I talk later. I’m better at writing messages than talking. I also have no desire to spend mucho money on a cell phone that I won’t use.
    I think people have gone overboard with being connected. I remember the time my husband and I were in Sears, looking for the work pants he wears. They all had cell phone pockets at the knee. He had to find something else. I don’t want a special pocket to carry machinery.
    Yes, I know regency people had pocket watches. But having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me. I also figure if I’m going to be “on” all the time, someone is going to pay me.

    Reply
  41. ++having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me.**
    LOL! I take your point. But there are a lot of workmen who are constantly out and about and impossible to find if they don’t have cellphones. Handymen, plumbers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians–they need cellphones. (Though not necessarily by the knee. *g*) I work at home and barelyever use my cellphone except when traveling, so I have the cheapest I could find. And I still have a ton of unused time on it.

    Reply
  42. ++having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me.**
    LOL! I take your point. But there are a lot of workmen who are constantly out and about and impossible to find if they don’t have cellphones. Handymen, plumbers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians–they need cellphones. (Though not necessarily by the knee. *g*) I work at home and barelyever use my cellphone except when traveling, so I have the cheapest I could find. And I still have a ton of unused time on it.

    Reply
  43. ++having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me.**
    LOL! I take your point. But there are a lot of workmen who are constantly out and about and impossible to find if they don’t have cellphones. Handymen, plumbers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians–they need cellphones. (Though not necessarily by the knee. *g*) I work at home and barelyever use my cellphone except when traveling, so I have the cheapest I could find. And I still have a ton of unused time on it.

    Reply
  44. ++having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me.**
    LOL! I take your point. But there are a lot of workmen who are constantly out and about and impossible to find if they don’t have cellphones. Handymen, plumbers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians–they need cellphones. (Though not necessarily by the knee. *g*) I work at home and barelyever use my cellphone except when traveling, so I have the cheapest I could find. And I still have a ton of unused time on it.

    Reply
  45. ++having my leg ring doesn’t appeal to me.**
    LOL! I take your point. But there are a lot of workmen who are constantly out and about and impossible to find if they don’t have cellphones. Handymen, plumbers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians–they need cellphones. (Though not necessarily by the knee. *g*) I work at home and barelyever use my cellphone except when traveling, so I have the cheapest I could find. And I still have a ton of unused time on it.

    Reply
  46. Jo here. As a person who’s moved a lot, I’ve been through a number of address books as I’ve tended to start a new one each time, whilst keeping the others. As you say, Mary Jo, an interesting archeology to delve into.
    A while ago I read somewhere that it’s a good thing to start a new address book, because an old one can tie us to the less pleasant parts of our lives and friends lost or left behind.
    An interesting idea, but some people I’ve mentioned it to actually shudder at the thought. Clearly old address books have deep emotional roots for many.
    Congrats on getting the book out there!
    Jo

    Reply
  47. Jo here. As a person who’s moved a lot, I’ve been through a number of address books as I’ve tended to start a new one each time, whilst keeping the others. As you say, Mary Jo, an interesting archeology to delve into.
    A while ago I read somewhere that it’s a good thing to start a new address book, because an old one can tie us to the less pleasant parts of our lives and friends lost or left behind.
    An interesting idea, but some people I’ve mentioned it to actually shudder at the thought. Clearly old address books have deep emotional roots for many.
    Congrats on getting the book out there!
    Jo

    Reply
  48. Jo here. As a person who’s moved a lot, I’ve been through a number of address books as I’ve tended to start a new one each time, whilst keeping the others. As you say, Mary Jo, an interesting archeology to delve into.
    A while ago I read somewhere that it’s a good thing to start a new address book, because an old one can tie us to the less pleasant parts of our lives and friends lost or left behind.
    An interesting idea, but some people I’ve mentioned it to actually shudder at the thought. Clearly old address books have deep emotional roots for many.
    Congrats on getting the book out there!
    Jo

    Reply
  49. Jo here. As a person who’s moved a lot, I’ve been through a number of address books as I’ve tended to start a new one each time, whilst keeping the others. As you say, Mary Jo, an interesting archeology to delve into.
    A while ago I read somewhere that it’s a good thing to start a new address book, because an old one can tie us to the less pleasant parts of our lives and friends lost or left behind.
    An interesting idea, but some people I’ve mentioned it to actually shudder at the thought. Clearly old address books have deep emotional roots for many.
    Congrats on getting the book out there!
    Jo

    Reply
  50. Jo here. As a person who’s moved a lot, I’ve been through a number of address books as I’ve tended to start a new one each time, whilst keeping the others. As you say, Mary Jo, an interesting archeology to delve into.
    A while ago I read somewhere that it’s a good thing to start a new address book, because an old one can tie us to the less pleasant parts of our lives and friends lost or left behind.
    An interesting idea, but some people I’ve mentioned it to actually shudder at the thought. Clearly old address books have deep emotional roots for many.
    Congrats on getting the book out there!
    Jo

    Reply
  51. Jo–it’s interesting to consider starting a new addressbook as symbolically opening a new life, but I prefer to do my own weeding in my own time. *g* Our pasts and memories have a lot to do with defining us (which is one reason I enjoy writing amnesia books, actually!)

    Reply
  52. Jo–it’s interesting to consider starting a new addressbook as symbolically opening a new life, but I prefer to do my own weeding in my own time. *g* Our pasts and memories have a lot to do with defining us (which is one reason I enjoy writing amnesia books, actually!)

    Reply
  53. Jo–it’s interesting to consider starting a new addressbook as symbolically opening a new life, but I prefer to do my own weeding in my own time. *g* Our pasts and memories have a lot to do with defining us (which is one reason I enjoy writing amnesia books, actually!)

    Reply
  54. Jo–it’s interesting to consider starting a new addressbook as symbolically opening a new life, but I prefer to do my own weeding in my own time. *g* Our pasts and memories have a lot to do with defining us (which is one reason I enjoy writing amnesia books, actually!)

    Reply
  55. Jo–it’s interesting to consider starting a new addressbook as symbolically opening a new life, but I prefer to do my own weeding in my own time. *g* Our pasts and memories have a lot to do with defining us (which is one reason I enjoy writing amnesia books, actually!)

    Reply
  56. Nothing permanent on my phone, nothing permanent on my computer — hope I’m not too much the Luddite. Actually, I keep a 3×5 permanent file list which is great for updates (kids, new addresses, etc). I buy the school-year assignment calendars annually for those pesky Drs. and relatives who are not in the phone-computer stuff and updating that one every year takes no time at all. Still like the 3×5 cards because the hold up better in my mess of a purse and then I can just throw the scribbled card into the file box. It does get sorted out eventually (mostly when my kids are feeling guilty and are going to “organize Mom” as a gift). Tee hee

    Reply
  57. Nothing permanent on my phone, nothing permanent on my computer — hope I’m not too much the Luddite. Actually, I keep a 3×5 permanent file list which is great for updates (kids, new addresses, etc). I buy the school-year assignment calendars annually for those pesky Drs. and relatives who are not in the phone-computer stuff and updating that one every year takes no time at all. Still like the 3×5 cards because the hold up better in my mess of a purse and then I can just throw the scribbled card into the file box. It does get sorted out eventually (mostly when my kids are feeling guilty and are going to “organize Mom” as a gift). Tee hee

    Reply
  58. Nothing permanent on my phone, nothing permanent on my computer — hope I’m not too much the Luddite. Actually, I keep a 3×5 permanent file list which is great for updates (kids, new addresses, etc). I buy the school-year assignment calendars annually for those pesky Drs. and relatives who are not in the phone-computer stuff and updating that one every year takes no time at all. Still like the 3×5 cards because the hold up better in my mess of a purse and then I can just throw the scribbled card into the file box. It does get sorted out eventually (mostly when my kids are feeling guilty and are going to “organize Mom” as a gift). Tee hee

    Reply
  59. Nothing permanent on my phone, nothing permanent on my computer — hope I’m not too much the Luddite. Actually, I keep a 3×5 permanent file list which is great for updates (kids, new addresses, etc). I buy the school-year assignment calendars annually for those pesky Drs. and relatives who are not in the phone-computer stuff and updating that one every year takes no time at all. Still like the 3×5 cards because the hold up better in my mess of a purse and then I can just throw the scribbled card into the file box. It does get sorted out eventually (mostly when my kids are feeling guilty and are going to “organize Mom” as a gift). Tee hee

    Reply
  60. Nothing permanent on my phone, nothing permanent on my computer — hope I’m not too much the Luddite. Actually, I keep a 3×5 permanent file list which is great for updates (kids, new addresses, etc). I buy the school-year assignment calendars annually for those pesky Drs. and relatives who are not in the phone-computer stuff and updating that one every year takes no time at all. Still like the 3×5 cards because the hold up better in my mess of a purse and then I can just throw the scribbled card into the file box. It does get sorted out eventually (mostly when my kids are feeling guilty and are going to “organize Mom” as a gift). Tee hee

    Reply
  61. I am the secretary of our condominium board. When I accepted the job I told the others that communication was our biggest problem, that posting a notice on the bulletin board did not constitute notifying the seasonal residents who live away. We needed to do more mailouts and email. As it turned out, I started something. Gradually all the other buildings in our large complex began using email. So…
    Address books:
    * Outlook Contacts for residents and board members, separated into groups. Also close friends I correspond with regularly, here and far away.
    * Microsoft Address Book for people I do not frequently contact but I don’t want to lose their addresses.
    * A physical phone directory with some of the same addresses and phones as above because some have multiple numbers, plus business phone numbers, like the plumber and the dentist. Business cards taped in. This has a few things covered with white tape, but while the names of deceased friends and/or their spouses are still there, they are still here.
    * A small format Rolodex that followed me home from work when I retired. Don’t use this much now but it was good for business cards and keeping track of passwords.
    * The condo Emergency Contact ring binder.
    You may deduce that I do not have a cell phone. I do keep a pocket calendar in my purse that has a place for phone numbers.
    In favor of the handwritten address book, let me say this: when I was digging up family info while working on Ancestry.com I found the old address book with the Christmas card list in the back. It was like finding gold. There were names and addresses I remembered from childhood, and the handwriting of my grandparents and my mother. I will never let it go.

    Reply
  62. I am the secretary of our condominium board. When I accepted the job I told the others that communication was our biggest problem, that posting a notice on the bulletin board did not constitute notifying the seasonal residents who live away. We needed to do more mailouts and email. As it turned out, I started something. Gradually all the other buildings in our large complex began using email. So…
    Address books:
    * Outlook Contacts for residents and board members, separated into groups. Also close friends I correspond with regularly, here and far away.
    * Microsoft Address Book for people I do not frequently contact but I don’t want to lose their addresses.
    * A physical phone directory with some of the same addresses and phones as above because some have multiple numbers, plus business phone numbers, like the plumber and the dentist. Business cards taped in. This has a few things covered with white tape, but while the names of deceased friends and/or their spouses are still there, they are still here.
    * A small format Rolodex that followed me home from work when I retired. Don’t use this much now but it was good for business cards and keeping track of passwords.
    * The condo Emergency Contact ring binder.
    You may deduce that I do not have a cell phone. I do keep a pocket calendar in my purse that has a place for phone numbers.
    In favor of the handwritten address book, let me say this: when I was digging up family info while working on Ancestry.com I found the old address book with the Christmas card list in the back. It was like finding gold. There were names and addresses I remembered from childhood, and the handwriting of my grandparents and my mother. I will never let it go.

    Reply
  63. I am the secretary of our condominium board. When I accepted the job I told the others that communication was our biggest problem, that posting a notice on the bulletin board did not constitute notifying the seasonal residents who live away. We needed to do more mailouts and email. As it turned out, I started something. Gradually all the other buildings in our large complex began using email. So…
    Address books:
    * Outlook Contacts for residents and board members, separated into groups. Also close friends I correspond with regularly, here and far away.
    * Microsoft Address Book for people I do not frequently contact but I don’t want to lose their addresses.
    * A physical phone directory with some of the same addresses and phones as above because some have multiple numbers, plus business phone numbers, like the plumber and the dentist. Business cards taped in. This has a few things covered with white tape, but while the names of deceased friends and/or their spouses are still there, they are still here.
    * A small format Rolodex that followed me home from work when I retired. Don’t use this much now but it was good for business cards and keeping track of passwords.
    * The condo Emergency Contact ring binder.
    You may deduce that I do not have a cell phone. I do keep a pocket calendar in my purse that has a place for phone numbers.
    In favor of the handwritten address book, let me say this: when I was digging up family info while working on Ancestry.com I found the old address book with the Christmas card list in the back. It was like finding gold. There were names and addresses I remembered from childhood, and the handwriting of my grandparents and my mother. I will never let it go.

    Reply
  64. I am the secretary of our condominium board. When I accepted the job I told the others that communication was our biggest problem, that posting a notice on the bulletin board did not constitute notifying the seasonal residents who live away. We needed to do more mailouts and email. As it turned out, I started something. Gradually all the other buildings in our large complex began using email. So…
    Address books:
    * Outlook Contacts for residents and board members, separated into groups. Also close friends I correspond with regularly, here and far away.
    * Microsoft Address Book for people I do not frequently contact but I don’t want to lose their addresses.
    * A physical phone directory with some of the same addresses and phones as above because some have multiple numbers, plus business phone numbers, like the plumber and the dentist. Business cards taped in. This has a few things covered with white tape, but while the names of deceased friends and/or their spouses are still there, they are still here.
    * A small format Rolodex that followed me home from work when I retired. Don’t use this much now but it was good for business cards and keeping track of passwords.
    * The condo Emergency Contact ring binder.
    You may deduce that I do not have a cell phone. I do keep a pocket calendar in my purse that has a place for phone numbers.
    In favor of the handwritten address book, let me say this: when I was digging up family info while working on Ancestry.com I found the old address book with the Christmas card list in the back. It was like finding gold. There were names and addresses I remembered from childhood, and the handwriting of my grandparents and my mother. I will never let it go.

    Reply
  65. I am the secretary of our condominium board. When I accepted the job I told the others that communication was our biggest problem, that posting a notice on the bulletin board did not constitute notifying the seasonal residents who live away. We needed to do more mailouts and email. As it turned out, I started something. Gradually all the other buildings in our large complex began using email. So…
    Address books:
    * Outlook Contacts for residents and board members, separated into groups. Also close friends I correspond with regularly, here and far away.
    * Microsoft Address Book for people I do not frequently contact but I don’t want to lose their addresses.
    * A physical phone directory with some of the same addresses and phones as above because some have multiple numbers, plus business phone numbers, like the plumber and the dentist. Business cards taped in. This has a few things covered with white tape, but while the names of deceased friends and/or their spouses are still there, they are still here.
    * A small format Rolodex that followed me home from work when I retired. Don’t use this much now but it was good for business cards and keeping track of passwords.
    * The condo Emergency Contact ring binder.
    You may deduce that I do not have a cell phone. I do keep a pocket calendar in my purse that has a place for phone numbers.
    In favor of the handwritten address book, let me say this: when I was digging up family info while working on Ancestry.com I found the old address book with the Christmas card list in the back. It was like finding gold. There were names and addresses I remembered from childhood, and the handwriting of my grandparents and my mother. I will never let it go.

    Reply
  66. Artemesia, well done dragging your condo into the 21st Century! The community association here now has e-mail lists for contacting homeowners, and it’s a huge plus.
    You sound well organized as well as comprehensive in your communications. Lovely that you found that old address book!

    Reply
  67. Artemesia, well done dragging your condo into the 21st Century! The community association here now has e-mail lists for contacting homeowners, and it’s a huge plus.
    You sound well organized as well as comprehensive in your communications. Lovely that you found that old address book!

    Reply
  68. Artemesia, well done dragging your condo into the 21st Century! The community association here now has e-mail lists for contacting homeowners, and it’s a huge plus.
    You sound well organized as well as comprehensive in your communications. Lovely that you found that old address book!

    Reply
  69. Artemesia, well done dragging your condo into the 21st Century! The community association here now has e-mail lists for contacting homeowners, and it’s a huge plus.
    You sound well organized as well as comprehensive in your communications. Lovely that you found that old address book!

    Reply
  70. Artemesia, well done dragging your condo into the 21st Century! The community association here now has e-mail lists for contacting homeowners, and it’s a huge plus.
    You sound well organized as well as comprehensive in your communications. Lovely that you found that old address book!

    Reply
  71. Thanks! Another surprising source of gen info was the “funeral book” that visitors would sign at the funeral home. I found some lost relatives there. The wenches are welcome to use either or both as a plot point.

    Reply
  72. Thanks! Another surprising source of gen info was the “funeral book” that visitors would sign at the funeral home. I found some lost relatives there. The wenches are welcome to use either or both as a plot point.

    Reply
  73. Thanks! Another surprising source of gen info was the “funeral book” that visitors would sign at the funeral home. I found some lost relatives there. The wenches are welcome to use either or both as a plot point.

    Reply
  74. Thanks! Another surprising source of gen info was the “funeral book” that visitors would sign at the funeral home. I found some lost relatives there. The wenches are welcome to use either or both as a plot point.

    Reply
  75. Thanks! Another surprising source of gen info was the “funeral book” that visitors would sign at the funeral home. I found some lost relatives there. The wenches are welcome to use either or both as a plot point.

    Reply

Leave a Comment