Celebrating with Susanna Kearsley & Pamela Hartshorne

10thWWAnnivLogo

Anne here, with Susanna Kearsley and Pamela Hartshorne dropping by to celebrate our 10th anniversary with us. Both Susanna and Pam are  'dual timeline/time slip' authors and Honorary Word Wenches (HWW). They're also representative of international wenchdom, as Pam is from the UK and Susanna from Canada. Welcome, Susanna and Pam!

Susanna-kearsleySusanna here, happy to be here to share in the Word Wenches’ tenth anniversary!

I am, as it happens, an Honorary Word Wench—a  noble and cherished designation that not only comes with the perk of being able to add the letters “H.W.W.” to my signature (always much appreciated by someone like me, who never finished university), but also stands as a sometimes much-needed reminder that I’m never really writing on my own.

It’s a thing about writing: so much of it needs to be done on your own in a room by yourself, shut away from distractions, that it would be easy to feel disconnected…if we didn’t have this amazing community.

The first time I took my elder son to FanExpo here in in Toronto, he looked across the lines of people standing in their cosplay costumes waiting to get in, and said, “My people!” And I knew exactly how he felt. A-desperate-fortune

I feel it, too, whenever I’m with other writers and readers who treasure historical romance. When I don’t have to explain why I’d rather shut myself away with a pile of 18th-century newspapers and a big pot of coffee than go to the mall. When I can say I’ve just surfaced from being in another time, and people understand. It’s a wonderful feeling, to be understood.

It’s in places like this one, with hosts like the Word Wenches, that we’re all able to find one another. We cheer each other, teach each other, share our craft and learn in equal measure; and, as evidenced by this past week, we give each other comfort.

RITANightSusannaKMJP&meBack when I was gifted with my Honorary Word Wench title, on September 23 of 2009, this group was a mere three years old, and I only knew Nicola. Since then I’ve met nearly all of the Wenches, and from sharing an event with Joanna to sharing drinks and laughter with Anne, to having her and Mary Jo come and stand at my shoulder when I won my RITA, the Word Wenches really and truly are “My people”. (Susanna's first interview with the wenches is here.)

May they continue another ten years, and beyond that.
And I’ll keep on adding “H.W.W.” after my name, with great pride.

Susanna Kearsley  

Susanna's most recent publication is A Desperate Fortune 
Her website is here.

And now, here's  Pamela Hartshorne: PamelaHartshorne

It is a great honour to be an Honorary Word Wench, especially when I spent so many years writing strictly contemporary romances for Mills & Boon as Jessica Hart. But I have always been fascinated by the relationship between the past and the present, and in fact started writing to fund a PhD in medieval history (although I ended up as an early modernist) so my historical leanings have always been there.

Throughout the (very) many years it took me to complete that PhD, the question I was asked most often – after ‘Have you ever thought about writing a real book?’, of course – was whether I was going to use my research to write a historical romance. My answer was always ‘no’: I fretted about authenticity and how I could possibly get modern readers to identify with characters who thought and spoke and acted so differently in the past.

But after writing 50 romances, it felt like time for a new challenge and I decided to get over myself and have a go at writing not a romance but a ‘time slip’, part historical novel, part ghost stories, part psychological thrillers – and, in my case, part romance too, because romances are about emotions, and emotions are what connect us to the past, whether that past is our own, or a more distant one. I let go of the authenticity issue; the truth is that no amount of academic research will tell us what it was ‘really like’ in the past. The only way we can know that would be to somehow go back and re-experience life as somebody who lived then (ooh, precisely the premise of a time slip!)

HOUSE OF SHADOWS PBFor me, the real appeal of historical novels, romances or otherwise, lies in the tension between everything that is different and intriguing about the past, and everything that is the same – and what never change are the human emotions that lie at the heart of every great story – love, hate, fear – and that we can all identify with, wherever and whenever we live.

The temptation for all those of us fascinated by the past is to get bogged down in details, and squeeze in every interesting piece of our research (I can’t tell you how much about dung heaps and cleaning gutters I had to force myself to jettison from my first drafts of Time’s Echo) but this is where historical romance comes into its own: focusing on the emotional relationship between the characters gives it the perfect structure to draw readers into the story while keeping them interested and intrigued with a dazzling backdrop of historical detail. (Pam's first interview with the Wenches is here.)

So let’s hear it for historical romance – and let’s hear it for the fabulous Word Wenches, and a blog that has been invariably interesting, entertaining and inspiring for an incredible ten years. Many congratulations to you all!

Pamela Hartshorne  ChampagneToastGroup

Pam’s latest book, House of Shadows (not to be confused with Nicola Cornick’s House of Shadows!) is out now.
Pamela's website is here.

Anne again — thank you so much, Susanna and Pam for coming to celebrating this exciting milestone with us! And dear readers, to quote Pat Rice, "we would love to shower all of you with champagne and cake. But instead, at the end of the week, we'll be handing out gifts to random commenters."
And here's a question for readers: — what historical period or geographical location would you love to see explored in a time slip or historical romance? 

215 thoughts on “Celebrating with Susanna Kearsley & Pamela Hartshorne”

  1. I liked Susanna Kearsley’s ‘Shadowy Horses’ with the sinister ghosts from the Roman Legions but haven’t tried Pamela Hartshorne’s books as yet. I do like to support home grown (English) authors so am considering the audio of ‘The Edge of Darkness’.
    As a physicist I have always been fascinated by time and love to imagine slipping through time to historically interesting periods. For me the meeting of James Clerk Maxwell with Michael Faraday in London, when electromagnetism was being intensely studied, is definitely worth a time slip adventure!

    Reply
  2. I liked Susanna Kearsley’s ‘Shadowy Horses’ with the sinister ghosts from the Roman Legions but haven’t tried Pamela Hartshorne’s books as yet. I do like to support home grown (English) authors so am considering the audio of ‘The Edge of Darkness’.
    As a physicist I have always been fascinated by time and love to imagine slipping through time to historically interesting periods. For me the meeting of James Clerk Maxwell with Michael Faraday in London, when electromagnetism was being intensely studied, is definitely worth a time slip adventure!

    Reply
  3. I liked Susanna Kearsley’s ‘Shadowy Horses’ with the sinister ghosts from the Roman Legions but haven’t tried Pamela Hartshorne’s books as yet. I do like to support home grown (English) authors so am considering the audio of ‘The Edge of Darkness’.
    As a physicist I have always been fascinated by time and love to imagine slipping through time to historically interesting periods. For me the meeting of James Clerk Maxwell with Michael Faraday in London, when electromagnetism was being intensely studied, is definitely worth a time slip adventure!

    Reply
  4. I liked Susanna Kearsley’s ‘Shadowy Horses’ with the sinister ghosts from the Roman Legions but haven’t tried Pamela Hartshorne’s books as yet. I do like to support home grown (English) authors so am considering the audio of ‘The Edge of Darkness’.
    As a physicist I have always been fascinated by time and love to imagine slipping through time to historically interesting periods. For me the meeting of James Clerk Maxwell with Michael Faraday in London, when electromagnetism was being intensely studied, is definitely worth a time slip adventure!

    Reply
  5. I liked Susanna Kearsley’s ‘Shadowy Horses’ with the sinister ghosts from the Roman Legions but haven’t tried Pamela Hartshorne’s books as yet. I do like to support home grown (English) authors so am considering the audio of ‘The Edge of Darkness’.
    As a physicist I have always been fascinated by time and love to imagine slipping through time to historically interesting periods. For me the meeting of James Clerk Maxwell with Michael Faraday in London, when electromagnetism was being intensely studied, is definitely worth a time slip adventure!

    Reply
  6. Hi Quantum, I’m a big fan of both Susanna and Pamela’s books and would happily recommend them both. I don’t know much about James Clerk Maxwell or Michael Faraday — but that Victorian era time of burgeoning scientific experimentation — where science and quackery formed a venn diagram, is certainly an interesting one. Thanks for the suggestion. I shall look up these gentlemen.

    Reply
  7. Hi Quantum, I’m a big fan of both Susanna and Pamela’s books and would happily recommend them both. I don’t know much about James Clerk Maxwell or Michael Faraday — but that Victorian era time of burgeoning scientific experimentation — where science and quackery formed a venn diagram, is certainly an interesting one. Thanks for the suggestion. I shall look up these gentlemen.

    Reply
  8. Hi Quantum, I’m a big fan of both Susanna and Pamela’s books and would happily recommend them both. I don’t know much about James Clerk Maxwell or Michael Faraday — but that Victorian era time of burgeoning scientific experimentation — where science and quackery formed a venn diagram, is certainly an interesting one. Thanks for the suggestion. I shall look up these gentlemen.

    Reply
  9. Hi Quantum, I’m a big fan of both Susanna and Pamela’s books and would happily recommend them both. I don’t know much about James Clerk Maxwell or Michael Faraday — but that Victorian era time of burgeoning scientific experimentation — where science and quackery formed a venn diagram, is certainly an interesting one. Thanks for the suggestion. I shall look up these gentlemen.

    Reply
  10. Hi Quantum, I’m a big fan of both Susanna and Pamela’s books and would happily recommend them both. I don’t know much about James Clerk Maxwell or Michael Faraday — but that Victorian era time of burgeoning scientific experimentation — where science and quackery formed a venn diagram, is certainly an interesting one. Thanks for the suggestion. I shall look up these gentlemen.

    Reply
  11. Hi Quantum. Am intrigued by the idea of using science as a backdrop to a time slip – I just wish that I understood more about physics. I’ve always stuck to the Elizabethan period in my own novels as that is the time I know best, but I would like to branch out into different times at some point, if only to learn more about them. I confess to knowing very little about the Victorians but I do have access to some family letters from the 1870s and have often wondered if I should use them as a springboard for a story …

    Reply
  12. Hi Quantum. Am intrigued by the idea of using science as a backdrop to a time slip – I just wish that I understood more about physics. I’ve always stuck to the Elizabethan period in my own novels as that is the time I know best, but I would like to branch out into different times at some point, if only to learn more about them. I confess to knowing very little about the Victorians but I do have access to some family letters from the 1870s and have often wondered if I should use them as a springboard for a story …

    Reply
  13. Hi Quantum. Am intrigued by the idea of using science as a backdrop to a time slip – I just wish that I understood more about physics. I’ve always stuck to the Elizabethan period in my own novels as that is the time I know best, but I would like to branch out into different times at some point, if only to learn more about them. I confess to knowing very little about the Victorians but I do have access to some family letters from the 1870s and have often wondered if I should use them as a springboard for a story …

    Reply
  14. Hi Quantum. Am intrigued by the idea of using science as a backdrop to a time slip – I just wish that I understood more about physics. I’ve always stuck to the Elizabethan period in my own novels as that is the time I know best, but I would like to branch out into different times at some point, if only to learn more about them. I confess to knowing very little about the Victorians but I do have access to some family letters from the 1870s and have often wondered if I should use them as a springboard for a story …

    Reply
  15. Hi Quantum. Am intrigued by the idea of using science as a backdrop to a time slip – I just wish that I understood more about physics. I’ve always stuck to the Elizabethan period in my own novels as that is the time I know best, but I would like to branch out into different times at some point, if only to learn more about them. I confess to knowing very little about the Victorians but I do have access to some family letters from the 1870s and have often wondered if I should use them as a springboard for a story …

    Reply
  16. My personal favorite time period in the past is pre World War I – starting at about 1890. Not exactly sure why I find that time so appealing. Could be the fashions – love them from that era. It just seems like a time that had enough conveniences to make life a little more comfortable, but a time that had not yet become a rat race. With WWI looming in the future, it seems like a sweet innocent time.

    Reply
  17. My personal favorite time period in the past is pre World War I – starting at about 1890. Not exactly sure why I find that time so appealing. Could be the fashions – love them from that era. It just seems like a time that had enough conveniences to make life a little more comfortable, but a time that had not yet become a rat race. With WWI looming in the future, it seems like a sweet innocent time.

    Reply
  18. My personal favorite time period in the past is pre World War I – starting at about 1890. Not exactly sure why I find that time so appealing. Could be the fashions – love them from that era. It just seems like a time that had enough conveniences to make life a little more comfortable, but a time that had not yet become a rat race. With WWI looming in the future, it seems like a sweet innocent time.

    Reply
  19. My personal favorite time period in the past is pre World War I – starting at about 1890. Not exactly sure why I find that time so appealing. Could be the fashions – love them from that era. It just seems like a time that had enough conveniences to make life a little more comfortable, but a time that had not yet become a rat race. With WWI looming in the future, it seems like a sweet innocent time.

    Reply
  20. My personal favorite time period in the past is pre World War I – starting at about 1890. Not exactly sure why I find that time so appealing. Could be the fashions – love them from that era. It just seems like a time that had enough conveniences to make life a little more comfortable, but a time that had not yet become a rat race. With WWI looming in the future, it seems like a sweet innocent time.

    Reply
  21. Yes, there does seem something very poignant about those years before the First World War, doesn’t there? For me, knowing the terrible events that were to come always makes me feel sad when I read about that period, though. It’s recent enough for there still to be a personal connection: I remember my great aunt telling me that she went to a ball in Edinburgh just before the war, and that not a single one of the young men she danced with survived. Writing about the more distance past makes it easier to have some distance – but I agree with you about the fashions!

    Reply
  22. Yes, there does seem something very poignant about those years before the First World War, doesn’t there? For me, knowing the terrible events that were to come always makes me feel sad when I read about that period, though. It’s recent enough for there still to be a personal connection: I remember my great aunt telling me that she went to a ball in Edinburgh just before the war, and that not a single one of the young men she danced with survived. Writing about the more distance past makes it easier to have some distance – but I agree with you about the fashions!

    Reply
  23. Yes, there does seem something very poignant about those years before the First World War, doesn’t there? For me, knowing the terrible events that were to come always makes me feel sad when I read about that period, though. It’s recent enough for there still to be a personal connection: I remember my great aunt telling me that she went to a ball in Edinburgh just before the war, and that not a single one of the young men she danced with survived. Writing about the more distance past makes it easier to have some distance – but I agree with you about the fashions!

    Reply
  24. Yes, there does seem something very poignant about those years before the First World War, doesn’t there? For me, knowing the terrible events that were to come always makes me feel sad when I read about that period, though. It’s recent enough for there still to be a personal connection: I remember my great aunt telling me that she went to a ball in Edinburgh just before the war, and that not a single one of the young men she danced with survived. Writing about the more distance past makes it easier to have some distance – but I agree with you about the fashions!

    Reply
  25. Yes, there does seem something very poignant about those years before the First World War, doesn’t there? For me, knowing the terrible events that were to come always makes me feel sad when I read about that period, though. It’s recent enough for there still to be a personal connection: I remember my great aunt telling me that she went to a ball in Edinburgh just before the war, and that not a single one of the young men she danced with survived. Writing about the more distance past makes it easier to have some distance – but I agree with you about the fashions!

    Reply
  26. Oh, and I forgot to say in my post that I am offering a copy of HOUSE OF SHADOWS to the Word Wenches’ heap of prizes that they’ll be handing out, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a copy, do keep commenting throughout the week!

    Reply
  27. Oh, and I forgot to say in my post that I am offering a copy of HOUSE OF SHADOWS to the Word Wenches’ heap of prizes that they’ll be handing out, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a copy, do keep commenting throughout the week!

    Reply
  28. Oh, and I forgot to say in my post that I am offering a copy of HOUSE OF SHADOWS to the Word Wenches’ heap of prizes that they’ll be handing out, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a copy, do keep commenting throughout the week!

    Reply
  29. Oh, and I forgot to say in my post that I am offering a copy of HOUSE OF SHADOWS to the Word Wenches’ heap of prizes that they’ll be handing out, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a copy, do keep commenting throughout the week!

    Reply
  30. Oh, and I forgot to say in my post that I am offering a copy of HOUSE OF SHADOWS to the Word Wenches’ heap of prizes that they’ll be handing out, so if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a copy, do keep commenting throughout the week!

    Reply
  31. Susanna and Pamela, it’s SO lovely to have you here to round out our 10th anniversary celebration!I love that historical romance can go in so many different directions, as you’ve both proved. So write long and prosper!

    Reply
  32. Susanna and Pamela, it’s SO lovely to have you here to round out our 10th anniversary celebration!I love that historical romance can go in so many different directions, as you’ve both proved. So write long and prosper!

    Reply
  33. Susanna and Pamela, it’s SO lovely to have you here to round out our 10th anniversary celebration!I love that historical romance can go in so many different directions, as you’ve both proved. So write long and prosper!

    Reply
  34. Susanna and Pamela, it’s SO lovely to have you here to round out our 10th anniversary celebration!I love that historical romance can go in so many different directions, as you’ve both proved. So write long and prosper!

    Reply
  35. Susanna and Pamela, it’s SO lovely to have you here to round out our 10th anniversary celebration!I love that historical romance can go in so many different directions, as you’ve both proved. So write long and prosper!

    Reply
  36. Mary, I also love the fashions of that period — and especiallythosefrom the designer Poiret — so elegant. And that pre-WW1 time involved quite a bit of social change, as well, which IMO makes things interesting. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Reply
  37. Mary, I also love the fashions of that period — and especiallythosefrom the designer Poiret — so elegant. And that pre-WW1 time involved quite a bit of social change, as well, which IMO makes things interesting. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Reply
  38. Mary, I also love the fashions of that period — and especiallythosefrom the designer Poiret — so elegant. And that pre-WW1 time involved quite a bit of social change, as well, which IMO makes things interesting. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Reply
  39. Mary, I also love the fashions of that period — and especiallythosefrom the designer Poiret — so elegant. And that pre-WW1 time involved quite a bit of social change, as well, which IMO makes things interesting. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Reply
  40. Mary, I also love the fashions of that period — and especiallythosefrom the designer Poiret — so elegant. And that pre-WW1 time involved quite a bit of social change, as well, which IMO makes things interesting. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Reply
  41. Thanks for this, Pam — House of Shadows is a wonderful book. I always enjoyed your short contemporary romances, but your time-slips have gone from strength to strength — and I see the readers on amazon.co.uk agree with me.

    Reply
  42. Thanks for this, Pam — House of Shadows is a wonderful book. I always enjoyed your short contemporary romances, but your time-slips have gone from strength to strength — and I see the readers on amazon.co.uk agree with me.

    Reply
  43. Thanks for this, Pam — House of Shadows is a wonderful book. I always enjoyed your short contemporary romances, but your time-slips have gone from strength to strength — and I see the readers on amazon.co.uk agree with me.

    Reply
  44. Thanks for this, Pam — House of Shadows is a wonderful book. I always enjoyed your short contemporary romances, but your time-slips have gone from strength to strength — and I see the readers on amazon.co.uk agree with me.

    Reply
  45. Thanks for this, Pam — House of Shadows is a wonderful book. I always enjoyed your short contemporary romances, but your time-slips have gone from strength to strength — and I see the readers on amazon.co.uk agree with me.

    Reply
  46. Yes, WW1 is always a shadow hanging over that period, and adds a layer of looming tragedy to the innocence of the time. So many young men slaughtered — so seemingly no good reason.

    Reply
  47. Yes, WW1 is always a shadow hanging over that period, and adds a layer of looming tragedy to the innocence of the time. So many young men slaughtered — so seemingly no good reason.

    Reply
  48. Yes, WW1 is always a shadow hanging over that period, and adds a layer of looming tragedy to the innocence of the time. So many young men slaughtered — so seemingly no good reason.

    Reply
  49. Yes, WW1 is always a shadow hanging over that period, and adds a layer of looming tragedy to the innocence of the time. So many young men slaughtered — so seemingly no good reason.

    Reply
  50. Yes, WW1 is always a shadow hanging over that period, and adds a layer of looming tragedy to the innocence of the time. So many young men slaughtered — so seemingly no good reason.

    Reply
  51. Susanna, I know exactly what you mean by finding one’s people. While writing for most of us is a lone endeavor, the company of other like-minded people fills up our creative wells, so to speak.
    And Pamela’s post reminds us that in a world where so many people want to drive wedges ‘them’ and ‘us’, humans have far more in common with each other than we do differences.

    Reply
  52. Susanna, I know exactly what you mean by finding one’s people. While writing for most of us is a lone endeavor, the company of other like-minded people fills up our creative wells, so to speak.
    And Pamela’s post reminds us that in a world where so many people want to drive wedges ‘them’ and ‘us’, humans have far more in common with each other than we do differences.

    Reply
  53. Susanna, I know exactly what you mean by finding one’s people. While writing for most of us is a lone endeavor, the company of other like-minded people fills up our creative wells, so to speak.
    And Pamela’s post reminds us that in a world where so many people want to drive wedges ‘them’ and ‘us’, humans have far more in common with each other than we do differences.

    Reply
  54. Susanna, I know exactly what you mean by finding one’s people. While writing for most of us is a lone endeavor, the company of other like-minded people fills up our creative wells, so to speak.
    And Pamela’s post reminds us that in a world where so many people want to drive wedges ‘them’ and ‘us’, humans have far more in common with each other than we do differences.

    Reply
  55. Susanna, I know exactly what you mean by finding one’s people. While writing for most of us is a lone endeavor, the company of other like-minded people fills up our creative wells, so to speak.
    And Pamela’s post reminds us that in a world where so many people want to drive wedges ‘them’ and ‘us’, humans have far more in common with each other than we do differences.

    Reply
  56. I have a few periods I dislike — the Jacobean revolts (sorry Susanna!), the French Revolution, the U. S. Civil War but not favorite periods.
    Susanna is one of my favorite authors — and SHE made the Jacobean period tolerable to me. I haven’t read Pamela as yet. I’m looking forward to finding her books.

    Reply
  57. I have a few periods I dislike — the Jacobean revolts (sorry Susanna!), the French Revolution, the U. S. Civil War but not favorite periods.
    Susanna is one of my favorite authors — and SHE made the Jacobean period tolerable to me. I haven’t read Pamela as yet. I’m looking forward to finding her books.

    Reply
  58. I have a few periods I dislike — the Jacobean revolts (sorry Susanna!), the French Revolution, the U. S. Civil War but not favorite periods.
    Susanna is one of my favorite authors — and SHE made the Jacobean period tolerable to me. I haven’t read Pamela as yet. I’m looking forward to finding her books.

    Reply
  59. I have a few periods I dislike — the Jacobean revolts (sorry Susanna!), the French Revolution, the U. S. Civil War but not favorite periods.
    Susanna is one of my favorite authors — and SHE made the Jacobean period tolerable to me. I haven’t read Pamela as yet. I’m looking forward to finding her books.

    Reply
  60. I have a few periods I dislike — the Jacobean revolts (sorry Susanna!), the French Revolution, the U. S. Civil War but not favorite periods.
    Susanna is one of my favorite authors — and SHE made the Jacobean period tolerable to me. I haven’t read Pamela as yet. I’m looking forward to finding her books.

    Reply
  61. Sue, I sympathize. When I was a kid, and we went to live in Scotland, I gobbled up all the Scottish stories of that era, and loved what I thought the romance of it and the brave wearing of the white cockade (a sprig of white heather that signalled your alleigance to the Jacobite cause) and Bonnie Prince Charlie. Now I feel sick at the waste and the destruction and the futile loyalty of good-hearted people that was betrayed so often.

    Reply
  62. Sue, I sympathize. When I was a kid, and we went to live in Scotland, I gobbled up all the Scottish stories of that era, and loved what I thought the romance of it and the brave wearing of the white cockade (a sprig of white heather that signalled your alleigance to the Jacobite cause) and Bonnie Prince Charlie. Now I feel sick at the waste and the destruction and the futile loyalty of good-hearted people that was betrayed so often.

    Reply
  63. Sue, I sympathize. When I was a kid, and we went to live in Scotland, I gobbled up all the Scottish stories of that era, and loved what I thought the romance of it and the brave wearing of the white cockade (a sprig of white heather that signalled your alleigance to the Jacobite cause) and Bonnie Prince Charlie. Now I feel sick at the waste and the destruction and the futile loyalty of good-hearted people that was betrayed so often.

    Reply
  64. Sue, I sympathize. When I was a kid, and we went to live in Scotland, I gobbled up all the Scottish stories of that era, and loved what I thought the romance of it and the brave wearing of the white cockade (a sprig of white heather that signalled your alleigance to the Jacobite cause) and Bonnie Prince Charlie. Now I feel sick at the waste and the destruction and the futile loyalty of good-hearted people that was betrayed so often.

    Reply
  65. Sue, I sympathize. When I was a kid, and we went to live in Scotland, I gobbled up all the Scottish stories of that era, and loved what I thought the romance of it and the brave wearing of the white cockade (a sprig of white heather that signalled your alleigance to the Jacobite cause) and Bonnie Prince Charlie. Now I feel sick at the waste and the destruction and the futile loyalty of good-hearted people that was betrayed so often.

    Reply
  66. I would like to see an historical romance set in fifteenth-century France at the time of the invasion of Henry V and the rise and death of Joan of Arc. This would be a spectacular backdrop to a relationship explored at a time of such upheaval.
    I read the non-fiction book, “Blood Royal” in which this time was described siting the first documented detective in history who was a sort of soldier/investigator who was appointed to the task of finding the man who assassinated a prince of the French Court.
    I think the bloodthirsty era would give enormous conflict to a romantic entanglement.

    Reply
  67. I would like to see an historical romance set in fifteenth-century France at the time of the invasion of Henry V and the rise and death of Joan of Arc. This would be a spectacular backdrop to a relationship explored at a time of such upheaval.
    I read the non-fiction book, “Blood Royal” in which this time was described siting the first documented detective in history who was a sort of soldier/investigator who was appointed to the task of finding the man who assassinated a prince of the French Court.
    I think the bloodthirsty era would give enormous conflict to a romantic entanglement.

    Reply
  68. I would like to see an historical romance set in fifteenth-century France at the time of the invasion of Henry V and the rise and death of Joan of Arc. This would be a spectacular backdrop to a relationship explored at a time of such upheaval.
    I read the non-fiction book, “Blood Royal” in which this time was described siting the first documented detective in history who was a sort of soldier/investigator who was appointed to the task of finding the man who assassinated a prince of the French Court.
    I think the bloodthirsty era would give enormous conflict to a romantic entanglement.

    Reply
  69. I would like to see an historical romance set in fifteenth-century France at the time of the invasion of Henry V and the rise and death of Joan of Arc. This would be a spectacular backdrop to a relationship explored at a time of such upheaval.
    I read the non-fiction book, “Blood Royal” in which this time was described siting the first documented detective in history who was a sort of soldier/investigator who was appointed to the task of finding the man who assassinated a prince of the French Court.
    I think the bloodthirsty era would give enormous conflict to a romantic entanglement.

    Reply
  70. I would like to see an historical romance set in fifteenth-century France at the time of the invasion of Henry V and the rise and death of Joan of Arc. This would be a spectacular backdrop to a relationship explored at a time of such upheaval.
    I read the non-fiction book, “Blood Royal” in which this time was described siting the first documented detective in history who was a sort of soldier/investigator who was appointed to the task of finding the man who assassinated a prince of the French Court.
    I think the bloodthirsty era would give enormous conflict to a romantic entanglement.

    Reply
  71. I’ve always been happiest, both in reading and writing, anywhere from the end of the Wars of the Roses to the end of the American Revolution, with a side dish of Edwardian. If I absolutely had to pick only one, right now, I would say the golden age of piracy. All the seafaring and swashbuckling, Spanish, English and Dutch battling for control of the seas, lots of tropical islands for romantic rendezvous and evading pirate hunters make for lots of story possibilities.

    Reply
  72. I’ve always been happiest, both in reading and writing, anywhere from the end of the Wars of the Roses to the end of the American Revolution, with a side dish of Edwardian. If I absolutely had to pick only one, right now, I would say the golden age of piracy. All the seafaring and swashbuckling, Spanish, English and Dutch battling for control of the seas, lots of tropical islands for romantic rendezvous and evading pirate hunters make for lots of story possibilities.

    Reply
  73. I’ve always been happiest, both in reading and writing, anywhere from the end of the Wars of the Roses to the end of the American Revolution, with a side dish of Edwardian. If I absolutely had to pick only one, right now, I would say the golden age of piracy. All the seafaring and swashbuckling, Spanish, English and Dutch battling for control of the seas, lots of tropical islands for romantic rendezvous and evading pirate hunters make for lots of story possibilities.

    Reply
  74. I’ve always been happiest, both in reading and writing, anywhere from the end of the Wars of the Roses to the end of the American Revolution, with a side dish of Edwardian. If I absolutely had to pick only one, right now, I would say the golden age of piracy. All the seafaring and swashbuckling, Spanish, English and Dutch battling for control of the seas, lots of tropical islands for romantic rendezvous and evading pirate hunters make for lots of story possibilities.

    Reply
  75. I’ve always been happiest, both in reading and writing, anywhere from the end of the Wars of the Roses to the end of the American Revolution, with a side dish of Edwardian. If I absolutely had to pick only one, right now, I would say the golden age of piracy. All the seafaring and swashbuckling, Spanish, English and Dutch battling for control of the seas, lots of tropical islands for romantic rendezvous and evading pirate hunters make for lots of story possibilities.

    Reply
  76. If I had the possibility of travelling back in time AND coming forward to the present again, I would be more daring and try the Medieval period. It was chaotic but perhaps the 10 years of the reign of Richard the Lionheart. If the possiblity of coming back to the present was dodgy, I would not want to go back any further than the Regency period when society was starting to consider the fact that women might deserve to have some choice in whom they married. The Victorian era would be exciting with the impact of the industrial revolution and developing social and civil rights.

    Reply
  77. If I had the possibility of travelling back in time AND coming forward to the present again, I would be more daring and try the Medieval period. It was chaotic but perhaps the 10 years of the reign of Richard the Lionheart. If the possiblity of coming back to the present was dodgy, I would not want to go back any further than the Regency period when society was starting to consider the fact that women might deserve to have some choice in whom they married. The Victorian era would be exciting with the impact of the industrial revolution and developing social and civil rights.

    Reply
  78. If I had the possibility of travelling back in time AND coming forward to the present again, I would be more daring and try the Medieval period. It was chaotic but perhaps the 10 years of the reign of Richard the Lionheart. If the possiblity of coming back to the present was dodgy, I would not want to go back any further than the Regency period when society was starting to consider the fact that women might deserve to have some choice in whom they married. The Victorian era would be exciting with the impact of the industrial revolution and developing social and civil rights.

    Reply
  79. If I had the possibility of travelling back in time AND coming forward to the present again, I would be more daring and try the Medieval period. It was chaotic but perhaps the 10 years of the reign of Richard the Lionheart. If the possiblity of coming back to the present was dodgy, I would not want to go back any further than the Regency period when society was starting to consider the fact that women might deserve to have some choice in whom they married. The Victorian era would be exciting with the impact of the industrial revolution and developing social and civil rights.

    Reply
  80. If I had the possibility of travelling back in time AND coming forward to the present again, I would be more daring and try the Medieval period. It was chaotic but perhaps the 10 years of the reign of Richard the Lionheart. If the possiblity of coming back to the present was dodgy, I would not want to go back any further than the Regency period when society was starting to consider the fact that women might deserve to have some choice in whom they married. The Victorian era would be exciting with the impact of the industrial revolution and developing social and civil rights.

    Reply
  81. I have always loved the Victorians. It was the big, kind of ridiculous, totally impractical, glorioiusly elaborate dresses that snagged me as a little girl. I had a pretty steady diet of Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery and Francis Hodgeson Burnett through the my girlhood, punctuated by Little House and other prairie settlement stories. Later, in my angst-y teens I discovered the Bronte’s and fell in love with their quiet but mighty heroines. I suppose quiet, buttoned up respectability isn’t exactly the stuff of steamy romances but it’s still the era that makes me feel like my soul is at home ( I thought for many years in my childhood that God had made a dreadful mistake and I’d been born 100 too late!). So when those brilliant physicists finally build their time machine, you’ll find me visiting the Victorians!

    Reply
  82. I have always loved the Victorians. It was the big, kind of ridiculous, totally impractical, glorioiusly elaborate dresses that snagged me as a little girl. I had a pretty steady diet of Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery and Francis Hodgeson Burnett through the my girlhood, punctuated by Little House and other prairie settlement stories. Later, in my angst-y teens I discovered the Bronte’s and fell in love with their quiet but mighty heroines. I suppose quiet, buttoned up respectability isn’t exactly the stuff of steamy romances but it’s still the era that makes me feel like my soul is at home ( I thought for many years in my childhood that God had made a dreadful mistake and I’d been born 100 too late!). So when those brilliant physicists finally build their time machine, you’ll find me visiting the Victorians!

    Reply
  83. I have always loved the Victorians. It was the big, kind of ridiculous, totally impractical, glorioiusly elaborate dresses that snagged me as a little girl. I had a pretty steady diet of Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery and Francis Hodgeson Burnett through the my girlhood, punctuated by Little House and other prairie settlement stories. Later, in my angst-y teens I discovered the Bronte’s and fell in love with their quiet but mighty heroines. I suppose quiet, buttoned up respectability isn’t exactly the stuff of steamy romances but it’s still the era that makes me feel like my soul is at home ( I thought for many years in my childhood that God had made a dreadful mistake and I’d been born 100 too late!). So when those brilliant physicists finally build their time machine, you’ll find me visiting the Victorians!

    Reply
  84. I have always loved the Victorians. It was the big, kind of ridiculous, totally impractical, glorioiusly elaborate dresses that snagged me as a little girl. I had a pretty steady diet of Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery and Francis Hodgeson Burnett through the my girlhood, punctuated by Little House and other prairie settlement stories. Later, in my angst-y teens I discovered the Bronte’s and fell in love with their quiet but mighty heroines. I suppose quiet, buttoned up respectability isn’t exactly the stuff of steamy romances but it’s still the era that makes me feel like my soul is at home ( I thought for many years in my childhood that God had made a dreadful mistake and I’d been born 100 too late!). So when those brilliant physicists finally build their time machine, you’ll find me visiting the Victorians!

    Reply
  85. I have always loved the Victorians. It was the big, kind of ridiculous, totally impractical, glorioiusly elaborate dresses that snagged me as a little girl. I had a pretty steady diet of Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery and Francis Hodgeson Burnett through the my girlhood, punctuated by Little House and other prairie settlement stories. Later, in my angst-y teens I discovered the Bronte’s and fell in love with their quiet but mighty heroines. I suppose quiet, buttoned up respectability isn’t exactly the stuff of steamy romances but it’s still the era that makes me feel like my soul is at home ( I thought for many years in my childhood that God had made a dreadful mistake and I’d been born 100 too late!). So when those brilliant physicists finally build their time machine, you’ll find me visiting the Victorians!

    Reply
  86. I am a reader and I love my history wrapped around and through an interesting romance. While I like to read about many different periods, I’m with Laura and would not want to be trapped in a period further back than the Regency and even that would be testing my patience. Although I am aware women have and use indirect methods to get at least some of what they want, I prefer to be very straight forward in my relationships and to be respected for my thoughts more than my body and appearance. At seventy, that’s a good thing since both body and looks are not what they used to be. I was a tomboy growing up, the equal of any of the boys I knew and my father, even more than my mother, treated my sisters and brothers as equals, expecting the same from us all in contributing to the well being of a farm family. So I was never the flirty type with boys. Probably would not do very well going back in time where those were the methods I would have to use. Most likely I would be one of the women disguising myself as a man in order to do what I wanted to do. Anyone following the pre-election nonsense in the U.S. knows it’s getting to be one of the ugliest and most bizarre in our recent history although our earliest history was also very partisan and violent. Earlier, Ann spoke of people trying to drive wedges between us when really we are more alike than different. I just today watched a film that I will post here, which I think has so many possibilities for historical romance. Enjoy. I about wept. https://www.facebook.com/momondo/videos/1741100669466167/?pnref=story

    Reply
  87. I am a reader and I love my history wrapped around and through an interesting romance. While I like to read about many different periods, I’m with Laura and would not want to be trapped in a period further back than the Regency and even that would be testing my patience. Although I am aware women have and use indirect methods to get at least some of what they want, I prefer to be very straight forward in my relationships and to be respected for my thoughts more than my body and appearance. At seventy, that’s a good thing since both body and looks are not what they used to be. I was a tomboy growing up, the equal of any of the boys I knew and my father, even more than my mother, treated my sisters and brothers as equals, expecting the same from us all in contributing to the well being of a farm family. So I was never the flirty type with boys. Probably would not do very well going back in time where those were the methods I would have to use. Most likely I would be one of the women disguising myself as a man in order to do what I wanted to do. Anyone following the pre-election nonsense in the U.S. knows it’s getting to be one of the ugliest and most bizarre in our recent history although our earliest history was also very partisan and violent. Earlier, Ann spoke of people trying to drive wedges between us when really we are more alike than different. I just today watched a film that I will post here, which I think has so many possibilities for historical romance. Enjoy. I about wept. https://www.facebook.com/momondo/videos/1741100669466167/?pnref=story

    Reply
  88. I am a reader and I love my history wrapped around and through an interesting romance. While I like to read about many different periods, I’m with Laura and would not want to be trapped in a period further back than the Regency and even that would be testing my patience. Although I am aware women have and use indirect methods to get at least some of what they want, I prefer to be very straight forward in my relationships and to be respected for my thoughts more than my body and appearance. At seventy, that’s a good thing since both body and looks are not what they used to be. I was a tomboy growing up, the equal of any of the boys I knew and my father, even more than my mother, treated my sisters and brothers as equals, expecting the same from us all in contributing to the well being of a farm family. So I was never the flirty type with boys. Probably would not do very well going back in time where those were the methods I would have to use. Most likely I would be one of the women disguising myself as a man in order to do what I wanted to do. Anyone following the pre-election nonsense in the U.S. knows it’s getting to be one of the ugliest and most bizarre in our recent history although our earliest history was also very partisan and violent. Earlier, Ann spoke of people trying to drive wedges between us when really we are more alike than different. I just today watched a film that I will post here, which I think has so many possibilities for historical romance. Enjoy. I about wept. https://www.facebook.com/momondo/videos/1741100669466167/?pnref=story

    Reply
  89. I am a reader and I love my history wrapped around and through an interesting romance. While I like to read about many different periods, I’m with Laura and would not want to be trapped in a period further back than the Regency and even that would be testing my patience. Although I am aware women have and use indirect methods to get at least some of what they want, I prefer to be very straight forward in my relationships and to be respected for my thoughts more than my body and appearance. At seventy, that’s a good thing since both body and looks are not what they used to be. I was a tomboy growing up, the equal of any of the boys I knew and my father, even more than my mother, treated my sisters and brothers as equals, expecting the same from us all in contributing to the well being of a farm family. So I was never the flirty type with boys. Probably would not do very well going back in time where those were the methods I would have to use. Most likely I would be one of the women disguising myself as a man in order to do what I wanted to do. Anyone following the pre-election nonsense in the U.S. knows it’s getting to be one of the ugliest and most bizarre in our recent history although our earliest history was also very partisan and violent. Earlier, Ann spoke of people trying to drive wedges between us when really we are more alike than different. I just today watched a film that I will post here, which I think has so many possibilities for historical romance. Enjoy. I about wept. https://www.facebook.com/momondo/videos/1741100669466167/?pnref=story

    Reply
  90. I am a reader and I love my history wrapped around and through an interesting romance. While I like to read about many different periods, I’m with Laura and would not want to be trapped in a period further back than the Regency and even that would be testing my patience. Although I am aware women have and use indirect methods to get at least some of what they want, I prefer to be very straight forward in my relationships and to be respected for my thoughts more than my body and appearance. At seventy, that’s a good thing since both body and looks are not what they used to be. I was a tomboy growing up, the equal of any of the boys I knew and my father, even more than my mother, treated my sisters and brothers as equals, expecting the same from us all in contributing to the well being of a farm family. So I was never the flirty type with boys. Probably would not do very well going back in time where those were the methods I would have to use. Most likely I would be one of the women disguising myself as a man in order to do what I wanted to do. Anyone following the pre-election nonsense in the U.S. knows it’s getting to be one of the ugliest and most bizarre in our recent history although our earliest history was also very partisan and violent. Earlier, Ann spoke of people trying to drive wedges between us when really we are more alike than different. I just today watched a film that I will post here, which I think has so many possibilities for historical romance. Enjoy. I about wept. https://www.facebook.com/momondo/videos/1741100669466167/?pnref=story

    Reply
  91. I’ve always been fascinated by medieval times but I also love Georgian so either of those is always a year in a time slip story for me.
    Happy 10th anniversary Word Wenches!

    Reply
  92. I’ve always been fascinated by medieval times but I also love Georgian so either of those is always a year in a time slip story for me.
    Happy 10th anniversary Word Wenches!

    Reply
  93. I’ve always been fascinated by medieval times but I also love Georgian so either of those is always a year in a time slip story for me.
    Happy 10th anniversary Word Wenches!

    Reply
  94. I’ve always been fascinated by medieval times but I also love Georgian so either of those is always a year in a time slip story for me.
    Happy 10th anniversary Word Wenches!

    Reply
  95. I’ve always been fascinated by medieval times but I also love Georgian so either of those is always a year in a time slip story for me.
    Happy 10th anniversary Word Wenches!

    Reply
  96. It’s the fairly recent past, but I’d enjoy reading a time slip romance set during the 1960s and the space race.

    Reply
  97. It’s the fairly recent past, but I’d enjoy reading a time slip romance set during the 1960s and the space race.

    Reply
  98. It’s the fairly recent past, but I’d enjoy reading a time slip romance set during the 1960s and the space race.

    Reply
  99. It’s the fairly recent past, but I’d enjoy reading a time slip romance set during the 1960s and the space race.

    Reply
  100. It’s the fairly recent past, but I’d enjoy reading a time slip romance set during the 1960s and the space race.

    Reply
  101. I’m fascinated by this period too, bn100. When I go out of my front door and look left, I can see York Minster at the end of the street, and I often wonder about the people who had the vision to create such a magnificent building at that time.

    Reply
  102. I’m fascinated by this period too, bn100. When I go out of my front door and look left, I can see York Minster at the end of the street, and I often wonder about the people who had the vision to create such a magnificent building at that time.

    Reply
  103. I’m fascinated by this period too, bn100. When I go out of my front door and look left, I can see York Minster at the end of the street, and I often wonder about the people who had the vision to create such a magnificent building at that time.

    Reply
  104. I’m fascinated by this period too, bn100. When I go out of my front door and look left, I can see York Minster at the end of the street, and I often wonder about the people who had the vision to create such a magnificent building at that time.

    Reply
  105. I’m fascinated by this period too, bn100. When I go out of my front door and look left, I can see York Minster at the end of the street, and I often wonder about the people who had the vision to create such a magnificent building at that time.

    Reply
  106. There are so many periods that I would love to experience as a fly on the wall but like you, Laura, I wouldn’t want to live in any time but the present. My main problem with the past is the food: I have a number of Elizabethan recipe books and most of them sound disgusting – a blancmange made with crushed capon brains, anyone? Am not that keen on some of the medical procedures in the past either. In fact, I think I’ll stick to time travelling through historical novels ….

    Reply
  107. There are so many periods that I would love to experience as a fly on the wall but like you, Laura, I wouldn’t want to live in any time but the present. My main problem with the past is the food: I have a number of Elizabethan recipe books and most of them sound disgusting – a blancmange made with crushed capon brains, anyone? Am not that keen on some of the medical procedures in the past either. In fact, I think I’ll stick to time travelling through historical novels ….

    Reply
  108. There are so many periods that I would love to experience as a fly on the wall but like you, Laura, I wouldn’t want to live in any time but the present. My main problem with the past is the food: I have a number of Elizabethan recipe books and most of them sound disgusting – a blancmange made with crushed capon brains, anyone? Am not that keen on some of the medical procedures in the past either. In fact, I think I’ll stick to time travelling through historical novels ….

    Reply
  109. There are so many periods that I would love to experience as a fly on the wall but like you, Laura, I wouldn’t want to live in any time but the present. My main problem with the past is the food: I have a number of Elizabethan recipe books and most of them sound disgusting – a blancmange made with crushed capon brains, anyone? Am not that keen on some of the medical procedures in the past either. In fact, I think I’ll stick to time travelling through historical novels ….

    Reply
  110. There are so many periods that I would love to experience as a fly on the wall but like you, Laura, I wouldn’t want to live in any time but the present. My main problem with the past is the food: I have a number of Elizabethan recipe books and most of them sound disgusting – a blancmange made with crushed capon brains, anyone? Am not that keen on some of the medical procedures in the past either. In fact, I think I’ll stick to time travelling through historical novels ….

    Reply
  111. How interesting that you feel such a connection with the Victorians, Jana. I never got those clothes – although Loretta Chase writes about them brilliantly! – but I can definitely see the steamy potential of buttoned up respectabiity!

    Reply
  112. How interesting that you feel such a connection with the Victorians, Jana. I never got those clothes – although Loretta Chase writes about them brilliantly! – but I can definitely see the steamy potential of buttoned up respectabiity!

    Reply
  113. How interesting that you feel such a connection with the Victorians, Jana. I never got those clothes – although Loretta Chase writes about them brilliantly! – but I can definitely see the steamy potential of buttoned up respectabiity!

    Reply
  114. How interesting that you feel such a connection with the Victorians, Jana. I never got those clothes – although Loretta Chase writes about them brilliantly! – but I can definitely see the steamy potential of buttoned up respectabiity!

    Reply
  115. How interesting that you feel such a connection with the Victorians, Jana. I never got those clothes – although Loretta Chase writes about them brilliantly! – but I can definitely see the steamy potential of buttoned up respectabiity!

    Reply
  116. Ah, the joys of autocorrect!
    It’s interesting how many readers are interested in the medieval period. My publishers tell me that the only periods that sell in the UK are Tudor and Victorian (Regency romances are a separate category altogether) – although Susanna Kearsley’s fabulous books have shown that is just not true!

    Reply
  117. Ah, the joys of autocorrect!
    It’s interesting how many readers are interested in the medieval period. My publishers tell me that the only periods that sell in the UK are Tudor and Victorian (Regency romances are a separate category altogether) – although Susanna Kearsley’s fabulous books have shown that is just not true!

    Reply
  118. Ah, the joys of autocorrect!
    It’s interesting how many readers are interested in the medieval period. My publishers tell me that the only periods that sell in the UK are Tudor and Victorian (Regency romances are a separate category altogether) – although Susanna Kearsley’s fabulous books have shown that is just not true!

    Reply
  119. Ah, the joys of autocorrect!
    It’s interesting how many readers are interested in the medieval period. My publishers tell me that the only periods that sell in the UK are Tudor and Victorian (Regency romances are a separate category altogether) – although Susanna Kearsley’s fabulous books have shown that is just not true!

    Reply
  120. Ah, the joys of autocorrect!
    It’s interesting how many readers are interested in the medieval period. My publishers tell me that the only periods that sell in the UK are Tudor and Victorian (Regency romances are a separate category altogether) – although Susanna Kearsley’s fabulous books have shown that is just not true!

    Reply
  121. Pam, I think that often the periods that become popular with readers are the ones they’ve become familiar with through TV shows and movies and other books. Once they feel they know an era — and most importantly come to enjoy it — they like to revisit it. If the image they get of a period is grim and violent and depressing, they don’t want to return there.

    Reply
  122. Pam, I think that often the periods that become popular with readers are the ones they’ve become familiar with through TV shows and movies and other books. Once they feel they know an era — and most importantly come to enjoy it — they like to revisit it. If the image they get of a period is grim and violent and depressing, they don’t want to return there.

    Reply
  123. Pam, I think that often the periods that become popular with readers are the ones they’ve become familiar with through TV shows and movies and other books. Once they feel they know an era — and most importantly come to enjoy it — they like to revisit it. If the image they get of a period is grim and violent and depressing, they don’t want to return there.

    Reply
  124. Pam, I think that often the periods that become popular with readers are the ones they’ve become familiar with through TV shows and movies and other books. Once they feel they know an era — and most importantly come to enjoy it — they like to revisit it. If the image they get of a period is grim and violent and depressing, they don’t want to return there.

    Reply
  125. Pam, I think that often the periods that become popular with readers are the ones they’ve become familiar with through TV shows and movies and other books. Once they feel they know an era — and most importantly come to enjoy it — they like to revisit it. If the image they get of a period is grim and violent and depressing, they don’t want to return there.

    Reply
  126. I have a couple of Pamela’s books but just haven’t got round to them. I LOVE Susanna’s books. The first one I ever read was Sophia’s Secret and I was hooked. It was a fabulous story.
    I love Regency time/slip novels and there doesn’t seem to be that many around or maybe I’m looking in the wrong places. I also love Medieval time/slips. In fact I just love history and it’s fantastic when it comes within a historical romance. My sons best friend is mad into science and inventing things. He has promised me a time machine one day so I can achieve my hearts desire lol!! It’s a standing joke.

    Reply
  127. I have a couple of Pamela’s books but just haven’t got round to them. I LOVE Susanna’s books. The first one I ever read was Sophia’s Secret and I was hooked. It was a fabulous story.
    I love Regency time/slip novels and there doesn’t seem to be that many around or maybe I’m looking in the wrong places. I also love Medieval time/slips. In fact I just love history and it’s fantastic when it comes within a historical romance. My sons best friend is mad into science and inventing things. He has promised me a time machine one day so I can achieve my hearts desire lol!! It’s a standing joke.

    Reply
  128. I have a couple of Pamela’s books but just haven’t got round to them. I LOVE Susanna’s books. The first one I ever read was Sophia’s Secret and I was hooked. It was a fabulous story.
    I love Regency time/slip novels and there doesn’t seem to be that many around or maybe I’m looking in the wrong places. I also love Medieval time/slips. In fact I just love history and it’s fantastic when it comes within a historical romance. My sons best friend is mad into science and inventing things. He has promised me a time machine one day so I can achieve my hearts desire lol!! It’s a standing joke.

    Reply
  129. I have a couple of Pamela’s books but just haven’t got round to them. I LOVE Susanna’s books. The first one I ever read was Sophia’s Secret and I was hooked. It was a fabulous story.
    I love Regency time/slip novels and there doesn’t seem to be that many around or maybe I’m looking in the wrong places. I also love Medieval time/slips. In fact I just love history and it’s fantastic when it comes within a historical romance. My sons best friend is mad into science and inventing things. He has promised me a time machine one day so I can achieve my hearts desire lol!! It’s a standing joke.

    Reply
  130. I have a couple of Pamela’s books but just haven’t got round to them. I LOVE Susanna’s books. The first one I ever read was Sophia’s Secret and I was hooked. It was a fabulous story.
    I love Regency time/slip novels and there doesn’t seem to be that many around or maybe I’m looking in the wrong places. I also love Medieval time/slips. In fact I just love history and it’s fantastic when it comes within a historical romance. My sons best friend is mad into science and inventing things. He has promised me a time machine one day so I can achieve my hearts desire lol!! It’s a standing joke.

    Reply
  131. For some reason I find it easier to deal with time slip in Sci Fi books than I do in romances. Why I don’t know.
    As to my favorite period…Anything from Regency to now, though I do like some Georgian. I don’t know why but before that not so much. Most medieval I can’t stand. Though one of my very favorite books that I reread each year is a medieval. For whatever reason….it hits the spot for me.
    Fantasy, magic, paranormal in my romances is fine and I really enjoy it…but time slip…. There is no explaining reader tastes is there!

    Reply
  132. For some reason I find it easier to deal with time slip in Sci Fi books than I do in romances. Why I don’t know.
    As to my favorite period…Anything from Regency to now, though I do like some Georgian. I don’t know why but before that not so much. Most medieval I can’t stand. Though one of my very favorite books that I reread each year is a medieval. For whatever reason….it hits the spot for me.
    Fantasy, magic, paranormal in my romances is fine and I really enjoy it…but time slip…. There is no explaining reader tastes is there!

    Reply
  133. For some reason I find it easier to deal with time slip in Sci Fi books than I do in romances. Why I don’t know.
    As to my favorite period…Anything from Regency to now, though I do like some Georgian. I don’t know why but before that not so much. Most medieval I can’t stand. Though one of my very favorite books that I reread each year is a medieval. For whatever reason….it hits the spot for me.
    Fantasy, magic, paranormal in my romances is fine and I really enjoy it…but time slip…. There is no explaining reader tastes is there!

    Reply
  134. For some reason I find it easier to deal with time slip in Sci Fi books than I do in romances. Why I don’t know.
    As to my favorite period…Anything from Regency to now, though I do like some Georgian. I don’t know why but before that not so much. Most medieval I can’t stand. Though one of my very favorite books that I reread each year is a medieval. For whatever reason….it hits the spot for me.
    Fantasy, magic, paranormal in my romances is fine and I really enjoy it…but time slip…. There is no explaining reader tastes is there!

    Reply
  135. For some reason I find it easier to deal with time slip in Sci Fi books than I do in romances. Why I don’t know.
    As to my favorite period…Anything from Regency to now, though I do like some Georgian. I don’t know why but before that not so much. Most medieval I can’t stand. Though one of my very favorite books that I reread each year is a medieval. For whatever reason….it hits the spot for me.
    Fantasy, magic, paranormal in my romances is fine and I really enjoy it…but time slip…. There is no explaining reader tastes is there!

    Reply
  136. I honestly don’t have a favorite time period, because I find all of them to be so interesting in so many ways. One of the things that is so fascinating about the Industrial Revolution is the rapid advances in technology – at the same time we live in a time of even more rapid hi-tech innovation.

    Reply
  137. I honestly don’t have a favorite time period, because I find all of them to be so interesting in so many ways. One of the things that is so fascinating about the Industrial Revolution is the rapid advances in technology – at the same time we live in a time of even more rapid hi-tech innovation.

    Reply
  138. I honestly don’t have a favorite time period, because I find all of them to be so interesting in so many ways. One of the things that is so fascinating about the Industrial Revolution is the rapid advances in technology – at the same time we live in a time of even more rapid hi-tech innovation.

    Reply
  139. I honestly don’t have a favorite time period, because I find all of them to be so interesting in so many ways. One of the things that is so fascinating about the Industrial Revolution is the rapid advances in technology – at the same time we live in a time of even more rapid hi-tech innovation.

    Reply
  140. I honestly don’t have a favorite time period, because I find all of them to be so interesting in so many ways. One of the things that is so fascinating about the Industrial Revolution is the rapid advances in technology – at the same time we live in a time of even more rapid hi-tech innovation.

    Reply
  141. I am new to Pamela Hartshorne, and I’ve put House of Shadows on my wish list.
    I was not a W.W. follower yet back in 2009, so Susanna’s interview was all new to me and completely fascinating! So glad for that link. When I read the part of the interview where Susanna was asked to describe her books in general, and then stating publishers had a difficult time categorizing her, I really had to smile. Because IMO, she has become ‘A Category’ herself. There are some kind-of copies out there, but none as well done as hers. The Shadowy Horses was my first and I was hooked. I’m bookmarking that interview. Thank you so much W.W.

    Reply
  142. I am new to Pamela Hartshorne, and I’ve put House of Shadows on my wish list.
    I was not a W.W. follower yet back in 2009, so Susanna’s interview was all new to me and completely fascinating! So glad for that link. When I read the part of the interview where Susanna was asked to describe her books in general, and then stating publishers had a difficult time categorizing her, I really had to smile. Because IMO, she has become ‘A Category’ herself. There are some kind-of copies out there, but none as well done as hers. The Shadowy Horses was my first and I was hooked. I’m bookmarking that interview. Thank you so much W.W.

    Reply
  143. I am new to Pamela Hartshorne, and I’ve put House of Shadows on my wish list.
    I was not a W.W. follower yet back in 2009, so Susanna’s interview was all new to me and completely fascinating! So glad for that link. When I read the part of the interview where Susanna was asked to describe her books in general, and then stating publishers had a difficult time categorizing her, I really had to smile. Because IMO, she has become ‘A Category’ herself. There are some kind-of copies out there, but none as well done as hers. The Shadowy Horses was my first and I was hooked. I’m bookmarking that interview. Thank you so much W.W.

    Reply
  144. I am new to Pamela Hartshorne, and I’ve put House of Shadows on my wish list.
    I was not a W.W. follower yet back in 2009, so Susanna’s interview was all new to me and completely fascinating! So glad for that link. When I read the part of the interview where Susanna was asked to describe her books in general, and then stating publishers had a difficult time categorizing her, I really had to smile. Because IMO, she has become ‘A Category’ herself. There are some kind-of copies out there, but none as well done as hers. The Shadowy Horses was my first and I was hooked. I’m bookmarking that interview. Thank you so much W.W.

    Reply
  145. I am new to Pamela Hartshorne, and I’ve put House of Shadows on my wish list.
    I was not a W.W. follower yet back in 2009, so Susanna’s interview was all new to me and completely fascinating! So glad for that link. When I read the part of the interview where Susanna was asked to describe her books in general, and then stating publishers had a difficult time categorizing her, I really had to smile. Because IMO, she has become ‘A Category’ herself. There are some kind-of copies out there, but none as well done as hers. The Shadowy Horses was my first and I was hooked. I’m bookmarking that interview. Thank you so much W.W.

    Reply
  146. Vicki, Im probably doing both Susanna and Pam a disservice by calling their books time-slip. Some are, others are stories where the past somehow calls to a person in the present, whether through dreams or documents or a place, or whatever. Theyre not the simple and accidental fall back in time stories a lot of romantic time-slips are.

    Reply
  147. Vicki, Im probably doing both Susanna and Pam a disservice by calling their books time-slip. Some are, others are stories where the past somehow calls to a person in the present, whether through dreams or documents or a place, or whatever. Theyre not the simple and accidental fall back in time stories a lot of romantic time-slips are.

    Reply
  148. Vicki, Im probably doing both Susanna and Pam a disservice by calling their books time-slip. Some are, others are stories where the past somehow calls to a person in the present, whether through dreams or documents or a place, or whatever. Theyre not the simple and accidental fall back in time stories a lot of romantic time-slips are.

    Reply
  149. Vicki, Im probably doing both Susanna and Pam a disservice by calling their books time-slip. Some are, others are stories where the past somehow calls to a person in the present, whether through dreams or documents or a place, or whatever. Theyre not the simple and accidental fall back in time stories a lot of romantic time-slips are.

    Reply
  150. Vicki, Im probably doing both Susanna and Pam a disservice by calling their books time-slip. Some are, others are stories where the past somehow calls to a person in the present, whether through dreams or documents or a place, or whatever. Theyre not the simple and accidental fall back in time stories a lot of romantic time-slips are.

    Reply
  151. Michelle, for most of the wenches, that was our introduction to Susanna, too — thank you Nicola. I, too have all her books and shes now an auto-buy author for most of the wenches. Youll see her name cropping up again and again in our what were reading monthly column.

    Reply
  152. Michelle, for most of the wenches, that was our introduction to Susanna, too — thank you Nicola. I, too have all her books and shes now an auto-buy author for most of the wenches. Youll see her name cropping up again and again in our what were reading monthly column.

    Reply
  153. Michelle, for most of the wenches, that was our introduction to Susanna, too — thank you Nicola. I, too have all her books and shes now an auto-buy author for most of the wenches. Youll see her name cropping up again and again in our what were reading monthly column.

    Reply
  154. Michelle, for most of the wenches, that was our introduction to Susanna, too — thank you Nicola. I, too have all her books and shes now an auto-buy author for most of the wenches. Youll see her name cropping up again and again in our what were reading monthly column.

    Reply
  155. Michelle, for most of the wenches, that was our introduction to Susanna, too — thank you Nicola. I, too have all her books and shes now an auto-buy author for most of the wenches. Youll see her name cropping up again and again in our what were reading monthly column.

    Reply
  156. Has anyone ever written a romance set in medieval Spain, when it was under Moorish rule-or perhaps when it was in the process of being reconquered by Ferdinard & Isabella? So much potential for drama and cross-cultural romance!

    Reply
  157. Has anyone ever written a romance set in medieval Spain, when it was under Moorish rule-or perhaps when it was in the process of being reconquered by Ferdinard & Isabella? So much potential for drama and cross-cultural romance!

    Reply
  158. Has anyone ever written a romance set in medieval Spain, when it was under Moorish rule-or perhaps when it was in the process of being reconquered by Ferdinard & Isabella? So much potential for drama and cross-cultural romance!

    Reply
  159. Has anyone ever written a romance set in medieval Spain, when it was under Moorish rule-or perhaps when it was in the process of being reconquered by Ferdinard & Isabella? So much potential for drama and cross-cultural romance!

    Reply
  160. Has anyone ever written a romance set in medieval Spain, when it was under Moorish rule-or perhaps when it was in the process of being reconquered by Ferdinard & Isabella? So much potential for drama and cross-cultural romance!

    Reply
  161. Hi Wenches, and bowing at the knee to the HWW in you all. Loving my hometown city of Melbourne, I’ve been delighted to visit and follow the State Library of Victoria and to feast on their old maps, photos, books, curiosities and snippets remnant from our rather young history. I could really imagine doing a time-slip here. With such a short look back in time since the establishment of our fair (wet/wild) city in 1835, it makes it easier to relate, to picture myself walking out in the costumes of the day. Perhaps meeting a distant relative, and going to their digs to sit down for a q and a session worth writing about! Thanks for the inspiration, I love this.

    Reply
  162. Hi Wenches, and bowing at the knee to the HWW in you all. Loving my hometown city of Melbourne, I’ve been delighted to visit and follow the State Library of Victoria and to feast on their old maps, photos, books, curiosities and snippets remnant from our rather young history. I could really imagine doing a time-slip here. With such a short look back in time since the establishment of our fair (wet/wild) city in 1835, it makes it easier to relate, to picture myself walking out in the costumes of the day. Perhaps meeting a distant relative, and going to their digs to sit down for a q and a session worth writing about! Thanks for the inspiration, I love this.

    Reply
  163. Hi Wenches, and bowing at the knee to the HWW in you all. Loving my hometown city of Melbourne, I’ve been delighted to visit and follow the State Library of Victoria and to feast on their old maps, photos, books, curiosities and snippets remnant from our rather young history. I could really imagine doing a time-slip here. With such a short look back in time since the establishment of our fair (wet/wild) city in 1835, it makes it easier to relate, to picture myself walking out in the costumes of the day. Perhaps meeting a distant relative, and going to their digs to sit down for a q and a session worth writing about! Thanks for the inspiration, I love this.

    Reply
  164. Hi Wenches, and bowing at the knee to the HWW in you all. Loving my hometown city of Melbourne, I’ve been delighted to visit and follow the State Library of Victoria and to feast on their old maps, photos, books, curiosities and snippets remnant from our rather young history. I could really imagine doing a time-slip here. With such a short look back in time since the establishment of our fair (wet/wild) city in 1835, it makes it easier to relate, to picture myself walking out in the costumes of the day. Perhaps meeting a distant relative, and going to their digs to sit down for a q and a session worth writing about! Thanks for the inspiration, I love this.

    Reply
  165. Hi Wenches, and bowing at the knee to the HWW in you all. Loving my hometown city of Melbourne, I’ve been delighted to visit and follow the State Library of Victoria and to feast on their old maps, photos, books, curiosities and snippets remnant from our rather young history. I could really imagine doing a time-slip here. With such a short look back in time since the establishment of our fair (wet/wild) city in 1835, it makes it easier to relate, to picture myself walking out in the costumes of the day. Perhaps meeting a distant relative, and going to their digs to sit down for a q and a session worth writing about! Thanks for the inspiration, I love this.

    Reply
  166. Jay, I’d love to do a novel set in 19th-century Australia based on the life of my great grandmother … and the main draw would be having to be in Australia to do all the research -although Adelaide rather than Melbourne, and a key scene in Broome. I LOVE Australia – my second home.

    Reply
  167. Jay, I’d love to do a novel set in 19th-century Australia based on the life of my great grandmother … and the main draw would be having to be in Australia to do all the research -although Adelaide rather than Melbourne, and a key scene in Broome. I LOVE Australia – my second home.

    Reply
  168. Jay, I’d love to do a novel set in 19th-century Australia based on the life of my great grandmother … and the main draw would be having to be in Australia to do all the research -although Adelaide rather than Melbourne, and a key scene in Broome. I LOVE Australia – my second home.

    Reply
  169. Jay, I’d love to do a novel set in 19th-century Australia based on the life of my great grandmother … and the main draw would be having to be in Australia to do all the research -although Adelaide rather than Melbourne, and a key scene in Broome. I LOVE Australia – my second home.

    Reply
  170. Jay, I’d love to do a novel set in 19th-century Australia based on the life of my great grandmother … and the main draw would be having to be in Australia to do all the research -although Adelaide rather than Melbourne, and a key scene in Broome. I LOVE Australia – my second home.

    Reply
  171. I hesitate to reply as a brand new member and not a normal reader of this literature (though I have picked up one here and there, especially at beach rentals with bookshelves of them waiting to while away a rainy day, so at least I know of what you speak), but I am a history geek. Forgive if these are too geeky.
    Three eras with potential. If I were to set something in a medieval time, I’d choose the period after the black death was basically finished wiping out a huge chunk of Europe. It was a time of hope, (relative) freedom, and great social change. Nobles didn’t have quite the power they once had as there weren’t enough people around to work the land, so it was a seller’s market, so to speak. Social barriers also became quite fluid in places and an emphasis on both romantic stories as well as bawdy ones was coming to the fore. (read Barbara Tuchman’s “Distant Mirror”)
    Perhaps a harder one to write or get into well, without getting too colonial, is the 19th-century Great Game. Russia was dashing into Central Asia, Britain was sending intrepid explorers and spies to try and determine if it was possible for Russia to invade India. Intrigue, exotic locals, danger, risk and great reward. Could be told from the East India Company side and you have Persia, the Ottoman Empire, India, Samarkand, Koshkand, the Silk Road as possible backdrops. The British wives led lives both cloistered and full of “adventure.” (duels involving married men coming back from long trips was quite common)
    Or, as others have suggested, 1880-1914 US. It was a time of tremendous change, economically and socially. It was a time of “muscular” vitality, and a lot of incongruities. In my research on steel pen manufacturing at the time, I have run across a mysterious reference I’ve not been able to explore further. In Chicago around the turn of the century, there was a pen manufacturer called M. Jacobs who made the “London Incandescent Pen.” In lists of manufacturers Jacobs is listed as “Mrs. M. Jacobs.” A woman owner of a manufacturing company was quite unusual, if not unprecedented. What’s also interesting is that the floor of a steel pen manufactury was traditionally mostly staffed by women. Only the forges and rolling plant, the dirty, hot jobs, were run by men. Women did the pressing, shaping, grinding, etc… Who was Mrs. M. Jacobs? How did she end up with her own factory and company? Was there ever a Mr. Jacobs?
    Anyway, that’s probably why I’m not writing these books and you all are. No one would read mine. 🙂

    Reply
  172. I hesitate to reply as a brand new member and not a normal reader of this literature (though I have picked up one here and there, especially at beach rentals with bookshelves of them waiting to while away a rainy day, so at least I know of what you speak), but I am a history geek. Forgive if these are too geeky.
    Three eras with potential. If I were to set something in a medieval time, I’d choose the period after the black death was basically finished wiping out a huge chunk of Europe. It was a time of hope, (relative) freedom, and great social change. Nobles didn’t have quite the power they once had as there weren’t enough people around to work the land, so it was a seller’s market, so to speak. Social barriers also became quite fluid in places and an emphasis on both romantic stories as well as bawdy ones was coming to the fore. (read Barbara Tuchman’s “Distant Mirror”)
    Perhaps a harder one to write or get into well, without getting too colonial, is the 19th-century Great Game. Russia was dashing into Central Asia, Britain was sending intrepid explorers and spies to try and determine if it was possible for Russia to invade India. Intrigue, exotic locals, danger, risk and great reward. Could be told from the East India Company side and you have Persia, the Ottoman Empire, India, Samarkand, Koshkand, the Silk Road as possible backdrops. The British wives led lives both cloistered and full of “adventure.” (duels involving married men coming back from long trips was quite common)
    Or, as others have suggested, 1880-1914 US. It was a time of tremendous change, economically and socially. It was a time of “muscular” vitality, and a lot of incongruities. In my research on steel pen manufacturing at the time, I have run across a mysterious reference I’ve not been able to explore further. In Chicago around the turn of the century, there was a pen manufacturer called M. Jacobs who made the “London Incandescent Pen.” In lists of manufacturers Jacobs is listed as “Mrs. M. Jacobs.” A woman owner of a manufacturing company was quite unusual, if not unprecedented. What’s also interesting is that the floor of a steel pen manufactury was traditionally mostly staffed by women. Only the forges and rolling plant, the dirty, hot jobs, were run by men. Women did the pressing, shaping, grinding, etc… Who was Mrs. M. Jacobs? How did she end up with her own factory and company? Was there ever a Mr. Jacobs?
    Anyway, that’s probably why I’m not writing these books and you all are. No one would read mine. 🙂

    Reply
  173. I hesitate to reply as a brand new member and not a normal reader of this literature (though I have picked up one here and there, especially at beach rentals with bookshelves of them waiting to while away a rainy day, so at least I know of what you speak), but I am a history geek. Forgive if these are too geeky.
    Three eras with potential. If I were to set something in a medieval time, I’d choose the period after the black death was basically finished wiping out a huge chunk of Europe. It was a time of hope, (relative) freedom, and great social change. Nobles didn’t have quite the power they once had as there weren’t enough people around to work the land, so it was a seller’s market, so to speak. Social barriers also became quite fluid in places and an emphasis on both romantic stories as well as bawdy ones was coming to the fore. (read Barbara Tuchman’s “Distant Mirror”)
    Perhaps a harder one to write or get into well, without getting too colonial, is the 19th-century Great Game. Russia was dashing into Central Asia, Britain was sending intrepid explorers and spies to try and determine if it was possible for Russia to invade India. Intrigue, exotic locals, danger, risk and great reward. Could be told from the East India Company side and you have Persia, the Ottoman Empire, India, Samarkand, Koshkand, the Silk Road as possible backdrops. The British wives led lives both cloistered and full of “adventure.” (duels involving married men coming back from long trips was quite common)
    Or, as others have suggested, 1880-1914 US. It was a time of tremendous change, economically and socially. It was a time of “muscular” vitality, and a lot of incongruities. In my research on steel pen manufacturing at the time, I have run across a mysterious reference I’ve not been able to explore further. In Chicago around the turn of the century, there was a pen manufacturer called M. Jacobs who made the “London Incandescent Pen.” In lists of manufacturers Jacobs is listed as “Mrs. M. Jacobs.” A woman owner of a manufacturing company was quite unusual, if not unprecedented. What’s also interesting is that the floor of a steel pen manufactury was traditionally mostly staffed by women. Only the forges and rolling plant, the dirty, hot jobs, were run by men. Women did the pressing, shaping, grinding, etc… Who was Mrs. M. Jacobs? How did she end up with her own factory and company? Was there ever a Mr. Jacobs?
    Anyway, that’s probably why I’m not writing these books and you all are. No one would read mine. 🙂

    Reply
  174. I hesitate to reply as a brand new member and not a normal reader of this literature (though I have picked up one here and there, especially at beach rentals with bookshelves of them waiting to while away a rainy day, so at least I know of what you speak), but I am a history geek. Forgive if these are too geeky.
    Three eras with potential. If I were to set something in a medieval time, I’d choose the period after the black death was basically finished wiping out a huge chunk of Europe. It was a time of hope, (relative) freedom, and great social change. Nobles didn’t have quite the power they once had as there weren’t enough people around to work the land, so it was a seller’s market, so to speak. Social barriers also became quite fluid in places and an emphasis on both romantic stories as well as bawdy ones was coming to the fore. (read Barbara Tuchman’s “Distant Mirror”)
    Perhaps a harder one to write or get into well, without getting too colonial, is the 19th-century Great Game. Russia was dashing into Central Asia, Britain was sending intrepid explorers and spies to try and determine if it was possible for Russia to invade India. Intrigue, exotic locals, danger, risk and great reward. Could be told from the East India Company side and you have Persia, the Ottoman Empire, India, Samarkand, Koshkand, the Silk Road as possible backdrops. The British wives led lives both cloistered and full of “adventure.” (duels involving married men coming back from long trips was quite common)
    Or, as others have suggested, 1880-1914 US. It was a time of tremendous change, economically and socially. It was a time of “muscular” vitality, and a lot of incongruities. In my research on steel pen manufacturing at the time, I have run across a mysterious reference I’ve not been able to explore further. In Chicago around the turn of the century, there was a pen manufacturer called M. Jacobs who made the “London Incandescent Pen.” In lists of manufacturers Jacobs is listed as “Mrs. M. Jacobs.” A woman owner of a manufacturing company was quite unusual, if not unprecedented. What’s also interesting is that the floor of a steel pen manufactury was traditionally mostly staffed by women. Only the forges and rolling plant, the dirty, hot jobs, were run by men. Women did the pressing, shaping, grinding, etc… Who was Mrs. M. Jacobs? How did she end up with her own factory and company? Was there ever a Mr. Jacobs?
    Anyway, that’s probably why I’m not writing these books and you all are. No one would read mine. 🙂

    Reply
  175. I hesitate to reply as a brand new member and not a normal reader of this literature (though I have picked up one here and there, especially at beach rentals with bookshelves of them waiting to while away a rainy day, so at least I know of what you speak), but I am a history geek. Forgive if these are too geeky.
    Three eras with potential. If I were to set something in a medieval time, I’d choose the period after the black death was basically finished wiping out a huge chunk of Europe. It was a time of hope, (relative) freedom, and great social change. Nobles didn’t have quite the power they once had as there weren’t enough people around to work the land, so it was a seller’s market, so to speak. Social barriers also became quite fluid in places and an emphasis on both romantic stories as well as bawdy ones was coming to the fore. (read Barbara Tuchman’s “Distant Mirror”)
    Perhaps a harder one to write or get into well, without getting too colonial, is the 19th-century Great Game. Russia was dashing into Central Asia, Britain was sending intrepid explorers and spies to try and determine if it was possible for Russia to invade India. Intrigue, exotic locals, danger, risk and great reward. Could be told from the East India Company side and you have Persia, the Ottoman Empire, India, Samarkand, Koshkand, the Silk Road as possible backdrops. The British wives led lives both cloistered and full of “adventure.” (duels involving married men coming back from long trips was quite common)
    Or, as others have suggested, 1880-1914 US. It was a time of tremendous change, economically and socially. It was a time of “muscular” vitality, and a lot of incongruities. In my research on steel pen manufacturing at the time, I have run across a mysterious reference I’ve not been able to explore further. In Chicago around the turn of the century, there was a pen manufacturer called M. Jacobs who made the “London Incandescent Pen.” In lists of manufacturers Jacobs is listed as “Mrs. M. Jacobs.” A woman owner of a manufacturing company was quite unusual, if not unprecedented. What’s also interesting is that the floor of a steel pen manufactury was traditionally mostly staffed by women. Only the forges and rolling plant, the dirty, hot jobs, were run by men. Women did the pressing, shaping, grinding, etc… Who was Mrs. M. Jacobs? How did she end up with her own factory and company? Was there ever a Mr. Jacobs?
    Anyway, that’s probably why I’m not writing these books and you all are. No one would read mine. 🙂

    Reply

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