Wondrous Memories

Camel2022 is hurtling into history, and given events, will no doubt make a huge splash in future history books. My life wasn’t quite so momentous as world events, but our trip to Israel and Egypt is definitely one for my books, both fictional and real. What are your year’s wondrous memories? Do you have plans for more in 2023?

Here’s to peace, love, and joy for all in the new year!

IMPRESSIONS OF EGYPT

CamelI admire avid travelers who can recount events, name famous places, and give a coherent travelogue on the spur of the moment. I am not one of them. Since I have never had a reliable memory, I experience travel. I might close my eyes and recall the scent of saffron and cinnamon, the lights on the mosque, the tune of a street musician—and inevitably, the cry of “One dollar, only one dollar, miss!” as a Marketvendor shoves an armful of bracelets at me. I will not be able to tell you the name of the market or the mosque. Although the one I’m recalling at the moment is in Cairo—and I didn’t take a single photo because I was living it, not recording it. Fortunately, my husband was not so lax!

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Ask a Wench for February: The Perfect Romance Convention

Screen Shot 2021-02-12 at 12.06.40 AMJoanna here, thinking how nice it would be to get away from all this rain.

Which leads to how the Wenches from time to time go to Writers’ Conferences where they attend sessions that help make them better writers and give talks that help other writers do the same, but mostly they hang out in coffee shops and gossip with friends because that’s what folks do at conferences.

So … what would be the most interesting spot for a conference if you could pick any time and place whatsoever?

Some thoughts on this.

 

Pat:  Oh my, this poses entirely too many choices. I’ll simply go with the first one that pops to mind—

Ranelagh

Ranelagh. Maybe Mozart is playing
(Click on the image for a close up_

Ranelagh Gardens in its heyday, about 1765 when the likes of Mozart played in a rotunda painted by Canaletto.  Vauxhall would be another choice, but I like warmth, and the rotunda was heated.

Neither of them are available today in all their glory, so it would be a great joy to see how they looked as our characters wandered about, rubbing elbows with dukes and princes in the case of Ranelagh, and with maids and merchants if we choose Vauxhall.

We could have sessions with genuine lords and ladies and ask them all those eternal questions on how they wish to be addressed (do you really wish to be addressed as Your Grace, Duke? Or would your closest friend address you by the name you had growing up, Kingsley, as in Marquess of?). I would not presume to give a talk on the address question, but I would be happy to speak to The Future and Women’s Rights in Our Novels, if asked.

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Twelfth Night: An interview with Anne Gracie

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo 
 
I always love Anne Gracie’s books, but I especially love this new one, Bride by Mistake, so an interview with Anne about the book is a perfect ending to the Word Wench Christmastide posts about favorite things.
 
Not only did I hunt Anne down and beg to read it, but here’s a quote I forced on her after I read the manuscript:
 
BridebyMistake68kb"The always terrific Anne Gracie outdoes herself with Bride By Mistake. When a protective young English officer rescues a Spanish girl and marries her to save her from an abusive suitor, he never expects to live long enough for it to matter. Now the war is over, the annulment is denied, and Luke Ripton has a wife he'd almost forgotten. But at least since Isabella has been living quietly in a convent, she must be modest and obedient….

She isn't! I loved Bride By Mistake. Gracie created two great characters, a high tension relationship, and a wonderfully satisfying ending. Not to be missed!"
 
The Story

Now that I have the gushing out of the way….<G>  Anne, your Devil Rider books have been quite varied in tone and setting.  (I also particularly like To Catch a Bride, with a good bit taking place in Egypt.  Library Journal listed it among the best romances of 2009.  This is just one among Anne’s many awards and honors.)  What led you to Spain, the setting of most of Bride by Mistake?
 
AG: Thank you for the very kind words, Mary Jo, and for the interview. The Devil Rufus1Riders books are about four friends home from the war, trying to find a way to live again in peacetime. Luke, the hero of Bride By Mistake, is the last of them. All the way through the writing of the other books, he's been there, and I knew something had happened to him in the war, something that still haunted him, but it only became clear as I wrote this book.
 
The war was against Napoleon, but much of it took place in Portugal and Spain — and Catchabride40kEgypt— and Bride By Mistake was sparked by an incident in Luke's early days at war, when, as a 19 year old Lieutenant he comes across a young girl — my heroine, Isabella — being attacked. He saves her, then, finding she's fleeing from an unwanted, forced marriage, he marries her for her own protection, and leaves her with her aunt in a convent. As you explained above, he planned on an annulment, but as my story opens, eight years later, Luke's confronted with the unwelcome realization that the marriage is binding and he must go to Spain to collect his bride.

I'm told a lot of readers don't like books set in foreign locations, that Regencies should take place primarily in London or Bath, but there was a great deal of travel in that era, and with the war in Europe and the growth of the British Empire, I simply can't resist the occasional foray into other countries, especially when they connect with everyday Regency people.

The Anne Gracie Heroine

MJP:  Your first Regency romance was called Gallant Waif (I could list more awards Gallant Waifand honors here <G>), but as I think back over your books, I realized they could be entitled Gallant Waif 1, Gallant Waif 2,GF  3, 4….etc.  Tell us about the archetypal Anne Gracie heroine, and about Bella, the heroine of Bride by Mistake, in particular.  
 
AG: You know, I hadn't thought of that, but I suppose you're right. I tend to choose heroines who are more or less on their own and in a difficult position when the story starts. I like them to be smart, resourceful, loyal and courageous in an everyday sense, as well as vulnerable, with a heart secretly aching for love. They're often ugly ducklings, with the heart of a mother lioness.

Bella, my heroine, is all of these. As heiress to her late mother's fortune, an only child who lacks beauty, Bella was raised by her widowed father to be "almost as good as a son" — his highest accolade.

When the story starts, Bella's been in the convent for eight years. Of course, having been so romantically rescued at the age of thirteen, she's had a huge crush on handsome, Luke Ripton— tall, dark and as beautiful as an angel, a warrior angel — but as the years have passed, the crush has waned. Her school friends think she made him up, and they tease her about her imaginary husband.
 
MJP:  Excerpt, please!
 
AG: There's an excerpt on my website showing Bella being teased at the convent. 
     Below is the moment Luke and Bella meet again, after eight years.

     This, then was her husband. Isabella tried not to stare. 
     He was even more beautiful than she remembered. Eight years ago she'd seen him with a child's eye, and he was her savior and, she had to admit, she'd confused him in her mind a little with the angel of the statue. She had after all, only known him two days, not even that.
    But she was a child no longer and he was… he was breathtaking. Tall, dark, his skin burnished with the sun, a rich dark-gold flush along his cheekbones and such fine cheekbones they were. His nose was a strong, straight blade, his mouth, severe and beautiful. And his eyes, dark, so dark they looked black, but she knew from before they were the darkest blue she had ever seen. There was no sign of blue now.
     She swallowed and held her head higher, knowing what he would see, knowing they were ill-matched. The girls had done their best to make her look as beautiful as they could. It wasn't their fault she looked as she did. She knew she'd never make a beauty. She desperately wished she looked pretty for him. 
     But she could see in his eyes she didn't.
     Dear God but it was Mama and Papa again, Papa the handsome eagle soaring high and Mama the plain, dowdy little pigeon, bleeding with love for a husband who never looked twice at her.
     Mama's words rose unbidden to her mind. Guard your heart, my little one, for love is pain. Love is nothing but pain.
 
BrideByMistakeAustFinalMJP:  I understand that besides the American edition of BBM from Berkley, you’ll also have a simultaneous Australian edition, which I gather is unusual for single title historical romances from American publishers.  Can you tell us more about that?

AG: Yes, it's very exciting. Up to now, they've always imported my US editions and put them on sale 6 months after they came out in the US. But a wonderful person at Penguin Australia read some of my books and passed them around the office. They told me they then realized two things: 1) that my books had been selling well in Australia with virtually no publisher support and 2) I was a local author, so they decided to publish me simultaneously, in trade paperback with this beautiful cover. So I'm feeling very lucky.
 
MJP:  What’s next for you?  
 
AG:  I had planned to write Marcus's story, an offshoot of the Devil Riders series, and had started on it, with my editor's approval, but then my publisher saw my proposal for a new series and they wanted me to go ahead with that immediately and put Marcus aside. So now I'm working on a new series, about 4 girls in London. That's all I can say at the moment.
 
MJP:  A big Awwww! about Marcus, but I’m sure the new series will also be terrific!  Anne, thanks so much for letting me interview you, because that way I got to read the book early!  I understand you’re going to give away a copy to one lucky persoln who comments between now and midnight Saturday.
 
 AG:  Mary Jo, thank YOU for your support and enthusiasm and for the interview and the fabulous quote. Your words of praise mean a great deal to me.

MJP: It's easy to be enthusiastic about your books.  <G>  For you readers–who is your favorite gallant waif heroine?  You can choose one of Anne's waifs, or others that you like.  Smart, resourceful, brave heroines are such a pleasure to read!