Your Scandalous Ways: the Interview, Part Uno

Yswfrontsm200dpiAn Interview with Loretta Chase
by Susan/Miranda

At last, at last! The book so many of us have been waiting for this spring is finally in stores NOW.  Your Scandalous Ways by Wench Loretta Chase is already gathering a heady share of well-deserved praise, and there are plenty of people (myself included) who think it's Loretta's best since Lord of Scoundrels.  To help get readers in the proper mood, Loretta reveals the Truth behind this extraordinary book — or at least the Truth about James, Francesca, the influence of Venice, and all those plaster putti. 

If you'd like to hear Loretta discuss this book via video (think along the exciting lines of "Garbo Speaks!"), please check out her new YouTube clips.  And please be sure to join us for Part Two of the interview of Friday.

Also: Loretta will be giving away a signed copy of Your Scandalous Ways to a reader who posts on either half of the interview.  Ask your quesitons now!

Susan/Miranda: Many of your previous books have been interconnected, but Your Scandalous Ways introduces a whole new set of characters to readers.  What inspired you to create James and Francesca?

Gianciotto_discovers_paolo_francesc Loretta:  Casino Royale was the spark.  It made me think, “What about a 007 in the early 19th Century?  I didn’t see Daniel Craig, though.  I saw tall, dark, and handsome.  And for some reason, I saw half-Italian.  Once James Cordier took form, Francesca came instantly to life.  The exotic looks–the elongated eyes, the wide mouth–came from a model in Brooks Brothers ads.  The movie got Venice on my mind, too.  I studied it, then Byron’s letters from his time there, and started thinking about English exiles and what they found there.  Like Byron, Francesca has left England because of a major scandal.  The scandal not only helped develop her character, but set the plot in motion–the thing that brings James into collision with her.

Bordonewk Susan/Miranda: Readers who remember Dain, the hero of Lord of Scoundrels, will love James Cordier, another “outsider” Englishman of unusual ancestry who chooses to live apart from polite society.  Do you think these two gentlemen would enjoy each other’s company, and why or why not?

Loretta:  Two extreme Alpha males, both with Italian blood?  I think they’d stir each other’s competitive instincts in a big way.  They’re such different men, it’s hard to imagine their having a conversation.  And while they’re trying to decide whether or not to like each other, all the women in the vicinity are swooning from testosterone overdose.

Ducal_palaceguardi Susan/Miranda: The city of Venice is almost another character in this book, and you do a wonderful job of catching the city’s mix of East and West, and its general other-worldliness.  Yet  you’ve chosen to set your story in an unusual era in Venetian history, after the fall of the Republic and well after the city’s glory-days.  Why?

French_enter_venice_1797 Loretta:  Mainly because it’s the time period in which I usually set my stories *g*.  But it’s still an interesting time.  The glory days were centuries earlier.  It’s always had problems with allies and enemies, disastrous wars, plagues, corruption, etc.  At the end of the 18th Century Napoleon stomps in.  That’s the end of the Republic of Venice, and it’s sad and awful. 

Bridge_of_sighs_1869cr By 1820, the time of my story, yes, people (especially foreigners) are nostalgic about the Republic (and let’s bear in mind this is the Romantic era) but Venice, like my heroine, is resilient.  And like her, it’s fun.  Though many of its riches have been plundered, so much remains.  It’s still beautiful and mysterious and it’s still distinctively Venice–like no other city in the world.  What Byron found there was a refuge.  Old and wicked as it was, it was a place of renewal for him, a place where he wasn’t judged and where he began to do his best work.  It enchanted him–and my characters–exactly as it does visitors today.

Titianwk Susan/Miranda: Courtesans are trendy right now in historical romances, albeit courtesans who often turn out to be faux-courtesans for the sake of Polite Readers.  However, Francesca Bonnard is the real thing, earning a tidy living in a city infamous at the time for being the “Brothel of Europe.”  How did you create a love story for a courtesan?

Harriette_wilson01wk Loretta: I thought of La Traviata, and my brain does what it usually does when contemplating a tragedy:  It changed the characters and plot in a way to make a happy ending.  I had in mind, too, Harriette Wilson, the famous courtesan of the Regency Era, and so I made my courtesan unrepentant, with a zest for life, and a bawdy sense of humor.  (I ought to add that your Bad Barbara of Royal Harlot  also inspired me.)  Francesca has been left penniless and friendless.  She’s become a courtesan to survive–but she does so on her own terms.  She chooses the men who are to have the privilege of keeping her, and only a very, very few qualify.  She’s exclusive and extremely expensive.  What she needed, I thought, was a man who truly appreciated what she had to offer, who’d done enough not-so-nice things himself not to judge her and who was at the same time honorable enough to win her trust.

Piazza_san_marco_basilicacanaletto1To be continued . . . .

Please join us Friday for the conclusion of this interview, and more delicious discussions with Loretta about Venice, courtesans, and Lord Byron.

And don't forget to leave a comment for a chance to win a signed copy of Your Scandalous Ways!

180 thoughts on “Your Scandalous Ways: the Interview, Part Uno”

  1. Lovely. Did I mention you’ve made me want to visit Venice this year? It is becoming quite an obsession, between reading about Your Scandalous Ways and remembering Don’t Look Now. (no link between the two besides Venice!)

    Reply
  2. Lovely. Did I mention you’ve made me want to visit Venice this year? It is becoming quite an obsession, between reading about Your Scandalous Ways and remembering Don’t Look Now. (no link between the two besides Venice!)

    Reply
  3. Lovely. Did I mention you’ve made me want to visit Venice this year? It is becoming quite an obsession, between reading about Your Scandalous Ways and remembering Don’t Look Now. (no link between the two besides Venice!)

    Reply
  4. Lovely. Did I mention you’ve made me want to visit Venice this year? It is becoming quite an obsession, between reading about Your Scandalous Ways and remembering Don’t Look Now. (no link between the two besides Venice!)

    Reply
  5. Lovely. Did I mention you’ve made me want to visit Venice this year? It is becoming quite an obsession, between reading about Your Scandalous Ways and remembering Don’t Look Now. (no link between the two besides Venice!)

    Reply
  6. Now I’m sure that I’m not a candidate for winning a book, since I’ve already been given one by you lovely ladies, but I had to comment anyway! I’ve been looking forward to Your Scandalous Ways for a long time – and with planning a trip to Italy shortly – it now becomes a must-buy travel book! At a recent book club meet up, Kate Cuthbert was bemoaning the number of scandal ridden / courtesan style storylines that have no social repercussions – so we are both very interested to see how Francesca fares, while trusting you completely!

    Reply
  7. Now I’m sure that I’m not a candidate for winning a book, since I’ve already been given one by you lovely ladies, but I had to comment anyway! I’ve been looking forward to Your Scandalous Ways for a long time – and with planning a trip to Italy shortly – it now becomes a must-buy travel book! At a recent book club meet up, Kate Cuthbert was bemoaning the number of scandal ridden / courtesan style storylines that have no social repercussions – so we are both very interested to see how Francesca fares, while trusting you completely!

    Reply
  8. Now I’m sure that I’m not a candidate for winning a book, since I’ve already been given one by you lovely ladies, but I had to comment anyway! I’ve been looking forward to Your Scandalous Ways for a long time – and with planning a trip to Italy shortly – it now becomes a must-buy travel book! At a recent book club meet up, Kate Cuthbert was bemoaning the number of scandal ridden / courtesan style storylines that have no social repercussions – so we are both very interested to see how Francesca fares, while trusting you completely!

    Reply
  9. Now I’m sure that I’m not a candidate for winning a book, since I’ve already been given one by you lovely ladies, but I had to comment anyway! I’ve been looking forward to Your Scandalous Ways for a long time – and with planning a trip to Italy shortly – it now becomes a must-buy travel book! At a recent book club meet up, Kate Cuthbert was bemoaning the number of scandal ridden / courtesan style storylines that have no social repercussions – so we are both very interested to see how Francesca fares, while trusting you completely!

    Reply
  10. Now I’m sure that I’m not a candidate for winning a book, since I’ve already been given one by you lovely ladies, but I had to comment anyway! I’ve been looking forward to Your Scandalous Ways for a long time – and with planning a trip to Italy shortly – it now becomes a must-buy travel book! At a recent book club meet up, Kate Cuthbert was bemoaning the number of scandal ridden / courtesan style storylines that have no social repercussions – so we are both very interested to see how Francesca fares, while trusting you completely!

    Reply
  11. I’ve ordered my copy. This whole discussion makes me want to book a flight to Venice, take up Italian cooking–or buy really expensive jewelery!

    Reply
  12. I’ve ordered my copy. This whole discussion makes me want to book a flight to Venice, take up Italian cooking–or buy really expensive jewelery!

    Reply
  13. I’ve ordered my copy. This whole discussion makes me want to book a flight to Venice, take up Italian cooking–or buy really expensive jewelery!

    Reply
  14. I’ve ordered my copy. This whole discussion makes me want to book a flight to Venice, take up Italian cooking–or buy really expensive jewelery!

    Reply
  15. I’ve ordered my copy. This whole discussion makes me want to book a flight to Venice, take up Italian cooking–or buy really expensive jewelery!

    Reply
  16. Venice truly seems like a world apart. It’s partly, I suppose the way it looks — all those palazzos looking as if they are made of spun sugar. It’s a stage set waiting for the next marvelous thing to happen, and I can’t wait to read your story.

    Reply
  17. Venice truly seems like a world apart. It’s partly, I suppose the way it looks — all those palazzos looking as if they are made of spun sugar. It’s a stage set waiting for the next marvelous thing to happen, and I can’t wait to read your story.

    Reply
  18. Venice truly seems like a world apart. It’s partly, I suppose the way it looks — all those palazzos looking as if they are made of spun sugar. It’s a stage set waiting for the next marvelous thing to happen, and I can’t wait to read your story.

    Reply
  19. Venice truly seems like a world apart. It’s partly, I suppose the way it looks — all those palazzos looking as if they are made of spun sugar. It’s a stage set waiting for the next marvelous thing to happen, and I can’t wait to read your story.

    Reply
  20. Venice truly seems like a world apart. It’s partly, I suppose the way it looks — all those palazzos looking as if they are made of spun sugar. It’s a stage set waiting for the next marvelous thing to happen, and I can’t wait to read your story.

    Reply
  21. Ah Venice, I remember it well….
    It will be interesting to see how Francesca and Venice combine to bring a man to his knees.

    Reply
  22. Ah Venice, I remember it well….
    It will be interesting to see how Francesca and Venice combine to bring a man to his knees.

    Reply
  23. Ah Venice, I remember it well….
    It will be interesting to see how Francesca and Venice combine to bring a man to his knees.

    Reply
  24. Ah Venice, I remember it well….
    It will be interesting to see how Francesca and Venice combine to bring a man to his knees.

    Reply
  25. Ah Venice, I remember it well….
    It will be interesting to see how Francesca and Venice combine to bring a man to his knees.

    Reply
  26. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  27. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  28. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  29. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  30. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  31. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  32. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  33. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  34. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  35. The whole idea of a city with canals instead of sidewalks is inherently fascinating to me. I live in SoCal, not far from a place called Venice Beach, and I recently learned that an early 20th century architect intended to have this area recall its namesake. There were to be canals–one large one and a series of smaller ones. It was an ambitious scheme probably destined to fail, but the scope of it was audacious.
    Today, the Grand Canal, which was indeed built, has all gone to mud and water weeds and the occasional wading bird, but four of the smaller canals survive and are pretty well-maintained. The waters are reasonably clean, if shallow; there are houses of varying styles built on the walkways; and there are rowboats tethered at the moorings (to my delight, one was named The Runcible Spoon, though it wasn’t pea-green). Ducks can often be found floating along on the water; there’s a whole duck colony living in a canalside park, in fact. It’s a very pleasant place to walk on a spring afternoon–and when I do, I find myself wishing I could afford to visit the real Venice. Maybe someday . . .

    Reply
  36. Your book sounds intriguing! A spy and a courtesan…so different from the usual Regency romance novels that I like to read. I look forward to reading your book. I enjoy heroines who are strong and a true match for the hero. I was wondering…how long did the book take to write from start to finish, including research?

    Reply
  37. Your book sounds intriguing! A spy and a courtesan…so different from the usual Regency romance novels that I like to read. I look forward to reading your book. I enjoy heroines who are strong and a true match for the hero. I was wondering…how long did the book take to write from start to finish, including research?

    Reply
  38. Your book sounds intriguing! A spy and a courtesan…so different from the usual Regency romance novels that I like to read. I look forward to reading your book. I enjoy heroines who are strong and a true match for the hero. I was wondering…how long did the book take to write from start to finish, including research?

    Reply
  39. Your book sounds intriguing! A spy and a courtesan…so different from the usual Regency romance novels that I like to read. I look forward to reading your book. I enjoy heroines who are strong and a true match for the hero. I was wondering…how long did the book take to write from start to finish, including research?

    Reply
  40. Your book sounds intriguing! A spy and a courtesan…so different from the usual Regency romance novels that I like to read. I look forward to reading your book. I enjoy heroines who are strong and a true match for the hero. I was wondering…how long did the book take to write from start to finish, including research?

    Reply
  41. I feel so fortunate to have read an advance copy of this marvelous book–and predict it will be a favourite with Loretta’s readership! (Don’t include me in the prize draw.)
    It’s altogether delicious–characters, escapades, and Venice! Reading it sparked a developing plan to return that wonderful city.

    Reply
  42. I feel so fortunate to have read an advance copy of this marvelous book–and predict it will be a favourite with Loretta’s readership! (Don’t include me in the prize draw.)
    It’s altogether delicious–characters, escapades, and Venice! Reading it sparked a developing plan to return that wonderful city.

    Reply
  43. I feel so fortunate to have read an advance copy of this marvelous book–and predict it will be a favourite with Loretta’s readership! (Don’t include me in the prize draw.)
    It’s altogether delicious–characters, escapades, and Venice! Reading it sparked a developing plan to return that wonderful city.

    Reply
  44. I feel so fortunate to have read an advance copy of this marvelous book–and predict it will be a favourite with Loretta’s readership! (Don’t include me in the prize draw.)
    It’s altogether delicious–characters, escapades, and Venice! Reading it sparked a developing plan to return that wonderful city.

    Reply
  45. I feel so fortunate to have read an advance copy of this marvelous book–and predict it will be a favourite with Loretta’s readership! (Don’t include me in the prize draw.)
    It’s altogether delicious–characters, escapades, and Venice! Reading it sparked a developing plan to return that wonderful city.

    Reply
  46. Francois, Debbie Jay, Beth: You and me both–or do I mean “all four”?__Piper, I’m envious, but continue to practice my Italian in hopes of visiting the place one day soon.__Stephanie, I always wondered about Venice Beach. That’s fascinating. Now I have to put it on my CA trip list–for whenever that happens.__Cindy, I hope you like the story.

    Reply
  47. Francois, Debbie Jay, Beth: You and me both–or do I mean “all four”?__Piper, I’m envious, but continue to practice my Italian in hopes of visiting the place one day soon.__Stephanie, I always wondered about Venice Beach. That’s fascinating. Now I have to put it on my CA trip list–for whenever that happens.__Cindy, I hope you like the story.

    Reply
  48. Francois, Debbie Jay, Beth: You and me both–or do I mean “all four”?__Piper, I’m envious, but continue to practice my Italian in hopes of visiting the place one day soon.__Stephanie, I always wondered about Venice Beach. That’s fascinating. Now I have to put it on my CA trip list–for whenever that happens.__Cindy, I hope you like the story.

    Reply
  49. Francois, Debbie Jay, Beth: You and me both–or do I mean “all four”?__Piper, I’m envious, but continue to practice my Italian in hopes of visiting the place one day soon.__Stephanie, I always wondered about Venice Beach. That’s fascinating. Now I have to put it on my CA trip list–for whenever that happens.__Cindy, I hope you like the story.

    Reply
  50. Francois, Debbie Jay, Beth: You and me both–or do I mean “all four”?__Piper, I’m envious, but continue to practice my Italian in hopes of visiting the place one day soon.__Stephanie, I always wondered about Venice Beach. That’s fascinating. Now I have to put it on my CA trip list–for whenever that happens.__Cindy, I hope you like the story.

    Reply
  51. Cheryl C, the book took about a year from start to finish, including some down time after the previous book was delivered & the dreaming-up phase. Basically, I get a year to write each book, though the bulk of the work gets done in the summer.__Margaret, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I just went looking on your sites for Venice pix but couldn’t find them. It would be nice if readers could see them, as several were incredibly helpful in my visualizing scenes.

    Reply
  52. Cheryl C, the book took about a year from start to finish, including some down time after the previous book was delivered & the dreaming-up phase. Basically, I get a year to write each book, though the bulk of the work gets done in the summer.__Margaret, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I just went looking on your sites for Venice pix but couldn’t find them. It would be nice if readers could see them, as several were incredibly helpful in my visualizing scenes.

    Reply
  53. Cheryl C, the book took about a year from start to finish, including some down time after the previous book was delivered & the dreaming-up phase. Basically, I get a year to write each book, though the bulk of the work gets done in the summer.__Margaret, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I just went looking on your sites for Venice pix but couldn’t find them. It would be nice if readers could see them, as several were incredibly helpful in my visualizing scenes.

    Reply
  54. Cheryl C, the book took about a year from start to finish, including some down time after the previous book was delivered & the dreaming-up phase. Basically, I get a year to write each book, though the bulk of the work gets done in the summer.__Margaret, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I just went looking on your sites for Venice pix but couldn’t find them. It would be nice if readers could see them, as several were incredibly helpful in my visualizing scenes.

    Reply
  55. Cheryl C, the book took about a year from start to finish, including some down time after the previous book was delivered & the dreaming-up phase. Basically, I get a year to write each book, though the bulk of the work gets done in the summer.__Margaret, I’m so glad you enjoyed it. I just went looking on your sites for Venice pix but couldn’t find them. It would be nice if readers could see them, as several were incredibly helpful in my visualizing scenes.

    Reply
  56. venice sounds like a wonderful
    setting for your book.your interview made me want to see
    it.i cant wait to read the book.

    Reply
  57. venice sounds like a wonderful
    setting for your book.your interview made me want to see
    it.i cant wait to read the book.

    Reply
  58. venice sounds like a wonderful
    setting for your book.your interview made me want to see
    it.i cant wait to read the book.

    Reply
  59. venice sounds like a wonderful
    setting for your book.your interview made me want to see
    it.i cant wait to read the book.

    Reply
  60. venice sounds like a wonderful
    setting for your book.your interview made me want to see
    it.i cant wait to read the book.

    Reply
  61. What I love about Ms. Chase’s books (and those of the other Wenches I’ve read) is that you can take a typical Romance trope and drop living, breathing people into the tale so that there’s not even a whiff of stereotype.

    Reply
  62. What I love about Ms. Chase’s books (and those of the other Wenches I’ve read) is that you can take a typical Romance trope and drop living, breathing people into the tale so that there’s not even a whiff of stereotype.

    Reply
  63. What I love about Ms. Chase’s books (and those of the other Wenches I’ve read) is that you can take a typical Romance trope and drop living, breathing people into the tale so that there’s not even a whiff of stereotype.

    Reply
  64. What I love about Ms. Chase’s books (and those of the other Wenches I’ve read) is that you can take a typical Romance trope and drop living, breathing people into the tale so that there’s not even a whiff of stereotype.

    Reply
  65. What I love about Ms. Chase’s books (and those of the other Wenches I’ve read) is that you can take a typical Romance trope and drop living, breathing people into the tale so that there’s not even a whiff of stereotype.

    Reply
  66. I have been looking forward to this book for months and can’t wait to read it. It sounds like a wonderful adventure.

    Reply
  67. I have been looking forward to this book for months and can’t wait to read it. It sounds like a wonderful adventure.

    Reply
  68. I have been looking forward to this book for months and can’t wait to read it. It sounds like a wonderful adventure.

    Reply
  69. I have been looking forward to this book for months and can’t wait to read it. It sounds like a wonderful adventure.

    Reply
  70. I have been looking forward to this book for months and can’t wait to read it. It sounds like a wonderful adventure.

    Reply
  71. There are some historical romance fans who aren’t receptive to a non-virginal heroine. Did you or your publisher have any apprehensions about writing this book because of this?

    Reply
  72. There are some historical romance fans who aren’t receptive to a non-virginal heroine. Did you or your publisher have any apprehensions about writing this book because of this?

    Reply
  73. There are some historical romance fans who aren’t receptive to a non-virginal heroine. Did you or your publisher have any apprehensions about writing this book because of this?

    Reply
  74. There are some historical romance fans who aren’t receptive to a non-virginal heroine. Did you or your publisher have any apprehensions about writing this book because of this?

    Reply
  75. There are some historical romance fans who aren’t receptive to a non-virginal heroine. Did you or your publisher have any apprehensions about writing this book because of this?

    Reply
  76. I watched the YouTube clips and just loved your wry, sly delivery. You’re so cute! I’ve heard you’re kind of shy, too. How do you feel about video interviews (like on RNTV)? Is that more or less promotional pressure than booksignings and conferences? I’d actually like to hear how all the Wenches feel about becoming “movie stars.”

    Reply
  77. I watched the YouTube clips and just loved your wry, sly delivery. You’re so cute! I’ve heard you’re kind of shy, too. How do you feel about video interviews (like on RNTV)? Is that more or less promotional pressure than booksignings and conferences? I’d actually like to hear how all the Wenches feel about becoming “movie stars.”

    Reply
  78. I watched the YouTube clips and just loved your wry, sly delivery. You’re so cute! I’ve heard you’re kind of shy, too. How do you feel about video interviews (like on RNTV)? Is that more or less promotional pressure than booksignings and conferences? I’d actually like to hear how all the Wenches feel about becoming “movie stars.”

    Reply
  79. I watched the YouTube clips and just loved your wry, sly delivery. You’re so cute! I’ve heard you’re kind of shy, too. How do you feel about video interviews (like on RNTV)? Is that more or less promotional pressure than booksignings and conferences? I’d actually like to hear how all the Wenches feel about becoming “movie stars.”

    Reply
  80. I watched the YouTube clips and just loved your wry, sly delivery. You’re so cute! I’ve heard you’re kind of shy, too. How do you feel about video interviews (like on RNTV)? Is that more or less promotional pressure than booksignings and conferences? I’d actually like to hear how all the Wenches feel about becoming “movie stars.”

    Reply
  81. Peggy, Crystal B., Maureen: If I’ve made you want to visit Venice AND read my book, I’ve done my job.*g* __ Margaret, thank you for the link__ Readers, check out Margaret’s photos. You’ll understand immediately why these and others (there were a number) were so helpful.___Susan D/C, I always say that there are only so many plots (Tolstoy said there were two); it’s what the writer does with them that makes them feel fresh…or not.

    Reply
  82. Peggy, Crystal B., Maureen: If I’ve made you want to visit Venice AND read my book, I’ve done my job.*g* __ Margaret, thank you for the link__ Readers, check out Margaret’s photos. You’ll understand immediately why these and others (there were a number) were so helpful.___Susan D/C, I always say that there are only so many plots (Tolstoy said there were two); it’s what the writer does with them that makes them feel fresh…or not.

    Reply
  83. Peggy, Crystal B., Maureen: If I’ve made you want to visit Venice AND read my book, I’ve done my job.*g* __ Margaret, thank you for the link__ Readers, check out Margaret’s photos. You’ll understand immediately why these and others (there were a number) were so helpful.___Susan D/C, I always say that there are only so many plots (Tolstoy said there were two); it’s what the writer does with them that makes them feel fresh…or not.

    Reply
  84. Peggy, Crystal B., Maureen: If I’ve made you want to visit Venice AND read my book, I’ve done my job.*g* __ Margaret, thank you for the link__ Readers, check out Margaret’s photos. You’ll understand immediately why these and others (there were a number) were so helpful.___Susan D/C, I always say that there are only so many plots (Tolstoy said there were two); it’s what the writer does with them that makes them feel fresh…or not.

    Reply
  85. Peggy, Crystal B., Maureen: If I’ve made you want to visit Venice AND read my book, I’ve done my job.*g* __ Margaret, thank you for the link__ Readers, check out Margaret’s photos. You’ll understand immediately why these and others (there were a number) were so helpful.___Susan D/C, I always say that there are only so many plots (Tolstoy said there were two); it’s what the writer does with them that makes them feel fresh…or not.

    Reply
  86. Kalen, I’m loving the idea of going to a far flung place about now, esp. as I deal with a recalcitrant WIP.___ Cyclops8: I know some readers prefer an innocent heroine, but I’ve done several women of experience so far, and whatever else people might complain about, it hasn’t been the lack of virginity. If my publishers had apprehensions, they kept mighty quiet about it.

    Reply
  87. Kalen, I’m loving the idea of going to a far flung place about now, esp. as I deal with a recalcitrant WIP.___ Cyclops8: I know some readers prefer an innocent heroine, but I’ve done several women of experience so far, and whatever else people might complain about, it hasn’t been the lack of virginity. If my publishers had apprehensions, they kept mighty quiet about it.

    Reply
  88. Kalen, I’m loving the idea of going to a far flung place about now, esp. as I deal with a recalcitrant WIP.___ Cyclops8: I know some readers prefer an innocent heroine, but I’ve done several women of experience so far, and whatever else people might complain about, it hasn’t been the lack of virginity. If my publishers had apprehensions, they kept mighty quiet about it.

    Reply
  89. Kalen, I’m loving the idea of going to a far flung place about now, esp. as I deal with a recalcitrant WIP.___ Cyclops8: I know some readers prefer an innocent heroine, but I’ve done several women of experience so far, and whatever else people might complain about, it hasn’t been the lack of virginity. If my publishers had apprehensions, they kept mighty quiet about it.

    Reply
  90. Kalen, I’m loving the idea of going to a far flung place about now, esp. as I deal with a recalcitrant WIP.___ Cyclops8: I know some readers prefer an innocent heroine, but I’ve done several women of experience so far, and whatever else people might complain about, it hasn’t been the lack of virginity. If my publishers had apprehensions, they kept mighty quiet about it.

    Reply
  91. How did you come up with the title? Or must I wait to read the book to figure that out? 😉
    The older I get, the less need I feel for the typical virgin-heroine. My opinion depends far more on the heroine’s attitude toward such things. If she’s careless with sex, I don’t care what other virtues she possesses, I can’t respect her.
    I’m definitely looking forward to getting to know Francesca.

    Reply
  92. How did you come up with the title? Or must I wait to read the book to figure that out? 😉
    The older I get, the less need I feel for the typical virgin-heroine. My opinion depends far more on the heroine’s attitude toward such things. If she’s careless with sex, I don’t care what other virtues she possesses, I can’t respect her.
    I’m definitely looking forward to getting to know Francesca.

    Reply
  93. How did you come up with the title? Or must I wait to read the book to figure that out? 😉
    The older I get, the less need I feel for the typical virgin-heroine. My opinion depends far more on the heroine’s attitude toward such things. If she’s careless with sex, I don’t care what other virtues she possesses, I can’t respect her.
    I’m definitely looking forward to getting to know Francesca.

    Reply
  94. How did you come up with the title? Or must I wait to read the book to figure that out? 😉
    The older I get, the less need I feel for the typical virgin-heroine. My opinion depends far more on the heroine’s attitude toward such things. If she’s careless with sex, I don’t care what other virtues she possesses, I can’t respect her.
    I’m definitely looking forward to getting to know Francesca.

    Reply
  95. How did you come up with the title? Or must I wait to read the book to figure that out? 😉
    The older I get, the less need I feel for the typical virgin-heroine. My opinion depends far more on the heroine’s attitude toward such things. If she’s careless with sex, I don’t care what other virtues she possesses, I can’t respect her.
    I’m definitely looking forward to getting to know Francesca.

    Reply
  96. Maggie, thank you! Cute? Ah, yes, sometimes, says DH. I _am_ shy & register way in the upper 90s on the Introvert scale. But I had an excellent video production team: my husband (once a producer, always a producer), who is also a gifted interviewer, plus a pro behind the camera (the company is Lightspeed Productions, BTW). For me, this was less stressful in a way than booksignings and conferences–because, while I love meeting readers, encountering large groups of strangers is a little unnerving to me. OTOH, I’m not that comfortable talking about my work–so more credit, please, to the team–and always say, if I could talk, I wouldn’t need to write.

    Reply
  97. Maggie, thank you! Cute? Ah, yes, sometimes, says DH. I _am_ shy & register way in the upper 90s on the Introvert scale. But I had an excellent video production team: my husband (once a producer, always a producer), who is also a gifted interviewer, plus a pro behind the camera (the company is Lightspeed Productions, BTW). For me, this was less stressful in a way than booksignings and conferences–because, while I love meeting readers, encountering large groups of strangers is a little unnerving to me. OTOH, I’m not that comfortable talking about my work–so more credit, please, to the team–and always say, if I could talk, I wouldn’t need to write.

    Reply
  98. Maggie, thank you! Cute? Ah, yes, sometimes, says DH. I _am_ shy & register way in the upper 90s on the Introvert scale. But I had an excellent video production team: my husband (once a producer, always a producer), who is also a gifted interviewer, plus a pro behind the camera (the company is Lightspeed Productions, BTW). For me, this was less stressful in a way than booksignings and conferences–because, while I love meeting readers, encountering large groups of strangers is a little unnerving to me. OTOH, I’m not that comfortable talking about my work–so more credit, please, to the team–and always say, if I could talk, I wouldn’t need to write.

    Reply
  99. Maggie, thank you! Cute? Ah, yes, sometimes, says DH. I _am_ shy & register way in the upper 90s on the Introvert scale. But I had an excellent video production team: my husband (once a producer, always a producer), who is also a gifted interviewer, plus a pro behind the camera (the company is Lightspeed Productions, BTW). For me, this was less stressful in a way than booksignings and conferences–because, while I love meeting readers, encountering large groups of strangers is a little unnerving to me. OTOH, I’m not that comfortable talking about my work–so more credit, please, to the team–and always say, if I could talk, I wouldn’t need to write.

    Reply
  100. Maggie, thank you! Cute? Ah, yes, sometimes, says DH. I _am_ shy & register way in the upper 90s on the Introvert scale. But I had an excellent video production team: my husband (once a producer, always a producer), who is also a gifted interviewer, plus a pro behind the camera (the company is Lightspeed Productions, BTW). For me, this was less stressful in a way than booksignings and conferences–because, while I love meeting readers, encountering large groups of strangers is a little unnerving to me. OTOH, I’m not that comfortable talking about my work–so more credit, please, to the team–and always say, if I could talk, I wouldn’t need to write.

    Reply
  101. Anne with an e (like Anne Shirley, who will always live in my heart), the tale of titles is a long one & probably will be a blog one day soon. This one involved a lot of brainstorming with a number of people. My idea of a title is WIP. That’s what I call them all until the emails start about the covers. Ummm, one important thing we need for this cover, Loretta? says my editor. A title? And I say, Aaargh. As to my heroine, I think we can safely say that one thing she definitely is not careless wtih is sex.

    Reply
  102. Anne with an e (like Anne Shirley, who will always live in my heart), the tale of titles is a long one & probably will be a blog one day soon. This one involved a lot of brainstorming with a number of people. My idea of a title is WIP. That’s what I call them all until the emails start about the covers. Ummm, one important thing we need for this cover, Loretta? says my editor. A title? And I say, Aaargh. As to my heroine, I think we can safely say that one thing she definitely is not careless wtih is sex.

    Reply
  103. Anne with an e (like Anne Shirley, who will always live in my heart), the tale of titles is a long one & probably will be a blog one day soon. This one involved a lot of brainstorming with a number of people. My idea of a title is WIP. That’s what I call them all until the emails start about the covers. Ummm, one important thing we need for this cover, Loretta? says my editor. A title? And I say, Aaargh. As to my heroine, I think we can safely say that one thing she definitely is not careless wtih is sex.

    Reply
  104. Anne with an e (like Anne Shirley, who will always live in my heart), the tale of titles is a long one & probably will be a blog one day soon. This one involved a lot of brainstorming with a number of people. My idea of a title is WIP. That’s what I call them all until the emails start about the covers. Ummm, one important thing we need for this cover, Loretta? says my editor. A title? And I say, Aaargh. As to my heroine, I think we can safely say that one thing she definitely is not careless wtih is sex.

    Reply
  105. Anne with an e (like Anne Shirley, who will always live in my heart), the tale of titles is a long one & probably will be a blog one day soon. This one involved a lot of brainstorming with a number of people. My idea of a title is WIP. That’s what I call them all until the emails start about the covers. Ummm, one important thing we need for this cover, Loretta? says my editor. A title? And I say, Aaargh. As to my heroine, I think we can safely say that one thing she definitely is not careless wtih is sex.

    Reply
  106. A chance to win a copy? Count me in. I am SO looking forward to reading this, and already have it on my Kindle. I’m saving it for the weekend so I can read it in one sitting! But I like the keepers to be solid and palpable, so a hard copy would be a definite boon. I have ALL your other books, Loretta; several copies of some, due to ordering extras on occasion, as when I’m spending large lumps of time away from home and finding that I’ve just GOT to re-read an old favorite right away.
    Funny that your book and Edith’s both have “Ways” in the title. Is there a trend shaping up, something in the zeitgeist? Telepathy? Inquiring minds…

    Reply
  107. A chance to win a copy? Count me in. I am SO looking forward to reading this, and already have it on my Kindle. I’m saving it for the weekend so I can read it in one sitting! But I like the keepers to be solid and palpable, so a hard copy would be a definite boon. I have ALL your other books, Loretta; several copies of some, due to ordering extras on occasion, as when I’m spending large lumps of time away from home and finding that I’ve just GOT to re-read an old favorite right away.
    Funny that your book and Edith’s both have “Ways” in the title. Is there a trend shaping up, something in the zeitgeist? Telepathy? Inquiring minds…

    Reply
  108. A chance to win a copy? Count me in. I am SO looking forward to reading this, and already have it on my Kindle. I’m saving it for the weekend so I can read it in one sitting! But I like the keepers to be solid and palpable, so a hard copy would be a definite boon. I have ALL your other books, Loretta; several copies of some, due to ordering extras on occasion, as when I’m spending large lumps of time away from home and finding that I’ve just GOT to re-read an old favorite right away.
    Funny that your book and Edith’s both have “Ways” in the title. Is there a trend shaping up, something in the zeitgeist? Telepathy? Inquiring minds…

    Reply
  109. A chance to win a copy? Count me in. I am SO looking forward to reading this, and already have it on my Kindle. I’m saving it for the weekend so I can read it in one sitting! But I like the keepers to be solid and palpable, so a hard copy would be a definite boon. I have ALL your other books, Loretta; several copies of some, due to ordering extras on occasion, as when I’m spending large lumps of time away from home and finding that I’ve just GOT to re-read an old favorite right away.
    Funny that your book and Edith’s both have “Ways” in the title. Is there a trend shaping up, something in the zeitgeist? Telepathy? Inquiring minds…

    Reply
  110. A chance to win a copy? Count me in. I am SO looking forward to reading this, and already have it on my Kindle. I’m saving it for the weekend so I can read it in one sitting! But I like the keepers to be solid and palpable, so a hard copy would be a definite boon. I have ALL your other books, Loretta; several copies of some, due to ordering extras on occasion, as when I’m spending large lumps of time away from home and finding that I’ve just GOT to re-read an old favorite right away.
    Funny that your book and Edith’s both have “Ways” in the title. Is there a trend shaping up, something in the zeitgeist? Telepathy? Inquiring minds…

    Reply
  111. I can’t wait to buy this book. I love Venice, having been there during Carnivale. And I love the idea of a heroine being a courtesan, particularly one who goes into the profession on her own terms. I find that fascinating, and I hope we see a trend of heroines who have a bit more complexity.

    Reply
  112. I can’t wait to buy this book. I love Venice, having been there during Carnivale. And I love the idea of a heroine being a courtesan, particularly one who goes into the profession on her own terms. I find that fascinating, and I hope we see a trend of heroines who have a bit more complexity.

    Reply
  113. I can’t wait to buy this book. I love Venice, having been there during Carnivale. And I love the idea of a heroine being a courtesan, particularly one who goes into the profession on her own terms. I find that fascinating, and I hope we see a trend of heroines who have a bit more complexity.

    Reply
  114. I can’t wait to buy this book. I love Venice, having been there during Carnivale. And I love the idea of a heroine being a courtesan, particularly one who goes into the profession on her own terms. I find that fascinating, and I hope we see a trend of heroines who have a bit more complexity.

    Reply
  115. I can’t wait to buy this book. I love Venice, having been there during Carnivale. And I love the idea of a heroine being a courtesan, particularly one who goes into the profession on her own terms. I find that fascinating, and I hope we see a trend of heroines who have a bit more complexity.

    Reply
  116. Hi again, Loretta. I have been reading your interviews on other sites, and EVERYONE is talking about your book. You must be thrilled with all the attention this new book is getting. I am sure that there is a great deal of satisfaction when something that you spent so much time and efort on is now receiving such praise and attention. Congrats!

    Reply
  117. Hi again, Loretta. I have been reading your interviews on other sites, and EVERYONE is talking about your book. You must be thrilled with all the attention this new book is getting. I am sure that there is a great deal of satisfaction when something that you spent so much time and efort on is now receiving such praise and attention. Congrats!

    Reply
  118. Hi again, Loretta. I have been reading your interviews on other sites, and EVERYONE is talking about your book. You must be thrilled with all the attention this new book is getting. I am sure that there is a great deal of satisfaction when something that you spent so much time and efort on is now receiving such praise and attention. Congrats!

    Reply
  119. Hi again, Loretta. I have been reading your interviews on other sites, and EVERYONE is talking about your book. You must be thrilled with all the attention this new book is getting. I am sure that there is a great deal of satisfaction when something that you spent so much time and efort on is now receiving such praise and attention. Congrats!

    Reply
  120. Hi again, Loretta. I have been reading your interviews on other sites, and EVERYONE is talking about your book. You must be thrilled with all the attention this new book is getting. I am sure that there is a great deal of satisfaction when something that you spent so much time and efort on is now receiving such praise and attention. Congrats!

    Reply
  121. I can’t wait till my copy arrives- my summer reading order from Amazon should be here just after I begin summer break from school. Three wench books are on it…Yay!

    Reply
  122. I can’t wait till my copy arrives- my summer reading order from Amazon should be here just after I begin summer break from school. Three wench books are on it…Yay!

    Reply
  123. I can’t wait till my copy arrives- my summer reading order from Amazon should be here just after I begin summer break from school. Three wench books are on it…Yay!

    Reply
  124. I can’t wait till my copy arrives- my summer reading order from Amazon should be here just after I begin summer break from school. Three wench books are on it…Yay!

    Reply
  125. I can’t wait till my copy arrives- my summer reading order from Amazon should be here just after I begin summer break from school. Three wench books are on it…Yay!

    Reply
  126. Elaine, thank you for making me one of your collectibles & giving my books a loving home. Edith & I laughed about the titles–the books are not only out in the same month, but from the same publisher! It has to be something in the zeitgeist–certainly as concerns what editors/marketing like/dislike, which words turn them on and which turn them off. __Elizabeth, Minna, Gretchen: Thank you! I am desperately hoping that this story lives up to expectations.___ CherylC, Hello again & thank you! I am thrilled–but it’s a lot to live up to, you know.

    Reply
  127. Elaine, thank you for making me one of your collectibles & giving my books a loving home. Edith & I laughed about the titles–the books are not only out in the same month, but from the same publisher! It has to be something in the zeitgeist–certainly as concerns what editors/marketing like/dislike, which words turn them on and which turn them off. __Elizabeth, Minna, Gretchen: Thank you! I am desperately hoping that this story lives up to expectations.___ CherylC, Hello again & thank you! I am thrilled–but it’s a lot to live up to, you know.

    Reply
  128. Elaine, thank you for making me one of your collectibles & giving my books a loving home. Edith & I laughed about the titles–the books are not only out in the same month, but from the same publisher! It has to be something in the zeitgeist–certainly as concerns what editors/marketing like/dislike, which words turn them on and which turn them off. __Elizabeth, Minna, Gretchen: Thank you! I am desperately hoping that this story lives up to expectations.___ CherylC, Hello again & thank you! I am thrilled–but it’s a lot to live up to, you know.

    Reply
  129. Elaine, thank you for making me one of your collectibles & giving my books a loving home. Edith & I laughed about the titles–the books are not only out in the same month, but from the same publisher! It has to be something in the zeitgeist–certainly as concerns what editors/marketing like/dislike, which words turn them on and which turn them off. __Elizabeth, Minna, Gretchen: Thank you! I am desperately hoping that this story lives up to expectations.___ CherylC, Hello again & thank you! I am thrilled–but it’s a lot to live up to, you know.

    Reply
  130. Elaine, thank you for making me one of your collectibles & giving my books a loving home. Edith & I laughed about the titles–the books are not only out in the same month, but from the same publisher! It has to be something in the zeitgeist–certainly as concerns what editors/marketing like/dislike, which words turn them on and which turn them off. __Elizabeth, Minna, Gretchen: Thank you! I am desperately hoping that this story lives up to expectations.___ CherylC, Hello again & thank you! I am thrilled–but it’s a lot to live up to, you know.

    Reply
  131. Oooh! I read it yesterday in one marathon session and it was wonderful! Venice is practically a character in the book, I felt. Francesca and James are two of my favorites now, I think.
    But, I’m curious about the Putti. Not being familiar with the plaster and paintwork myself, I had trouble imagining some things. Did you have pictures of this kind of architectural detail to work from?

    Reply
  132. Oooh! I read it yesterday in one marathon session and it was wonderful! Venice is practically a character in the book, I felt. Francesca and James are two of my favorites now, I think.
    But, I’m curious about the Putti. Not being familiar with the plaster and paintwork myself, I had trouble imagining some things. Did you have pictures of this kind of architectural detail to work from?

    Reply
  133. Oooh! I read it yesterday in one marathon session and it was wonderful! Venice is practically a character in the book, I felt. Francesca and James are two of my favorites now, I think.
    But, I’m curious about the Putti. Not being familiar with the plaster and paintwork myself, I had trouble imagining some things. Did you have pictures of this kind of architectural detail to work from?

    Reply
  134. Oooh! I read it yesterday in one marathon session and it was wonderful! Venice is practically a character in the book, I felt. Francesca and James are two of my favorites now, I think.
    But, I’m curious about the Putti. Not being familiar with the plaster and paintwork myself, I had trouble imagining some things. Did you have pictures of this kind of architectural detail to work from?

    Reply
  135. Oooh! I read it yesterday in one marathon session and it was wonderful! Venice is practically a character in the book, I felt. Francesca and James are two of my favorites now, I think.
    But, I’m curious about the Putti. Not being familiar with the plaster and paintwork myself, I had trouble imagining some things. Did you have pictures of this kind of architectural detail to work from?

    Reply
  136. jrox–Yay! You liked it! Oh, those putti. Come back on Friday for Part Due of the interview, where I discuss them and many other things. In a nutshell, the inspiration was the Palazzo Albrizzi, and yes, I referred to photographs in my various gigantic picture books about Venetian palazzi…but took that place a step or two farther.

    Reply
  137. jrox–Yay! You liked it! Oh, those putti. Come back on Friday for Part Due of the interview, where I discuss them and many other things. In a nutshell, the inspiration was the Palazzo Albrizzi, and yes, I referred to photographs in my various gigantic picture books about Venetian palazzi…but took that place a step or two farther.

    Reply
  138. jrox–Yay! You liked it! Oh, those putti. Come back on Friday for Part Due of the interview, where I discuss them and many other things. In a nutshell, the inspiration was the Palazzo Albrizzi, and yes, I referred to photographs in my various gigantic picture books about Venetian palazzi…but took that place a step or two farther.

    Reply
  139. jrox–Yay! You liked it! Oh, those putti. Come back on Friday for Part Due of the interview, where I discuss them and many other things. In a nutshell, the inspiration was the Palazzo Albrizzi, and yes, I referred to photographs in my various gigantic picture books about Venetian palazzi…but took that place a step or two farther.

    Reply
  140. jrox–Yay! You liked it! Oh, those putti. Come back on Friday for Part Due of the interview, where I discuss them and many other things. In a nutshell, the inspiration was the Palazzo Albrizzi, and yes, I referred to photographs in my various gigantic picture books about Venetian palazzi…but took that place a step or two farther.

    Reply
  141. Hi Loretta, I’ve loved the exotic settings in your previous books and Mr Impossible is my absolute fav. I can’t wait to read Your Scandalous Ways and see Venice through your eyes! The cast of characters sound intriguing.

    Reply
  142. Hi Loretta, I’ve loved the exotic settings in your previous books and Mr Impossible is my absolute fav. I can’t wait to read Your Scandalous Ways and see Venice through your eyes! The cast of characters sound intriguing.

    Reply
  143. Hi Loretta, I’ve loved the exotic settings in your previous books and Mr Impossible is my absolute fav. I can’t wait to read Your Scandalous Ways and see Venice through your eyes! The cast of characters sound intriguing.

    Reply
  144. Hi Loretta, I’ve loved the exotic settings in your previous books and Mr Impossible is my absolute fav. I can’t wait to read Your Scandalous Ways and see Venice through your eyes! The cast of characters sound intriguing.

    Reply
  145. Hi Loretta, I’ve loved the exotic settings in your previous books and Mr Impossible is my absolute fav. I can’t wait to read Your Scandalous Ways and see Venice through your eyes! The cast of characters sound intriguing.

    Reply
  146. Ah, Venice, definitely one of my favorite places on earth! I’m sure a lot has changed since I was there during the early 1970s. I loved revisiting through Margaret’s pictures. I’ve got 100s of slides that I took in Italy. I must see more of her pictures another time.
    It was so nice of you to think of mentioning the research “attitude” you have. I’ve felt lost during the last few years because I have only the Internet to look things up. LOL Most people probably find that a strange comment, but I do so miss my books in which I can more easily explore things. Whenever I read or hear something that interests me, I used to reach for my reference books or maps. I know there are maps on the Internet but they never seem to give me the information that I’m looking for.
    At the beginning of the interview, I thought I’d ask if you actually went to Venice as part of your research. However, I guess you didn’t from what you said on You-tube. Have you ever been to any of the places in which your books have been set and how difficult do you find it to set a novel in different cities or countries? I guess the same question goes for the other Wenches.
    I’m really looking forward to reading this book too (and would love to win it). I know I’ll be reliving my visit there just as I recently relived my visit to Pompeii and Naples in one of Madeline Hunter’s books.

    Reply
  147. Ah, Venice, definitely one of my favorite places on earth! I’m sure a lot has changed since I was there during the early 1970s. I loved revisiting through Margaret’s pictures. I’ve got 100s of slides that I took in Italy. I must see more of her pictures another time.
    It was so nice of you to think of mentioning the research “attitude” you have. I’ve felt lost during the last few years because I have only the Internet to look things up. LOL Most people probably find that a strange comment, but I do so miss my books in which I can more easily explore things. Whenever I read or hear something that interests me, I used to reach for my reference books or maps. I know there are maps on the Internet but they never seem to give me the information that I’m looking for.
    At the beginning of the interview, I thought I’d ask if you actually went to Venice as part of your research. However, I guess you didn’t from what you said on You-tube. Have you ever been to any of the places in which your books have been set and how difficult do you find it to set a novel in different cities or countries? I guess the same question goes for the other Wenches.
    I’m really looking forward to reading this book too (and would love to win it). I know I’ll be reliving my visit there just as I recently relived my visit to Pompeii and Naples in one of Madeline Hunter’s books.

    Reply
  148. Ah, Venice, definitely one of my favorite places on earth! I’m sure a lot has changed since I was there during the early 1970s. I loved revisiting through Margaret’s pictures. I’ve got 100s of slides that I took in Italy. I must see more of her pictures another time.
    It was so nice of you to think of mentioning the research “attitude” you have. I’ve felt lost during the last few years because I have only the Internet to look things up. LOL Most people probably find that a strange comment, but I do so miss my books in which I can more easily explore things. Whenever I read or hear something that interests me, I used to reach for my reference books or maps. I know there are maps on the Internet but they never seem to give me the information that I’m looking for.
    At the beginning of the interview, I thought I’d ask if you actually went to Venice as part of your research. However, I guess you didn’t from what you said on You-tube. Have you ever been to any of the places in which your books have been set and how difficult do you find it to set a novel in different cities or countries? I guess the same question goes for the other Wenches.
    I’m really looking forward to reading this book too (and would love to win it). I know I’ll be reliving my visit there just as I recently relived my visit to Pompeii and Naples in one of Madeline Hunter’s books.

    Reply
  149. Ah, Venice, definitely one of my favorite places on earth! I’m sure a lot has changed since I was there during the early 1970s. I loved revisiting through Margaret’s pictures. I’ve got 100s of slides that I took in Italy. I must see more of her pictures another time.
    It was so nice of you to think of mentioning the research “attitude” you have. I’ve felt lost during the last few years because I have only the Internet to look things up. LOL Most people probably find that a strange comment, but I do so miss my books in which I can more easily explore things. Whenever I read or hear something that interests me, I used to reach for my reference books or maps. I know there are maps on the Internet but they never seem to give me the information that I’m looking for.
    At the beginning of the interview, I thought I’d ask if you actually went to Venice as part of your research. However, I guess you didn’t from what you said on You-tube. Have you ever been to any of the places in which your books have been set and how difficult do you find it to set a novel in different cities or countries? I guess the same question goes for the other Wenches.
    I’m really looking forward to reading this book too (and would love to win it). I know I’ll be reliving my visit there just as I recently relived my visit to Pompeii and Naples in one of Madeline Hunter’s books.

    Reply
  150. Ah, Venice, definitely one of my favorite places on earth! I’m sure a lot has changed since I was there during the early 1970s. I loved revisiting through Margaret’s pictures. I’ve got 100s of slides that I took in Italy. I must see more of her pictures another time.
    It was so nice of you to think of mentioning the research “attitude” you have. I’ve felt lost during the last few years because I have only the Internet to look things up. LOL Most people probably find that a strange comment, but I do so miss my books in which I can more easily explore things. Whenever I read or hear something that interests me, I used to reach for my reference books or maps. I know there are maps on the Internet but they never seem to give me the information that I’m looking for.
    At the beginning of the interview, I thought I’d ask if you actually went to Venice as part of your research. However, I guess you didn’t from what you said on You-tube. Have you ever been to any of the places in which your books have been set and how difficult do you find it to set a novel in different cities or countries? I guess the same question goes for the other Wenches.
    I’m really looking forward to reading this book too (and would love to win it). I know I’ll be reliving my visit there just as I recently relived my visit to Pompeii and Naples in one of Madeline Hunter’s books.

    Reply

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