Susan Sarah’s Deadline Challenge

137_3774 Susan Sarah here:

I am on a quest.

(I mean, other than to finish my manuscript in the next few days!)
I propose we find another word to replace a commonly used one: Deadline.

Think about it. Dead…line. What does that conjure for you?  ~eeeuuuww~

Deadline, what IS that! Why do they call it that?  And apparently I have to MEET this thing.

Some commonly heard phrases:
     "When’s your deadline?"
     "Meet your deadline."
     "I’ve got to meet my deadline."
Meet it where? In a dark alley? Does it wear a big black cloak, is it tall, will it be surrounded in mysterious fog? Will I have to look away–look away when it slowly turns….

Ridinghood_1 Author wakes up and sees Deadline has arrived

Isn’t there something ELSE we can call this phenomenon, this moment, this event, this contractual requirement?  Now, I will admit that I’m one of those who writes better, faster, cleaner when the flame is turned up under me, so Deadline at its most ominous and looming has its advantages.  Still…maybe there are some alternatives.

Webster’s Collegiate Tenth Dictionary says:
dead-line \(a few squiggly symbols)\ 1: a line drawn within or around a prison that a prisoner passes at the risk of being shot
Whaaaaat???
I did not make that up. That is the Number One definition of deadline. Go look for yourselves.
Has anyone ever noticed this before? Okay, now I am really panicking…

Let us proceed to the number two definition. Quickly.
2. a: a date or time before which something must be done
That’s more like it. But what if that Something isn’t done? This question is often asked by authors. And the dictionary helpfully provides the explanation:
2 b: the time after which copy is not accepted for a particular issue of a publication

What!! Nobody told me that! As in, not accepted ever? As in, how about another week, another six hours, can I send the first half while I wildly finish the second half…? (been there, done that).
We DEFINITELY need a new word. This one depresses the heck out of me now (prisoner?).

Let me grab Roget’s Thesaurus off the shelf (old style, which looks like it has Lots More Words):

dead duck – oops, sorry, not that one…
deadline:
     Boundary 235.3
     Crucial Moment 129.5
Boundary: Frontier, border, borderland,… marches… outskirts, outpost….Pillars of Hercules??….three-mile or twelve-mile limit (I’ll take twelve, please, it sounds like it gives me more time)…"Thus far and no farther" (yes that works too).

Crucial moment: Timeliness, occasion…hmm…. Crisis (now we’re getting somewhere!), critical point, crunch (very expressive), climacteric (no thank you), turning point (three per book, yes, we professionals call them TPs), emergency (also a contender), kairos (whuzzat), pregnant moment (umm….), moment of truth (possibilities), nick of time (this one applies to me a lot), eleventh hour, zero hour (NOW we’re getting somewhere!), target date….and back to deadline.

So now we have some interesting alternatives:

Boundary Line (can it be stretched?)
Frontier (endless time allotted, good)
Twelve-Mile Limit (accommodating)
Crucial Moment (tight)
Crunch (tighter)
Emergency (all-nighter is necessary)
Moment of Truth (4 a.m. on all-nighter)
Nick of Time (editor doesn’t need it quite yet)
Eleventh Hour (just beginning the all-nighter)
Zero Hour (send that thing in 59 minutes or else)
Target Date (ah, back to some breathing room)

So which word would you choose to replace the Dreaded Deadline?
Or does that word motivate you when nothing else will?
Perhaps you can think of an even better one, in which case, go for it!  I’ve got to get back to my book. The final crunch-time-eleventh-hour-zero-hour is approaching!

Stealing_sophieavon ~Susan Sarah

51 thoughts on “Susan Sarah’s Deadline Challenge”

  1. Great post, Susan, but you forgot the zombie-ridden Night of the Living Dead, which is what writers must pass through as we hang over the keyboard until dawn.
    And of course Deadheads: nothing to do with Jerry Garcia, but rather how we look when we finally get to toss that manuscript box into the FedEx box….

    Reply
  2. Great post, Susan, but you forgot the zombie-ridden Night of the Living Dead, which is what writers must pass through as we hang over the keyboard until dawn.
    And of course Deadheads: nothing to do with Jerry Garcia, but rather how we look when we finally get to toss that manuscript box into the FedEx box….

    Reply
  3. Great post, Susan, but you forgot the zombie-ridden Night of the Living Dead, which is what writers must pass through as we hang over the keyboard until dawn.
    And of course Deadheads: nothing to do with Jerry Garcia, but rather how we look when we finally get to toss that manuscript box into the FedEx box….

    Reply
  4. LOL! I have to vote for Frontier because deadlines never mean the book is finished, they’re just kind of the beginning of a whole new process of torture, where we haul the wagons over raging rivers and through treacherous deserts in our search for a Real Book.

    Reply
  5. LOL! I have to vote for Frontier because deadlines never mean the book is finished, they’re just kind of the beginning of a whole new process of torture, where we haul the wagons over raging rivers and through treacherous deserts in our search for a Real Book.

    Reply
  6. LOL! I have to vote for Frontier because deadlines never mean the book is finished, they’re just kind of the beginning of a whole new process of torture, where we haul the wagons over raging rivers and through treacherous deserts in our search for a Real Book.

    Reply
  7. Finish line?
    “Target date” to me says, “This is when I’d like to have it finished but there’s wiggle room”. The “dead” and the “line” both indicate a threshold where the before and after are markedly different. “Finish line” seems to have the same meaning, but a gentler tone.
    OTOH, gentle doesn’t work with me. I need something that raises spectres of horrible pain and awful screams. Of course, sometimes that doesn’t work either. I have developed a thick skin for horrible pain and awful screams. Or maybe I’ve just developed an effective self-medication for it – caramel ice cream with caramel sauce and M&Ms.
    I carry around my middle the many pounds of missed deadlines.

    Reply
  8. Finish line?
    “Target date” to me says, “This is when I’d like to have it finished but there’s wiggle room”. The “dead” and the “line” both indicate a threshold where the before and after are markedly different. “Finish line” seems to have the same meaning, but a gentler tone.
    OTOH, gentle doesn’t work with me. I need something that raises spectres of horrible pain and awful screams. Of course, sometimes that doesn’t work either. I have developed a thick skin for horrible pain and awful screams. Or maybe I’ve just developed an effective self-medication for it – caramel ice cream with caramel sauce and M&Ms.
    I carry around my middle the many pounds of missed deadlines.

    Reply
  9. Finish line?
    “Target date” to me says, “This is when I’d like to have it finished but there’s wiggle room”. The “dead” and the “line” both indicate a threshold where the before and after are markedly different. “Finish line” seems to have the same meaning, but a gentler tone.
    OTOH, gentle doesn’t work with me. I need something that raises spectres of horrible pain and awful screams. Of course, sometimes that doesn’t work either. I have developed a thick skin for horrible pain and awful screams. Or maybe I’ve just developed an effective self-medication for it – caramel ice cream with caramel sauce and M&Ms.
    I carry around my middle the many pounds of missed deadlines.

    Reply
  10. Great blog, Susan.
    I go for Crunch Date. There’s something so gritty about crunch, and it is the time when we have to crunch down if the book’s not finished.
    Mind you, an alternative would be “under the boom” except that I’m not sure what that is. Nautical, I assume.
    Jo

    Reply
  11. Great blog, Susan.
    I go for Crunch Date. There’s something so gritty about crunch, and it is the time when we have to crunch down if the book’s not finished.
    Mind you, an alternative would be “under the boom” except that I’m not sure what that is. Nautical, I assume.
    Jo

    Reply
  12. Great blog, Susan.
    I go for Crunch Date. There’s something so gritty about crunch, and it is the time when we have to crunch down if the book’s not finished.
    Mind you, an alternative would be “under the boom” except that I’m not sure what that is. Nautical, I assume.
    Jo

    Reply
  13. In IT, the dreaded word is “opportunity”. The definition of which is: watching both sunrise and sunset from the office window on the same day.

    Reply
  14. In IT, the dreaded word is “opportunity”. The definition of which is: watching both sunrise and sunset from the office window on the same day.

    Reply
  15. In IT, the dreaded word is “opportunity”. The definition of which is: watching both sunrise and sunset from the office window on the same day.

    Reply
  16. How about ‘birthline’? I do see similarities between giving birth and producing a book, and Susanna C said ‘I need something that raises spectres of horrible pain and awful screams’. 😉 Also, when I was getting towards the end of writing my thesis, I really did have a birth-line, because I was pregnant, and I had to get it finished before the baby was born.

    Reply
  17. How about ‘birthline’? I do see similarities between giving birth and producing a book, and Susanna C said ‘I need something that raises spectres of horrible pain and awful screams’. 😉 Also, when I was getting towards the end of writing my thesis, I really did have a birth-line, because I was pregnant, and I had to get it finished before the baby was born.

    Reply
  18. How about ‘birthline’? I do see similarities between giving birth and producing a book, and Susanna C said ‘I need something that raises spectres of horrible pain and awful screams’. 😉 Also, when I was getting towards the end of writing my thesis, I really did have a birth-line, because I was pregnant, and I had to get it finished before the baby was born.

    Reply
  19. Jo, I like crunch time, too.
    There’s also “drop-dead date.” A bit harsh, I’d say.
    “Under the boom” is, indeed, nautical. The boom is the large crosswise pole that holds a sail at the bottom. The mast is the tall, pointy pole that holds a sail up to the top. This spreads the maximum amount of material out so that the wind can be gathered in it to push the boat along. “Boom” is also the sound it makes when it connects with an unwary crewmember’s head, causing him/her to lose all interest in the proceedings and lie down on the deck.
    What about “under the gun”? That has the implication of “get this done OR ELSE!” Or, there’s “under the sword.” That’s rather ominous and similar to “under the gun” in tone. I forget who it was, but someone who was waiting to be executed commented that the prospect of his demise “concentrated the mind wonderfully.” I’ve found that a deadline is a strong motivation to accomplish what I should have done in a more timely fashion. 😉

    Reply
  20. Jo, I like crunch time, too.
    There’s also “drop-dead date.” A bit harsh, I’d say.
    “Under the boom” is, indeed, nautical. The boom is the large crosswise pole that holds a sail at the bottom. The mast is the tall, pointy pole that holds a sail up to the top. This spreads the maximum amount of material out so that the wind can be gathered in it to push the boat along. “Boom” is also the sound it makes when it connects with an unwary crewmember’s head, causing him/her to lose all interest in the proceedings and lie down on the deck.
    What about “under the gun”? That has the implication of “get this done OR ELSE!” Or, there’s “under the sword.” That’s rather ominous and similar to “under the gun” in tone. I forget who it was, but someone who was waiting to be executed commented that the prospect of his demise “concentrated the mind wonderfully.” I’ve found that a deadline is a strong motivation to accomplish what I should have done in a more timely fashion. 😉

    Reply
  21. Jo, I like crunch time, too.
    There’s also “drop-dead date.” A bit harsh, I’d say.
    “Under the boom” is, indeed, nautical. The boom is the large crosswise pole that holds a sail at the bottom. The mast is the tall, pointy pole that holds a sail up to the top. This spreads the maximum amount of material out so that the wind can be gathered in it to push the boat along. “Boom” is also the sound it makes when it connects with an unwary crewmember’s head, causing him/her to lose all interest in the proceedings and lie down on the deck.
    What about “under the gun”? That has the implication of “get this done OR ELSE!” Or, there’s “under the sword.” That’s rather ominous and similar to “under the gun” in tone. I forget who it was, but someone who was waiting to be executed commented that the prospect of his demise “concentrated the mind wonderfully.” I’ve found that a deadline is a strong motivation to accomplish what I should have done in a more timely fashion. 😉

    Reply
  22. The grim origin is, as usual, provided by The Word Detective:
    Deadline, schmedline. Moi is an artiste.
    Dear Word Detective: I would be most grateful to you if you could advise me of the origins and any history behind the word “deadline.” Many thanks in anticipation of your abilities and assistance. — Paul L. Simpson, UK, via the internet.
    Aha! You see, someone on this planet still knows the proper way to ask a question. Please notice, dear readers, that Mr. Simpson did not submit an e-mail message consisting solely (and rudely) of the word he was inquiring about (“Widget?”), nor did he clutter his query with pointless pleas for me to reveal the third word ending in “gry” (aside from “hungry” and “angry”). We language columnists all know what that “gry” word is, by the way. We’re just not allowed to tell. Honest. It’s a government thing. Black helicopters and all that.
    “Deadline” is a word near and dear to my heart, especially as I am facing one even as I write this. Anyone who has ever worked at or near a newspaper knows that a “deadline” is the time when copy must be submitted in order to be printed in a given edition. “Deadline” first showed up around 1920 in this journalistic sense, and pretty quickly jumped into general usage, meaning any sort of absolute, ironclad, “or else” time limit.
    I had always assumed, as I am sure many writers do, that “deadline” arose simply as shorthand for the probability that if you missed one, your editor would kill you. In researching the term, however, I discovered that “deadline” has a far more literal and grisly history. During the American Civil War, the guards at the notoriously brutal Confederate military prison at Andersonville drew a line on the ground around the perimeter of the compound, a uniform seventeen feet inside the prison walls. Any prisoner crossing over that line was presumed to be trying to reach the wall in order to escape, and was summarily shot. This boundary was known succinctly as “the dead line.” The first appearance in print of this original sense of “deadline” came in the Congressional Record in 1864.
    ————————-
    I remember seeing the TV production of THE ANDERSONVILLE TRIAL back in the mid-1960s and learning the origin of this term.
    I like “zero hour,” myself. But there’s the lovely Latin “terminus ad quem.”
    terminus ad quem
    Latin, “fixed date to which”, with terminus a quo, “fixed date before which”, set limits to possible dates e.g. “27CE and 33CE are the terminus a quo and the terminus ad quem for the resurrection”.
    (Not to be confused with Terminus Est, the executioner’s sword in Gene Wolfe’s Book of the New Sun series)

    Reply
  23. The grim origin is, as usual, provided by The Word Detective:
    Deadline, schmedline. Moi is an artiste.
    Dear Word Detective: I would be most grateful to you if you could advise me of the origins and any history behind the word “deadline.” Many thanks in anticipation of your abilities and assistance. — Paul L. Simpson, UK, via the internet.
    Aha! You see, someone on this planet still knows the proper way to ask a question. Please notice, dear readers, that Mr. Simpson did not submit an e-mail message consisting solely (and rudely) of the word he was inquiring about (“Widget?”), nor did he clutter his query with pointless pleas for me to reveal the third word ending in “gry” (aside from “hungry” and “angry”). We language columnists all know what that “gry” word is, by the way. We’re just not allowed to tell. Honest. It’s a government thing. Black helicopters and all that.
    “Deadline” is a word near and dear to my heart, especially as I am facing one even as I write this. Anyone who has ever worked at or near a newspaper knows that a “deadline” is the time when copy must be submitted in order to be printed in a given edition. “Deadline” first showed up around 1920 in this journalistic sense, and pretty quickly jumped into general usage, meaning any sort of absolute, ironclad, “or else” time limit.
    I had always assumed, as I am sure many writers do, that “deadline” arose simply as shorthand for the probability that if you missed one, your editor would kill you. In researching the term, however, I discovered that “deadline” has a far more literal and grisly history. During the American Civil War, the guards at the notoriously brutal Confederate military prison at Andersonville drew a line on the ground around the perimeter of the compound, a uniform seventeen feet inside the prison walls. Any prisoner crossing over that line was presumed to be trying to reach the wall in order to escape, and was summarily shot. This boundary was known succinctly as “the dead line.” The first appearance in print of this original sense of “deadline” came in the Congressional Record in 1864.
    ————————-
    I remember seeing the TV production of THE ANDERSONVILLE TRIAL back in the mid-1960s and learning the origin of this term.
    I like “zero hour,” myself. But there’s the lovely Latin “terminus ad quem.”
    terminus ad quem
    Latin, “fixed date to which”, with terminus a quo, “fixed date before which”, set limits to possible dates e.g. “27CE and 33CE are the terminus a quo and the terminus ad quem for the resurrection”.
    (Not to be confused with Terminus Est, the executioner’s sword in Gene Wolfe’s Book of the New Sun series)

    Reply
  24. The grim origin is, as usual, provided by The Word Detective:
    Deadline, schmedline. Moi is an artiste.
    Dear Word Detective: I would be most grateful to you if you could advise me of the origins and any history behind the word “deadline.” Many thanks in anticipation of your abilities and assistance. — Paul L. Simpson, UK, via the internet.
    Aha! You see, someone on this planet still knows the proper way to ask a question. Please notice, dear readers, that Mr. Simpson did not submit an e-mail message consisting solely (and rudely) of the word he was inquiring about (“Widget?”), nor did he clutter his query with pointless pleas for me to reveal the third word ending in “gry” (aside from “hungry” and “angry”). We language columnists all know what that “gry” word is, by the way. We’re just not allowed to tell. Honest. It’s a government thing. Black helicopters and all that.
    “Deadline” is a word near and dear to my heart, especially as I am facing one even as I write this. Anyone who has ever worked at or near a newspaper knows that a “deadline” is the time when copy must be submitted in order to be printed in a given edition. “Deadline” first showed up around 1920 in this journalistic sense, and pretty quickly jumped into general usage, meaning any sort of absolute, ironclad, “or else” time limit.
    I had always assumed, as I am sure many writers do, that “deadline” arose simply as shorthand for the probability that if you missed one, your editor would kill you. In researching the term, however, I discovered that “deadline” has a far more literal and grisly history. During the American Civil War, the guards at the notoriously brutal Confederate military prison at Andersonville drew a line on the ground around the perimeter of the compound, a uniform seventeen feet inside the prison walls. Any prisoner crossing over that line was presumed to be trying to reach the wall in order to escape, and was summarily shot. This boundary was known succinctly as “the dead line.” The first appearance in print of this original sense of “deadline” came in the Congressional Record in 1864.
    ————————-
    I remember seeing the TV production of THE ANDERSONVILLE TRIAL back in the mid-1960s and learning the origin of this term.
    I like “zero hour,” myself. But there’s the lovely Latin “terminus ad quem.”
    terminus ad quem
    Latin, “fixed date to which”, with terminus a quo, “fixed date before which”, set limits to possible dates e.g. “27CE and 33CE are the terminus a quo and the terminus ad quem for the resurrection”.
    (Not to be confused with Terminus Est, the executioner’s sword in Gene Wolfe’s Book of the New Sun series)

    Reply
  25. In OD, we use ‘hard stop.’ Always reminded me a bit of the word ‘crunch’ — as in car wreck or running blindly into an unexpected brick wall. This, btw, is what if often feels like to work in OD.
    Nina, liking the sound of susannac’s self-medication.

    Reply
  26. In OD, we use ‘hard stop.’ Always reminded me a bit of the word ‘crunch’ — as in car wreck or running blindly into an unexpected brick wall. This, btw, is what if often feels like to work in OD.
    Nina, liking the sound of susannac’s self-medication.

    Reply
  27. In OD, we use ‘hard stop.’ Always reminded me a bit of the word ‘crunch’ — as in car wreck or running blindly into an unexpected brick wall. This, btw, is what if often feels like to work in OD.
    Nina, liking the sound of susannac’s self-medication.

    Reply
  28. You could also borrow the publication term “laydown date”–only in this case it would mean the date you fling yourself flat on the floor in front of your editor’s desk, sobbing, and beg her to forgive you for not having finished the book yet…

    Reply
  29. You could also borrow the publication term “laydown date”–only in this case it would mean the date you fling yourself flat on the floor in front of your editor’s desk, sobbing, and beg her to forgive you for not having finished the book yet…

    Reply
  30. You could also borrow the publication term “laydown date”–only in this case it would mean the date you fling yourself flat on the floor in front of your editor’s desk, sobbing, and beg her to forgive you for not having finished the book yet…

    Reply
  31. Great suggestions!
    -Susan, you’ve got a point about looking like deadheads at deadline time!
    -Pat, LOL on “frontier” — just because we send in the ms. doesnt’ mean it’s over. We’ve just breached another frontier!
    -Susanna, my agent calls it “target date” which sort of covers everything. Though I’m with you, I need something stronger than that to kick me into final gear. If ice cream and M&Ms can help, I’m there!
    -Val, ‘opportunity’ is a really interesting suggestion — so very corporate PC, and works on a lot of levels. I too watch sunrise, sunset, and the wee midnight hours from my desk…
    -Laura, birth-time — good one! I’ve always thought that finishing a book is very much like childbirth — we go through all the stages for sure. When I start snapping at people, I figure I’m at about 10 cm. and getting ready to push…the book through. *g*
    -“Due date” makes sense with that one too. But whenever I say “due date” I want to wear big shirts and stretchy pants. *g*
    – & Jo’s right, it’s unreliable!
    -Jo and Kathy, I like Crunch date or time too and I use it a lot. It’s so very expressive. The crunch of papers underfoot, because who has time to clean up the office….
    -Nina, ‘Hard stop’ is interesting, kinda like typing. As Pat pointed out with frontier, the process just keeps on going and going.
    -Tal, I like ‘terminus ad quem’ and your description of ‘laydown’ is great. LOL!
    Thanks all for jumping into some fun w/ this — I think the outer group mind probably still rules on this issue and we won’t get rid of ‘deadline’ so easily…and right now I’ve got that big bad wolf in my bed, so I’d better get back to work!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  32. Great suggestions!
    -Susan, you’ve got a point about looking like deadheads at deadline time!
    -Pat, LOL on “frontier” — just because we send in the ms. doesnt’ mean it’s over. We’ve just breached another frontier!
    -Susanna, my agent calls it “target date” which sort of covers everything. Though I’m with you, I need something stronger than that to kick me into final gear. If ice cream and M&Ms can help, I’m there!
    -Val, ‘opportunity’ is a really interesting suggestion — so very corporate PC, and works on a lot of levels. I too watch sunrise, sunset, and the wee midnight hours from my desk…
    -Laura, birth-time — good one! I’ve always thought that finishing a book is very much like childbirth — we go through all the stages for sure. When I start snapping at people, I figure I’m at about 10 cm. and getting ready to push…the book through. *g*
    -“Due date” makes sense with that one too. But whenever I say “due date” I want to wear big shirts and stretchy pants. *g*
    – & Jo’s right, it’s unreliable!
    -Jo and Kathy, I like Crunch date or time too and I use it a lot. It’s so very expressive. The crunch of papers underfoot, because who has time to clean up the office….
    -Nina, ‘Hard stop’ is interesting, kinda like typing. As Pat pointed out with frontier, the process just keeps on going and going.
    -Tal, I like ‘terminus ad quem’ and your description of ‘laydown’ is great. LOL!
    Thanks all for jumping into some fun w/ this — I think the outer group mind probably still rules on this issue and we won’t get rid of ‘deadline’ so easily…and right now I’ve got that big bad wolf in my bed, so I’d better get back to work!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  33. Great suggestions!
    -Susan, you’ve got a point about looking like deadheads at deadline time!
    -Pat, LOL on “frontier” — just because we send in the ms. doesnt’ mean it’s over. We’ve just breached another frontier!
    -Susanna, my agent calls it “target date” which sort of covers everything. Though I’m with you, I need something stronger than that to kick me into final gear. If ice cream and M&Ms can help, I’m there!
    -Val, ‘opportunity’ is a really interesting suggestion — so very corporate PC, and works on a lot of levels. I too watch sunrise, sunset, and the wee midnight hours from my desk…
    -Laura, birth-time — good one! I’ve always thought that finishing a book is very much like childbirth — we go through all the stages for sure. When I start snapping at people, I figure I’m at about 10 cm. and getting ready to push…the book through. *g*
    -“Due date” makes sense with that one too. But whenever I say “due date” I want to wear big shirts and stretchy pants. *g*
    – & Jo’s right, it’s unreliable!
    -Jo and Kathy, I like Crunch date or time too and I use it a lot. It’s so very expressive. The crunch of papers underfoot, because who has time to clean up the office….
    -Nina, ‘Hard stop’ is interesting, kinda like typing. As Pat pointed out with frontier, the process just keeps on going and going.
    -Tal, I like ‘terminus ad quem’ and your description of ‘laydown’ is great. LOL!
    Thanks all for jumping into some fun w/ this — I think the outer group mind probably still rules on this issue and we won’t get rid of ‘deadline’ so easily…and right now I’ve got that big bad wolf in my bed, so I’d better get back to work!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  34. Great post, Susan 🙂 I’d go with Target Date myself *g*. Funny how we say words all the time and don’t think about the actual meaning, but when we analyse them we have a whole different feeling. Hmmmm.

    Reply
  35. Great post, Susan 🙂 I’d go with Target Date myself *g*. Funny how we say words all the time and don’t think about the actual meaning, but when we analyse them we have a whole different feeling. Hmmmm.

    Reply
  36. Great post, Susan 🙂 I’d go with Target Date myself *g*. Funny how we say words all the time and don’t think about the actual meaning, but when we analyse them we have a whole different feeling. Hmmmm.

    Reply
  37. Susan/Sarah, I remember that during my M.A. orals, I was asked if the date of 1400 was a terminus ad quem for TROILUS AND CRISEYDE. I blurted, “Well, it was certainly a terminus ad quem for Chaucer!” (He died that year.)

    Reply
  38. Susan/Sarah, I remember that during my M.A. orals, I was asked if the date of 1400 was a terminus ad quem for TROILUS AND CRISEYDE. I blurted, “Well, it was certainly a terminus ad quem for Chaucer!” (He died that year.)

    Reply
  39. Susan/Sarah, I remember that during my M.A. orals, I was asked if the date of 1400 was a terminus ad quem for TROILUS AND CRISEYDE. I blurted, “Well, it was certainly a terminus ad quem for Chaucer!” (He died that year.)

    Reply
  40. -Tal – Terminus ad quem for Chaucer indeed, and just the answer they were looking for ! 😉
    I remember when I did my PhD orals, the profs were fond of slipping sneaky things in there. I was shown a slide that was about one square inch of a painting, the crack in a floor tile in the background of a painting, and then asked if I could identify it. Van Eyck, the NGA-DC Annunciation, what else… groan…. Oh the good ol’ days…
    Target Date: the day I get to go to Target (Tar-zhay) because the book is finished!
    Almost…..
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  41. -Tal – Terminus ad quem for Chaucer indeed, and just the answer they were looking for ! 😉
    I remember when I did my PhD orals, the profs were fond of slipping sneaky things in there. I was shown a slide that was about one square inch of a painting, the crack in a floor tile in the background of a painting, and then asked if I could identify it. Van Eyck, the NGA-DC Annunciation, what else… groan…. Oh the good ol’ days…
    Target Date: the day I get to go to Target (Tar-zhay) because the book is finished!
    Almost…..
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  42. -Tal – Terminus ad quem for Chaucer indeed, and just the answer they were looking for ! 😉
    I remember when I did my PhD orals, the profs were fond of slipping sneaky things in there. I was shown a slide that was about one square inch of a painting, the crack in a floor tile in the background of a painting, and then asked if I could identify it. Van Eyck, the NGA-DC Annunciation, what else… groan…. Oh the good ol’ days…
    Target Date: the day I get to go to Target (Tar-zhay) because the book is finished!
    Almost…..
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  43. By the time I took my Ph.D. orals, I’d switched to Renaissance from Medieval lit; my interests still covered both, but I’d been a graduate assistant in so many Age of Milton courses that I figured I wouldn’t even have to study for that part.
    The professor for whom I’d worked in most of those classes was the chairman of my orals committee. He opened the proceedings by announcing that he would personally verify my expertise in the 17th century, and he proposed that they examine me only on the 16th…
    So much for thinking I could get by with only reading Shakespeare’s MAJOR plays!

    Reply
  44. By the time I took my Ph.D. orals, I’d switched to Renaissance from Medieval lit; my interests still covered both, but I’d been a graduate assistant in so many Age of Milton courses that I figured I wouldn’t even have to study for that part.
    The professor for whom I’d worked in most of those classes was the chairman of my orals committee. He opened the proceedings by announcing that he would personally verify my expertise in the 17th century, and he proposed that they examine me only on the 16th…
    So much for thinking I could get by with only reading Shakespeare’s MAJOR plays!

    Reply
  45. By the time I took my Ph.D. orals, I’d switched to Renaissance from Medieval lit; my interests still covered both, but I’d been a graduate assistant in so many Age of Milton courses that I figured I wouldn’t even have to study for that part.
    The professor for whom I’d worked in most of those classes was the chairman of my orals committee. He opened the proceedings by announcing that he would personally verify my expertise in the 17th century, and he proposed that they examine me only on the 16th…
    So much for thinking I could get by with only reading Shakespeare’s MAJOR plays!

    Reply

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