A Cavalier Chat with Christina Courtenay

Susanna here, hosting my very first Word Wenches Interview—and it’s especially wonderful because my guest is a friend of mine (and, I believe, a great friend of this blog as well): Christina Courtenay!

PiaRNAGreenwich1I first met Christina in London in 2009, at my very first Romantic Novelists’ Association function, and knew straight away I was in the presence of a kindred spirit. She is, simply put, one of my very favourite people, and any time I get to spend with her—even if only by email—is time I look forward to.

Since she’s already an Honorary Word Wench I’m sure many of you know her work already, but for those who don’t, Christina writes time slip, historical romance, and—as Pia Fenton—YA contemporary romance, all published by independent publisher Choc Lit. She’s a former chairman of the UK’s Romantic Novelists’ Association, and her novels Highland Storms and The Gilded Fan have both won the RoNA Award for Best Historical Romantic Novel of the Year (in 2012 and 2014 respectively). Her newest time slip novel is The Velvet Cloak of Moonlight, which is being published this week (on Friday, 7th October).

Here’s a summary:

 


VCOM high res"As the velvet cloak of moonlight settled over the ruined towers of Raglan Castle, the shadows beneath them stirred …"

When newly widowed Tess visits Raglan Castle, she experiences an extraordinary vision that transports her to seventeenth-century Wales and a castle on the brink of a siege. Even when Tess leaves Raglan to return to Merrick Court, her late husband’s home, the strange dreams continue as her life becomes increasingly intertwined with the past. And when the new owner of the estate arrives – New Zealander Josh Owens – the parallels become even more obvious. But perhaps the visions aren’t just trying to tell their own story, maybe they’re also giving a warning …

 

Susanna: Welcome, Christina! Over at your website, on the pages for your travel and research, you say something that I love. You say, “Personally, I have always favoured the Royalists (well, I am a romantic novelist and what could be more romantic than the Cavaliers?)”. But I know in a previous novel of yours, The Gilded Fan, the story forced you to view things from the Parliamentary side instead of the Royalist one, which must have been a challenge. Did you learn anything from that experience that helped you with writing this new novel, where you were free to return to the Royalist fold (I assume you’re still waving the flag for Prince Rupert?)

Moat Aug 16Christina: I’m the kind of person who always tries to see both sides in an argument, so I did come to empathise with the Parliamentarians to a certain extent when I wrote my previous book. After reading all the claims and counter-claims, I understood the grievances of both parties and I felt the deep emotions that led them into conflict. But it didn’t make me change my own opinion – I’m still a Royalist at heart (and yes, definitely waving the flag for Prince Rupert!) and have always felt that the dispute should have been resolved through more negotiations. Beheading the King was a bit too drastic IMO and that stopped me from truly taking the Parliamentarian side. So the challenge was to forget that part when writing and focus on what was happening to my characters, not the King. Ordinary people who were forced to take sides and who were affected on a more basic level. It was a relief to be able to go back to the point of view of the ‘right’ side when writing this story, although I was careful to show that there could be honour on both sides and the Parliamentarian general Fairfax stuck to his word that no one inside the besieged garrison would be harmed if they lay down their arms.

Rag twelveSusanna: I’m sure you’ve been asked this many times before, but what is it about the time slip structure that appeals to you?

Christina: I think it’s partly the fact that you have two love stories instead of one so it’s double the intensity and emotion. I feel that alternating the two strands heightens the tension for the reader. Also that you are effectively writing three different sub-genres at the same time – contemporary, historical and paranormal (if you add some ghostly phenomena or perhaps a bit of magic or something) which is more interesting. I have a very low boredom threshold so I find it much more exciting to follow two story lines and it’s easier for me to write that way too. It can be frustrating trying to weave the two strands together, but when it works it’s great fun.

Susanna: Which character surprised you the most in writing this story?

Christina: I think it was the hero in the present – Josh Owens. He’s a sheep farmer from New Zealand who suddenly finds himself a peer of the realm in the UK with a vast estate. It comes as a bit of a shock since he didn’t even know he was related to aristocracy (his father never told him). When I first started this novel, I was sure that my favourite character would be the hero in the past – a Cavalier, of course, and a handsome Welshman with green eyes at that – because the idea for the novel began with him. But Josh started to grow on me and by the time I finished writing, I found I liked him more. I definitely hadn’t expected that!

R courtyardSusanna: Which character was hardest for you to let go of?

Christina: All of them :-D. I don’t know about you, but when you live with your fictional characters for so long it’s always hard to let them go and stop thinking about what would be happening to them next. In fact, I couldn’t quite do it and wrote a mini sequel (a little novella) set twenty years on from the Civil War just so I could spend a little more time with the family and see what had happened to them. But now I have definitely moved on. Honest. Well, sort of … 🙂

Susanna: Will you be returning to the Civil War in a future novel, do you think? Or perhaps even to Merrick Court itself?

Christina: I wouldn’t rule it out – those Cavaliers definitely tempt me – but even though the English Civil War is one of my favourite periods, I don’t have any plans do so at present as other eras are calling to me now. Being half Swedish I have a yearning to write about Vikings, so we’ll see how that goes.

Susanna: Well, while we’re waiting for your Vikings, we can get to know Josh Owens, and I’m sure he’ll charm us just as he did you.

Let’s meet him—and his newly inherited house, shall we? Here’s an excerpt from The Velvet Cloak of Moonlight:

* * * * *

Josh stopped on the gravel outside the front door and drew in a couple of huge breaths of fresh spring air, bending over to brace his hands against his knees. He felt as though he’d been through a fierce workout, both mentally and physically. His brain was all scrambled with too much information and a kaleidoscope of images jostling for space. The reality of Merrick Court had knocked him for six.

When he’d first been informed of his inheritance, he’d imagined a largish house in the countryside, but nothing like this. This was a bloody great big mansion. And old; ancient, in parts. Wandering through all the rooms behind Tess had been like touring some royal palace and he just couldn’t take in the fact that it was his. Why had his father never mentioned being related to English aristocracy? It was exactly the sort of thing he’d have been proud of. But perhaps he hadn’t known? Or maybe he’d been ashamed of the way they were connected. As far as Josh could make out from Mr Harrison, it was through a younger son who’d been such a black sheep he’d been sent to Australia as a condemned criminal. He’d gambled away everything he had, and more, stealing to fund his addiction, then ended up on one of the convict ships before later making his way to New Zealand after serving his sentence.

His father wouldn’t have liked that, even though it was quite fashionable nowadays to have convict ancestors. No, he would have hated it. Which, conversely, made Josh like it.

‘Thanks, Mr Black Sheep, I owe you,’ he murmured, then shook his head at himself. He was talking to thin air. Losing it big time. But was it any wonder?

He stood up straight and went to his car to retrieve a plan of the estate that Harrison had given him. He’d walk around some of the fields, clear his head a bit before finding Bryn again. There was an old stile not far from the gate where he’d come in earlier, so he climbed over that and set off along the perimeter of the nearest field. This was what he needed; some space to think.

It was a glorious day and the fields were edged with hedgerows where little birds hopped in and out, twittering away. Some of the bushes were full of blossom and their leaves were that amazing green colour only spring produced – clean and fresh. Josh took note of the soil, a rich dark reddish type that looked very fertile but heavy with moisture. Great for growing whatever you needed. In the fields used for pasture, the grass was lush, perfect for sheep and cattle. All round the edges trees grew – oak, beech and others he didn’t recognise. Some of the oak trees looked to be hundreds of years old, their girth impressive. Josh had the sudden thought that his ancestors had seen them too, touched them, and had walked here for hundreds of years before him. It was an odd feeling. Emotional.

And nothing like he’d ever felt for his father’s sheep station in New Zealand.

Not that you could really compare the two. The station had comprised mostly hills and wide open valleys, undulating tussock-covered land crossed by rivers and with high mountain ranges as a backdrop. It was a totally different environment, thousands of square kilometres to keep track of, necessitating the use of four-wheel drive vehicles for mustering the sheep and sometimes even helicopters. Here everything felt much smaller, enclosed, but not in a bad way, like he was hemmed in. Rather, it was manageable. He could see himself herding the sheep from one field to another with just the help of a trusted sheep dog. No quad bikes would be necessary. Nor big teams of helpers.

He stopped to lean against one particularly vast tree trunk and closed his eyes, letting the sun warm his face while he tried to process it all.

Did he really want to part with this?

Then again, how could he keep it? He didn’t know the first thing about being a landowner and sheep farmer – or a lord for that matter – in the UK. But maybe it wasn’t so different? A sheep was a sheep wherever it was in the world. And as far as he knew, there were no rules for how a lord had to behave, so surely that was up to him?

He sighed. This was something that would require a lot more thought than he’d envisaged.

* * * * *

Susanna: If you don’t want to stop reading there, you can buy The Velvet Cloak of Midnight using these links for the USA and for the UK. And you can connect with Christina here:

Website:  http://christinacourtenay.com/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/christinacourtenayauthor?fref=ts

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/PiaCCourtenay

Stair well

Christina: Thank you so much for having me as your guest on Word Wenches!

Susanna: Thank YOU for making my first interview here special (not to mention easy!). Wishing every success to this novel, and to your latest YA romance—New England Dreams. And Vikings or Cavaliers, you know I’ll happily read any story you choose to tell next.

Now, for the Wenchery—if you have questions for Christina, feel free to ask away!

100 thoughts on “A Cavalier Chat with Christina Courtenay”

  1. Interesting interview … thanks for introducing me to a fascinating new author!
    I have recently been drawn to time-slip novels. I think the paranormal element adds a certain frisante to the historical aspects. Also having dabbled in dowsing and energy healing I wonder whether there is more to existence than science currently reveals. I would love to hear what drew you both to write time slips.
    Christina, could you perhaps recommend a book to introduce me to your writing, preferably one with an audio version. At the moment I’m looking at ‘The Secret Kiss of Darkness’, particularly because I like Jenny Funnell’s narration and it is the first of a series.

    Reply
  2. Interesting interview … thanks for introducing me to a fascinating new author!
    I have recently been drawn to time-slip novels. I think the paranormal element adds a certain frisante to the historical aspects. Also having dabbled in dowsing and energy healing I wonder whether there is more to existence than science currently reveals. I would love to hear what drew you both to write time slips.
    Christina, could you perhaps recommend a book to introduce me to your writing, preferably one with an audio version. At the moment I’m looking at ‘The Secret Kiss of Darkness’, particularly because I like Jenny Funnell’s narration and it is the first of a series.

    Reply
  3. Interesting interview … thanks for introducing me to a fascinating new author!
    I have recently been drawn to time-slip novels. I think the paranormal element adds a certain frisante to the historical aspects. Also having dabbled in dowsing and energy healing I wonder whether there is more to existence than science currently reveals. I would love to hear what drew you both to write time slips.
    Christina, could you perhaps recommend a book to introduce me to your writing, preferably one with an audio version. At the moment I’m looking at ‘The Secret Kiss of Darkness’, particularly because I like Jenny Funnell’s narration and it is the first of a series.

    Reply
  4. Interesting interview … thanks for introducing me to a fascinating new author!
    I have recently been drawn to time-slip novels. I think the paranormal element adds a certain frisante to the historical aspects. Also having dabbled in dowsing and energy healing I wonder whether there is more to existence than science currently reveals. I would love to hear what drew you both to write time slips.
    Christina, could you perhaps recommend a book to introduce me to your writing, preferably one with an audio version. At the moment I’m looking at ‘The Secret Kiss of Darkness’, particularly because I like Jenny Funnell’s narration and it is the first of a series.

    Reply
  5. Interesting interview … thanks for introducing me to a fascinating new author!
    I have recently been drawn to time-slip novels. I think the paranormal element adds a certain frisante to the historical aspects. Also having dabbled in dowsing and energy healing I wonder whether there is more to existence than science currently reveals. I would love to hear what drew you both to write time slips.
    Christina, could you perhaps recommend a book to introduce me to your writing, preferably one with an audio version. At the moment I’m looking at ‘The Secret Kiss of Darkness’, particularly because I like Jenny Funnell’s narration and it is the first of a series.

    Reply
  6. Thank you, I’m so glad you liked the interview – Susanna is always lovely to chat to and she asks great questions 🙂
    I agree about the paranormal element and also that there is more to existence than what is known at the moment. I was first drawn to time slips by reading ‘The House on the Strand’ by Daphne du Maurier and later Susanna’s ‘Mariana’, as well as ‘Lady of Hay’ by Barbara Erskine. And when I went to stay at a 600-year old house and was told they had seen a handsome blond male ghost in chain mail there, I knew I just had to write a story like that myself based on him. (That turned into The Silent Touch of Shadows, my first time slip novel).
    They are all stand-alones so either that one or The Secret Kiss of Darkness would serve as an introduction to my work – do hope you enjoy it! Many thanks!

    Reply
  7. Thank you, I’m so glad you liked the interview – Susanna is always lovely to chat to and she asks great questions 🙂
    I agree about the paranormal element and also that there is more to existence than what is known at the moment. I was first drawn to time slips by reading ‘The House on the Strand’ by Daphne du Maurier and later Susanna’s ‘Mariana’, as well as ‘Lady of Hay’ by Barbara Erskine. And when I went to stay at a 600-year old house and was told they had seen a handsome blond male ghost in chain mail there, I knew I just had to write a story like that myself based on him. (That turned into The Silent Touch of Shadows, my first time slip novel).
    They are all stand-alones so either that one or The Secret Kiss of Darkness would serve as an introduction to my work – do hope you enjoy it! Many thanks!

    Reply
  8. Thank you, I’m so glad you liked the interview – Susanna is always lovely to chat to and she asks great questions 🙂
    I agree about the paranormal element and also that there is more to existence than what is known at the moment. I was first drawn to time slips by reading ‘The House on the Strand’ by Daphne du Maurier and later Susanna’s ‘Mariana’, as well as ‘Lady of Hay’ by Barbara Erskine. And when I went to stay at a 600-year old house and was told they had seen a handsome blond male ghost in chain mail there, I knew I just had to write a story like that myself based on him. (That turned into The Silent Touch of Shadows, my first time slip novel).
    They are all stand-alones so either that one or The Secret Kiss of Darkness would serve as an introduction to my work – do hope you enjoy it! Many thanks!

    Reply
  9. Thank you, I’m so glad you liked the interview – Susanna is always lovely to chat to and she asks great questions 🙂
    I agree about the paranormal element and also that there is more to existence than what is known at the moment. I was first drawn to time slips by reading ‘The House on the Strand’ by Daphne du Maurier and later Susanna’s ‘Mariana’, as well as ‘Lady of Hay’ by Barbara Erskine. And when I went to stay at a 600-year old house and was told they had seen a handsome blond male ghost in chain mail there, I knew I just had to write a story like that myself based on him. (That turned into The Silent Touch of Shadows, my first time slip novel).
    They are all stand-alones so either that one or The Secret Kiss of Darkness would serve as an introduction to my work – do hope you enjoy it! Many thanks!

    Reply
  10. Thank you, I’m so glad you liked the interview – Susanna is always lovely to chat to and she asks great questions 🙂
    I agree about the paranormal element and also that there is more to existence than what is known at the moment. I was first drawn to time slips by reading ‘The House on the Strand’ by Daphne du Maurier and later Susanna’s ‘Mariana’, as well as ‘Lady of Hay’ by Barbara Erskine. And when I went to stay at a 600-year old house and was told they had seen a handsome blond male ghost in chain mail there, I knew I just had to write a story like that myself based on him. (That turned into The Silent Touch of Shadows, my first time slip novel).
    They are all stand-alones so either that one or The Secret Kiss of Darkness would serve as an introduction to my work – do hope you enjoy it! Many thanks!

    Reply
  11. Christina and Susanna, a great interview!
    Nonetheless, I’m anti-Royalist. The Stuarts lost me with their fascist, bigoted, entitled “divine right of kings” philosophy, and I haven’t a lot of sympathy with any of them. (Well, Charles II is kind of appealing but he was a lazy love rat. *G*)
    I should probably mention that my American ancestors were Puritans not that long after the Civil War, and were sure Round Heads.
    And I have NO doubt that your stories are wonderful no matter which side you’re on, Christina!

    Reply
  12. Christina and Susanna, a great interview!
    Nonetheless, I’m anti-Royalist. The Stuarts lost me with their fascist, bigoted, entitled “divine right of kings” philosophy, and I haven’t a lot of sympathy with any of them. (Well, Charles II is kind of appealing but he was a lazy love rat. *G*)
    I should probably mention that my American ancestors were Puritans not that long after the Civil War, and were sure Round Heads.
    And I have NO doubt that your stories are wonderful no matter which side you’re on, Christina!

    Reply
  13. Christina and Susanna, a great interview!
    Nonetheless, I’m anti-Royalist. The Stuarts lost me with their fascist, bigoted, entitled “divine right of kings” philosophy, and I haven’t a lot of sympathy with any of them. (Well, Charles II is kind of appealing but he was a lazy love rat. *G*)
    I should probably mention that my American ancestors were Puritans not that long after the Civil War, and were sure Round Heads.
    And I have NO doubt that your stories are wonderful no matter which side you’re on, Christina!

    Reply
  14. Christina and Susanna, a great interview!
    Nonetheless, I’m anti-Royalist. The Stuarts lost me with their fascist, bigoted, entitled “divine right of kings” philosophy, and I haven’t a lot of sympathy with any of them. (Well, Charles II is kind of appealing but he was a lazy love rat. *G*)
    I should probably mention that my American ancestors were Puritans not that long after the Civil War, and were sure Round Heads.
    And I have NO doubt that your stories are wonderful no matter which side you’re on, Christina!

    Reply
  15. Christina and Susanna, a great interview!
    Nonetheless, I’m anti-Royalist. The Stuarts lost me with their fascist, bigoted, entitled “divine right of kings” philosophy, and I haven’t a lot of sympathy with any of them. (Well, Charles II is kind of appealing but he was a lazy love rat. *G*)
    I should probably mention that my American ancestors were Puritans not that long after the Civil War, and were sure Round Heads.
    And I have NO doubt that your stories are wonderful no matter which side you’re on, Christina!

    Reply
  16. Thank you Mary Jo – the whole concept of their ‘divine right’ to rule was probably just something they were taught from birth and never thought to doubt or question. As I said, I can see the Parliamentarian arguments were very valid too – it was just a shame it all went as far as war and regicide! I quite like Charles II too, despite his love rat tendencies 😀 but my favourite will always be Prince Rupert.
    I love hearing about people’s ancestors – mine were Methodists and some of them went to America too, but much later 🙂

    Reply
  17. Thank you Mary Jo – the whole concept of their ‘divine right’ to rule was probably just something they were taught from birth and never thought to doubt or question. As I said, I can see the Parliamentarian arguments were very valid too – it was just a shame it all went as far as war and regicide! I quite like Charles II too, despite his love rat tendencies 😀 but my favourite will always be Prince Rupert.
    I love hearing about people’s ancestors – mine were Methodists and some of them went to America too, but much later 🙂

    Reply
  18. Thank you Mary Jo – the whole concept of their ‘divine right’ to rule was probably just something they were taught from birth and never thought to doubt or question. As I said, I can see the Parliamentarian arguments were very valid too – it was just a shame it all went as far as war and regicide! I quite like Charles II too, despite his love rat tendencies 😀 but my favourite will always be Prince Rupert.
    I love hearing about people’s ancestors – mine were Methodists and some of them went to America too, but much later 🙂

    Reply
  19. Thank you Mary Jo – the whole concept of their ‘divine right’ to rule was probably just something they were taught from birth and never thought to doubt or question. As I said, I can see the Parliamentarian arguments were very valid too – it was just a shame it all went as far as war and regicide! I quite like Charles II too, despite his love rat tendencies 😀 but my favourite will always be Prince Rupert.
    I love hearing about people’s ancestors – mine were Methodists and some of them went to America too, but much later 🙂

    Reply
  20. Thank you Mary Jo – the whole concept of their ‘divine right’ to rule was probably just something they were taught from birth and never thought to doubt or question. As I said, I can see the Parliamentarian arguments were very valid too – it was just a shame it all went as far as war and regicide! I quite like Charles II too, despite his love rat tendencies 😀 but my favourite will always be Prince Rupert.
    I love hearing about people’s ancestors – mine were Methodists and some of them went to America too, but much later 🙂

    Reply
  21. I adore everything Susanna writes…own it all in 3 different formats. So when she starts an interview with that kind of recommendation…I am off to buy Christina Courtenay books! =D Great interview! *Stephanie excitedly buying books*

    Reply
  22. I adore everything Susanna writes…own it all in 3 different formats. So when she starts an interview with that kind of recommendation…I am off to buy Christina Courtenay books! =D Great interview! *Stephanie excitedly buying books*

    Reply
  23. I adore everything Susanna writes…own it all in 3 different formats. So when she starts an interview with that kind of recommendation…I am off to buy Christina Courtenay books! =D Great interview! *Stephanie excitedly buying books*

    Reply
  24. I adore everything Susanna writes…own it all in 3 different formats. So when she starts an interview with that kind of recommendation…I am off to buy Christina Courtenay books! =D Great interview! *Stephanie excitedly buying books*

    Reply
  25. I adore everything Susanna writes…own it all in 3 different formats. So when she starts an interview with that kind of recommendation…I am off to buy Christina Courtenay books! =D Great interview! *Stephanie excitedly buying books*

    Reply
  26. That’s great, Stephanie, many thanks! I adore all Susanna’s books too – she’s just brilliant! ‘Sophia’s Secret’ (aka ‘The Winter Sea’) made me cry, in the best possible way, not many books do that to me 🙂

    Reply
  27. That’s great, Stephanie, many thanks! I adore all Susanna’s books too – she’s just brilliant! ‘Sophia’s Secret’ (aka ‘The Winter Sea’) made me cry, in the best possible way, not many books do that to me 🙂

    Reply
  28. That’s great, Stephanie, many thanks! I adore all Susanna’s books too – she’s just brilliant! ‘Sophia’s Secret’ (aka ‘The Winter Sea’) made me cry, in the best possible way, not many books do that to me 🙂

    Reply
  29. That’s great, Stephanie, many thanks! I adore all Susanna’s books too – she’s just brilliant! ‘Sophia’s Secret’ (aka ‘The Winter Sea’) made me cry, in the best possible way, not many books do that to me 🙂

    Reply
  30. That’s great, Stephanie, many thanks! I adore all Susanna’s books too – she’s just brilliant! ‘Sophia’s Secret’ (aka ‘The Winter Sea’) made me cry, in the best possible way, not many books do that to me 🙂

    Reply
  31. Lovely interview! Can’t believe in your first answer above Christina you mentioned three of my most favourite books. I love Susanna’s books. I read your book The Secret Kiss of Darkness and thoroughly enjoyed it. Love time-slip novels.
    My family have some ‘hairy’ skeletons in the cupboard. I’ve often thought my family’s history would make a good story. Like the sound of your new book. I’m off to earmark it now.

    Reply
  32. Lovely interview! Can’t believe in your first answer above Christina you mentioned three of my most favourite books. I love Susanna’s books. I read your book The Secret Kiss of Darkness and thoroughly enjoyed it. Love time-slip novels.
    My family have some ‘hairy’ skeletons in the cupboard. I’ve often thought my family’s history would make a good story. Like the sound of your new book. I’m off to earmark it now.

    Reply
  33. Lovely interview! Can’t believe in your first answer above Christina you mentioned three of my most favourite books. I love Susanna’s books. I read your book The Secret Kiss of Darkness and thoroughly enjoyed it. Love time-slip novels.
    My family have some ‘hairy’ skeletons in the cupboard. I’ve often thought my family’s history would make a good story. Like the sound of your new book. I’m off to earmark it now.

    Reply
  34. Lovely interview! Can’t believe in your first answer above Christina you mentioned three of my most favourite books. I love Susanna’s books. I read your book The Secret Kiss of Darkness and thoroughly enjoyed it. Love time-slip novels.
    My family have some ‘hairy’ skeletons in the cupboard. I’ve often thought my family’s history would make a good story. Like the sound of your new book. I’m off to earmark it now.

    Reply
  35. Lovely interview! Can’t believe in your first answer above Christina you mentioned three of my most favourite books. I love Susanna’s books. I read your book The Secret Kiss of Darkness and thoroughly enjoyed it. Love time-slip novels.
    My family have some ‘hairy’ skeletons in the cupboard. I’ve often thought my family’s history would make a good story. Like the sound of your new book. I’m off to earmark it now.

    Reply
  36. I’m with Mary Jo as to being on the Parliament side and for the same reason. My ancestors on this side were anabaptists, methodists, and Calvinists, so they probably have something to do with my bias. (Also some unaffiliated free-thinkers.) As a young adult I joined the Presbyterian Church, which surely makes me a Round Head. On the other hand, I find many of the Round Heads stiff-necked and over-righteous!
    You books sound very interesting! I will certainly try some trial reads. (Sigh! There goes my resolve to cut down on book acquisitions!)

    Reply
  37. I’m with Mary Jo as to being on the Parliament side and for the same reason. My ancestors on this side were anabaptists, methodists, and Calvinists, so they probably have something to do with my bias. (Also some unaffiliated free-thinkers.) As a young adult I joined the Presbyterian Church, which surely makes me a Round Head. On the other hand, I find many of the Round Heads stiff-necked and over-righteous!
    You books sound very interesting! I will certainly try some trial reads. (Sigh! There goes my resolve to cut down on book acquisitions!)

    Reply
  38. I’m with Mary Jo as to being on the Parliament side and for the same reason. My ancestors on this side were anabaptists, methodists, and Calvinists, so they probably have something to do with my bias. (Also some unaffiliated free-thinkers.) As a young adult I joined the Presbyterian Church, which surely makes me a Round Head. On the other hand, I find many of the Round Heads stiff-necked and over-righteous!
    You books sound very interesting! I will certainly try some trial reads. (Sigh! There goes my resolve to cut down on book acquisitions!)

    Reply
  39. I’m with Mary Jo as to being on the Parliament side and for the same reason. My ancestors on this side were anabaptists, methodists, and Calvinists, so they probably have something to do with my bias. (Also some unaffiliated free-thinkers.) As a young adult I joined the Presbyterian Church, which surely makes me a Round Head. On the other hand, I find many of the Round Heads stiff-necked and over-righteous!
    You books sound very interesting! I will certainly try some trial reads. (Sigh! There goes my resolve to cut down on book acquisitions!)

    Reply
  40. I’m with Mary Jo as to being on the Parliament side and for the same reason. My ancestors on this side were anabaptists, methodists, and Calvinists, so they probably have something to do with my bias. (Also some unaffiliated free-thinkers.) As a young adult I joined the Presbyterian Church, which surely makes me a Round Head. On the other hand, I find many of the Round Heads stiff-necked and over-righteous!
    You books sound very interesting! I will certainly try some trial reads. (Sigh! There goes my resolve to cut down on book acquisitions!)

    Reply
  41. Many thanks Teresa, so glad you enjoyed The Secret Kiss of Darkness! Time slip novels are definitely addictive 🙂
    Skeletons in the cupboard are the best as they make brilliant stories and when doing genealogy it’s the ‘naughty’ ones you find the most information about!

    Reply
  42. Many thanks Teresa, so glad you enjoyed The Secret Kiss of Darkness! Time slip novels are definitely addictive 🙂
    Skeletons in the cupboard are the best as they make brilliant stories and when doing genealogy it’s the ‘naughty’ ones you find the most information about!

    Reply
  43. Many thanks Teresa, so glad you enjoyed The Secret Kiss of Darkness! Time slip novels are definitely addictive 🙂
    Skeletons in the cupboard are the best as they make brilliant stories and when doing genealogy it’s the ‘naughty’ ones you find the most information about!

    Reply
  44. Many thanks Teresa, so glad you enjoyed The Secret Kiss of Darkness! Time slip novels are definitely addictive 🙂
    Skeletons in the cupboard are the best as they make brilliant stories and when doing genealogy it’s the ‘naughty’ ones you find the most information about!

    Reply
  45. Many thanks Teresa, so glad you enjoyed The Secret Kiss of Darkness! Time slip novels are definitely addictive 🙂
    Skeletons in the cupboard are the best as they make brilliant stories and when doing genealogy it’s the ‘naughty’ ones you find the most information about!

    Reply
  46. I think there were stiff-necked people on both sides, Sue, and pros and cons for both views too. For me, the Royalist cause has always been the one to root for – that’s probably the romantic in me (and as Susanna mentioned, Prince Rupert has a lot to answer for as well) 🙂
    Book acquisitions – I’m with you there, it’s impossible to stop buying them, isn’t it! I can’t even look at my TBR pile …

    Reply
  47. I think there were stiff-necked people on both sides, Sue, and pros and cons for both views too. For me, the Royalist cause has always been the one to root for – that’s probably the romantic in me (and as Susanna mentioned, Prince Rupert has a lot to answer for as well) 🙂
    Book acquisitions – I’m with you there, it’s impossible to stop buying them, isn’t it! I can’t even look at my TBR pile …

    Reply
  48. I think there were stiff-necked people on both sides, Sue, and pros and cons for both views too. For me, the Royalist cause has always been the one to root for – that’s probably the romantic in me (and as Susanna mentioned, Prince Rupert has a lot to answer for as well) 🙂
    Book acquisitions – I’m with you there, it’s impossible to stop buying them, isn’t it! I can’t even look at my TBR pile …

    Reply
  49. I think there were stiff-necked people on both sides, Sue, and pros and cons for both views too. For me, the Royalist cause has always been the one to root for – that’s probably the romantic in me (and as Susanna mentioned, Prince Rupert has a lot to answer for as well) 🙂
    Book acquisitions – I’m with you there, it’s impossible to stop buying them, isn’t it! I can’t even look at my TBR pile …

    Reply
  50. I think there were stiff-necked people on both sides, Sue, and pros and cons for both views too. For me, the Royalist cause has always been the one to root for – that’s probably the romantic in me (and as Susanna mentioned, Prince Rupert has a lot to answer for as well) 🙂
    Book acquisitions – I’m with you there, it’s impossible to stop buying them, isn’t it! I can’t even look at my TBR pile …

    Reply
  51. Thank you so much to both Susanna and Christina! I adore time-slip romance (it’s what I’m writing myself), but I’d never read Christina’s books before. Looking through all her titles, reviews, and excerpts, I’ve now broken my “I will NOT buy any more books” pledge yet again and added some truly appealing titles to my TBR mountain. Christina, I particularly liked the “short story” on your website, but due to my somewhat hasty perusal, I couldn’t determine if it was part of a larger book. I want to know what happens to both Eliza and Richard, please!

    Reply
  52. Thank you so much to both Susanna and Christina! I adore time-slip romance (it’s what I’m writing myself), but I’d never read Christina’s books before. Looking through all her titles, reviews, and excerpts, I’ve now broken my “I will NOT buy any more books” pledge yet again and added some truly appealing titles to my TBR mountain. Christina, I particularly liked the “short story” on your website, but due to my somewhat hasty perusal, I couldn’t determine if it was part of a larger book. I want to know what happens to both Eliza and Richard, please!

    Reply
  53. Thank you so much to both Susanna and Christina! I adore time-slip romance (it’s what I’m writing myself), but I’d never read Christina’s books before. Looking through all her titles, reviews, and excerpts, I’ve now broken my “I will NOT buy any more books” pledge yet again and added some truly appealing titles to my TBR mountain. Christina, I particularly liked the “short story” on your website, but due to my somewhat hasty perusal, I couldn’t determine if it was part of a larger book. I want to know what happens to both Eliza and Richard, please!

    Reply
  54. Thank you so much to both Susanna and Christina! I adore time-slip romance (it’s what I’m writing myself), but I’d never read Christina’s books before. Looking through all her titles, reviews, and excerpts, I’ve now broken my “I will NOT buy any more books” pledge yet again and added some truly appealing titles to my TBR mountain. Christina, I particularly liked the “short story” on your website, but due to my somewhat hasty perusal, I couldn’t determine if it was part of a larger book. I want to know what happens to both Eliza and Richard, please!

    Reply
  55. Thank you so much to both Susanna and Christina! I adore time-slip romance (it’s what I’m writing myself), but I’d never read Christina’s books before. Looking through all her titles, reviews, and excerpts, I’ve now broken my “I will NOT buy any more books” pledge yet again and added some truly appealing titles to my TBR mountain. Christina, I particularly liked the “short story” on your website, but due to my somewhat hasty perusal, I couldn’t determine if it was part of a larger book. I want to know what happens to both Eliza and Richard, please!

    Reply
  56. Wonderful interview, Christina and Susanna. I’m a huge fan of timeslip for all the reasons you mention, Christina. I love seeing history from a contemporary perspective as well as the nitty-gritty of the someone in the era. It creates a wonderful atmosphere as well as plot tension.
    Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  57. Wonderful interview, Christina and Susanna. I’m a huge fan of timeslip for all the reasons you mention, Christina. I love seeing history from a contemporary perspective as well as the nitty-gritty of the someone in the era. It creates a wonderful atmosphere as well as plot tension.
    Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  58. Wonderful interview, Christina and Susanna. I’m a huge fan of timeslip for all the reasons you mention, Christina. I love seeing history from a contemporary perspective as well as the nitty-gritty of the someone in the era. It creates a wonderful atmosphere as well as plot tension.
    Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  59. Wonderful interview, Christina and Susanna. I’m a huge fan of timeslip for all the reasons you mention, Christina. I love seeing history from a contemporary perspective as well as the nitty-gritty of the someone in the era. It creates a wonderful atmosphere as well as plot tension.
    Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  60. Wonderful interview, Christina and Susanna. I’m a huge fan of timeslip for all the reasons you mention, Christina. I love seeing history from a contemporary perspective as well as the nitty-gritty of the someone in the era. It creates a wonderful atmosphere as well as plot tension.
    Can’t wait to read this!

    Reply
  61. Thank you Margaret – I look forward to reading your time slip romances as I never tire of them 🙂
    The short story doesn’t have a continuation at the moment, but thank you so much for liking it – perhaps I’ll make it into a longer story one of these days!

    Reply
  62. Thank you Margaret – I look forward to reading your time slip romances as I never tire of them 🙂
    The short story doesn’t have a continuation at the moment, but thank you so much for liking it – perhaps I’ll make it into a longer story one of these days!

    Reply
  63. Thank you Margaret – I look forward to reading your time slip romances as I never tire of them 🙂
    The short story doesn’t have a continuation at the moment, but thank you so much for liking it – perhaps I’ll make it into a longer story one of these days!

    Reply
  64. Thank you Margaret – I look forward to reading your time slip romances as I never tire of them 🙂
    The short story doesn’t have a continuation at the moment, but thank you so much for liking it – perhaps I’ll make it into a longer story one of these days!

    Reply
  65. Thank you Margaret – I look forward to reading your time slip romances as I never tire of them 🙂
    The short story doesn’t have a continuation at the moment, but thank you so much for liking it – perhaps I’ll make it into a longer story one of these days!

    Reply
  66. I can also recommend Christina’s Japan-set novels. She lived in japan for a time, and her novels are about Europeans living in medieval Japan.

    Reply
  67. I can also recommend Christina’s Japan-set novels. She lived in japan for a time, and her novels are about Europeans living in medieval Japan.

    Reply
  68. I can also recommend Christina’s Japan-set novels. She lived in japan for a time, and her novels are about Europeans living in medieval Japan.

    Reply
  69. I can also recommend Christina’s Japan-set novels. She lived in japan for a time, and her novels are about Europeans living in medieval Japan.

    Reply
  70. I can also recommend Christina’s Japan-set novels. She lived in japan for a time, and her novels are about Europeans living in medieval Japan.

    Reply
  71. Cousin Christina!
    My family is generations of Methodist, but they came to American long before John Wesley was born, so they must have been some flavor of Puritans. They settled in New England and were farmers, which sounds about right.

    Reply
  72. Cousin Christina!
    My family is generations of Methodist, but they came to American long before John Wesley was born, so they must have been some flavor of Puritans. They settled in New England and were farmers, which sounds about right.

    Reply
  73. Cousin Christina!
    My family is generations of Methodist, but they came to American long before John Wesley was born, so they must have been some flavor of Puritans. They settled in New England and were farmers, which sounds about right.

    Reply
  74. Cousin Christina!
    My family is generations of Methodist, but they came to American long before John Wesley was born, so they must have been some flavor of Puritans. They settled in New England and were farmers, which sounds about right.

    Reply
  75. Cousin Christina!
    My family is generations of Methodist, but they came to American long before John Wesley was born, so they must have been some flavor of Puritans. They settled in New England and were farmers, which sounds about right.

    Reply

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