YOU Inspire Teresa Medeiros!

Casualhead What a thrill it is to be invited to blog with some of my favorite wenches!  Patricia Rice and I have known each other for…well…way longer than I care to admit.  (If my memory hasn’t failed me, I think we were both wearing powdered wigs and corsets at our first meeting.  Which took place around 1762.)  When Pat first asked me to blog this week, my first thought was, "Oh I can’t!  I’m already sick of myself!"  That’s what happens when you hit the internet circuit to promote a new book.  Ever since THE VAMPIRE WHO LOVED ME was released at the first of the month, I’ve been reviewed, interviewed, and guested on so many blogs that even I (an only child who normally adores talking about herself) can’t think of anything else clever to confess about me or my writing process.

Which is why I’m incredibly grateful to revmelinda and susannac in alabama for coming up with two questions that stirred up the fairy dust of my imagination.  Revmelinda asks:  "Many romance authors write (or are trying their hand at) fantasy/magic/paranormal romance. Why do you think this is? Is there a reason besides "they’re fun and ripping great stories"? I suppose my own thought on the subject is that it’s a "safe" (ie non-religious) way to explore spirituality and that sense of Connection to a power greater than ourselves. (Or is that just a nonsensical piece of wishful thinking on my part?)" 

Vampe_2 I found this to be a fascinating question because writing a vampire romance caused me to do some soul-searching of my own.  In AFTER MIDNIGHT, the prequel to THE VAMPIRE WHO LOVED ME, my hero was a vampire hunter, not a vampire.  But in THE VAMPIRE WHO LOVED ME, Julian was a bonafide bloodsucking creature of the night.  I struggled in the beginning because I was truly concerned that this theme would conflict with my own spiritual values.  Until I realized that it was probably the most overtly spiritual story I’d ever told.  Early in my career, an editor told me that "redemption" was the theme that ran through all of my books.  In almost all of my books, somebody needed saving–usually my hero.  In VAMPIRE, Julian is literally a man who has lost his soul and "all hope of heaven."  (In my vampire universe, a vampire is "turned" when another vampire sucks the soul out of him at the exact moment of his death.) 

As I was writing, my subconscious provided plenty of opportunities to explore this theme.  When Julian realizes that Portia is in terrible danger, he whispers, "Dear God", invoking "a name he no longer had any right to use."  After they make love for the first time, Julian has a dream where he stands in a church "no longer banished from the presence of God" and sees Portia coming to him as his bride.  Once I realized I hadn’t gone over to the dark side and inadvertantly bartered my own soul to write this book, the words began to flow like a river of blessings.  Sometimes I fear that we’ve become so gun-shy about publicly talking about our own faith that we forget that our historical characters would have had deeply spiritual concerns of their own. 

And susannac in alabama writes:  How is writing an undead hero different from writing a mortal one? Does "happily ever after" take on a different tone?

First of all, I had to keep in mind that Julian wasn’t dead.  He was undead.  And there had to be a distinction in my own mind.  I didn’t give him creepy cold flesh either.  Instead, whenever Portia was nearby, his flesh "burned with a supernatural fever", which was actually pretty sexy.  Since he was turned into a vampire at a relatively young age, I mentioned him being "frozen forever in the first potent flush of manhood."  (Not THAT kind of manhood.  Get your minds out of the gutter! ;))  But the most fun part of writing a supernatural hero was letting Julian mock his own condition.  During his appearances in AFTER MIDNIGHT, he quotes Byron’s vampire poetry, although he loathes Byron for being such a melodramatic sot and he tells someone, "When you women are all swooning over the romance of the vampire, you never stop to think about the little inconveniences like blood breath, do you?"  Julian may have lost his soul but he never lost his sense of humor!

I have a theory about the current popularity of paranormals, which is that readers were getting a little tired of books where there was nothing at stake.  We missed those sweeping "I’d die without you!" historicals of the 80’s and 90’s.  With paranormals, something is always at risk, whether it’s a human life or the fate of the universe or a man’s (or woman’s) eternal soul.  And because the risks are so much greater, the payoff can be that much greater, giving your "happily ever after" moment even more impact. 

So how about you?  As a reader, is it possible for you to warm up to a paranormal hero?  If he’s a werewolf, can you suspend disbelief long enough to overlook the fleas and the hairy back?  If he’s a vampire, can you overlook his prominent canine teeth as long as he vows to love you for all eternity? 

117 thoughts on “YOU Inspire Teresa Medeiros!”

  1. Hey, Terri! I’m pretty sure it was 1792 and we’d thrown aside the wigs, if not the corsets, and shimmied in one of Marie A’s shepherdess costumes.
    I was going to stop in and leave an intro, but you’re even an earlier riser than I am. I knew there was a reason we’re friends. “g”
    I love revmelinda’s question and was dying to play with it. I think just using the larger playing board, the “fate of the world” or at least, the fate of the hero, gives us a chance to explore spirituality, although heaven forbid we tell our editors that. “G” Although, I will admit, my historical editor did not keel over when my characters discussed variations of God and religious beliefs in my next release, so maybe NYC is starting to get what we’re saying?
    And to answer your question, I can suspend disbelief for your guy, or for any extremely well-written weirdo, “G” but brooding thugs leave me cold even when they’re not undead. So the guy has to be hero material before I’ll accept those canines!

    Reply
  2. Hey, Terri! I’m pretty sure it was 1792 and we’d thrown aside the wigs, if not the corsets, and shimmied in one of Marie A’s shepherdess costumes.
    I was going to stop in and leave an intro, but you’re even an earlier riser than I am. I knew there was a reason we’re friends. “g”
    I love revmelinda’s question and was dying to play with it. I think just using the larger playing board, the “fate of the world” or at least, the fate of the hero, gives us a chance to explore spirituality, although heaven forbid we tell our editors that. “G” Although, I will admit, my historical editor did not keel over when my characters discussed variations of God and religious beliefs in my next release, so maybe NYC is starting to get what we’re saying?
    And to answer your question, I can suspend disbelief for your guy, or for any extremely well-written weirdo, “G” but brooding thugs leave me cold even when they’re not undead. So the guy has to be hero material before I’ll accept those canines!

    Reply
  3. Hey, Terri! I’m pretty sure it was 1792 and we’d thrown aside the wigs, if not the corsets, and shimmied in one of Marie A’s shepherdess costumes.
    I was going to stop in and leave an intro, but you’re even an earlier riser than I am. I knew there was a reason we’re friends. “g”
    I love revmelinda’s question and was dying to play with it. I think just using the larger playing board, the “fate of the world” or at least, the fate of the hero, gives us a chance to explore spirituality, although heaven forbid we tell our editors that. “G” Although, I will admit, my historical editor did not keel over when my characters discussed variations of God and religious beliefs in my next release, so maybe NYC is starting to get what we’re saying?
    And to answer your question, I can suspend disbelief for your guy, or for any extremely well-written weirdo, “G” but brooding thugs leave me cold even when they’re not undead. So the guy has to be hero material before I’ll accept those canines!

    Reply
  4. And we were eating cake, weren’t we, Pat? (Of course we’re always eating cake.)
    Tee hee! Yes, I crawled out of bed at 6 a.m. when my husband left for work and slithered down the stairs on my stomach mumbling, “wordwenches…wordwenches.” You know I’m one of those disgustingly perky morning people!
    And now I’m dying to read your next release! What’s the title?

    Reply
  5. And we were eating cake, weren’t we, Pat? (Of course we’re always eating cake.)
    Tee hee! Yes, I crawled out of bed at 6 a.m. when my husband left for work and slithered down the stairs on my stomach mumbling, “wordwenches…wordwenches.” You know I’m one of those disgustingly perky morning people!
    And now I’m dying to read your next release! What’s the title?

    Reply
  6. And we were eating cake, weren’t we, Pat? (Of course we’re always eating cake.)
    Tee hee! Yes, I crawled out of bed at 6 a.m. when my husband left for work and slithered down the stairs on my stomach mumbling, “wordwenches…wordwenches.” You know I’m one of those disgustingly perky morning people!
    And now I’m dying to read your next release! What’s the title?

    Reply
  7. Hi, Terri! Welcome to WordWenchWorld!
    You mention the current popularity of paranormal romances, but you’ve certainly been dabbling in “different” romances long before their current surge in the market. I particularly remember the Puritan witch in “Touch of Magic”, and that must have been about the time you, Pat, and Marie Antoinette were frolicing at Versailles.
    Has this always an interest of yours? Do you find that writing characters with a paranormal twist is more challenging, more fun, or both?

    Reply
  8. Hi, Terri! Welcome to WordWenchWorld!
    You mention the current popularity of paranormal romances, but you’ve certainly been dabbling in “different” romances long before their current surge in the market. I particularly remember the Puritan witch in “Touch of Magic”, and that must have been about the time you, Pat, and Marie Antoinette were frolicing at Versailles.
    Has this always an interest of yours? Do you find that writing characters with a paranormal twist is more challenging, more fun, or both?

    Reply
  9. Hi, Terri! Welcome to WordWenchWorld!
    You mention the current popularity of paranormal romances, but you’ve certainly been dabbling in “different” romances long before their current surge in the market. I particularly remember the Puritan witch in “Touch of Magic”, and that must have been about the time you, Pat, and Marie Antoinette were frolicing at Versailles.
    Has this always an interest of yours? Do you find that writing characters with a paranormal twist is more challenging, more fun, or both?

    Reply
  10. The next historical will be Mystic Guardian, but it won’t be out until next summer. I may actually introduce Marie Antoinette by the second book, but I’m sticking to mermaids and volcanic gods and heroes for the first one. “G”
    Susan, I’ve adored Terri’s quirky characters ever since she put the dwarf on the castle trapeze. The woman has a truly wicked imagination.

    Reply
  11. The next historical will be Mystic Guardian, but it won’t be out until next summer. I may actually introduce Marie Antoinette by the second book, but I’m sticking to mermaids and volcanic gods and heroes for the first one. “G”
    Susan, I’ve adored Terri’s quirky characters ever since she put the dwarf on the castle trapeze. The woman has a truly wicked imagination.

    Reply
  12. The next historical will be Mystic Guardian, but it won’t be out until next summer. I may actually introduce Marie Antoinette by the second book, but I’m sticking to mermaids and volcanic gods and heroes for the first one. “G”
    Susan, I’ve adored Terri’s quirky characters ever since she put the dwarf on the castle trapeze. The woman has a truly wicked imagination.

    Reply
  13. Hi Susan! Yes, I did my two time-traveling witch books (BREATH OF MAGIC and TOUCH OF ENCHANTMENT) back in ’96 and ’97 during the first big paranormal boom.
    I had originally written the first 3 chapters and the last 2 chapters of BREATH OF MAGIC nearly TEN years before in 1986 when publishers wouldn’t touch paranormal with a ten foot magic wand. It was originally a fantasy novel and Tristan was a very powerful magician. In the version that ended up getting published, I changed it to a time travel where my heroine came forward in time to contemporary New York City and Tristan was a skeptical multi-billionaire. (Instead of a castle, he had a penthouse.)
    My dream when I first started writing was to write a romance in every sub-genre. When vampire books became popular this time around, I thought, “Oh goody! Now I can write my vampire stories!”
    I think the most challenging thing about working with paranormals is coming up with the mythology and staying true to the rules of the universe that you create. I seem to remember banging my head against the wall at one point when I was writing BREATH OF MAGIC and muttering, “I’ll never do paranormal again!” That’s why I always say, “Never say never!” πŸ™‚

    Reply
  14. Hi Susan! Yes, I did my two time-traveling witch books (BREATH OF MAGIC and TOUCH OF ENCHANTMENT) back in ’96 and ’97 during the first big paranormal boom.
    I had originally written the first 3 chapters and the last 2 chapters of BREATH OF MAGIC nearly TEN years before in 1986 when publishers wouldn’t touch paranormal with a ten foot magic wand. It was originally a fantasy novel and Tristan was a very powerful magician. In the version that ended up getting published, I changed it to a time travel where my heroine came forward in time to contemporary New York City and Tristan was a skeptical multi-billionaire. (Instead of a castle, he had a penthouse.)
    My dream when I first started writing was to write a romance in every sub-genre. When vampire books became popular this time around, I thought, “Oh goody! Now I can write my vampire stories!”
    I think the most challenging thing about working with paranormals is coming up with the mythology and staying true to the rules of the universe that you create. I seem to remember banging my head against the wall at one point when I was writing BREATH OF MAGIC and muttering, “I’ll never do paranormal again!” That’s why I always say, “Never say never!” πŸ™‚

    Reply
  15. Hi Susan! Yes, I did my two time-traveling witch books (BREATH OF MAGIC and TOUCH OF ENCHANTMENT) back in ’96 and ’97 during the first big paranormal boom.
    I had originally written the first 3 chapters and the last 2 chapters of BREATH OF MAGIC nearly TEN years before in 1986 when publishers wouldn’t touch paranormal with a ten foot magic wand. It was originally a fantasy novel and Tristan was a very powerful magician. In the version that ended up getting published, I changed it to a time travel where my heroine came forward in time to contemporary New York City and Tristan was a skeptical multi-billionaire. (Instead of a castle, he had a penthouse.)
    My dream when I first started writing was to write a romance in every sub-genre. When vampire books became popular this time around, I thought, “Oh goody! Now I can write my vampire stories!”
    I think the most challenging thing about working with paranormals is coming up with the mythology and staying true to the rules of the universe that you create. I seem to remember banging my head against the wall at one point when I was writing BREATH OF MAGIC and muttering, “I’ll never do paranormal again!” That’s why I always say, “Never say never!” πŸ™‚

    Reply
  16. I like historicals because I like to read about things that might have actually happened, things I can at least pretend did happen. I guess I’m pretty firmly in the non-paranormal camp. They just don’t do it for me. At least not as romances . . . the whole appeal of the paranormal for me has always been the creature’s ability to be evil, to bad, to be β€œthe other”. I don’t want him tamed, redeemed, etc. I want him to glory in being WHAT HE IS (or what she is).

    Reply
  17. I like historicals because I like to read about things that might have actually happened, things I can at least pretend did happen. I guess I’m pretty firmly in the non-paranormal camp. They just don’t do it for me. At least not as romances . . . the whole appeal of the paranormal for me has always been the creature’s ability to be evil, to bad, to be β€œthe other”. I don’t want him tamed, redeemed, etc. I want him to glory in being WHAT HE IS (or what she is).

    Reply
  18. I like historicals because I like to read about things that might have actually happened, things I can at least pretend did happen. I guess I’m pretty firmly in the non-paranormal camp. They just don’t do it for me. At least not as romances . . . the whole appeal of the paranormal for me has always been the creature’s ability to be evil, to bad, to be β€œthe other”. I don’t want him tamed, redeemed, etc. I want him to glory in being WHAT HE IS (or what she is).

    Reply
  19. Terri,
    How lovely of you to come and visit! And how particularly nice that you’re picking up on RevMelinda’s extremely interesting question. I definitely think paranormal and fantasy romances are an opportunity to explore spiritual dimensions without being specifically religious. Though in fact I’ve dealt with most of the world’s great religions in my books at one time or another. (I’m very ecumenical. )
    I also think paranormal elements bring fresh twists to classical plots. My most recent book, The Marriage Spell, is a very traditional marriage of convenience–only with magic added. It’s a whole new dimension.
    As to vampires–who better needs a sense of humor? πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, laughing over “blood breath”

    Reply
  20. Terri,
    How lovely of you to come and visit! And how particularly nice that you’re picking up on RevMelinda’s extremely interesting question. I definitely think paranormal and fantasy romances are an opportunity to explore spiritual dimensions without being specifically religious. Though in fact I’ve dealt with most of the world’s great religions in my books at one time or another. (I’m very ecumenical. )
    I also think paranormal elements bring fresh twists to classical plots. My most recent book, The Marriage Spell, is a very traditional marriage of convenience–only with magic added. It’s a whole new dimension.
    As to vampires–who better needs a sense of humor? πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, laughing over “blood breath”

    Reply
  21. Terri,
    How lovely of you to come and visit! And how particularly nice that you’re picking up on RevMelinda’s extremely interesting question. I definitely think paranormal and fantasy romances are an opportunity to explore spiritual dimensions without being specifically religious. Though in fact I’ve dealt with most of the world’s great religions in my books at one time or another. (I’m very ecumenical. )
    I also think paranormal elements bring fresh twists to classical plots. My most recent book, The Marriage Spell, is a very traditional marriage of convenience–only with magic added. It’s a whole new dimension.
    As to vampires–who better needs a sense of humor? πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, laughing over “blood breath”

    Reply
  22. Very interesting, Kalen. I guess I always want to “cure” the paranormal guy with my love πŸ™‚
    Hi, Mary Jo! You guys have a gorgeous “house” over here and I’m so delighted to visit. I promise to use a coaster and not put my feet up on the furniture πŸ˜‰
    And I agree with what you said about the paranormal elements adding fresh twists. Sometimes it’s as much about an author challenging herself to stretch her muscles a little as it is about current market trends. I know both Mary Jo and Pat have been “dabbling” in paranormal for years, even when it wasn’t as wildly popular as it is right now.

    Reply
  23. Very interesting, Kalen. I guess I always want to “cure” the paranormal guy with my love πŸ™‚
    Hi, Mary Jo! You guys have a gorgeous “house” over here and I’m so delighted to visit. I promise to use a coaster and not put my feet up on the furniture πŸ˜‰
    And I agree with what you said about the paranormal elements adding fresh twists. Sometimes it’s as much about an author challenging herself to stretch her muscles a little as it is about current market trends. I know both Mary Jo and Pat have been “dabbling” in paranormal for years, even when it wasn’t as wildly popular as it is right now.

    Reply
  24. Very interesting, Kalen. I guess I always want to “cure” the paranormal guy with my love πŸ™‚
    Hi, Mary Jo! You guys have a gorgeous “house” over here and I’m so delighted to visit. I promise to use a coaster and not put my feet up on the furniture πŸ˜‰
    And I agree with what you said about the paranormal elements adding fresh twists. Sometimes it’s as much about an author challenging herself to stretch her muscles a little as it is about current market trends. I know both Mary Jo and Pat have been “dabbling” in paranormal for years, even when it wasn’t as wildly popular as it is right now.

    Reply
  25. Thank you, Teresa, for your answer. It’s interesting to see how you addressed the inherent difficulties of being hot and undead at the same time! And the whole discussion about spirituality is fascinating too. There’s so much complexity that can come into stories when that’s an added element. I also very much appreciate that you consciously think about your writing in relation to your own spirituality. While it’s not often a major part of your stories, it clearly adds depth and realism to your work.

    Reply
  26. Thank you, Teresa, for your answer. It’s interesting to see how you addressed the inherent difficulties of being hot and undead at the same time! And the whole discussion about spirituality is fascinating too. There’s so much complexity that can come into stories when that’s an added element. I also very much appreciate that you consciously think about your writing in relation to your own spirituality. While it’s not often a major part of your stories, it clearly adds depth and realism to your work.

    Reply
  27. Thank you, Teresa, for your answer. It’s interesting to see how you addressed the inherent difficulties of being hot and undead at the same time! And the whole discussion about spirituality is fascinating too. There’s so much complexity that can come into stories when that’s an added element. I also very much appreciate that you consciously think about your writing in relation to your own spirituality. While it’s not often a major part of your stories, it clearly adds depth and realism to your work.

    Reply
  28. Could I ever warm up to a paranormal hero??
    Hmmmm . . . well, if he was a good-looking, TALENTED werewolf, I suppose I’d just buy stock in that well-know brush company and check out a good pet shampoo. And if he was a vampire–?– I’d add off the shoulder ensembles to my wardrobe and never, ever wear white.

    Reply
  29. Could I ever warm up to a paranormal hero??
    Hmmmm . . . well, if he was a good-looking, TALENTED werewolf, I suppose I’d just buy stock in that well-know brush company and check out a good pet shampoo. And if he was a vampire–?– I’d add off the shoulder ensembles to my wardrobe and never, ever wear white.

    Reply
  30. Could I ever warm up to a paranormal hero??
    Hmmmm . . . well, if he was a good-looking, TALENTED werewolf, I suppose I’d just buy stock in that well-know brush company and check out a good pet shampoo. And if he was a vampire–?– I’d add off the shoulder ensembles to my wardrobe and never, ever wear white.

    Reply
  31. Good morning, Terri! (Yes, it’s still the crack of dawn here in the Pacific Northwest) How exciting to have company! We raced around cleaning house and stowing the dirty dishes in the oven before you arrived. Hope you like the tea and little bat-shaped cakes.
    I really loved RevMelinda’s question about spirituality, and your response made me look at paranormals in a whole new light. Somehow, one doesn’t think of vampires and spirituality in the same breath, so your answer was truly enlightening. (Pun! Pun!)
    Terri, are any of your books in audiobook format? I discovered audiobooks a few years ago and got totally hooked. After reading the others’ comments about your quirky characters, I’m dying to try a Medeiros. I love quirky characters, especially if they have great lines like “blood breath.” LOL!
    Oh, and don’t worry about putting your feet up on the furniture. We do it all the time!

    Reply
  32. Good morning, Terri! (Yes, it’s still the crack of dawn here in the Pacific Northwest) How exciting to have company! We raced around cleaning house and stowing the dirty dishes in the oven before you arrived. Hope you like the tea and little bat-shaped cakes.
    I really loved RevMelinda’s question about spirituality, and your response made me look at paranormals in a whole new light. Somehow, one doesn’t think of vampires and spirituality in the same breath, so your answer was truly enlightening. (Pun! Pun!)
    Terri, are any of your books in audiobook format? I discovered audiobooks a few years ago and got totally hooked. After reading the others’ comments about your quirky characters, I’m dying to try a Medeiros. I love quirky characters, especially if they have great lines like “blood breath.” LOL!
    Oh, and don’t worry about putting your feet up on the furniture. We do it all the time!

    Reply
  33. Good morning, Terri! (Yes, it’s still the crack of dawn here in the Pacific Northwest) How exciting to have company! We raced around cleaning house and stowing the dirty dishes in the oven before you arrived. Hope you like the tea and little bat-shaped cakes.
    I really loved RevMelinda’s question about spirituality, and your response made me look at paranormals in a whole new light. Somehow, one doesn’t think of vampires and spirituality in the same breath, so your answer was truly enlightening. (Pun! Pun!)
    Terri, are any of your books in audiobook format? I discovered audiobooks a few years ago and got totally hooked. After reading the others’ comments about your quirky characters, I’m dying to try a Medeiros. I love quirky characters, especially if they have great lines like “blood breath.” LOL!
    Oh, and don’t worry about putting your feet up on the furniture. We do it all the time!

    Reply
  34. I have been known to kick the furniture, but unless it’s warm outside, don’t throw it through the window!
    And definitely, Sherrie, if you’re into quirky characters (and I know you’re into humor), you HAVE to read Terri. The books are even better after we’ve spilled a few beers with her and know how she thinks.

    Reply
  35. I have been known to kick the furniture, but unless it’s warm outside, don’t throw it through the window!
    And definitely, Sherrie, if you’re into quirky characters (and I know you’re into humor), you HAVE to read Terri. The books are even better after we’ve spilled a few beers with her and know how she thinks.

    Reply
  36. I have been known to kick the furniture, but unless it’s warm outside, don’t throw it through the window!
    And definitely, Sherrie, if you’re into quirky characters (and I know you’re into humor), you HAVE to read Terri. The books are even better after we’ve spilled a few beers with her and know how she thinks.

    Reply
  37. Teresa, loved After Midnight and TVWLM. I had not really connected the spirituality until your great post. I’m trying to read deeper when I read now, thanks.
    Keep up the writing, love your stories.

    Reply
  38. Teresa, loved After Midnight and TVWLM. I had not really connected the spirituality until your great post. I’m trying to read deeper when I read now, thanks.
    Keep up the writing, love your stories.

    Reply
  39. Teresa, loved After Midnight and TVWLM. I had not really connected the spirituality until your great post. I’m trying to read deeper when I read now, thanks.
    Keep up the writing, love your stories.

    Reply
  40. Sherrie,
    The only book I have out in audio is THE BRIDE AND THE BEAST and you can still get it at http://www.recordedbooks.com
    I had never gone back and read one of my books after it was published but I just discovered this audio version last year and listened to the whole thing (it’s unabridged) and I’m embarrassed to say that I was enraptured!
    The narrator, Virginia Leishman, an English actress, was just perfection. She read everything with such spirit and credibility. It wasn’t even embarrassing to hear the love scenes read aloud because she was so convincing. (Even my dad listened to it :)) Since the only tape player I had was in my car, I would drive to Sonic for breakfast just so I could listen to some more.
    I guess it was my first glimpse into how a playwright must feel hearing their work “performed” for the first time.

    Reply
  41. Sherrie,
    The only book I have out in audio is THE BRIDE AND THE BEAST and you can still get it at http://www.recordedbooks.com
    I had never gone back and read one of my books after it was published but I just discovered this audio version last year and listened to the whole thing (it’s unabridged) and I’m embarrassed to say that I was enraptured!
    The narrator, Virginia Leishman, an English actress, was just perfection. She read everything with such spirit and credibility. It wasn’t even embarrassing to hear the love scenes read aloud because she was so convincing. (Even my dad listened to it :)) Since the only tape player I had was in my car, I would drive to Sonic for breakfast just so I could listen to some more.
    I guess it was my first glimpse into how a playwright must feel hearing their work “performed” for the first time.

    Reply
  42. Sherrie,
    The only book I have out in audio is THE BRIDE AND THE BEAST and you can still get it at http://www.recordedbooks.com
    I had never gone back and read one of my books after it was published but I just discovered this audio version last year and listened to the whole thing (it’s unabridged) and I’m embarrassed to say that I was enraptured!
    The narrator, Virginia Leishman, an English actress, was just perfection. She read everything with such spirit and credibility. It wasn’t even embarrassing to hear the love scenes read aloud because she was so convincing. (Even my dad listened to it :)) Since the only tape player I had was in my car, I would drive to Sonic for breakfast just so I could listen to some more.
    I guess it was my first glimpse into how a playwright must feel hearing their work “performed” for the first time.

    Reply
  43. And Linda, I decided I could definitely “warm up” to a parnormal hero after watching James Marsters portrayal of “Spike” on BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER πŸ˜‰
    Thank you susanna for the great question and thank you jill for loving the books πŸ™‚

    Reply
  44. And Linda, I decided I could definitely “warm up” to a parnormal hero after watching James Marsters portrayal of “Spike” on BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER πŸ˜‰
    Thank you susanna for the great question and thank you jill for loving the books πŸ™‚

    Reply
  45. And Linda, I decided I could definitely “warm up” to a parnormal hero after watching James Marsters portrayal of “Spike” on BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER πŸ˜‰
    Thank you susanna for the great question and thank you jill for loving the books πŸ™‚

    Reply
  46. Yay, Terri’s here! Welcome to our humble abode at WordWenches! Don’t worry about putting your feet up on the furniture, we’re all about comfort here, despite our fancy parlor color scheme.
    You and Pat should go see the new Marie Antoinette movie — bet it will bring back memories. πŸ™‚
    Terri, I have always loved your books, because they’re just great stories, regardless of paranormal or ‘normal’ elements — and because you employ strong archetypal themes, like fairy tale and myth frameworks, which can add a rich layer of meaning and entertainment to romance fiction– that’s a great glue for bonding paranormal and historical elements.
    I’ve always mixed paranormal elements in my own historicals, from my first book on, sometimes more and sometimes less — it’s nice to see the trend growing at the current rate, since it gives those of us who are interested a lot more freedom to play around.
    You make an excellent point about the importance of theme, particularly redemption, in the current appeal of paranormals. There are underlying powerful spiritual themes in love stories anyway, and putting these through a filter of vampires, werewolves, faeries, ghosts, supernatural powers and so on, explores larger themes in storytelling. So very Campbell, Jung, Bettelheim…but there ya go, I truly think that’s a big part of the success of these stories.
    Think back over all the great storytelling cultures of the world — they’re full of paranormal themes, all of them. And I’ve always thought of romance fiction as being in that old, classic storytelling stream.
    And besides, woo-woo elements are just such fun. πŸ™‚
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  47. Yay, Terri’s here! Welcome to our humble abode at WordWenches! Don’t worry about putting your feet up on the furniture, we’re all about comfort here, despite our fancy parlor color scheme.
    You and Pat should go see the new Marie Antoinette movie — bet it will bring back memories. πŸ™‚
    Terri, I have always loved your books, because they’re just great stories, regardless of paranormal or ‘normal’ elements — and because you employ strong archetypal themes, like fairy tale and myth frameworks, which can add a rich layer of meaning and entertainment to romance fiction– that’s a great glue for bonding paranormal and historical elements.
    I’ve always mixed paranormal elements in my own historicals, from my first book on, sometimes more and sometimes less — it’s nice to see the trend growing at the current rate, since it gives those of us who are interested a lot more freedom to play around.
    You make an excellent point about the importance of theme, particularly redemption, in the current appeal of paranormals. There are underlying powerful spiritual themes in love stories anyway, and putting these through a filter of vampires, werewolves, faeries, ghosts, supernatural powers and so on, explores larger themes in storytelling. So very Campbell, Jung, Bettelheim…but there ya go, I truly think that’s a big part of the success of these stories.
    Think back over all the great storytelling cultures of the world — they’re full of paranormal themes, all of them. And I’ve always thought of romance fiction as being in that old, classic storytelling stream.
    And besides, woo-woo elements are just such fun. πŸ™‚
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  48. Yay, Terri’s here! Welcome to our humble abode at WordWenches! Don’t worry about putting your feet up on the furniture, we’re all about comfort here, despite our fancy parlor color scheme.
    You and Pat should go see the new Marie Antoinette movie — bet it will bring back memories. πŸ™‚
    Terri, I have always loved your books, because they’re just great stories, regardless of paranormal or ‘normal’ elements — and because you employ strong archetypal themes, like fairy tale and myth frameworks, which can add a rich layer of meaning and entertainment to romance fiction– that’s a great glue for bonding paranormal and historical elements.
    I’ve always mixed paranormal elements in my own historicals, from my first book on, sometimes more and sometimes less — it’s nice to see the trend growing at the current rate, since it gives those of us who are interested a lot more freedom to play around.
    You make an excellent point about the importance of theme, particularly redemption, in the current appeal of paranormals. There are underlying powerful spiritual themes in love stories anyway, and putting these through a filter of vampires, werewolves, faeries, ghosts, supernatural powers and so on, explores larger themes in storytelling. So very Campbell, Jung, Bettelheim…but there ya go, I truly think that’s a big part of the success of these stories.
    Think back over all the great storytelling cultures of the world — they’re full of paranormal themes, all of them. And I’ve always thought of romance fiction as being in that old, classic storytelling stream.
    And besides, woo-woo elements are just such fun. πŸ™‚
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  49. Spike was great. But I liked bad Spike, not neutered by a chip in the head Spike, orβ€”even worseβ€”neutered by love Spike. And Angel just bored me to tears (Anglus on the other hand . . .). I always thought the Anglus/Darla story line was far more interesting than the Angel/Buffy one.
    Maybe I was just ruined as child by all those Ann Rice books where Lestat was unrepentant and unapologetic about what he was . . . maybe I’d rather be made bad than make him good? Too much Goth in my soul?

    Reply
  50. Spike was great. But I liked bad Spike, not neutered by a chip in the head Spike, orβ€”even worseβ€”neutered by love Spike. And Angel just bored me to tears (Anglus on the other hand . . .). I always thought the Anglus/Darla story line was far more interesting than the Angel/Buffy one.
    Maybe I was just ruined as child by all those Ann Rice books where Lestat was unrepentant and unapologetic about what he was . . . maybe I’d rather be made bad than make him good? Too much Goth in my soul?

    Reply
  51. Spike was great. But I liked bad Spike, not neutered by a chip in the head Spike, orβ€”even worseβ€”neutered by love Spike. And Angel just bored me to tears (Anglus on the other hand . . .). I always thought the Anglus/Darla story line was far more interesting than the Angel/Buffy one.
    Maybe I was just ruined as child by all those Ann Rice books where Lestat was unrepentant and unapologetic about what he was . . . maybe I’d rather be made bad than make him good? Too much Goth in my soul?

    Reply
  52. Hi, Terri.
    Thank you so much for hanging out with us today. A very interesting take on spirituality in paranormals. I also wondered if –at least in the U.S.–the popularity was connected to the upheaval of 9/11. Was it possible that the good vs evil component of paranormals became of increasing appeal to readers after this incomprehensible event?
    I was never a huge fan of paranormals, and still can’t get snuggly feelings about werewolves. But BUFFY changed my viewpoint about vampires–and I did love Spike. I thought he gave the whole series a big shot in the arm–and did the same when he went to ANGEL. I love him: bad Spike and good Spike, because even the good one still has a delicious wicked streak.

    Reply
  53. Hi, Terri.
    Thank you so much for hanging out with us today. A very interesting take on spirituality in paranormals. I also wondered if –at least in the U.S.–the popularity was connected to the upheaval of 9/11. Was it possible that the good vs evil component of paranormals became of increasing appeal to readers after this incomprehensible event?
    I was never a huge fan of paranormals, and still can’t get snuggly feelings about werewolves. But BUFFY changed my viewpoint about vampires–and I did love Spike. I thought he gave the whole series a big shot in the arm–and did the same when he went to ANGEL. I love him: bad Spike and good Spike, because even the good one still has a delicious wicked streak.

    Reply
  54. Hi, Terri.
    Thank you so much for hanging out with us today. A very interesting take on spirituality in paranormals. I also wondered if –at least in the U.S.–the popularity was connected to the upheaval of 9/11. Was it possible that the good vs evil component of paranormals became of increasing appeal to readers after this incomprehensible event?
    I was never a huge fan of paranormals, and still can’t get snuggly feelings about werewolves. But BUFFY changed my viewpoint about vampires–and I did love Spike. I thought he gave the whole series a big shot in the arm–and did the same when he went to ANGEL. I love him: bad Spike and good Spike, because even the good one still has a delicious wicked streak.

    Reply
  55. Hi Teresa and everyone,
    Just peeking in over my lunch break and I wanted to say I am thrilled by this discussion. Most of the time I am with Kalen and prefer straight historicals but I did just stick my toe in the water with MJ’s Kiss of Fate and Stolen Magic (which actually sparked my initial question). MJ, I so loved your skillful interweaving of various kinds of “spiritual energy” (magic, Gaia, myth, good ole Church of England, and ancient Celtic–did I leave any out?). You might just have made me a convert. Teresa, your historicals have always been great so I bet your vampirish books are too! Loretta, I do think you’re right in that the question of good vs. evil (or one might say “the problem of evil”) is a fundamental spiritual question that has sparked some of the world’s greatest literature (and theology)–why shouldn’t it power great romance novels, too? Sorry to ramble on–but I just have to say that any blog that includes both Buffy and Bettelheim in a discussion of romance just rocks.
    Melinda

    Reply
  56. Hi Teresa and everyone,
    Just peeking in over my lunch break and I wanted to say I am thrilled by this discussion. Most of the time I am with Kalen and prefer straight historicals but I did just stick my toe in the water with MJ’s Kiss of Fate and Stolen Magic (which actually sparked my initial question). MJ, I so loved your skillful interweaving of various kinds of “spiritual energy” (magic, Gaia, myth, good ole Church of England, and ancient Celtic–did I leave any out?). You might just have made me a convert. Teresa, your historicals have always been great so I bet your vampirish books are too! Loretta, I do think you’re right in that the question of good vs. evil (or one might say “the problem of evil”) is a fundamental spiritual question that has sparked some of the world’s greatest literature (and theology)–why shouldn’t it power great romance novels, too? Sorry to ramble on–but I just have to say that any blog that includes both Buffy and Bettelheim in a discussion of romance just rocks.
    Melinda

    Reply
  57. Hi Teresa and everyone,
    Just peeking in over my lunch break and I wanted to say I am thrilled by this discussion. Most of the time I am with Kalen and prefer straight historicals but I did just stick my toe in the water with MJ’s Kiss of Fate and Stolen Magic (which actually sparked my initial question). MJ, I so loved your skillful interweaving of various kinds of “spiritual energy” (magic, Gaia, myth, good ole Church of England, and ancient Celtic–did I leave any out?). You might just have made me a convert. Teresa, your historicals have always been great so I bet your vampirish books are too! Loretta, I do think you’re right in that the question of good vs. evil (or one might say “the problem of evil”) is a fundamental spiritual question that has sparked some of the world’s greatest literature (and theology)–why shouldn’t it power great romance novels, too? Sorry to ramble on–but I just have to say that any blog that includes both Buffy and Bettelheim in a discussion of romance just rocks.
    Melinda

    Reply
  58. “So how about you? As a reader, is it possible for you to warm up to a paranormal hero? If he’s a werewolf, can you suspend disbelief long enough to overlook the fleas and the hairy back? If he’s a vampire, can you overlook his prominent canine teeth as long as he vows to love you for all eternity?”
    I love paranormal heroes. They’re usually physically or psychically powerful, and powerful heroes are a turn-on for me (the whole power behind the throne thing, you know). Also, I can suspend disbelief with the best of them. I get totally immersed in the author’s world and the only thing that will trigger disbelief are inconsistencies in the rules of the world or in characterization. I don’t usually think about things like fleas or prominent teeth unless they’re actually mentioned. Fleas are real world and don’t necessarily exist in the story world! Suspension of disbelief is a mixed blessing though. Because I mentally adopt the rules of the author’s world, inconsistencies are obvious and very jarring. And I’m not very forgiving of being yanked out of the story.
    I do have one pet peeve. I don’t like it when the heroine turns into a paranormal at the end. It just dilutes the whole dynamic of the relationship for me. Obviously, with vampires somebody has to change because of the living forever problem, but if a werewolf falls in love with a human and the human changes into a werewolf the story looses its punch. It’s like Prince Charming falling in love with Cinderella and then finding out that she’s a long-lost princess.
    Oh, and I like my heroes to be good (not evil) (at least deep down) in their paranormalness. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  59. “So how about you? As a reader, is it possible for you to warm up to a paranormal hero? If he’s a werewolf, can you suspend disbelief long enough to overlook the fleas and the hairy back? If he’s a vampire, can you overlook his prominent canine teeth as long as he vows to love you for all eternity?”
    I love paranormal heroes. They’re usually physically or psychically powerful, and powerful heroes are a turn-on for me (the whole power behind the throne thing, you know). Also, I can suspend disbelief with the best of them. I get totally immersed in the author’s world and the only thing that will trigger disbelief are inconsistencies in the rules of the world or in characterization. I don’t usually think about things like fleas or prominent teeth unless they’re actually mentioned. Fleas are real world and don’t necessarily exist in the story world! Suspension of disbelief is a mixed blessing though. Because I mentally adopt the rules of the author’s world, inconsistencies are obvious and very jarring. And I’m not very forgiving of being yanked out of the story.
    I do have one pet peeve. I don’t like it when the heroine turns into a paranormal at the end. It just dilutes the whole dynamic of the relationship for me. Obviously, with vampires somebody has to change because of the living forever problem, but if a werewolf falls in love with a human and the human changes into a werewolf the story looses its punch. It’s like Prince Charming falling in love with Cinderella and then finding out that she’s a long-lost princess.
    Oh, and I like my heroes to be good (not evil) (at least deep down) in their paranormalness. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  60. “So how about you? As a reader, is it possible for you to warm up to a paranormal hero? If he’s a werewolf, can you suspend disbelief long enough to overlook the fleas and the hairy back? If he’s a vampire, can you overlook his prominent canine teeth as long as he vows to love you for all eternity?”
    I love paranormal heroes. They’re usually physically or psychically powerful, and powerful heroes are a turn-on for me (the whole power behind the throne thing, you know). Also, I can suspend disbelief with the best of them. I get totally immersed in the author’s world and the only thing that will trigger disbelief are inconsistencies in the rules of the world or in characterization. I don’t usually think about things like fleas or prominent teeth unless they’re actually mentioned. Fleas are real world and don’t necessarily exist in the story world! Suspension of disbelief is a mixed blessing though. Because I mentally adopt the rules of the author’s world, inconsistencies are obvious and very jarring. And I’m not very forgiving of being yanked out of the story.
    I do have one pet peeve. I don’t like it when the heroine turns into a paranormal at the end. It just dilutes the whole dynamic of the relationship for me. Obviously, with vampires somebody has to change because of the living forever problem, but if a werewolf falls in love with a human and the human changes into a werewolf the story looses its punch. It’s like Prince Charming falling in love with Cinderella and then finding out that she’s a long-lost princess.
    Oh, and I like my heroes to be good (not evil) (at least deep down) in their paranormalness. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  61. Hi, Teresa.Jo here.
    Sorry to be late chiming in. It’s the west coast time problem.Wonderful answers, and I do remember very fondly your witch books. I just mentioned one on a list somewhere as one of the really funny romances I’ve read. A Puritan witch and a tech billionarie. Brilliant.
    The vampire phenomenen intrigues me, too — though I doubt I’ll ever write one. I thought I’d never like a vampire romance, but I have enjoyed some. I think you’re right that vampires bring in epic issues, especially when we’re talking about souls. Is there also an allure of immortality in restless times?
    And other paranormal elements can often involve personal, national, and international high stakes.
    Do you think it’s partly a reaction against the popularity of the mundane Regency romance? I love the regency, but without paranormal elements it’s hard to bring in high, wide-scale drama. There’s such a weight of good manners and good order then. There is the war, but that mostly takes the characters out of the English society readers love.
    My paranormal instincts mostly take me to other world, which is a whole other situation.
    Thanks for being here? Need a stiff drink, yet? I have excellent brandy and port.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  62. Hi, Teresa.Jo here.
    Sorry to be late chiming in. It’s the west coast time problem.Wonderful answers, and I do remember very fondly your witch books. I just mentioned one on a list somewhere as one of the really funny romances I’ve read. A Puritan witch and a tech billionarie. Brilliant.
    The vampire phenomenen intrigues me, too — though I doubt I’ll ever write one. I thought I’d never like a vampire romance, but I have enjoyed some. I think you’re right that vampires bring in epic issues, especially when we’re talking about souls. Is there also an allure of immortality in restless times?
    And other paranormal elements can often involve personal, national, and international high stakes.
    Do you think it’s partly a reaction against the popularity of the mundane Regency romance? I love the regency, but without paranormal elements it’s hard to bring in high, wide-scale drama. There’s such a weight of good manners and good order then. There is the war, but that mostly takes the characters out of the English society readers love.
    My paranormal instincts mostly take me to other world, which is a whole other situation.
    Thanks for being here? Need a stiff drink, yet? I have excellent brandy and port.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  63. Hi, Teresa.Jo here.
    Sorry to be late chiming in. It’s the west coast time problem.Wonderful answers, and I do remember very fondly your witch books. I just mentioned one on a list somewhere as one of the really funny romances I’ve read. A Puritan witch and a tech billionarie. Brilliant.
    The vampire phenomenen intrigues me, too — though I doubt I’ll ever write one. I thought I’d never like a vampire romance, but I have enjoyed some. I think you’re right that vampires bring in epic issues, especially when we’re talking about souls. Is there also an allure of immortality in restless times?
    And other paranormal elements can often involve personal, national, and international high stakes.
    Do you think it’s partly a reaction against the popularity of the mundane Regency romance? I love the regency, but without paranormal elements it’s hard to bring in high, wide-scale drama. There’s such a weight of good manners and good order then. There is the war, but that mostly takes the characters out of the English society readers love.
    My paranormal instincts mostly take me to other world, which is a whole other situation.
    Thanks for being here? Need a stiff drink, yet? I have excellent brandy and port.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  64. I loved Spike, too, and my respect for him grew when I learned that he FAKED that wonderful british accent!
    Terrie~~~I got so wound up in imagining my life with the undead in my previous post, I forgot to fawn! I do so love your books—all of them. In fact, yours and those of all the ‘Wenches’ listed here, rank among my favorites. I only wish, kiddingly, that none of you had ‘lives’ so you could each pop out another book as fast as I read them.

    Reply
  65. I loved Spike, too, and my respect for him grew when I learned that he FAKED that wonderful british accent!
    Terrie~~~I got so wound up in imagining my life with the undead in my previous post, I forgot to fawn! I do so love your books—all of them. In fact, yours and those of all the ‘Wenches’ listed here, rank among my favorites. I only wish, kiddingly, that none of you had ‘lives’ so you could each pop out another book as fast as I read them.

    Reply
  66. I loved Spike, too, and my respect for him grew when I learned that he FAKED that wonderful british accent!
    Terrie~~~I got so wound up in imagining my life with the undead in my previous post, I forgot to fawn! I do so love your books—all of them. In fact, yours and those of all the ‘Wenches’ listed here, rank among my favorites. I only wish, kiddingly, that none of you had ‘lives’ so you could each pop out another book as fast as I read them.

    Reply
  67. Hi!!!!!!!!!!!! I love your books!!!!! πŸ™‚ Okay, now that I got that out. . . LOL πŸ™‚ I’m someone who likes straight out historicals, and like my paranormal stuff in the X-Files. . . *inserting BIG but here* but, you were my first exception because I simply enjoyed the books of yours I read before After Midnight came out. And I totally enjoyed that one, and Vampire Who Loves Me. So in the end, while I prefer regular historical, if I enjoy an author, I’ll definitely try a paranormal because I’ll probably enjoy it too! πŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  68. Hi!!!!!!!!!!!! I love your books!!!!! πŸ™‚ Okay, now that I got that out. . . LOL πŸ™‚ I’m someone who likes straight out historicals, and like my paranormal stuff in the X-Files. . . *inserting BIG but here* but, you were my first exception because I simply enjoyed the books of yours I read before After Midnight came out. And I totally enjoyed that one, and Vampire Who Loves Me. So in the end, while I prefer regular historical, if I enjoy an author, I’ll definitely try a paranormal because I’ll probably enjoy it too! πŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  69. Hi!!!!!!!!!!!! I love your books!!!!! πŸ™‚ Okay, now that I got that out. . . LOL πŸ™‚ I’m someone who likes straight out historicals, and like my paranormal stuff in the X-Files. . . *inserting BIG but here* but, you were my first exception because I simply enjoyed the books of yours I read before After Midnight came out. And I totally enjoyed that one, and Vampire Who Loves Me. So in the end, while I prefer regular historical, if I enjoy an author, I’ll definitely try a paranormal because I’ll probably enjoy it too! πŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  70. >>Hi, Mary Jo! You guys have a gorgeous “house” over here and I’m so delighted to visit. I promise to use a coaster and not put my feet up on the furniture ;)<< Hey, relax, hon! (That's Baltimore-speak. πŸ™‚ Honored guests are supposed to make themselves comfortable. I'll just heat up some of the chocolate chip cookies from the Scottish bakery. They're great cold, but SENSATIONAL hot! And being virtual today--no calories. πŸ™‚ RevMelinda, I'm glad you've liked my Guardian books! I'm perfectly comfortable mixing traditions--and why shouldn't the medieval priests and nuns have magical powers??? Mary Jo, really enjoying this discussion

    Reply
  71. >>Hi, Mary Jo! You guys have a gorgeous “house” over here and I’m so delighted to visit. I promise to use a coaster and not put my feet up on the furniture ;)<< Hey, relax, hon! (That's Baltimore-speak. πŸ™‚ Honored guests are supposed to make themselves comfortable. I'll just heat up some of the chocolate chip cookies from the Scottish bakery. They're great cold, but SENSATIONAL hot! And being virtual today--no calories. πŸ™‚ RevMelinda, I'm glad you've liked my Guardian books! I'm perfectly comfortable mixing traditions--and why shouldn't the medieval priests and nuns have magical powers??? Mary Jo, really enjoying this discussion

    Reply
  72. >>Hi, Mary Jo! You guys have a gorgeous “house” over here and I’m so delighted to visit. I promise to use a coaster and not put my feet up on the furniture ;)<< Hey, relax, hon! (That's Baltimore-speak. πŸ™‚ Honored guests are supposed to make themselves comfortable. I'll just heat up some of the chocolate chip cookies from the Scottish bakery. They're great cold, but SENSATIONAL hot! And being virtual today--no calories. πŸ™‚ RevMelinda, I'm glad you've liked my Guardian books! I'm perfectly comfortable mixing traditions--and why shouldn't the medieval priests and nuns have magical powers??? Mary Jo, really enjoying this discussion

    Reply
  73. “I guess it was my first glimpse into how a playwright must feel hearing their work “performed” for the first time.”
    You know, that’s a really astute observation, Terri, and possibly one of the true tests of time: being able to “listen” to someone narrate your story and loving it as much as when you wrote it. The few times I’ve heard anyone narrate my stuff, I’ve wanted to crawl into a hole.

    Reply
  74. “I guess it was my first glimpse into how a playwright must feel hearing their work “performed” for the first time.”
    You know, that’s a really astute observation, Terri, and possibly one of the true tests of time: being able to “listen” to someone narrate your story and loving it as much as when you wrote it. The few times I’ve heard anyone narrate my stuff, I’ve wanted to crawl into a hole.

    Reply
  75. “I guess it was my first glimpse into how a playwright must feel hearing their work “performed” for the first time.”
    You know, that’s a really astute observation, Terri, and possibly one of the true tests of time: being able to “listen” to someone narrate your story and loving it as much as when you wrote it. The few times I’ve heard anyone narrate my stuff, I’ve wanted to crawl into a hole.

    Reply
  76. Thank you, Susan Sarah! I’ve often included threads of paranormal elements in my straight historicals like “family curses,” etc. It just gives the book a little extra flavor.
    And see, Kalen, I hated Lestat! He was just too mean for me. I liked Louie πŸ™‚
    Loretta,
    I think you’re definitely on to something with the 9/11 good/evil theme. We also love to believe that the power of love can convert evil to good–a very powerful wish fulfillment for our world today.
    Mary K, I will confess that I hate it at the end of the Beauty and the Beast stories when the Beast turns into a prince. I fell in wuv with my hairy wittle beast and it’s him I want! (But I did like it at the end of SHREK when Fiona turned into an ogre. I always tear up during that part.)
    All fawning is welcome, Linda! πŸ˜‰ And they really should rename this site “The Wonderful Wenches.”
    Thanks so much for giving the vampire books a chance, Lori! That means the world to me.
    And Sherrie, it was totally embarrassing when I was listening to my book on tape and I actually had to pull off of the road for a minute because I couldn’t believe I’d written such a great sentence. What an idiot!

    Reply
  77. Thank you, Susan Sarah! I’ve often included threads of paranormal elements in my straight historicals like “family curses,” etc. It just gives the book a little extra flavor.
    And see, Kalen, I hated Lestat! He was just too mean for me. I liked Louie πŸ™‚
    Loretta,
    I think you’re definitely on to something with the 9/11 good/evil theme. We also love to believe that the power of love can convert evil to good–a very powerful wish fulfillment for our world today.
    Mary K, I will confess that I hate it at the end of the Beauty and the Beast stories when the Beast turns into a prince. I fell in wuv with my hairy wittle beast and it’s him I want! (But I did like it at the end of SHREK when Fiona turned into an ogre. I always tear up during that part.)
    All fawning is welcome, Linda! πŸ˜‰ And they really should rename this site “The Wonderful Wenches.”
    Thanks so much for giving the vampire books a chance, Lori! That means the world to me.
    And Sherrie, it was totally embarrassing when I was listening to my book on tape and I actually had to pull off of the road for a minute because I couldn’t believe I’d written such a great sentence. What an idiot!

    Reply
  78. Thank you, Susan Sarah! I’ve often included threads of paranormal elements in my straight historicals like “family curses,” etc. It just gives the book a little extra flavor.
    And see, Kalen, I hated Lestat! He was just too mean for me. I liked Louie πŸ™‚
    Loretta,
    I think you’re definitely on to something with the 9/11 good/evil theme. We also love to believe that the power of love can convert evil to good–a very powerful wish fulfillment for our world today.
    Mary K, I will confess that I hate it at the end of the Beauty and the Beast stories when the Beast turns into a prince. I fell in wuv with my hairy wittle beast and it’s him I want! (But I did like it at the end of SHREK when Fiona turned into an ogre. I always tear up during that part.)
    All fawning is welcome, Linda! πŸ˜‰ And they really should rename this site “The Wonderful Wenches.”
    Thanks so much for giving the vampire books a chance, Lori! That means the world to me.
    And Sherrie, it was totally embarrassing when I was listening to my book on tape and I actually had to pull off of the road for a minute because I couldn’t believe I’d written such a great sentence. What an idiot!

    Reply
  79. I can’t manage to listen to anyone read anything aloud, so I’ve not tried to listen to my books on tape. (not that I have a tape player either, oh well!) But if you had someone good reading yours, it would be almost like listening to someone else’s work–very exciting.
    But isn’t it amazing how we can go back and look at a book later and wonder who wrote those words? We only spend half our lives putting them together, but they never seem quite real after they’ve left our hands.
    We’re hiding shrimp salad and lasagna in the back room if you’re getting hungry!

    Reply
  80. I can’t manage to listen to anyone read anything aloud, so I’ve not tried to listen to my books on tape. (not that I have a tape player either, oh well!) But if you had someone good reading yours, it would be almost like listening to someone else’s work–very exciting.
    But isn’t it amazing how we can go back and look at a book later and wonder who wrote those words? We only spend half our lives putting them together, but they never seem quite real after they’ve left our hands.
    We’re hiding shrimp salad and lasagna in the back room if you’re getting hungry!

    Reply
  81. I can’t manage to listen to anyone read anything aloud, so I’ve not tried to listen to my books on tape. (not that I have a tape player either, oh well!) But if you had someone good reading yours, it would be almost like listening to someone else’s work–very exciting.
    But isn’t it amazing how we can go back and look at a book later and wonder who wrote those words? We only spend half our lives putting them together, but they never seem quite real after they’ve left our hands.
    We’re hiding shrimp salad and lasagna in the back room if you’re getting hungry!

    Reply
  82. “It’s like Prince Charming falling in love with Cinderella and then finding out that she’s a long-lost princess.”
    But that IS the essence of the Cinderella story: Her restoration to her proper place (she’s the daughter of a nobleman who’s been displaced by her stepmother). In all the fairy tales the seemingly lowborn character is always RESTORED to where they belong, never lifted up above their proper station. The characters innate nobility is supposed to shine through (hence the reoccurring themes of golden hair and nature being submissive to their will). The stories reaffirm that nobility is inalienable, a very part of their being.

    Reply
  83. “It’s like Prince Charming falling in love with Cinderella and then finding out that she’s a long-lost princess.”
    But that IS the essence of the Cinderella story: Her restoration to her proper place (she’s the daughter of a nobleman who’s been displaced by her stepmother). In all the fairy tales the seemingly lowborn character is always RESTORED to where they belong, never lifted up above their proper station. The characters innate nobility is supposed to shine through (hence the reoccurring themes of golden hair and nature being submissive to their will). The stories reaffirm that nobility is inalienable, a very part of their being.

    Reply
  84. “It’s like Prince Charming falling in love with Cinderella and then finding out that she’s a long-lost princess.”
    But that IS the essence of the Cinderella story: Her restoration to her proper place (she’s the daughter of a nobleman who’s been displaced by her stepmother). In all the fairy tales the seemingly lowborn character is always RESTORED to where they belong, never lifted up above their proper station. The characters innate nobility is supposed to shine through (hence the reoccurring themes of golden hair and nature being submissive to their will). The stories reaffirm that nobility is inalienable, a very part of their being.

    Reply
  85. “. . .why shouldn’t the medieval priests and nuns have magical powers???”
    LOL Mary Jo–You made me think of how “hocus pocus” really is a corruption of “hoc est corpus meum” (this is my body) from the consecration part of the Latin mass! The spiritual and the magical have always marched together (or should I say “sinuously intertwined”?)–they just intertwine differently these days than in historical times.

    Reply
  86. “. . .why shouldn’t the medieval priests and nuns have magical powers???”
    LOL Mary Jo–You made me think of how “hocus pocus” really is a corruption of “hoc est corpus meum” (this is my body) from the consecration part of the Latin mass! The spiritual and the magical have always marched together (or should I say “sinuously intertwined”?)–they just intertwine differently these days than in historical times.

    Reply
  87. “. . .why shouldn’t the medieval priests and nuns have magical powers???”
    LOL Mary Jo–You made me think of how “hocus pocus” really is a corruption of “hoc est corpus meum” (this is my body) from the consecration part of the Latin mass! The spiritual and the magical have always marched together (or should I say “sinuously intertwined”?)–they just intertwine differently these days than in historical times.

    Reply
  88. JO wrote: “Do you think it’s partly a reaction against the popularity of the mundane Regency romance? I love the regency, but without paranormal elements it’s hard to bring in high, wide-scale drama. There’s such a weight of good manners and good order then. There is the war, but that mostly takes the characters out of the English society readers love.”
    Jo, I think you can tackle some of those issues in a Regency but as you all know, the lighthearted Regency seemed to be the only game in town for awhile. And what I was finding in my reading was that the heroes were becoming too much like “the boy next door.” Maybe they were appealing to the really young readers but I still like my heroes (no matter how heroic) to be a little dangerous as well. If he doesn’t pose some kind of emotional threat to the heroine’s peace of mind, then I don’t think he’s a very exciting foil for her.
    And yes, Pat, I’m just waiting until I get old and senile enough that I can go back and read all of my books as if I wasn’t the one who wrote them. (Next year should be good.)

    Reply
  89. JO wrote: “Do you think it’s partly a reaction against the popularity of the mundane Regency romance? I love the regency, but without paranormal elements it’s hard to bring in high, wide-scale drama. There’s such a weight of good manners and good order then. There is the war, but that mostly takes the characters out of the English society readers love.”
    Jo, I think you can tackle some of those issues in a Regency but as you all know, the lighthearted Regency seemed to be the only game in town for awhile. And what I was finding in my reading was that the heroes were becoming too much like “the boy next door.” Maybe they were appealing to the really young readers but I still like my heroes (no matter how heroic) to be a little dangerous as well. If he doesn’t pose some kind of emotional threat to the heroine’s peace of mind, then I don’t think he’s a very exciting foil for her.
    And yes, Pat, I’m just waiting until I get old and senile enough that I can go back and read all of my books as if I wasn’t the one who wrote them. (Next year should be good.)

    Reply
  90. JO wrote: “Do you think it’s partly a reaction against the popularity of the mundane Regency romance? I love the regency, but without paranormal elements it’s hard to bring in high, wide-scale drama. There’s such a weight of good manners and good order then. There is the war, but that mostly takes the characters out of the English society readers love.”
    Jo, I think you can tackle some of those issues in a Regency but as you all know, the lighthearted Regency seemed to be the only game in town for awhile. And what I was finding in my reading was that the heroes were becoming too much like “the boy next door.” Maybe they were appealing to the really young readers but I still like my heroes (no matter how heroic) to be a little dangerous as well. If he doesn’t pose some kind of emotional threat to the heroine’s peace of mind, then I don’t think he’s a very exciting foil for her.
    And yes, Pat, I’m just waiting until I get old and senile enough that I can go back and read all of my books as if I wasn’t the one who wrote them. (Next year should be good.)

    Reply
  91. Terri, thanks so much for visiting Word Wenches! The Wench Fairy left a little prezzie for you on the main blog page…. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  92. Terri, thanks so much for visiting Word Wenches! The Wench Fairy left a little prezzie for you on the main blog page…. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  93. Terri, thanks so much for visiting Word Wenches! The Wench Fairy left a little prezzie for you on the main blog page…. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  94. p.s. the previous post does not mean to signal the end of your blog, by any means! Keep commenting away, deep into the night. Take advantage of those vampire hours….
    The announcement just indicates that the the Wench Fairy is tired and is going to bed now and wanted to get that posted before she forgot….

    Reply
  95. p.s. the previous post does not mean to signal the end of your blog, by any means! Keep commenting away, deep into the night. Take advantage of those vampire hours….
    The announcement just indicates that the the Wench Fairy is tired and is going to bed now and wanted to get that posted before she forgot….

    Reply
  96. p.s. the previous post does not mean to signal the end of your blog, by any means! Keep commenting away, deep into the night. Take advantage of those vampire hours….
    The announcement just indicates that the the Wench Fairy is tired and is going to bed now and wanted to get that posted before she forgot….

    Reply
  97. Thank you Susan Sarah and all of the wonderful wenches! I’ve enjoyed the discussion so much and it’s truly been a delight to visit your beautiful home πŸ™‚

    Reply
  98. Thank you Susan Sarah and all of the wonderful wenches! I’ve enjoyed the discussion so much and it’s truly been a delight to visit your beautiful home πŸ™‚

    Reply
  99. Thank you Susan Sarah and all of the wonderful wenches! I’ve enjoyed the discussion so much and it’s truly been a delight to visit your beautiful home πŸ™‚

    Reply
  100. Terri–
    Thanks for your contributions…an interesting discussion, as ever!
    I didn’t make it over here yesterday, but better late than never.
    (I think I just rhymed…)

    Reply
  101. Terri–
    Thanks for your contributions…an interesting discussion, as ever!
    I didn’t make it over here yesterday, but better late than never.
    (I think I just rhymed…)

    Reply
  102. Terri–
    Thanks for your contributions…an interesting discussion, as ever!
    I didn’t make it over here yesterday, but better late than never.
    (I think I just rhymed…)

    Reply
  103. I just realized that I missed Theresa’s blog about paranormals- but I am going to comment anyhow, because it was a great discussion! Theresa, I agree with your assessment about why paranormals are so hot right now- the idea that there is so much at stake is very compelling to me. I have shocked myself (and my husband) by how much I am drawn to vampire heros! I absolutely adore them, including Julian in particular. I think it adds to the hero’s allure, not only is he different and very male, but also, a bloodsucking vampire!, and hence a totally different species. Thanks for your lovely books, Theresa, I enjoy them enormously.

    Reply
  104. I just realized that I missed Theresa’s blog about paranormals- but I am going to comment anyhow, because it was a great discussion! Theresa, I agree with your assessment about why paranormals are so hot right now- the idea that there is so much at stake is very compelling to me. I have shocked myself (and my husband) by how much I am drawn to vampire heros! I absolutely adore them, including Julian in particular. I think it adds to the hero’s allure, not only is he different and very male, but also, a bloodsucking vampire!, and hence a totally different species. Thanks for your lovely books, Theresa, I enjoy them enormously.

    Reply
  105. I just realized that I missed Theresa’s blog about paranormals- but I am going to comment anyhow, because it was a great discussion! Theresa, I agree with your assessment about why paranormals are so hot right now- the idea that there is so much at stake is very compelling to me. I have shocked myself (and my husband) by how much I am drawn to vampire heros! I absolutely adore them, including Julian in particular. I think it adds to the hero’s allure, not only is he different and very male, but also, a bloodsucking vampire!, and hence a totally different species. Thanks for your lovely books, Theresa, I enjoy them enormously.

    Reply

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