The Exuberant Art of Crayon Painting

Bouquet of Flowers-Odilon Redon; courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Andrea here, musing about art today. I made a recent visit to the Metropolitan Museum in New York City—one of my favorite places in the world!—to see a show on Literary Posters (more on that in a future blog.) But as usual, I took a stroll through a number of the other galleries just to enjoy the heady buzz of creative energy that always swirls through any venue showcasing art.

As I took in some of the marvelous works by the Impressionists, I was reminded that this past Christmas, I gave a set of pastels “crayons” to an art-minded friend—and also decided to gift myself with a set, too! I have very fond childhood memories of exuberantly scribbling away with the huge set of colorful sticks that my artist mother let me use in her studio. The colors are much richer than regular crayons, as they are actually fashioned with ground pigments, just like oil paints.

That got me to thinking about the art of pastels, and how it has an odd niche in the pantheon of artistic mediums.  It doesn’t get as much respect as one might think—perhaps because, like me, many children use pastels in school art classes because of the rich colors, and so it doesn’t have the same mystique as oil painting. So, history nerd that I am, I decided to do a little research into the subject . . .

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Fifty Shades of Black

Ackermann_mouning_eveningdress1817_fullCara/Andrea here, I'm musing today on a dark subject . . . as in black! Now, New York fashionistas would have no problem adhering to the complex rituals of 19th century mourning—wearing black is very stylish and an everyday staple of any modern trendy wardrobe. It’s hip and ultra cool to eschew brighter colors for the shadow-dark hue of midnight. But as we all know, black had a different connotation in in the past.

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