A Professor Studies Scottish Romance




24232296.thbSusan here. The Word
Wenches are so pleased to welc
ome Dr. Euan Hague, associate professor of Geography
at DePaul University, to the blog today!
Professor Hague has a special interest in
historical romance—-he's currently researching the phenomenon of Scotland-set literature
among the Scottish-American diaspora, focusing on novels written by authors exploring Scotland and Scottish culture in their work—which includes the wide array of Scottish romances.

EuanHagueEuan Hague is not only an
academician—he is a Scotsman transplanted to the U.S.
Throughout his career he has closely studied the aspects and expressions of the
Scottish-American diasporic community. And, fancy words aside, it's apparent he’s becoming a proponent of Scottish historical romance.

A few months ago, Professor Hague
contacted me to talk about fiction set in Scotland–and Scottish romance–as part of his research for his essay in an anthology for
Edinburgh University Press regarding the Scottish cultural dispersion. Originally from Edinburgh, he left home to pursue an academic
career and is now Associate Professor of Geography at DePaul University. In addition to lecturing, he has collaborated on two books and is a regular contributor to
academic debates about American perceptions of Scotland. He has appeared
on both NPR and the BBC to discuss Scottish nationalism, identity and the
Scottish-American diaspora. He is on the Board of the St. Andrew's Society of
Illinois and in his spare time he is a keen soccer player and father
to two daughters.

Susan: Welcome to Word Wenches, Euan! We’re delighted that
you are joining us to share your research and your thoughts about Scottish historical romance.

Euan Hague: It’s great
to be here with the Wenches! And that's not a sentence I ever thought that I
would write during my academic career. 🙂  The one piece missing from my
puzzle is more reader input into the discussion. Some of the writers I
interviewed shared a few reader comments with me, which were fascinating, and I look forward to gathering more reader opinion today at Word Wenches.

SK:  Tell us something about your project. How did you,
as a professor of Geography, become interested in Scottish historical romance
as an academic research topic?

EH: I moved to the United States to do my Ph.D. at Syracuse
University in 1994. When I arrived, everything seemed very foreign, but pretty
soon everyone was asking me about Scotland, after “Rob Roy” and “Braveheart”
came out in 1995. I remember going to see “Rob Roy” in the Carousel Mall movie
theater in Syracuse while wearing a kilt! As a Ph.D. student back in
the days before Google and iPads, I spent a lot of time in used book stores. As
I was researching my Ph.D. on Scottish-American views and representations of
Scotland, I began noticing romance novels with kilted Highlanders on the covers. I didn’t do any writing on it at that time, but the topic stuck
in my head and I thought that would be something interesting to look at in the future.

Laird of the wind

One of Susan's kilted heroes

When I moved to Chicago to DePaul University, I had published a great
deal of my previous research in academic journals and had become known as the
‘Scots in the USA’ guy. That led Scottish journalist David Stenhouse to contact
me when he was visiting Chicago around 2005 or 2006, and he’d recently
published in the Scottish press about romance novels.

At the same time I was approached by University of
Edinburgh’s Berthold Schoene to write a chapter about Scottish writing in the
United States for The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literature.
I decided to go back and look at those plaid-wearing Highlanders. I went to a used book store and picked up Sue-Ellen Welfonder’s
Devil in a Kilt,
Julie Garwood’s The Wedding and The Secret, Julie Moffat’s The
Thorn and the Thistle
and Janet Bieber’s Highland Bride. The result was a
chapter in Berthold’s book in 2007, but I always thought that there was enough
material for a sequel. When Duncan Sim asked me to contribute to his new
book on the Scottish diaspora, I took up the topic again–and now I’m thinking
of this could be a trilogy! I’m finding out that romance novels are both big business
and are really interesting in how they depict Scotland

2007_Dec_Arran_Machrie_Moor_26_standing_stones

Isle of Arran: Photo, Euan Hague

People in Scotland
don’t really know about these romances, so it is a great topic to explore.

Why is all this Geography? Well, Geography has
changed a lot since people took it in third grade and learned state capitals!
Today, academic geographers examine how places and landscapes are constructed,
represented and understood. Why do places look like they do, and how are places
similar and different. This can mean conducting digital analysis of satellite
data showing deforestation, exploring urban planning and development policies
and their impacts on housing, learning about mountain and river formation or,
in this case, asking how literature depicts countries. It is a really exciting
field. Geography is a perspective, looking at things through the lens of place.
We do a bit of history, economics, sociology, literary studies, ethnic studies,
science, digital mapping, political science, international relations -  a bit of everything!  

SK:  How are you going about the research?  Have
you talked to authors, and are you reading Scottish romances and other
Scottish-set books? 

EH:  I’ve been reading some of the books. Most recently I
finished Blythe Gifford’s Return of the Border
Highlandersmercy Warrior
and as she lives here
in Chicago, I was able to meet and interview her. She recommended speaking with
Terri Brisbin, who I phoned and then picked up a copy of The Highlander’s
Silent Touch.
I spoke with Margaret
Mallory
, who kindly sent me a copy of The Warrior. Also, my colleague here at DePaul, Prof. Alec Brownlow, recommended I talk to a
friend of his family, Word Wench Susan Fraser King! So I called Susan too, but first
made sure to read Queen Hereafter: A Novel of Margaret of Scotland.

SK: (Thank you!) What does your research reveal about Scottish
literature and romance in particular?  


Hague_1995_photo (1)

Euan in a kilt, 1995


EH:
 Of course, I’m finding that Highlanders are very popular, as
are feisty heroines, but I’m also learning that romance authors know more about
Scottish history than I do! When I was in High School in Edinburgh in the 1980s,
we were taught about Scotland after 1760, and my previous academic studies on
Scottish identity really explored the Jacobite period and the era of Walter
Scott, I’d say 1715-1822. Blythe knows more about Scotland in 1528-29 than
anyone I’ve ever met; and Susan as much about the 11th century!

Another thing I’ve been thinking about are those covers showing
muscle-bound shirtless men wearing a kilt and a strip of plaid over one
shoulder – you’d die of pneumonia wearing that outfit in Scotland! I was there
all last July and it rained every day. I never once saw the sun!

Highland-groom-sarah-gabriel

(Does this guy look cold to you?)

 

SK:  What did you expect to find when you first began
the project — and has any result surprised you?
 

EH:  I think that I expected to find what I’d call “tartanry”
stereotypes of Scotland – kilts, haggis, heather, lochs, castles – stirred into
somewhat formulaic romance plots. I certainly never expected time travel like
in Karen Marie Moning’s The Highlander’s Touch or detailed discussions of
medieval Scotland’s political and religious institutions as in Susan's mainstream historicals. I think the biggest
surprise has been the determination of the authors I’ve talked with to get
Scottish history right.

SK: With all that you're learning about romance — and having the advantage of being a kilted Scottish guy yourself — are you tempted to write your own Scottish romance?

EH:  I have been. I wrote a chapter about a woman time travelling
from Chicago to historic Scotland, but now I think I don’t know enough about
Scottish history to be able to finish it!

SK:  I think you'd do a great job–and just think how interesting your geography and landscape settings would be! What are some of your favorite places in Scotland?

Edinburgh_05_castle_from_scott_monument

Edinburgh Castle: Photo, Euan Hague

EH:  Well, I still have family and friends in Edinburgh, so I go
there every year and I love it. Seeing Edinburgh Castle, especially on a
late fall afternoon with a sprinkling of snow glistening in the sunset is just
a wonderful view. I like Greyfriar’s Churchyard in Edinburgh with all the
medieval gravestones. And being from Edinburgh means I’m meant to hate Glasgow — but the
Necropolis, People’s Palace and Kelvingrove there are great to visit. I also
went to the Island of Arran for the first time a few years ago and that was
spectacular. Typically when going
to the UK it means flying to London or

2007_December_Arran_Thunderguy_04_view_of_Kilbrannan_Sound

Isle of Arran: Photo, Euan Hague

Manchester in England, so I love the
moment when the M6 highway crosses the border and becomes the M74, and then the
drive through small towns in the Borders and on up into Edinburgh always makes
me smile nostalgically.

SK:  Now that you've looked at the interest in
Scottish-set romance from an academic standpoint — why do you think it is such
a consistently popular sub-genre?  

EH:  Ha! The million dollar question. The men in kilts? I know
how that works – I’ve worn a kilt!  I think Scottish romances allow readers
to experience a different time and place, but one that is not so foreign that
it is difficult to understand. I think that using pre-modern Scottish clans also enables
an emphasis on family relationships and genealogy which I think attracts
readers both as romance fans and Americans. In my experience, genealogy is a
more popular interest here in the U.S. than it is back in Scotland.

SK:  What's next for your research in Scottish romance?

EH: I’d love to
hear directly from your readers what they think of Scottish romance! Why do you like it (or not) — what are some of your favorites, and which books should I read next?

SK: Readers, authors, Wenches too — do you love Scottish romance, or do you not love it particularly … and why? Tell Prof. Hague what you think! He may want to use your comments in his chapter (if he does, we will contact you).

EH: Thanks, everyone –this is the most fun I've had writing an academic piece in a while. And thanks for inviting me to Word Wenches!

Tell us what you think about Scottish romance! And there's a prize in it for someone — I'll be sending one of my books to a reader chosen at random from among the commenters today and tomorrow.

 

365 thoughts on “A Professor Studies Scottish Romance”

  1. This is such an interesting discussion. Thank you. I have no particular favorite book, I like them all. I read English historical romance novels, but they all seem to be about the “ton” and that can be very narrow, even when we do get a glimpse of the “slums” or a reference to war. On the other hand, Scottish romance generally is more encompassing, with more discussion and detail about the history that is taking place. This seems to give them more variety, as well as giving me more knowledge and understanding, and this is why I generally prefer the Scottish books.

    Reply
  2. This is such an interesting discussion. Thank you. I have no particular favorite book, I like them all. I read English historical romance novels, but they all seem to be about the “ton” and that can be very narrow, even when we do get a glimpse of the “slums” or a reference to war. On the other hand, Scottish romance generally is more encompassing, with more discussion and detail about the history that is taking place. This seems to give them more variety, as well as giving me more knowledge and understanding, and this is why I generally prefer the Scottish books.

    Reply
  3. This is such an interesting discussion. Thank you. I have no particular favorite book, I like them all. I read English historical romance novels, but they all seem to be about the “ton” and that can be very narrow, even when we do get a glimpse of the “slums” or a reference to war. On the other hand, Scottish romance generally is more encompassing, with more discussion and detail about the history that is taking place. This seems to give them more variety, as well as giving me more knowledge and understanding, and this is why I generally prefer the Scottish books.

    Reply
  4. This is such an interesting discussion. Thank you. I have no particular favorite book, I like them all. I read English historical romance novels, but they all seem to be about the “ton” and that can be very narrow, even when we do get a glimpse of the “slums” or a reference to war. On the other hand, Scottish romance generally is more encompassing, with more discussion and detail about the history that is taking place. This seems to give them more variety, as well as giving me more knowledge and understanding, and this is why I generally prefer the Scottish books.

    Reply
  5. This is such an interesting discussion. Thank you. I have no particular favorite book, I like them all. I read English historical romance novels, but they all seem to be about the “ton” and that can be very narrow, even when we do get a glimpse of the “slums” or a reference to war. On the other hand, Scottish romance generally is more encompassing, with more discussion and detail about the history that is taking place. This seems to give them more variety, as well as giving me more knowledge and understanding, and this is why I generally prefer the Scottish books.

    Reply
  6. Scottish romance is compelling because of the locale which is unique and special. I am transported to another place, realm, era and enjoy this experience. The characters have depth and are realistic.

    Reply
  7. Scottish romance is compelling because of the locale which is unique and special. I am transported to another place, realm, era and enjoy this experience. The characters have depth and are realistic.

    Reply
  8. Scottish romance is compelling because of the locale which is unique and special. I am transported to another place, realm, era and enjoy this experience. The characters have depth and are realistic.

    Reply
  9. Scottish romance is compelling because of the locale which is unique and special. I am transported to another place, realm, era and enjoy this experience. The characters have depth and are realistic.

    Reply
  10. Scottish romance is compelling because of the locale which is unique and special. I am transported to another place, realm, era and enjoy this experience. The characters have depth and are realistic.

    Reply
  11. Maya Banks’s McCabe Highlander trilogy made me fall in love with Scottish historical romance. Historical romance in general is not my favorite (interesting as I am a historian by training!) but what I like about most Scottish romance is the period in which it’s set – say, 1200s-1500s. The remoteness of that period makes it a truly different world to experience. I also like that the political and religious turmoil that shapes many of the books necessitate that the heroes be warrior types. And, yeah, I like the kilts, too… Fun topic!

    Reply
  12. Maya Banks’s McCabe Highlander trilogy made me fall in love with Scottish historical romance. Historical romance in general is not my favorite (interesting as I am a historian by training!) but what I like about most Scottish romance is the period in which it’s set – say, 1200s-1500s. The remoteness of that period makes it a truly different world to experience. I also like that the political and religious turmoil that shapes many of the books necessitate that the heroes be warrior types. And, yeah, I like the kilts, too… Fun topic!

    Reply
  13. Maya Banks’s McCabe Highlander trilogy made me fall in love with Scottish historical romance. Historical romance in general is not my favorite (interesting as I am a historian by training!) but what I like about most Scottish romance is the period in which it’s set – say, 1200s-1500s. The remoteness of that period makes it a truly different world to experience. I also like that the political and religious turmoil that shapes many of the books necessitate that the heroes be warrior types. And, yeah, I like the kilts, too… Fun topic!

    Reply
  14. Maya Banks’s McCabe Highlander trilogy made me fall in love with Scottish historical romance. Historical romance in general is not my favorite (interesting as I am a historian by training!) but what I like about most Scottish romance is the period in which it’s set – say, 1200s-1500s. The remoteness of that period makes it a truly different world to experience. I also like that the political and religious turmoil that shapes many of the books necessitate that the heroes be warrior types. And, yeah, I like the kilts, too… Fun topic!

    Reply
  15. Maya Banks’s McCabe Highlander trilogy made me fall in love with Scottish historical romance. Historical romance in general is not my favorite (interesting as I am a historian by training!) but what I like about most Scottish romance is the period in which it’s set – say, 1200s-1500s. The remoteness of that period makes it a truly different world to experience. I also like that the political and religious turmoil that shapes many of the books necessitate that the heroes be warrior types. And, yeah, I like the kilts, too… Fun topic!

    Reply
  16. Hi Anne, Alison and Liz,
    Thanks for your comments and I’m glad you enjoyed my conversation with Susan.
    Anne, I think that the ability of authors to create another world, but one that is historically authentic is an appealing aspect of historicals generally.
    Alison, the Regency genre, for example, is a lot narrower in its conventions than Scottish historicals, so writers have more to work with using a Scottish setting. That enables different time periods and places – and characters!
    Liz,
    Thanks for the link. I don’t know Jennifer McQuiston’s book so I’ll have to check it out.

    Reply
  17. Hi Anne, Alison and Liz,
    Thanks for your comments and I’m glad you enjoyed my conversation with Susan.
    Anne, I think that the ability of authors to create another world, but one that is historically authentic is an appealing aspect of historicals generally.
    Alison, the Regency genre, for example, is a lot narrower in its conventions than Scottish historicals, so writers have more to work with using a Scottish setting. That enables different time periods and places – and characters!
    Liz,
    Thanks for the link. I don’t know Jennifer McQuiston’s book so I’ll have to check it out.

    Reply
  18. Hi Anne, Alison and Liz,
    Thanks for your comments and I’m glad you enjoyed my conversation with Susan.
    Anne, I think that the ability of authors to create another world, but one that is historically authentic is an appealing aspect of historicals generally.
    Alison, the Regency genre, for example, is a lot narrower in its conventions than Scottish historicals, so writers have more to work with using a Scottish setting. That enables different time periods and places – and characters!
    Liz,
    Thanks for the link. I don’t know Jennifer McQuiston’s book so I’ll have to check it out.

    Reply
  19. Hi Anne, Alison and Liz,
    Thanks for your comments and I’m glad you enjoyed my conversation with Susan.
    Anne, I think that the ability of authors to create another world, but one that is historically authentic is an appealing aspect of historicals generally.
    Alison, the Regency genre, for example, is a lot narrower in its conventions than Scottish historicals, so writers have more to work with using a Scottish setting. That enables different time periods and places – and characters!
    Liz,
    Thanks for the link. I don’t know Jennifer McQuiston’s book so I’ll have to check it out.

    Reply
  20. Hi Anne, Alison and Liz,
    Thanks for your comments and I’m glad you enjoyed my conversation with Susan.
    Anne, I think that the ability of authors to create another world, but one that is historically authentic is an appealing aspect of historicals generally.
    Alison, the Regency genre, for example, is a lot narrower in its conventions than Scottish historicals, so writers have more to work with using a Scottish setting. That enables different time periods and places – and characters!
    Liz,
    Thanks for the link. I don’t know Jennifer McQuiston’s book so I’ll have to check it out.

    Reply
  21. I cut my romantic teeth on Scottish romances–because of the kilt, but also the accent. The accent is verra important, if ye ken.
    My current favorite Scottish series is Monica McCarty’s HIGHLAND GUARD series, which is this “secret ops” group set around the time of Robert the Bruce trying to become king. So lots of history; things I remembered in my history books about Scotland, et al.
    I’m more interested in the era of Scotland either from 1200-1500 or 1800-present. I’m not into the Jacobite Rebellion era; nor do I read books set around Culloden (which just makes me depressed). I’d oddly picky about my history. *LOL*

    Reply
  22. I cut my romantic teeth on Scottish romances–because of the kilt, but also the accent. The accent is verra important, if ye ken.
    My current favorite Scottish series is Monica McCarty’s HIGHLAND GUARD series, which is this “secret ops” group set around the time of Robert the Bruce trying to become king. So lots of history; things I remembered in my history books about Scotland, et al.
    I’m more interested in the era of Scotland either from 1200-1500 or 1800-present. I’m not into the Jacobite Rebellion era; nor do I read books set around Culloden (which just makes me depressed). I’d oddly picky about my history. *LOL*

    Reply
  23. I cut my romantic teeth on Scottish romances–because of the kilt, but also the accent. The accent is verra important, if ye ken.
    My current favorite Scottish series is Monica McCarty’s HIGHLAND GUARD series, which is this “secret ops” group set around the time of Robert the Bruce trying to become king. So lots of history; things I remembered in my history books about Scotland, et al.
    I’m more interested in the era of Scotland either from 1200-1500 or 1800-present. I’m not into the Jacobite Rebellion era; nor do I read books set around Culloden (which just makes me depressed). I’d oddly picky about my history. *LOL*

    Reply
  24. I cut my romantic teeth on Scottish romances–because of the kilt, but also the accent. The accent is verra important, if ye ken.
    My current favorite Scottish series is Monica McCarty’s HIGHLAND GUARD series, which is this “secret ops” group set around the time of Robert the Bruce trying to become king. So lots of history; things I remembered in my history books about Scotland, et al.
    I’m more interested in the era of Scotland either from 1200-1500 or 1800-present. I’m not into the Jacobite Rebellion era; nor do I read books set around Culloden (which just makes me depressed). I’d oddly picky about my history. *LOL*

    Reply
  25. I cut my romantic teeth on Scottish romances–because of the kilt, but also the accent. The accent is verra important, if ye ken.
    My current favorite Scottish series is Monica McCarty’s HIGHLAND GUARD series, which is this “secret ops” group set around the time of Robert the Bruce trying to become king. So lots of history; things I remembered in my history books about Scotland, et al.
    I’m more interested in the era of Scotland either from 1200-1500 or 1800-present. I’m not into the Jacobite Rebellion era; nor do I read books set around Culloden (which just makes me depressed). I’d oddly picky about my history. *LOL*

    Reply
  26. Hellion,
    It’s funny you skip the 18th Century, especially as Sir Walter Scott arguably invented historical romances in 1814 with his Jacobite-era “Waverley.” His romantic scenes weren’t much though!
    The 14th century/Wars of Independence period is one of the most popular, at least from what I’ve read. I never really learned much about Robert the Bruce in high school, except the legend of him hiding in a cave watching the spider build its web. I do remember in elementary school in the early-1980s we went on a trip to Edinburgh Castle, and there are statues of Bruce and Wallace at the entrance. We had to draw pictures of them. Mine weren’t good 🙂

    Reply
  27. Hellion,
    It’s funny you skip the 18th Century, especially as Sir Walter Scott arguably invented historical romances in 1814 with his Jacobite-era “Waverley.” His romantic scenes weren’t much though!
    The 14th century/Wars of Independence period is one of the most popular, at least from what I’ve read. I never really learned much about Robert the Bruce in high school, except the legend of him hiding in a cave watching the spider build its web. I do remember in elementary school in the early-1980s we went on a trip to Edinburgh Castle, and there are statues of Bruce and Wallace at the entrance. We had to draw pictures of them. Mine weren’t good 🙂

    Reply
  28. Hellion,
    It’s funny you skip the 18th Century, especially as Sir Walter Scott arguably invented historical romances in 1814 with his Jacobite-era “Waverley.” His romantic scenes weren’t much though!
    The 14th century/Wars of Independence period is one of the most popular, at least from what I’ve read. I never really learned much about Robert the Bruce in high school, except the legend of him hiding in a cave watching the spider build its web. I do remember in elementary school in the early-1980s we went on a trip to Edinburgh Castle, and there are statues of Bruce and Wallace at the entrance. We had to draw pictures of them. Mine weren’t good 🙂

    Reply
  29. Hellion,
    It’s funny you skip the 18th Century, especially as Sir Walter Scott arguably invented historical romances in 1814 with his Jacobite-era “Waverley.” His romantic scenes weren’t much though!
    The 14th century/Wars of Independence period is one of the most popular, at least from what I’ve read. I never really learned much about Robert the Bruce in high school, except the legend of him hiding in a cave watching the spider build its web. I do remember in elementary school in the early-1980s we went on a trip to Edinburgh Castle, and there are statues of Bruce and Wallace at the entrance. We had to draw pictures of them. Mine weren’t good 🙂

    Reply
  30. Hellion,
    It’s funny you skip the 18th Century, especially as Sir Walter Scott arguably invented historical romances in 1814 with his Jacobite-era “Waverley.” His romantic scenes weren’t much though!
    The 14th century/Wars of Independence period is one of the most popular, at least from what I’ve read. I never really learned much about Robert the Bruce in high school, except the legend of him hiding in a cave watching the spider build its web. I do remember in elementary school in the early-1980s we went on a trip to Edinburgh Castle, and there are statues of Bruce and Wallace at the entrance. We had to draw pictures of them. Mine weren’t good 🙂

    Reply
  31. Thanks Maya,
    I only just hit refresh so didn’t see your post until now! Your two themes – remoteness and warriors in kilts – certainly seem to make Scottish romances a hit.

    Reply
  32. Thanks Maya,
    I only just hit refresh so didn’t see your post until now! Your two themes – remoteness and warriors in kilts – certainly seem to make Scottish romances a hit.

    Reply
  33. Thanks Maya,
    I only just hit refresh so didn’t see your post until now! Your two themes – remoteness and warriors in kilts – certainly seem to make Scottish romances a hit.

    Reply
  34. Thanks Maya,
    I only just hit refresh so didn’t see your post until now! Your two themes – remoteness and warriors in kilts – certainly seem to make Scottish romances a hit.

    Reply
  35. Thanks Maya,
    I only just hit refresh so didn’t see your post until now! Your two themes – remoteness and warriors in kilts – certainly seem to make Scottish romances a hit.

    Reply
  36. I’m not an American so I wouldn’t be of any use to your research but given your statement that ‘I took up the topic again–and now I’m thinking of this could be a trilogy!’, I was wondering how many articles you’ve already written about romance novels. I’ve read “A Very Interesting Place: Representing Scotland in American Romance Novels”. Is there another one?

    Reply
  37. I’m not an American so I wouldn’t be of any use to your research but given your statement that ‘I took up the topic again–and now I’m thinking of this could be a trilogy!’, I was wondering how many articles you’ve already written about romance novels. I’ve read “A Very Interesting Place: Representing Scotland in American Romance Novels”. Is there another one?

    Reply
  38. I’m not an American so I wouldn’t be of any use to your research but given your statement that ‘I took up the topic again–and now I’m thinking of this could be a trilogy!’, I was wondering how many articles you’ve already written about romance novels. I’ve read “A Very Interesting Place: Representing Scotland in American Romance Novels”. Is there another one?

    Reply
  39. I’m not an American so I wouldn’t be of any use to your research but given your statement that ‘I took up the topic again–and now I’m thinking of this could be a trilogy!’, I was wondering how many articles you’ve already written about romance novels. I’ve read “A Very Interesting Place: Representing Scotland in American Romance Novels”. Is there another one?

    Reply
  40. I’m not an American so I wouldn’t be of any use to your research but given your statement that ‘I took up the topic again–and now I’m thinking of this could be a trilogy!’, I was wondering how many articles you’ve already written about romance novels. I’ve read “A Very Interesting Place: Representing Scotland in American Romance Novels”. Is there another one?

    Reply
  41. From a writer’s viewpoint, I have to say I found the history of Scotland fascinating, romantic, tragic, heroic…everything that makes a romance worth writing as well as reading. I also discovered, being a Canadian with no real knowledge of clan structure aside from the stories told by a feisty Scottish neighbor, that the amount of research that went into a relatively simple task like choosing names for the main characters was nearly overwhelming. Toss in religious affiliations and politics and the research workload trebled. However…I would not have traded the experience for anything. Walking the battlefield at Culloden is still one of the highest things on my bucket list.

    Reply
  42. From a writer’s viewpoint, I have to say I found the history of Scotland fascinating, romantic, tragic, heroic…everything that makes a romance worth writing as well as reading. I also discovered, being a Canadian with no real knowledge of clan structure aside from the stories told by a feisty Scottish neighbor, that the amount of research that went into a relatively simple task like choosing names for the main characters was nearly overwhelming. Toss in religious affiliations and politics and the research workload trebled. However…I would not have traded the experience for anything. Walking the battlefield at Culloden is still one of the highest things on my bucket list.

    Reply
  43. From a writer’s viewpoint, I have to say I found the history of Scotland fascinating, romantic, tragic, heroic…everything that makes a romance worth writing as well as reading. I also discovered, being a Canadian with no real knowledge of clan structure aside from the stories told by a feisty Scottish neighbor, that the amount of research that went into a relatively simple task like choosing names for the main characters was nearly overwhelming. Toss in religious affiliations and politics and the research workload trebled. However…I would not have traded the experience for anything. Walking the battlefield at Culloden is still one of the highest things on my bucket list.

    Reply
  44. From a writer’s viewpoint, I have to say I found the history of Scotland fascinating, romantic, tragic, heroic…everything that makes a romance worth writing as well as reading. I also discovered, being a Canadian with no real knowledge of clan structure aside from the stories told by a feisty Scottish neighbor, that the amount of research that went into a relatively simple task like choosing names for the main characters was nearly overwhelming. Toss in religious affiliations and politics and the research workload trebled. However…I would not have traded the experience for anything. Walking the battlefield at Culloden is still one of the highest things on my bucket list.

    Reply
  45. From a writer’s viewpoint, I have to say I found the history of Scotland fascinating, romantic, tragic, heroic…everything that makes a romance worth writing as well as reading. I also discovered, being a Canadian with no real knowledge of clan structure aside from the stories told by a feisty Scottish neighbor, that the amount of research that went into a relatively simple task like choosing names for the main characters was nearly overwhelming. Toss in religious affiliations and politics and the research workload trebled. However…I would not have traded the experience for anything. Walking the battlefield at Culloden is still one of the highest things on my bucket list.

    Reply
  46. Hi Laura,
    Only 2007’s “A Very Interesting Place” is published right now. My second essay, which led me to contact Susan Fraser King, will be published in 2014 (and it’s not quite finished yet!). I also thought that as I’m thinking about this area of study, I should write a third piece, this one for for the Journal of Popular Romance Studies (http://jprstudies.org/) about how (Scottish) places are represented in romance fiction. So I’m about a third of the way through that draft. Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you. By the way, I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.
    By the way, when I began researching my current chapter, someone recommended to me that I should read your blog about my own previous essay on Scottish romances (http://teachmetonight.blogspot.com/2010/12/braving-scottish-romance.html)
    Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  47. Hi Laura,
    Only 2007’s “A Very Interesting Place” is published right now. My second essay, which led me to contact Susan Fraser King, will be published in 2014 (and it’s not quite finished yet!). I also thought that as I’m thinking about this area of study, I should write a third piece, this one for for the Journal of Popular Romance Studies (http://jprstudies.org/) about how (Scottish) places are represented in romance fiction. So I’m about a third of the way through that draft. Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you. By the way, I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.
    By the way, when I began researching my current chapter, someone recommended to me that I should read your blog about my own previous essay on Scottish romances (http://teachmetonight.blogspot.com/2010/12/braving-scottish-romance.html)
    Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  48. Hi Laura,
    Only 2007’s “A Very Interesting Place” is published right now. My second essay, which led me to contact Susan Fraser King, will be published in 2014 (and it’s not quite finished yet!). I also thought that as I’m thinking about this area of study, I should write a third piece, this one for for the Journal of Popular Romance Studies (http://jprstudies.org/) about how (Scottish) places are represented in romance fiction. So I’m about a third of the way through that draft. Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you. By the way, I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.
    By the way, when I began researching my current chapter, someone recommended to me that I should read your blog about my own previous essay on Scottish romances (http://teachmetonight.blogspot.com/2010/12/braving-scottish-romance.html)
    Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  49. Hi Laura,
    Only 2007’s “A Very Interesting Place” is published right now. My second essay, which led me to contact Susan Fraser King, will be published in 2014 (and it’s not quite finished yet!). I also thought that as I’m thinking about this area of study, I should write a third piece, this one for for the Journal of Popular Romance Studies (http://jprstudies.org/) about how (Scottish) places are represented in romance fiction. So I’m about a third of the way through that draft. Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you. By the way, I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.
    By the way, when I began researching my current chapter, someone recommended to me that I should read your blog about my own previous essay on Scottish romances (http://teachmetonight.blogspot.com/2010/12/braving-scottish-romance.html)
    Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  50. Hi Laura,
    Only 2007’s “A Very Interesting Place” is published right now. My second essay, which led me to contact Susan Fraser King, will be published in 2014 (and it’s not quite finished yet!). I also thought that as I’m thinking about this area of study, I should write a third piece, this one for for the Journal of Popular Romance Studies (http://jprstudies.org/) about how (Scottish) places are represented in romance fiction. So I’m about a third of the way through that draft. Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you. By the way, I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.
    By the way, when I began researching my current chapter, someone recommended to me that I should read your blog about my own previous essay on Scottish romances (http://teachmetonight.blogspot.com/2010/12/braving-scottish-romance.html)
    Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  51. “Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you.”
    I’d love to read them. I’m Scottish and in Scotland but as it happens, I’m currently working on ideas about the US which emerge from US romances. I’ve also been preparing a conference paper on the depiction of Greece in Mills & Boon romances, so the intersections of romance, geography and national identity are very much of interest to me.
    “I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.”
    I hope you find it interesting/useful. There’s not a lot about place in it, but I do suggest that some places have particular connotations which can affect characterisation.

    Reply
  52. “Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you.”
    I’d love to read them. I’m Scottish and in Scotland but as it happens, I’m currently working on ideas about the US which emerge from US romances. I’ve also been preparing a conference paper on the depiction of Greece in Mills & Boon romances, so the intersections of romance, geography and national identity are very much of interest to me.
    “I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.”
    I hope you find it interesting/useful. There’s not a lot about place in it, but I do suggest that some places have particular connotations which can affect characterisation.

    Reply
  53. “Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you.”
    I’d love to read them. I’m Scottish and in Scotland but as it happens, I’m currently working on ideas about the US which emerge from US romances. I’ve also been preparing a conference paper on the depiction of Greece in Mills & Boon romances, so the intersections of romance, geography and national identity are very much of interest to me.
    “I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.”
    I hope you find it interesting/useful. There’s not a lot about place in it, but I do suggest that some places have particular connotations which can affect characterisation.

    Reply
  54. “Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you.”
    I’d love to read them. I’m Scottish and in Scotland but as it happens, I’m currently working on ideas about the US which emerge from US romances. I’ve also been preparing a conference paper on the depiction of Greece in Mills & Boon romances, so the intersections of romance, geography and national identity are very much of interest to me.
    “I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.”
    I hope you find it interesting/useful. There’s not a lot about place in it, but I do suggest that some places have particular connotations which can affect characterisation.

    Reply
  55. “Once they’re all done, I’d be happy to get copies to you.”
    I’d love to read them. I’m Scottish and in Scotland but as it happens, I’m currently working on ideas about the US which emerge from US romances. I’ve also been preparing a conference paper on the depiction of Greece in Mills & Boon romances, so the intersections of romance, geography and national identity are very much of interest to me.
    “I’ve got your book “For Love and Money” on my ‘to read’ list. I’m looking forward to it.”
    I hope you find it interesting/useful. There’s not a lot about place in it, but I do suggest that some places have particular connotations which can affect characterisation.

    Reply
  56. Marsha,
    Thanks for chiming in! I must admit I’ve only skimmed your 1997 “Pride of Lions” Jacobite-era Scottish historical. There are hundreds of Scottish historicals – it’s impossible to read them all!
    Culloden is a very evocative place. It’s where Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite (primarily Catholic) troops, were defeated by the British military (which included many Scots) on 16 April 1746. I’d say go when it is quiet and a little frosty (that would be February when the flights are cheapest too!) It is very evocative. Standing there, you see it’s pretty flat and open, and you wonder just what it was like (and how senseless it was) standing looking at the enemy and then charging into cannon-fire. It’s a historical moment with so many stories around it there is plenty for an author to be inspired by.

    Reply
  57. Marsha,
    Thanks for chiming in! I must admit I’ve only skimmed your 1997 “Pride of Lions” Jacobite-era Scottish historical. There are hundreds of Scottish historicals – it’s impossible to read them all!
    Culloden is a very evocative place. It’s where Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite (primarily Catholic) troops, were defeated by the British military (which included many Scots) on 16 April 1746. I’d say go when it is quiet and a little frosty (that would be February when the flights are cheapest too!) It is very evocative. Standing there, you see it’s pretty flat and open, and you wonder just what it was like (and how senseless it was) standing looking at the enemy and then charging into cannon-fire. It’s a historical moment with so many stories around it there is plenty for an author to be inspired by.

    Reply
  58. Marsha,
    Thanks for chiming in! I must admit I’ve only skimmed your 1997 “Pride of Lions” Jacobite-era Scottish historical. There are hundreds of Scottish historicals – it’s impossible to read them all!
    Culloden is a very evocative place. It’s where Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite (primarily Catholic) troops, were defeated by the British military (which included many Scots) on 16 April 1746. I’d say go when it is quiet and a little frosty (that would be February when the flights are cheapest too!) It is very evocative. Standing there, you see it’s pretty flat and open, and you wonder just what it was like (and how senseless it was) standing looking at the enemy and then charging into cannon-fire. It’s a historical moment with so many stories around it there is plenty for an author to be inspired by.

    Reply
  59. Marsha,
    Thanks for chiming in! I must admit I’ve only skimmed your 1997 “Pride of Lions” Jacobite-era Scottish historical. There are hundreds of Scottish historicals – it’s impossible to read them all!
    Culloden is a very evocative place. It’s where Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite (primarily Catholic) troops, were defeated by the British military (which included many Scots) on 16 April 1746. I’d say go when it is quiet and a little frosty (that would be February when the flights are cheapest too!) It is very evocative. Standing there, you see it’s pretty flat and open, and you wonder just what it was like (and how senseless it was) standing looking at the enemy and then charging into cannon-fire. It’s a historical moment with so many stories around it there is plenty for an author to be inspired by.

    Reply
  60. Marsha,
    Thanks for chiming in! I must admit I’ve only skimmed your 1997 “Pride of Lions” Jacobite-era Scottish historical. There are hundreds of Scottish historicals – it’s impossible to read them all!
    Culloden is a very evocative place. It’s where Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite (primarily Catholic) troops, were defeated by the British military (which included many Scots) on 16 April 1746. I’d say go when it is quiet and a little frosty (that would be February when the flights are cheapest too!) It is very evocative. Standing there, you see it’s pretty flat and open, and you wonder just what it was like (and how senseless it was) standing looking at the enemy and then charging into cannon-fire. It’s a historical moment with so many stories around it there is plenty for an author to be inspired by.

    Reply
  61. When I read a Scottish romance it is very emotional and memorable, due to the beauty of the landscape and the effect it has upon the characters and their lives. Strong minded individuals and hardships make the stories unforgettable.

    Reply
  62. When I read a Scottish romance it is very emotional and memorable, due to the beauty of the landscape and the effect it has upon the characters and their lives. Strong minded individuals and hardships make the stories unforgettable.

    Reply
  63. When I read a Scottish romance it is very emotional and memorable, due to the beauty of the landscape and the effect it has upon the characters and their lives. Strong minded individuals and hardships make the stories unforgettable.

    Reply
  64. When I read a Scottish romance it is very emotional and memorable, due to the beauty of the landscape and the effect it has upon the characters and their lives. Strong minded individuals and hardships make the stories unforgettable.

    Reply
  65. When I read a Scottish romance it is very emotional and memorable, due to the beauty of the landscape and the effect it has upon the characters and their lives. Strong minded individuals and hardships make the stories unforgettable.

    Reply
  66. What a fun discussion! I totally agree that the span of history available in Scottish romance is part of its endurance in the romance genre — anywhere from medieval to modern, and yet its unique and recognizable culture aspects and some very Scottish themes can still be in play.
    And Marsha is so right <> about the strongly romantic, heroic nature of Scotland’s heroes and history. There is inherent power in any story about Scotland, and as a writer too, I’m very drawn to the potentials.
    LOL, Euan — geeky geography professor gear, just right for romance!

    Reply
  67. What a fun discussion! I totally agree that the span of history available in Scottish romance is part of its endurance in the romance genre — anywhere from medieval to modern, and yet its unique and recognizable culture aspects and some very Scottish themes can still be in play.
    And Marsha is so right <> about the strongly romantic, heroic nature of Scotland’s heroes and history. There is inherent power in any story about Scotland, and as a writer too, I’m very drawn to the potentials.
    LOL, Euan — geeky geography professor gear, just right for romance!

    Reply
  68. What a fun discussion! I totally agree that the span of history available in Scottish romance is part of its endurance in the romance genre — anywhere from medieval to modern, and yet its unique and recognizable culture aspects and some very Scottish themes can still be in play.
    And Marsha is so right <> about the strongly romantic, heroic nature of Scotland’s heroes and history. There is inherent power in any story about Scotland, and as a writer too, I’m very drawn to the potentials.
    LOL, Euan — geeky geography professor gear, just right for romance!

    Reply
  69. What a fun discussion! I totally agree that the span of history available in Scottish romance is part of its endurance in the romance genre — anywhere from medieval to modern, and yet its unique and recognizable culture aspects and some very Scottish themes can still be in play.
    And Marsha is so right <> about the strongly romantic, heroic nature of Scotland’s heroes and history. There is inherent power in any story about Scotland, and as a writer too, I’m very drawn to the potentials.
    LOL, Euan — geeky geography professor gear, just right for romance!

    Reply
  70. What a fun discussion! I totally agree that the span of history available in Scottish romance is part of its endurance in the romance genre — anywhere from medieval to modern, and yet its unique and recognizable culture aspects and some very Scottish themes can still be in play.
    And Marsha is so right <> about the strongly romantic, heroic nature of Scotland’s heroes and history. There is inherent power in any story about Scotland, and as a writer too, I’m very drawn to the potentials.
    LOL, Euan — geeky geography professor gear, just right for romance!

    Reply
  71. Syracuse! I went to grad school there — the Carousel Mall–wow, what you said made me experience a major flash back.
    I think there is a kind of tragic independent “I know I’ll be damned if I do it, but I’m gonna anyway” kind of historic theme we associate with Scots, and that works like magic in romance novels. It’s a certain kind of doomed yet idealistic romanticism.
    Also there’s this hands on — literally — sense of earthiness about Scottish lads that’s been built up into it’s own unique slice of masculinity — perhaps originally fostered by Scots culture, but now it’s probably it’s own thing.
    And yes, that pre-modern relationship connection thing in a slightly more modern setting is probably part of the appeal as well.
    Meanwhile, I had this eye crossing experience reading Roberta Gellis’s TAPESTRY of DREAMS (which is not sympathetic to the scots) the same weekend I read BORN FIGHTING: HOW THE SCOTS-IRISH SHAPED AMERICA by James WEBB (which is.)
    Lately, I’ve been trying to chew on Johnson & Boswell’s journals of their tour through the Hebrides. It’s a very layered reading experience after you know the history that’s underneath everything they’re experiencing and writing about.
    When are your books out? Make sure to contact Virginia Festival of the Book when you’re promoting your book. We love history and we also do romance panels–you’d be welcome here!

    Reply
  72. Syracuse! I went to grad school there — the Carousel Mall–wow, what you said made me experience a major flash back.
    I think there is a kind of tragic independent “I know I’ll be damned if I do it, but I’m gonna anyway” kind of historic theme we associate with Scots, and that works like magic in romance novels. It’s a certain kind of doomed yet idealistic romanticism.
    Also there’s this hands on — literally — sense of earthiness about Scottish lads that’s been built up into it’s own unique slice of masculinity — perhaps originally fostered by Scots culture, but now it’s probably it’s own thing.
    And yes, that pre-modern relationship connection thing in a slightly more modern setting is probably part of the appeal as well.
    Meanwhile, I had this eye crossing experience reading Roberta Gellis’s TAPESTRY of DREAMS (which is not sympathetic to the scots) the same weekend I read BORN FIGHTING: HOW THE SCOTS-IRISH SHAPED AMERICA by James WEBB (which is.)
    Lately, I’ve been trying to chew on Johnson & Boswell’s journals of their tour through the Hebrides. It’s a very layered reading experience after you know the history that’s underneath everything they’re experiencing and writing about.
    When are your books out? Make sure to contact Virginia Festival of the Book when you’re promoting your book. We love history and we also do romance panels–you’d be welcome here!

    Reply
  73. Syracuse! I went to grad school there — the Carousel Mall–wow, what you said made me experience a major flash back.
    I think there is a kind of tragic independent “I know I’ll be damned if I do it, but I’m gonna anyway” kind of historic theme we associate with Scots, and that works like magic in romance novels. It’s a certain kind of doomed yet idealistic romanticism.
    Also there’s this hands on — literally — sense of earthiness about Scottish lads that’s been built up into it’s own unique slice of masculinity — perhaps originally fostered by Scots culture, but now it’s probably it’s own thing.
    And yes, that pre-modern relationship connection thing in a slightly more modern setting is probably part of the appeal as well.
    Meanwhile, I had this eye crossing experience reading Roberta Gellis’s TAPESTRY of DREAMS (which is not sympathetic to the scots) the same weekend I read BORN FIGHTING: HOW THE SCOTS-IRISH SHAPED AMERICA by James WEBB (which is.)
    Lately, I’ve been trying to chew on Johnson & Boswell’s journals of their tour through the Hebrides. It’s a very layered reading experience after you know the history that’s underneath everything they’re experiencing and writing about.
    When are your books out? Make sure to contact Virginia Festival of the Book when you’re promoting your book. We love history and we also do romance panels–you’d be welcome here!

    Reply
  74. Syracuse! I went to grad school there — the Carousel Mall–wow, what you said made me experience a major flash back.
    I think there is a kind of tragic independent “I know I’ll be damned if I do it, but I’m gonna anyway” kind of historic theme we associate with Scots, and that works like magic in romance novels. It’s a certain kind of doomed yet idealistic romanticism.
    Also there’s this hands on — literally — sense of earthiness about Scottish lads that’s been built up into it’s own unique slice of masculinity — perhaps originally fostered by Scots culture, but now it’s probably it’s own thing.
    And yes, that pre-modern relationship connection thing in a slightly more modern setting is probably part of the appeal as well.
    Meanwhile, I had this eye crossing experience reading Roberta Gellis’s TAPESTRY of DREAMS (which is not sympathetic to the scots) the same weekend I read BORN FIGHTING: HOW THE SCOTS-IRISH SHAPED AMERICA by James WEBB (which is.)
    Lately, I’ve been trying to chew on Johnson & Boswell’s journals of their tour through the Hebrides. It’s a very layered reading experience after you know the history that’s underneath everything they’re experiencing and writing about.
    When are your books out? Make sure to contact Virginia Festival of the Book when you’re promoting your book. We love history and we also do romance panels–you’d be welcome here!

    Reply
  75. Syracuse! I went to grad school there — the Carousel Mall–wow, what you said made me experience a major flash back.
    I think there is a kind of tragic independent “I know I’ll be damned if I do it, but I’m gonna anyway” kind of historic theme we associate with Scots, and that works like magic in romance novels. It’s a certain kind of doomed yet idealistic romanticism.
    Also there’s this hands on — literally — sense of earthiness about Scottish lads that’s been built up into it’s own unique slice of masculinity — perhaps originally fostered by Scots culture, but now it’s probably it’s own thing.
    And yes, that pre-modern relationship connection thing in a slightly more modern setting is probably part of the appeal as well.
    Meanwhile, I had this eye crossing experience reading Roberta Gellis’s TAPESTRY of DREAMS (which is not sympathetic to the scots) the same weekend I read BORN FIGHTING: HOW THE SCOTS-IRISH SHAPED AMERICA by James WEBB (which is.)
    Lately, I’ve been trying to chew on Johnson & Boswell’s journals of their tour through the Hebrides. It’s a very layered reading experience after you know the history that’s underneath everything they’re experiencing and writing about.
    When are your books out? Make sure to contact Virginia Festival of the Book when you’re promoting your book. We love history and we also do romance panels–you’d be welcome here!

    Reply
  76. I love historical romance, English, Scottish, American. Love it all. I’ve written one with a Scottish heroine, and my S-I-L who loves my books, wasn’t fond of that one. She found the written accent hard to follow, which was a disappointment for me. However, I love learning about history, the older the better. Most of the authors, me included, try our darnest to get it right. So, I think I can trust most of what I read.

    Reply
  77. I love historical romance, English, Scottish, American. Love it all. I’ve written one with a Scottish heroine, and my S-I-L who loves my books, wasn’t fond of that one. She found the written accent hard to follow, which was a disappointment for me. However, I love learning about history, the older the better. Most of the authors, me included, try our darnest to get it right. So, I think I can trust most of what I read.

    Reply
  78. I love historical romance, English, Scottish, American. Love it all. I’ve written one with a Scottish heroine, and my S-I-L who loves my books, wasn’t fond of that one. She found the written accent hard to follow, which was a disappointment for me. However, I love learning about history, the older the better. Most of the authors, me included, try our darnest to get it right. So, I think I can trust most of what I read.

    Reply
  79. I love historical romance, English, Scottish, American. Love it all. I’ve written one with a Scottish heroine, and my S-I-L who loves my books, wasn’t fond of that one. She found the written accent hard to follow, which was a disappointment for me. However, I love learning about history, the older the better. Most of the authors, me included, try our darnest to get it right. So, I think I can trust most of what I read.

    Reply
  80. I love historical romance, English, Scottish, American. Love it all. I’ve written one with a Scottish heroine, and my S-I-L who loves my books, wasn’t fond of that one. She found the written accent hard to follow, which was a disappointment for me. However, I love learning about history, the older the better. Most of the authors, me included, try our darnest to get it right. So, I think I can trust most of what I read.

    Reply
  81. Diane,
    I think the intersection of the characters and landscape is especially interesting. It is a theme that I am thinking about as I write my academic essays.
    Michelle, Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  82. Diane,
    I think the intersection of the characters and landscape is especially interesting. It is a theme that I am thinking about as I write my academic essays.
    Michelle, Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  83. Diane,
    I think the intersection of the characters and landscape is especially interesting. It is a theme that I am thinking about as I write my academic essays.
    Michelle, Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  84. Diane,
    I think the intersection of the characters and landscape is especially interesting. It is a theme that I am thinking about as I write my academic essays.
    Michelle, Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  85. Diane,
    I think the intersection of the characters and landscape is especially interesting. It is a theme that I am thinking about as I write my academic essays.
    Michelle, Thanks for your comment!

    Reply
  86. Hello Blythe, thanks for jumping in. I’m looking forward to the last few sections of “Tempted by the Border Captain” and I just finished “Taken by the Border Rebel.”

    Reply
  87. Hello Blythe, thanks for jumping in. I’m looking forward to the last few sections of “Tempted by the Border Captain” and I just finished “Taken by the Border Rebel.”

    Reply
  88. Hello Blythe, thanks for jumping in. I’m looking forward to the last few sections of “Tempted by the Border Captain” and I just finished “Taken by the Border Rebel.”

    Reply
  89. Hello Blythe, thanks for jumping in. I’m looking forward to the last few sections of “Tempted by the Border Captain” and I just finished “Taken by the Border Rebel.”

    Reply
  90. Hello Blythe, thanks for jumping in. I’m looking forward to the last few sections of “Tempted by the Border Captain” and I just finished “Taken by the Border Rebel.”

    Reply
  91. Madeline,
    I have some issues with Webb’s “Born Fighting” and his take on Scots-Irish more generally; I don’t know Gellis’s book.
    I spent 6 years in Syracuse, at one point, when I was 30, that was 20% of my life (and 20% of that must have been spent at Taps, a bar on Westcott, the free popcorn was always a hit!). I wonder if that’s still there.

    Reply
  92. Madeline,
    I have some issues with Webb’s “Born Fighting” and his take on Scots-Irish more generally; I don’t know Gellis’s book.
    I spent 6 years in Syracuse, at one point, when I was 30, that was 20% of my life (and 20% of that must have been spent at Taps, a bar on Westcott, the free popcorn was always a hit!). I wonder if that’s still there.

    Reply
  93. Madeline,
    I have some issues with Webb’s “Born Fighting” and his take on Scots-Irish more generally; I don’t know Gellis’s book.
    I spent 6 years in Syracuse, at one point, when I was 30, that was 20% of my life (and 20% of that must have been spent at Taps, a bar on Westcott, the free popcorn was always a hit!). I wonder if that’s still there.

    Reply
  94. Madeline,
    I have some issues with Webb’s “Born Fighting” and his take on Scots-Irish more generally; I don’t know Gellis’s book.
    I spent 6 years in Syracuse, at one point, when I was 30, that was 20% of my life (and 20% of that must have been spent at Taps, a bar on Westcott, the free popcorn was always a hit!). I wonder if that’s still there.

    Reply
  95. Madeline,
    I have some issues with Webb’s “Born Fighting” and his take on Scots-Irish more generally; I don’t know Gellis’s book.
    I spent 6 years in Syracuse, at one point, when I was 30, that was 20% of my life (and 20% of that must have been spent at Taps, a bar on Westcott, the free popcorn was always a hit!). I wonder if that’s still there.

    Reply
  96. Allison,
    Writing accents is tough – especially given that no-one knows what people sounded like 600 years ago! There have been efforts to write in Scots, but these tend to be contemporary books and certainly not romances – authors like Irvine Welsh and James Kelman.

    Reply
  97. Allison,
    Writing accents is tough – especially given that no-one knows what people sounded like 600 years ago! There have been efforts to write in Scots, but these tend to be contemporary books and certainly not romances – authors like Irvine Welsh and James Kelman.

    Reply
  98. Allison,
    Writing accents is tough – especially given that no-one knows what people sounded like 600 years ago! There have been efforts to write in Scots, but these tend to be contemporary books and certainly not romances – authors like Irvine Welsh and James Kelman.

    Reply
  99. Allison,
    Writing accents is tough – especially given that no-one knows what people sounded like 600 years ago! There have been efforts to write in Scots, but these tend to be contemporary books and certainly not romances – authors like Irvine Welsh and James Kelman.

    Reply
  100. Allison,
    Writing accents is tough – especially given that no-one knows what people sounded like 600 years ago! There have been efforts to write in Scots, but these tend to be contemporary books and certainly not romances – authors like Irvine Welsh and James Kelman.

    Reply
  101. Hello Euan! I love this post, & thanks so much for including me in your article. And, hey, great photo of you in a kilt. 😉
    When I visited the Isle of Skye to research my books, I was happily surprised by the lack of development outside the towns. It wasn’t at all hard to imagine my 16 century Highland warriors climbing the hills, wandering into the faery glen, or sailing their birlinns along the coastline. Of course, some of the castles are in ruins now, but that only added to the romance. Sigh…
    Margaret

    Reply
  102. Hello Euan! I love this post, & thanks so much for including me in your article. And, hey, great photo of you in a kilt. 😉
    When I visited the Isle of Skye to research my books, I was happily surprised by the lack of development outside the towns. It wasn’t at all hard to imagine my 16 century Highland warriors climbing the hills, wandering into the faery glen, or sailing their birlinns along the coastline. Of course, some of the castles are in ruins now, but that only added to the romance. Sigh…
    Margaret

    Reply
  103. Hello Euan! I love this post, & thanks so much for including me in your article. And, hey, great photo of you in a kilt. 😉
    When I visited the Isle of Skye to research my books, I was happily surprised by the lack of development outside the towns. It wasn’t at all hard to imagine my 16 century Highland warriors climbing the hills, wandering into the faery glen, or sailing their birlinns along the coastline. Of course, some of the castles are in ruins now, but that only added to the romance. Sigh…
    Margaret

    Reply
  104. Hello Euan! I love this post, & thanks so much for including me in your article. And, hey, great photo of you in a kilt. 😉
    When I visited the Isle of Skye to research my books, I was happily surprised by the lack of development outside the towns. It wasn’t at all hard to imagine my 16 century Highland warriors climbing the hills, wandering into the faery glen, or sailing their birlinns along the coastline. Of course, some of the castles are in ruins now, but that only added to the romance. Sigh…
    Margaret

    Reply
  105. Hello Euan! I love this post, & thanks so much for including me in your article. And, hey, great photo of you in a kilt. 😉
    When I visited the Isle of Skye to research my books, I was happily surprised by the lack of development outside the towns. It wasn’t at all hard to imagine my 16 century Highland warriors climbing the hills, wandering into the faery glen, or sailing their birlinns along the coastline. Of course, some of the castles are in ruins now, but that only added to the romance. Sigh…
    Margaret

    Reply
  106. Hi Margaret, nice to hear from you. That photo of me in my kilt is over 15 years old now! I still remember it being taken.
    Putting my urban development hat on, Scottish towns have what urban planners ‘green belt’ policies that prevent sprawl, so you can be in the countryside within a short drive. Not many places in the US have these types of restrictions.
    One of my favorite ruined castles near Edinburgh is Tantallon – here’s a link to some photos: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/northberwick/tantalloncastle/

    Reply
  107. Hi Margaret, nice to hear from you. That photo of me in my kilt is over 15 years old now! I still remember it being taken.
    Putting my urban development hat on, Scottish towns have what urban planners ‘green belt’ policies that prevent sprawl, so you can be in the countryside within a short drive. Not many places in the US have these types of restrictions.
    One of my favorite ruined castles near Edinburgh is Tantallon – here’s a link to some photos: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/northberwick/tantalloncastle/

    Reply
  108. Hi Margaret, nice to hear from you. That photo of me in my kilt is over 15 years old now! I still remember it being taken.
    Putting my urban development hat on, Scottish towns have what urban planners ‘green belt’ policies that prevent sprawl, so you can be in the countryside within a short drive. Not many places in the US have these types of restrictions.
    One of my favorite ruined castles near Edinburgh is Tantallon – here’s a link to some photos: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/northberwick/tantalloncastle/

    Reply
  109. Hi Margaret, nice to hear from you. That photo of me in my kilt is over 15 years old now! I still remember it being taken.
    Putting my urban development hat on, Scottish towns have what urban planners ‘green belt’ policies that prevent sprawl, so you can be in the countryside within a short drive. Not many places in the US have these types of restrictions.
    One of my favorite ruined castles near Edinburgh is Tantallon – here’s a link to some photos: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/northberwick/tantalloncastle/

    Reply
  110. Hi Margaret, nice to hear from you. That photo of me in my kilt is over 15 years old now! I still remember it being taken.
    Putting my urban development hat on, Scottish towns have what urban planners ‘green belt’ policies that prevent sprawl, so you can be in the countryside within a short drive. Not many places in the US have these types of restrictions.
    One of my favorite ruined castles near Edinburgh is Tantallon – here’s a link to some photos: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/northberwick/tantalloncastle/

    Reply
  111. Great interview, Euan! Love your name, might have to use it in a book! Many of my mother’s family came from Scotland, some who are famous and many who settled parts of Canada and so I love reading Highland romances. I had been writing Medieval Scottish romances, and for one of my publishers–werewolf romance, she wanted something different. So I’d always wanted to write a contemporary werewolf romance–Highland style. 🙂 I have the third book in the series coming out in May, A Highland Werewolf Wedding. My werewolves live long lives, so they combine a contemporary world, old Scottish world, and a paranormal world in one. 🙂 What could be more fun?

    Reply
  112. Great interview, Euan! Love your name, might have to use it in a book! Many of my mother’s family came from Scotland, some who are famous and many who settled parts of Canada and so I love reading Highland romances. I had been writing Medieval Scottish romances, and for one of my publishers–werewolf romance, she wanted something different. So I’d always wanted to write a contemporary werewolf romance–Highland style. 🙂 I have the third book in the series coming out in May, A Highland Werewolf Wedding. My werewolves live long lives, so they combine a contemporary world, old Scottish world, and a paranormal world in one. 🙂 What could be more fun?

    Reply
  113. Great interview, Euan! Love your name, might have to use it in a book! Many of my mother’s family came from Scotland, some who are famous and many who settled parts of Canada and so I love reading Highland romances. I had been writing Medieval Scottish romances, and for one of my publishers–werewolf romance, she wanted something different. So I’d always wanted to write a contemporary werewolf romance–Highland style. 🙂 I have the third book in the series coming out in May, A Highland Werewolf Wedding. My werewolves live long lives, so they combine a contemporary world, old Scottish world, and a paranormal world in one. 🙂 What could be more fun?

    Reply
  114. Great interview, Euan! Love your name, might have to use it in a book! Many of my mother’s family came from Scotland, some who are famous and many who settled parts of Canada and so I love reading Highland romances. I had been writing Medieval Scottish romances, and for one of my publishers–werewolf romance, she wanted something different. So I’d always wanted to write a contemporary werewolf romance–Highland style. 🙂 I have the third book in the series coming out in May, A Highland Werewolf Wedding. My werewolves live long lives, so they combine a contemporary world, old Scottish world, and a paranormal world in one. 🙂 What could be more fun?

    Reply
  115. Great interview, Euan! Love your name, might have to use it in a book! Many of my mother’s family came from Scotland, some who are famous and many who settled parts of Canada and so I love reading Highland romances. I had been writing Medieval Scottish romances, and for one of my publishers–werewolf romance, she wanted something different. So I’d always wanted to write a contemporary werewolf romance–Highland style. 🙂 I have the third book in the series coming out in May, A Highland Werewolf Wedding. My werewolves live long lives, so they combine a contemporary world, old Scottish world, and a paranormal world in one. 🙂 What could be more fun?

    Reply
  116. I’m not American either, so can’t contribute directly. However, a couple of things crossed my mind, and I mention them although I suspect you’re already well aware of them.
    Firstly: in the 1980s and 1990s Patricia Veryan published several series of novels about Scottish heroes, mainly Jacobites. She may have thought of them as spy stories or mysteries but I suspect many thought of them as historical romances. These may well have been influential on those writing today – or on those who directly influence them. Although Patricia Veryan was born and brought up in the UK, she has lived in the US since the end of WWII.
    Secondly: I suspect another series has been very influential in the way in which writers perceive Scotland, and that is the phenomenally popular Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I just looked her up on Fantastic Fiction and it says: “Although American by birth, Diana has become fascinated by the history of Scotland, England, France and the USA in the mid-18th century when the struggles that would determine the shape of the modern world were taking place.”
    Do you liaise with your colleagues in other departments? I ask because I know of de Paul University from its English Dept which does good work in romance studies. I am aware of Eric Selinger in particular.
    I look forward to reading your essay once it is complete!

    Reply
  117. I’m not American either, so can’t contribute directly. However, a couple of things crossed my mind, and I mention them although I suspect you’re already well aware of them.
    Firstly: in the 1980s and 1990s Patricia Veryan published several series of novels about Scottish heroes, mainly Jacobites. She may have thought of them as spy stories or mysteries but I suspect many thought of them as historical romances. These may well have been influential on those writing today – or on those who directly influence them. Although Patricia Veryan was born and brought up in the UK, she has lived in the US since the end of WWII.
    Secondly: I suspect another series has been very influential in the way in which writers perceive Scotland, and that is the phenomenally popular Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I just looked her up on Fantastic Fiction and it says: “Although American by birth, Diana has become fascinated by the history of Scotland, England, France and the USA in the mid-18th century when the struggles that would determine the shape of the modern world were taking place.”
    Do you liaise with your colleagues in other departments? I ask because I know of de Paul University from its English Dept which does good work in romance studies. I am aware of Eric Selinger in particular.
    I look forward to reading your essay once it is complete!

    Reply
  118. I’m not American either, so can’t contribute directly. However, a couple of things crossed my mind, and I mention them although I suspect you’re already well aware of them.
    Firstly: in the 1980s and 1990s Patricia Veryan published several series of novels about Scottish heroes, mainly Jacobites. She may have thought of them as spy stories or mysteries but I suspect many thought of them as historical romances. These may well have been influential on those writing today – or on those who directly influence them. Although Patricia Veryan was born and brought up in the UK, she has lived in the US since the end of WWII.
    Secondly: I suspect another series has been very influential in the way in which writers perceive Scotland, and that is the phenomenally popular Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I just looked her up on Fantastic Fiction and it says: “Although American by birth, Diana has become fascinated by the history of Scotland, England, France and the USA in the mid-18th century when the struggles that would determine the shape of the modern world were taking place.”
    Do you liaise with your colleagues in other departments? I ask because I know of de Paul University from its English Dept which does good work in romance studies. I am aware of Eric Selinger in particular.
    I look forward to reading your essay once it is complete!

    Reply
  119. I’m not American either, so can’t contribute directly. However, a couple of things crossed my mind, and I mention them although I suspect you’re already well aware of them.
    Firstly: in the 1980s and 1990s Patricia Veryan published several series of novels about Scottish heroes, mainly Jacobites. She may have thought of them as spy stories or mysteries but I suspect many thought of them as historical romances. These may well have been influential on those writing today – or on those who directly influence them. Although Patricia Veryan was born and brought up in the UK, she has lived in the US since the end of WWII.
    Secondly: I suspect another series has been very influential in the way in which writers perceive Scotland, and that is the phenomenally popular Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I just looked her up on Fantastic Fiction and it says: “Although American by birth, Diana has become fascinated by the history of Scotland, England, France and the USA in the mid-18th century when the struggles that would determine the shape of the modern world were taking place.”
    Do you liaise with your colleagues in other departments? I ask because I know of de Paul University from its English Dept which does good work in romance studies. I am aware of Eric Selinger in particular.
    I look forward to reading your essay once it is complete!

    Reply
  120. I’m not American either, so can’t contribute directly. However, a couple of things crossed my mind, and I mention them although I suspect you’re already well aware of them.
    Firstly: in the 1980s and 1990s Patricia Veryan published several series of novels about Scottish heroes, mainly Jacobites. She may have thought of them as spy stories or mysteries but I suspect many thought of them as historical romances. These may well have been influential on those writing today – or on those who directly influence them. Although Patricia Veryan was born and brought up in the UK, she has lived in the US since the end of WWII.
    Secondly: I suspect another series has been very influential in the way in which writers perceive Scotland, and that is the phenomenally popular Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I just looked her up on Fantastic Fiction and it says: “Although American by birth, Diana has become fascinated by the history of Scotland, England, France and the USA in the mid-18th century when the struggles that would determine the shape of the modern world were taking place.”
    Do you liaise with your colleagues in other departments? I ask because I know of de Paul University from its English Dept which does good work in romance studies. I am aware of Eric Selinger in particular.
    I look forward to reading your essay once it is complete!

    Reply
  121. Historical romance, British, Scottish and American are all fascinating and similar in many ways since they explore the depth of feelings, the innermost thoughts and the importance of relationships. Your interview gave me a peek into your work and your writing.

    Reply
  122. Historical romance, British, Scottish and American are all fascinating and similar in many ways since they explore the depth of feelings, the innermost thoughts and the importance of relationships. Your interview gave me a peek into your work and your writing.

    Reply
  123. Historical romance, British, Scottish and American are all fascinating and similar in many ways since they explore the depth of feelings, the innermost thoughts and the importance of relationships. Your interview gave me a peek into your work and your writing.

    Reply
  124. Historical romance, British, Scottish and American are all fascinating and similar in many ways since they explore the depth of feelings, the innermost thoughts and the importance of relationships. Your interview gave me a peek into your work and your writing.

    Reply
  125. Historical romance, British, Scottish and American are all fascinating and similar in many ways since they explore the depth of feelings, the innermost thoughts and the importance of relationships. Your interview gave me a peek into your work and your writing.

    Reply
  126. Love Scottish romance as my parents were from Glasgow. Been to Scotland and Glasgow is my favorite city. The accents,kilts, brawny men- although I didn’t see that many when I was there. I mean brawny bare chested men in kilts ;).

    Reply
  127. Love Scottish romance as my parents were from Glasgow. Been to Scotland and Glasgow is my favorite city. The accents,kilts, brawny men- although I didn’t see that many when I was there. I mean brawny bare chested men in kilts ;).

    Reply
  128. Love Scottish romance as my parents were from Glasgow. Been to Scotland and Glasgow is my favorite city. The accents,kilts, brawny men- although I didn’t see that many when I was there. I mean brawny bare chested men in kilts ;).

    Reply
  129. Love Scottish romance as my parents were from Glasgow. Been to Scotland and Glasgow is my favorite city. The accents,kilts, brawny men- although I didn’t see that many when I was there. I mean brawny bare chested men in kilts ;).

    Reply
  130. Love Scottish romance as my parents were from Glasgow. Been to Scotland and Glasgow is my favorite city. The accents,kilts, brawny men- although I didn’t see that many when I was there. I mean brawny bare chested men in kilts ;).

    Reply
  131. Sheila,
    I’d be surprised if you saw many brawny bare-chested men in Glasgow! Thanks for your comment – which books/authors are your favorites?

    Reply
  132. Sheila,
    I’d be surprised if you saw many brawny bare-chested men in Glasgow! Thanks for your comment – which books/authors are your favorites?

    Reply
  133. Sheila,
    I’d be surprised if you saw many brawny bare-chested men in Glasgow! Thanks for your comment – which books/authors are your favorites?

    Reply
  134. Sheila,
    I’d be surprised if you saw many brawny bare-chested men in Glasgow! Thanks for your comment – which books/authors are your favorites?

    Reply
  135. Sheila,
    I’d be surprised if you saw many brawny bare-chested men in Glasgow! Thanks for your comment – which books/authors are your favorites?

    Reply
  136. HJ,
    You’re definitely right about Gabaldon’s impact, especially in the US. I’ve no idea why they renamed “Outlander” as “Cross Stitch” in Scotland though – do you?
    And, I do know Eric Selinger – we’ve worked in the same University, within a block of each other, for a decade and yet we only just met! Bizarre.
    Thanks for your comments!

    Reply
  137. HJ,
    You’re definitely right about Gabaldon’s impact, especially in the US. I’ve no idea why they renamed “Outlander” as “Cross Stitch” in Scotland though – do you?
    And, I do know Eric Selinger – we’ve worked in the same University, within a block of each other, for a decade and yet we only just met! Bizarre.
    Thanks for your comments!

    Reply
  138. HJ,
    You’re definitely right about Gabaldon’s impact, especially in the US. I’ve no idea why they renamed “Outlander” as “Cross Stitch” in Scotland though – do you?
    And, I do know Eric Selinger – we’ve worked in the same University, within a block of each other, for a decade and yet we only just met! Bizarre.
    Thanks for your comments!

    Reply
  139. HJ,
    You’re definitely right about Gabaldon’s impact, especially in the US. I’ve no idea why they renamed “Outlander” as “Cross Stitch” in Scotland though – do you?
    And, I do know Eric Selinger – we’ve worked in the same University, within a block of each other, for a decade and yet we only just met! Bizarre.
    Thanks for your comments!

    Reply
  140. HJ,
    You’re definitely right about Gabaldon’s impact, especially in the US. I’ve no idea why they renamed “Outlander” as “Cross Stitch” in Scotland though – do you?
    And, I do know Eric Selinger – we’ve worked in the same University, within a block of each other, for a decade and yet we only just met! Bizarre.
    Thanks for your comments!

    Reply
  141. I became involved in Scottish things a long time ago, even attended the local Burns Dinner where the highlight of the evening was a parade with a giant slab of haggis, which is followed by a Burns poem (which I couldn’t understand,) after reading the poem someone takes a dagger out and stabs the haggis. Oh those whacky Scots. Seriously, there is nothing that sends chills down my spine faster than a mass band of bagpipers marching toward me. (And in a good way.) I’ve loved Scottish romance novels for years and years. I have fond memories of Arnette Lamb’s Highland Rogue written in 1991.

    Reply
  142. I became involved in Scottish things a long time ago, even attended the local Burns Dinner where the highlight of the evening was a parade with a giant slab of haggis, which is followed by a Burns poem (which I couldn’t understand,) after reading the poem someone takes a dagger out and stabs the haggis. Oh those whacky Scots. Seriously, there is nothing that sends chills down my spine faster than a mass band of bagpipers marching toward me. (And in a good way.) I’ve loved Scottish romance novels for years and years. I have fond memories of Arnette Lamb’s Highland Rogue written in 1991.

    Reply
  143. I became involved in Scottish things a long time ago, even attended the local Burns Dinner where the highlight of the evening was a parade with a giant slab of haggis, which is followed by a Burns poem (which I couldn’t understand,) after reading the poem someone takes a dagger out and stabs the haggis. Oh those whacky Scots. Seriously, there is nothing that sends chills down my spine faster than a mass band of bagpipers marching toward me. (And in a good way.) I’ve loved Scottish romance novels for years and years. I have fond memories of Arnette Lamb’s Highland Rogue written in 1991.

    Reply
  144. I became involved in Scottish things a long time ago, even attended the local Burns Dinner where the highlight of the evening was a parade with a giant slab of haggis, which is followed by a Burns poem (which I couldn’t understand,) after reading the poem someone takes a dagger out and stabs the haggis. Oh those whacky Scots. Seriously, there is nothing that sends chills down my spine faster than a mass band of bagpipers marching toward me. (And in a good way.) I’ve loved Scottish romance novels for years and years. I have fond memories of Arnette Lamb’s Highland Rogue written in 1991.

    Reply
  145. I became involved in Scottish things a long time ago, even attended the local Burns Dinner where the highlight of the evening was a parade with a giant slab of haggis, which is followed by a Burns poem (which I couldn’t understand,) after reading the poem someone takes a dagger out and stabs the haggis. Oh those whacky Scots. Seriously, there is nothing that sends chills down my spine faster than a mass band of bagpipers marching toward me. (And in a good way.) I’ve loved Scottish romance novels for years and years. I have fond memories of Arnette Lamb’s Highland Rogue written in 1991.

    Reply
  146. Kay,
    Did you know it’s illegal to import haggis from Scotland to the USA? A rule that began in the 1980s with the “mad cow disease” scare. For me, if you can’t understand Burns, read him out loud. It makes more (some?) sense. I like his “To A Mouse,” “Tam o’Shanter” and of course his romantic poems like “A Red, Red Rose”. Which are your other favorite Scottish historicals?

    Reply
  147. Kay,
    Did you know it’s illegal to import haggis from Scotland to the USA? A rule that began in the 1980s with the “mad cow disease” scare. For me, if you can’t understand Burns, read him out loud. It makes more (some?) sense. I like his “To A Mouse,” “Tam o’Shanter” and of course his romantic poems like “A Red, Red Rose”. Which are your other favorite Scottish historicals?

    Reply
  148. Kay,
    Did you know it’s illegal to import haggis from Scotland to the USA? A rule that began in the 1980s with the “mad cow disease” scare. For me, if you can’t understand Burns, read him out loud. It makes more (some?) sense. I like his “To A Mouse,” “Tam o’Shanter” and of course his romantic poems like “A Red, Red Rose”. Which are your other favorite Scottish historicals?

    Reply
  149. Kay,
    Did you know it’s illegal to import haggis from Scotland to the USA? A rule that began in the 1980s with the “mad cow disease” scare. For me, if you can’t understand Burns, read him out loud. It makes more (some?) sense. I like his “To A Mouse,” “Tam o’Shanter” and of course his romantic poems like “A Red, Red Rose”. Which are your other favorite Scottish historicals?

    Reply
  150. Kay,
    Did you know it’s illegal to import haggis from Scotland to the USA? A rule that began in the 1980s with the “mad cow disease” scare. For me, if you can’t understand Burns, read him out loud. It makes more (some?) sense. I like his “To A Mouse,” “Tam o’Shanter” and of course his romantic poems like “A Red, Red Rose”. Which are your other favorite Scottish historicals?

    Reply
  151. Thank you so much for stopping by the word wenches! I love any richly detailed historical romance, without a particular preference to geography. But I think Americans have this fascination with their ancestors, and many of us look to the Scottish historicals as myths that come from our own past and people.

    Reply
  152. Thank you so much for stopping by the word wenches! I love any richly detailed historical romance, without a particular preference to geography. But I think Americans have this fascination with their ancestors, and many of us look to the Scottish historicals as myths that come from our own past and people.

    Reply
  153. Thank you so much for stopping by the word wenches! I love any richly detailed historical romance, without a particular preference to geography. But I think Americans have this fascination with their ancestors, and many of us look to the Scottish historicals as myths that come from our own past and people.

    Reply
  154. Thank you so much for stopping by the word wenches! I love any richly detailed historical romance, without a particular preference to geography. But I think Americans have this fascination with their ancestors, and many of us look to the Scottish historicals as myths that come from our own past and people.

    Reply
  155. Thank you so much for stopping by the word wenches! I love any richly detailed historical romance, without a particular preference to geography. But I think Americans have this fascination with their ancestors, and many of us look to the Scottish historicals as myths that come from our own past and people.

    Reply
  156. I should add that in elementary school, my class learned to sing “The Deil’s awa’ wi’ the Exciseman” by Burns. I still remember it – probably the best song about a taxman being kidnapped by the devil (admittedly, there’s not a lot of competition in that category!) Once the taxman’s gone, the whole town gets drunk and dances joyously! The lyrics are here: http://www.robertburns.org/works/374.shtml

    Reply
  157. I should add that in elementary school, my class learned to sing “The Deil’s awa’ wi’ the Exciseman” by Burns. I still remember it – probably the best song about a taxman being kidnapped by the devil (admittedly, there’s not a lot of competition in that category!) Once the taxman’s gone, the whole town gets drunk and dances joyously! The lyrics are here: http://www.robertburns.org/works/374.shtml

    Reply
  158. I should add that in elementary school, my class learned to sing “The Deil’s awa’ wi’ the Exciseman” by Burns. I still remember it – probably the best song about a taxman being kidnapped by the devil (admittedly, there’s not a lot of competition in that category!) Once the taxman’s gone, the whole town gets drunk and dances joyously! The lyrics are here: http://www.robertburns.org/works/374.shtml

    Reply
  159. I should add that in elementary school, my class learned to sing “The Deil’s awa’ wi’ the Exciseman” by Burns. I still remember it – probably the best song about a taxman being kidnapped by the devil (admittedly, there’s not a lot of competition in that category!) Once the taxman’s gone, the whole town gets drunk and dances joyously! The lyrics are here: http://www.robertburns.org/works/374.shtml

    Reply
  160. I should add that in elementary school, my class learned to sing “The Deil’s awa’ wi’ the Exciseman” by Burns. I still remember it – probably the best song about a taxman being kidnapped by the devil (admittedly, there’s not a lot of competition in that category!) Once the taxman’s gone, the whole town gets drunk and dances joyously! The lyrics are here: http://www.robertburns.org/works/374.shtml

    Reply
  161. I realize I’m very late to the conversation, but wanted to chime in as a reader and a writer.
    The first Scottish historical I read was Johanna Lindsay’s ‘A Gentle Feuding’ many moons ago. I live on an island in eastern Canada which still has strong ties to the British Isles and so I developed a voracious appetite for UK based historical romances. More recently I have read, and love, Julianne Maclean’s Highlander series and Deborah Hale’s ‘Highland Rogue’.
    As an emerging author, choosing a country for my setting was easy, but my era took a little digging. And really, being a history buff, I enjoyed every minute of it. My series is set during the reign of James Stewart I, specifically 1430. I am enthralled with his laws on authoritative reform and what that meant for the nobles. So my historicals have a strong political backdrop layered with the smokin’ hot hero. No kilts in 1430, but I can make him work a leather jherkin. Oh yeah.:)
    Good luck with your research and thank you and the amazing Wenches for a fabulous post.

    Reply
  162. I realize I’m very late to the conversation, but wanted to chime in as a reader and a writer.
    The first Scottish historical I read was Johanna Lindsay’s ‘A Gentle Feuding’ many moons ago. I live on an island in eastern Canada which still has strong ties to the British Isles and so I developed a voracious appetite for UK based historical romances. More recently I have read, and love, Julianne Maclean’s Highlander series and Deborah Hale’s ‘Highland Rogue’.
    As an emerging author, choosing a country for my setting was easy, but my era took a little digging. And really, being a history buff, I enjoyed every minute of it. My series is set during the reign of James Stewart I, specifically 1430. I am enthralled with his laws on authoritative reform and what that meant for the nobles. So my historicals have a strong political backdrop layered with the smokin’ hot hero. No kilts in 1430, but I can make him work a leather jherkin. Oh yeah.:)
    Good luck with your research and thank you and the amazing Wenches for a fabulous post.

    Reply
  163. I realize I’m very late to the conversation, but wanted to chime in as a reader and a writer.
    The first Scottish historical I read was Johanna Lindsay’s ‘A Gentle Feuding’ many moons ago. I live on an island in eastern Canada which still has strong ties to the British Isles and so I developed a voracious appetite for UK based historical romances. More recently I have read, and love, Julianne Maclean’s Highlander series and Deborah Hale’s ‘Highland Rogue’.
    As an emerging author, choosing a country for my setting was easy, but my era took a little digging. And really, being a history buff, I enjoyed every minute of it. My series is set during the reign of James Stewart I, specifically 1430. I am enthralled with his laws on authoritative reform and what that meant for the nobles. So my historicals have a strong political backdrop layered with the smokin’ hot hero. No kilts in 1430, but I can make him work a leather jherkin. Oh yeah.:)
    Good luck with your research and thank you and the amazing Wenches for a fabulous post.

    Reply
  164. I realize I’m very late to the conversation, but wanted to chime in as a reader and a writer.
    The first Scottish historical I read was Johanna Lindsay’s ‘A Gentle Feuding’ many moons ago. I live on an island in eastern Canada which still has strong ties to the British Isles and so I developed a voracious appetite for UK based historical romances. More recently I have read, and love, Julianne Maclean’s Highlander series and Deborah Hale’s ‘Highland Rogue’.
    As an emerging author, choosing a country for my setting was easy, but my era took a little digging. And really, being a history buff, I enjoyed every minute of it. My series is set during the reign of James Stewart I, specifically 1430. I am enthralled with his laws on authoritative reform and what that meant for the nobles. So my historicals have a strong political backdrop layered with the smokin’ hot hero. No kilts in 1430, but I can make him work a leather jherkin. Oh yeah.:)
    Good luck with your research and thank you and the amazing Wenches for a fabulous post.

    Reply
  165. I realize I’m very late to the conversation, but wanted to chime in as a reader and a writer.
    The first Scottish historical I read was Johanna Lindsay’s ‘A Gentle Feuding’ many moons ago. I live on an island in eastern Canada which still has strong ties to the British Isles and so I developed a voracious appetite for UK based historical romances. More recently I have read, and love, Julianne Maclean’s Highlander series and Deborah Hale’s ‘Highland Rogue’.
    As an emerging author, choosing a country for my setting was easy, but my era took a little digging. And really, being a history buff, I enjoyed every minute of it. My series is set during the reign of James Stewart I, specifically 1430. I am enthralled with his laws on authoritative reform and what that meant for the nobles. So my historicals have a strong political backdrop layered with the smokin’ hot hero. No kilts in 1430, but I can make him work a leather jherkin. Oh yeah.:)
    Good luck with your research and thank you and the amazing Wenches for a fabulous post.

    Reply
  166. Hello, Dr. Hague! This was such a fun post!
    As for why I like to read Scottish romance historical books . . .
    Dr. Colin G. Calloway, another uprooted Scot academic, wrote in his book White People, Indians, and Highlanders: Tribal People and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America that “when the Black Watch Regiment arrived in America at the start of the Seven Years’ War, Indians reputedly ‘flocked from all quarters’ to see them, ‘and from a surprising resemblance in the manner of their dress, and the great similitude of their language, the Indians concluded they were anciently one and the same people, and most cordially received them as brethren.’” I’m not Native American, although raised on and off of a reservation for much of my childhood, but when I read my first Scottish historical romance, I felt something resonate within me, like I had met these people before, knew them. As Madeline Iva said earlier, there is a tragic independence theme that reverberates amongst us Americans, and the Scottish historical romance books taps into that in a thrilling way.

    Reply
  167. Hello, Dr. Hague! This was such a fun post!
    As for why I like to read Scottish romance historical books . . .
    Dr. Colin G. Calloway, another uprooted Scot academic, wrote in his book White People, Indians, and Highlanders: Tribal People and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America that “when the Black Watch Regiment arrived in America at the start of the Seven Years’ War, Indians reputedly ‘flocked from all quarters’ to see them, ‘and from a surprising resemblance in the manner of their dress, and the great similitude of their language, the Indians concluded they were anciently one and the same people, and most cordially received them as brethren.’” I’m not Native American, although raised on and off of a reservation for much of my childhood, but when I read my first Scottish historical romance, I felt something resonate within me, like I had met these people before, knew them. As Madeline Iva said earlier, there is a tragic independence theme that reverberates amongst us Americans, and the Scottish historical romance books taps into that in a thrilling way.

    Reply
  168. Hello, Dr. Hague! This was such a fun post!
    As for why I like to read Scottish romance historical books . . .
    Dr. Colin G. Calloway, another uprooted Scot academic, wrote in his book White People, Indians, and Highlanders: Tribal People and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America that “when the Black Watch Regiment arrived in America at the start of the Seven Years’ War, Indians reputedly ‘flocked from all quarters’ to see them, ‘and from a surprising resemblance in the manner of their dress, and the great similitude of their language, the Indians concluded they were anciently one and the same people, and most cordially received them as brethren.’” I’m not Native American, although raised on and off of a reservation for much of my childhood, but when I read my first Scottish historical romance, I felt something resonate within me, like I had met these people before, knew them. As Madeline Iva said earlier, there is a tragic independence theme that reverberates amongst us Americans, and the Scottish historical romance books taps into that in a thrilling way.

    Reply
  169. Hello, Dr. Hague! This was such a fun post!
    As for why I like to read Scottish romance historical books . . .
    Dr. Colin G. Calloway, another uprooted Scot academic, wrote in his book White People, Indians, and Highlanders: Tribal People and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America that “when the Black Watch Regiment arrived in America at the start of the Seven Years’ War, Indians reputedly ‘flocked from all quarters’ to see them, ‘and from a surprising resemblance in the manner of their dress, and the great similitude of their language, the Indians concluded they were anciently one and the same people, and most cordially received them as brethren.’” I’m not Native American, although raised on and off of a reservation for much of my childhood, but when I read my first Scottish historical romance, I felt something resonate within me, like I had met these people before, knew them. As Madeline Iva said earlier, there is a tragic independence theme that reverberates amongst us Americans, and the Scottish historical romance books taps into that in a thrilling way.

    Reply
  170. Hello, Dr. Hague! This was such a fun post!
    As for why I like to read Scottish romance historical books . . .
    Dr. Colin G. Calloway, another uprooted Scot academic, wrote in his book White People, Indians, and Highlanders: Tribal People and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America that “when the Black Watch Regiment arrived in America at the start of the Seven Years’ War, Indians reputedly ‘flocked from all quarters’ to see them, ‘and from a surprising resemblance in the manner of their dress, and the great similitude of their language, the Indians concluded they were anciently one and the same people, and most cordially received them as brethren.’” I’m not Native American, although raised on and off of a reservation for much of my childhood, but when I read my first Scottish historical romance, I felt something resonate within me, like I had met these people before, knew them. As Madeline Iva said earlier, there is a tragic independence theme that reverberates amongst us Americans, and the Scottish historical romance books taps into that in a thrilling way.

    Reply
  171. Professor Hague–
    I also went to Syracuse University, and I know that it has a very good geography department. The course I took freshman year on Cultural Geography is one of the courses I remember best because the teacher was great, and it changed my view of the world. I think it is seriously cool that you are bringing that perspective to Scottish historical romances. *G*

    Reply
  172. Professor Hague–
    I also went to Syracuse University, and I know that it has a very good geography department. The course I took freshman year on Cultural Geography is one of the courses I remember best because the teacher was great, and it changed my view of the world. I think it is seriously cool that you are bringing that perspective to Scottish historical romances. *G*

    Reply
  173. Professor Hague–
    I also went to Syracuse University, and I know that it has a very good geography department. The course I took freshman year on Cultural Geography is one of the courses I remember best because the teacher was great, and it changed my view of the world. I think it is seriously cool that you are bringing that perspective to Scottish historical romances. *G*

    Reply
  174. Professor Hague–
    I also went to Syracuse University, and I know that it has a very good geography department. The course I took freshman year on Cultural Geography is one of the courses I remember best because the teacher was great, and it changed my view of the world. I think it is seriously cool that you are bringing that perspective to Scottish historical romances. *G*

    Reply
  175. Professor Hague–
    I also went to Syracuse University, and I know that it has a very good geography department. The course I took freshman year on Cultural Geography is one of the courses I remember best because the teacher was great, and it changed my view of the world. I think it is seriously cool that you are bringing that perspective to Scottish historical romances. *G*

    Reply
  176. I think I’ve thought of something else–not sure if someone has touched on this–but I think we like to read about the “underdogs”–and Scotland is loaded with “underdogs” in history. I know I read a lot of English set/ton set novels–but for them I am usually reading for the heroine, who is the underdog. When I’m reading a Scottish one, the hero is just as important because usually he’s as much of an underdog–the stakes are greater! (Freedom for your entire country–a huge stake! *LOL*)
    *LOL* Would love to see the statues of Bruce and Wallace…and your drawings of them. Sounds like an epic class trip. We just went to our state capital…where one of the “notable” statues was Rush Limbaugh…it’s just not the same.

    Reply
  177. I think I’ve thought of something else–not sure if someone has touched on this–but I think we like to read about the “underdogs”–and Scotland is loaded with “underdogs” in history. I know I read a lot of English set/ton set novels–but for them I am usually reading for the heroine, who is the underdog. When I’m reading a Scottish one, the hero is just as important because usually he’s as much of an underdog–the stakes are greater! (Freedom for your entire country–a huge stake! *LOL*)
    *LOL* Would love to see the statues of Bruce and Wallace…and your drawings of them. Sounds like an epic class trip. We just went to our state capital…where one of the “notable” statues was Rush Limbaugh…it’s just not the same.

    Reply
  178. I think I’ve thought of something else–not sure if someone has touched on this–but I think we like to read about the “underdogs”–and Scotland is loaded with “underdogs” in history. I know I read a lot of English set/ton set novels–but for them I am usually reading for the heroine, who is the underdog. When I’m reading a Scottish one, the hero is just as important because usually he’s as much of an underdog–the stakes are greater! (Freedom for your entire country–a huge stake! *LOL*)
    *LOL* Would love to see the statues of Bruce and Wallace…and your drawings of them. Sounds like an epic class trip. We just went to our state capital…where one of the “notable” statues was Rush Limbaugh…it’s just not the same.

    Reply
  179. I think I’ve thought of something else–not sure if someone has touched on this–but I think we like to read about the “underdogs”–and Scotland is loaded with “underdogs” in history. I know I read a lot of English set/ton set novels–but for them I am usually reading for the heroine, who is the underdog. When I’m reading a Scottish one, the hero is just as important because usually he’s as much of an underdog–the stakes are greater! (Freedom for your entire country–a huge stake! *LOL*)
    *LOL* Would love to see the statues of Bruce and Wallace…and your drawings of them. Sounds like an epic class trip. We just went to our state capital…where one of the “notable” statues was Rush Limbaugh…it’s just not the same.

    Reply
  180. I think I’ve thought of something else–not sure if someone has touched on this–but I think we like to read about the “underdogs”–and Scotland is loaded with “underdogs” in history. I know I read a lot of English set/ton set novels–but for them I am usually reading for the heroine, who is the underdog. When I’m reading a Scottish one, the hero is just as important because usually he’s as much of an underdog–the stakes are greater! (Freedom for your entire country–a huge stake! *LOL*)
    *LOL* Would love to see the statues of Bruce and Wallace…and your drawings of them. Sounds like an epic class trip. We just went to our state capital…where one of the “notable” statues was Rush Limbaugh…it’s just not the same.

    Reply
  181. Great discussion – thank you so much for stopping in, Euan. I wouldn’t have said that I was a particular fan of stories set in Scotland, just a fan of well-written historical fiction.
    I did just recently read Patricia Veryan’s series (The Golden Chronicles) about the Jacobite rebellion and English sympathizers, which I enjoyed immensely. A Scottish romance that I really enjoyed was Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian MacKenzie.

    Reply
  182. Great discussion – thank you so much for stopping in, Euan. I wouldn’t have said that I was a particular fan of stories set in Scotland, just a fan of well-written historical fiction.
    I did just recently read Patricia Veryan’s series (The Golden Chronicles) about the Jacobite rebellion and English sympathizers, which I enjoyed immensely. A Scottish romance that I really enjoyed was Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian MacKenzie.

    Reply
  183. Great discussion – thank you so much for stopping in, Euan. I wouldn’t have said that I was a particular fan of stories set in Scotland, just a fan of well-written historical fiction.
    I did just recently read Patricia Veryan’s series (The Golden Chronicles) about the Jacobite rebellion and English sympathizers, which I enjoyed immensely. A Scottish romance that I really enjoyed was Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian MacKenzie.

    Reply
  184. Great discussion – thank you so much for stopping in, Euan. I wouldn’t have said that I was a particular fan of stories set in Scotland, just a fan of well-written historical fiction.
    I did just recently read Patricia Veryan’s series (The Golden Chronicles) about the Jacobite rebellion and English sympathizers, which I enjoyed immensely. A Scottish romance that I really enjoyed was Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian MacKenzie.

    Reply
  185. Great discussion – thank you so much for stopping in, Euan. I wouldn’t have said that I was a particular fan of stories set in Scotland, just a fan of well-written historical fiction.
    I did just recently read Patricia Veryan’s series (The Golden Chronicles) about the Jacobite rebellion and English sympathizers, which I enjoyed immensely. A Scottish romance that I really enjoyed was Jennifer Ashley’s The Madness of Lord Ian MacKenzie.

    Reply
  186. What a wonderful article!
    I think the archetype of “Highlanders” represents a combination of personality facets that most women find appealing:
    On the exterior, you have a rough-hewn, hardened man who gives it all he has and lauds fighting to the death for country and honor. In short, he’s selfless and raised to defend others over himself.
    On the interior, you have a man that has a heart and is raised to not only accept that fact, but to express it to all as a sign of pride. The more in-tune with his family and his clan a man is, the more “manly” he is acknowledged to be.
    So we get to have it all: strong on the outside, and sweet on the inside.
    The kilt has become the visual representation of the archetype, now, much like the scent of home cooking reminds someone of their family.
    As a romance author, myself (I write Urban Fantasy with heavy Welsh, English, Irish, and Scottish history and mythology), I think one of the most important aspects of our stories is the reality of them, however. And that’s what is so darned appealing to our readers:
    In many ways, each book we write is a fantasy full of metaphors about our desires, our passions, and our needs. A good romance novel can take the reader on a fantastical journey without leaving the parameters of existing reality. This is true for everything including high fantasy in that parameters are established and tightly followed, giving the reader a sense of “realism”.
    The more realistic (and historically accurate respective to the associated “universe”)) a story, the more gripping it can become because it means the fantasy is equally that much more tangible if not probable.
    I think Scottish historicals are some of the most beloved because of the often very tragic yet courageous history that Scotland has endured, as a nation. It often embodies the classic trope of romance, in and of itself, and thus makes a perfect backdrop.
    Again, I might be talking out of my neck, on this one, but it’s how I, as a reader, view romance novels… with the dash of being a romance author, myself.
    Best of luck to you, sir!!
    And to the Wenches: another brilliant post! Keep up the good work and the wonderful novels!!

    Reply
  187. What a wonderful article!
    I think the archetype of “Highlanders” represents a combination of personality facets that most women find appealing:
    On the exterior, you have a rough-hewn, hardened man who gives it all he has and lauds fighting to the death for country and honor. In short, he’s selfless and raised to defend others over himself.
    On the interior, you have a man that has a heart and is raised to not only accept that fact, but to express it to all as a sign of pride. The more in-tune with his family and his clan a man is, the more “manly” he is acknowledged to be.
    So we get to have it all: strong on the outside, and sweet on the inside.
    The kilt has become the visual representation of the archetype, now, much like the scent of home cooking reminds someone of their family.
    As a romance author, myself (I write Urban Fantasy with heavy Welsh, English, Irish, and Scottish history and mythology), I think one of the most important aspects of our stories is the reality of them, however. And that’s what is so darned appealing to our readers:
    In many ways, each book we write is a fantasy full of metaphors about our desires, our passions, and our needs. A good romance novel can take the reader on a fantastical journey without leaving the parameters of existing reality. This is true for everything including high fantasy in that parameters are established and tightly followed, giving the reader a sense of “realism”.
    The more realistic (and historically accurate respective to the associated “universe”)) a story, the more gripping it can become because it means the fantasy is equally that much more tangible if not probable.
    I think Scottish historicals are some of the most beloved because of the often very tragic yet courageous history that Scotland has endured, as a nation. It often embodies the classic trope of romance, in and of itself, and thus makes a perfect backdrop.
    Again, I might be talking out of my neck, on this one, but it’s how I, as a reader, view romance novels… with the dash of being a romance author, myself.
    Best of luck to you, sir!!
    And to the Wenches: another brilliant post! Keep up the good work and the wonderful novels!!

    Reply
  188. What a wonderful article!
    I think the archetype of “Highlanders” represents a combination of personality facets that most women find appealing:
    On the exterior, you have a rough-hewn, hardened man who gives it all he has and lauds fighting to the death for country and honor. In short, he’s selfless and raised to defend others over himself.
    On the interior, you have a man that has a heart and is raised to not only accept that fact, but to express it to all as a sign of pride. The more in-tune with his family and his clan a man is, the more “manly” he is acknowledged to be.
    So we get to have it all: strong on the outside, and sweet on the inside.
    The kilt has become the visual representation of the archetype, now, much like the scent of home cooking reminds someone of their family.
    As a romance author, myself (I write Urban Fantasy with heavy Welsh, English, Irish, and Scottish history and mythology), I think one of the most important aspects of our stories is the reality of them, however. And that’s what is so darned appealing to our readers:
    In many ways, each book we write is a fantasy full of metaphors about our desires, our passions, and our needs. A good romance novel can take the reader on a fantastical journey without leaving the parameters of existing reality. This is true for everything including high fantasy in that parameters are established and tightly followed, giving the reader a sense of “realism”.
    The more realistic (and historically accurate respective to the associated “universe”)) a story, the more gripping it can become because it means the fantasy is equally that much more tangible if not probable.
    I think Scottish historicals are some of the most beloved because of the often very tragic yet courageous history that Scotland has endured, as a nation. It often embodies the classic trope of romance, in and of itself, and thus makes a perfect backdrop.
    Again, I might be talking out of my neck, on this one, but it’s how I, as a reader, view romance novels… with the dash of being a romance author, myself.
    Best of luck to you, sir!!
    And to the Wenches: another brilliant post! Keep up the good work and the wonderful novels!!

    Reply
  189. What a wonderful article!
    I think the archetype of “Highlanders” represents a combination of personality facets that most women find appealing:
    On the exterior, you have a rough-hewn, hardened man who gives it all he has and lauds fighting to the death for country and honor. In short, he’s selfless and raised to defend others over himself.
    On the interior, you have a man that has a heart and is raised to not only accept that fact, but to express it to all as a sign of pride. The more in-tune with his family and his clan a man is, the more “manly” he is acknowledged to be.
    So we get to have it all: strong on the outside, and sweet on the inside.
    The kilt has become the visual representation of the archetype, now, much like the scent of home cooking reminds someone of their family.
    As a romance author, myself (I write Urban Fantasy with heavy Welsh, English, Irish, and Scottish history and mythology), I think one of the most important aspects of our stories is the reality of them, however. And that’s what is so darned appealing to our readers:
    In many ways, each book we write is a fantasy full of metaphors about our desires, our passions, and our needs. A good romance novel can take the reader on a fantastical journey without leaving the parameters of existing reality. This is true for everything including high fantasy in that parameters are established and tightly followed, giving the reader a sense of “realism”.
    The more realistic (and historically accurate respective to the associated “universe”)) a story, the more gripping it can become because it means the fantasy is equally that much more tangible if not probable.
    I think Scottish historicals are some of the most beloved because of the often very tragic yet courageous history that Scotland has endured, as a nation. It often embodies the classic trope of romance, in and of itself, and thus makes a perfect backdrop.
    Again, I might be talking out of my neck, on this one, but it’s how I, as a reader, view romance novels… with the dash of being a romance author, myself.
    Best of luck to you, sir!!
    And to the Wenches: another brilliant post! Keep up the good work and the wonderful novels!!

    Reply
  190. What a wonderful article!
    I think the archetype of “Highlanders” represents a combination of personality facets that most women find appealing:
    On the exterior, you have a rough-hewn, hardened man who gives it all he has and lauds fighting to the death for country and honor. In short, he’s selfless and raised to defend others over himself.
    On the interior, you have a man that has a heart and is raised to not only accept that fact, but to express it to all as a sign of pride. The more in-tune with his family and his clan a man is, the more “manly” he is acknowledged to be.
    So we get to have it all: strong on the outside, and sweet on the inside.
    The kilt has become the visual representation of the archetype, now, much like the scent of home cooking reminds someone of their family.
    As a romance author, myself (I write Urban Fantasy with heavy Welsh, English, Irish, and Scottish history and mythology), I think one of the most important aspects of our stories is the reality of them, however. And that’s what is so darned appealing to our readers:
    In many ways, each book we write is a fantasy full of metaphors about our desires, our passions, and our needs. A good romance novel can take the reader on a fantastical journey without leaving the parameters of existing reality. This is true for everything including high fantasy in that parameters are established and tightly followed, giving the reader a sense of “realism”.
    The more realistic (and historically accurate respective to the associated “universe”)) a story, the more gripping it can become because it means the fantasy is equally that much more tangible if not probable.
    I think Scottish historicals are some of the most beloved because of the often very tragic yet courageous history that Scotland has endured, as a nation. It often embodies the classic trope of romance, in and of itself, and thus makes a perfect backdrop.
    Again, I might be talking out of my neck, on this one, but it’s how I, as a reader, view romance novels… with the dash of being a romance author, myself.
    Best of luck to you, sir!!
    And to the Wenches: another brilliant post! Keep up the good work and the wonderful novels!!

    Reply
  191. What a fun post! It’s always nice to see a male interested in the genre. 🙂 and I bet you are surprised by how much you must be learning from these books.
    I found your comment on the kilts interesting. We all know the great kilt doesn’t look like today’s kilt but, yes, that’s what goes on the cover because the great kilt hides too much manchest, but that’s also what sells books, so it’s a toss up I suppose. 🙂

    Reply
  192. What a fun post! It’s always nice to see a male interested in the genre. 🙂 and I bet you are surprised by how much you must be learning from these books.
    I found your comment on the kilts interesting. We all know the great kilt doesn’t look like today’s kilt but, yes, that’s what goes on the cover because the great kilt hides too much manchest, but that’s also what sells books, so it’s a toss up I suppose. 🙂

    Reply
  193. What a fun post! It’s always nice to see a male interested in the genre. 🙂 and I bet you are surprised by how much you must be learning from these books.
    I found your comment on the kilts interesting. We all know the great kilt doesn’t look like today’s kilt but, yes, that’s what goes on the cover because the great kilt hides too much manchest, but that’s also what sells books, so it’s a toss up I suppose. 🙂

    Reply
  194. What a fun post! It’s always nice to see a male interested in the genre. 🙂 and I bet you are surprised by how much you must be learning from these books.
    I found your comment on the kilts interesting. We all know the great kilt doesn’t look like today’s kilt but, yes, that’s what goes on the cover because the great kilt hides too much manchest, but that’s also what sells books, so it’s a toss up I suppose. 🙂

    Reply
  195. What a fun post! It’s always nice to see a male interested in the genre. 🙂 and I bet you are surprised by how much you must be learning from these books.
    I found your comment on the kilts interesting. We all know the great kilt doesn’t look like today’s kilt but, yes, that’s what goes on the cover because the great kilt hides too much manchest, but that’s also what sells books, so it’s a toss up I suppose. 🙂

    Reply
  196. I agree with the idea that readers like Scottish romance because of the ideas of family relationships and genealogy, but I think it also applies to books set in the current time – such as Donna Kauffman’s Catch Me If You Can, Bad Boys in Kilts, and The Great Scot.

    Reply
  197. I agree with the idea that readers like Scottish romance because of the ideas of family relationships and genealogy, but I think it also applies to books set in the current time – such as Donna Kauffman’s Catch Me If You Can, Bad Boys in Kilts, and The Great Scot.

    Reply
  198. I agree with the idea that readers like Scottish romance because of the ideas of family relationships and genealogy, but I think it also applies to books set in the current time – such as Donna Kauffman’s Catch Me If You Can, Bad Boys in Kilts, and The Great Scot.

    Reply
  199. I agree with the idea that readers like Scottish romance because of the ideas of family relationships and genealogy, but I think it also applies to books set in the current time – such as Donna Kauffman’s Catch Me If You Can, Bad Boys in Kilts, and The Great Scot.

    Reply
  200. I agree with the idea that readers like Scottish romance because of the ideas of family relationships and genealogy, but I think it also applies to books set in the current time – such as Donna Kauffman’s Catch Me If You Can, Bad Boys in Kilts, and The Great Scot.

    Reply
  201. Such an interesting topic. I write and read mostly Regencies, but I love a good Scottish romance. The first books I read set in Scotland were Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond series. Her Nicolo series also has parts that take place in Scotland. Diana Gabaldon’s Voyager series were next. Though not technically a romance, it has a romantic theme. Now, after learning about so many other authors, I’ve branched out. Scotland interests me also because I do our family’s genealogy. I have an ancestor that was born in Edinburgh, but I’ve had no luck finding his family. There were just too many Michael Kennedys born in the same year. Also, my husband has Frasers in his family. When we lived in England we visited Edinburgh. I loved it, and the food was much better than in England.
    Good luck on your project.

    Reply
  202. Such an interesting topic. I write and read mostly Regencies, but I love a good Scottish romance. The first books I read set in Scotland were Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond series. Her Nicolo series also has parts that take place in Scotland. Diana Gabaldon’s Voyager series were next. Though not technically a romance, it has a romantic theme. Now, after learning about so many other authors, I’ve branched out. Scotland interests me also because I do our family’s genealogy. I have an ancestor that was born in Edinburgh, but I’ve had no luck finding his family. There were just too many Michael Kennedys born in the same year. Also, my husband has Frasers in his family. When we lived in England we visited Edinburgh. I loved it, and the food was much better than in England.
    Good luck on your project.

    Reply
  203. Such an interesting topic. I write and read mostly Regencies, but I love a good Scottish romance. The first books I read set in Scotland were Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond series. Her Nicolo series also has parts that take place in Scotland. Diana Gabaldon’s Voyager series were next. Though not technically a romance, it has a romantic theme. Now, after learning about so many other authors, I’ve branched out. Scotland interests me also because I do our family’s genealogy. I have an ancestor that was born in Edinburgh, but I’ve had no luck finding his family. There were just too many Michael Kennedys born in the same year. Also, my husband has Frasers in his family. When we lived in England we visited Edinburgh. I loved it, and the food was much better than in England.
    Good luck on your project.

    Reply
  204. Such an interesting topic. I write and read mostly Regencies, but I love a good Scottish romance. The first books I read set in Scotland were Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond series. Her Nicolo series also has parts that take place in Scotland. Diana Gabaldon’s Voyager series were next. Though not technically a romance, it has a romantic theme. Now, after learning about so many other authors, I’ve branched out. Scotland interests me also because I do our family’s genealogy. I have an ancestor that was born in Edinburgh, but I’ve had no luck finding his family. There were just too many Michael Kennedys born in the same year. Also, my husband has Frasers in his family. When we lived in England we visited Edinburgh. I loved it, and the food was much better than in England.
    Good luck on your project.

    Reply
  205. Such an interesting topic. I write and read mostly Regencies, but I love a good Scottish romance. The first books I read set in Scotland were Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond series. Her Nicolo series also has parts that take place in Scotland. Diana Gabaldon’s Voyager series were next. Though not technically a romance, it has a romantic theme. Now, after learning about so many other authors, I’ve branched out. Scotland interests me also because I do our family’s genealogy. I have an ancestor that was born in Edinburgh, but I’ve had no luck finding his family. There were just too many Michael Kennedys born in the same year. Also, my husband has Frasers in his family. When we lived in England we visited Edinburgh. I loved it, and the food was much better than in England.
    Good luck on your project.

    Reply
  206. Wonderful interview. Professor Hague and Susan!
    It’s interesting what a fascination Scotland holds for romance readers. I tend to think it’s a mix of the wild Celtic myths, the tradition of Highland warriors, the fiercely independent spirit of the people . . . and the fabulous accent!
    Thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches!

    Reply
  207. Wonderful interview. Professor Hague and Susan!
    It’s interesting what a fascination Scotland holds for romance readers. I tend to think it’s a mix of the wild Celtic myths, the tradition of Highland warriors, the fiercely independent spirit of the people . . . and the fabulous accent!
    Thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches!

    Reply
  208. Wonderful interview. Professor Hague and Susan!
    It’s interesting what a fascination Scotland holds for romance readers. I tend to think it’s a mix of the wild Celtic myths, the tradition of Highland warriors, the fiercely independent spirit of the people . . . and the fabulous accent!
    Thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches!

    Reply
  209. Wonderful interview. Professor Hague and Susan!
    It’s interesting what a fascination Scotland holds for romance readers. I tend to think it’s a mix of the wild Celtic myths, the tradition of Highland warriors, the fiercely independent spirit of the people . . . and the fabulous accent!
    Thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches!

    Reply
  210. Wonderful interview. Professor Hague and Susan!
    It’s interesting what a fascination Scotland holds for romance readers. I tend to think it’s a mix of the wild Celtic myths, the tradition of Highland warriors, the fiercely independent spirit of the people . . . and the fabulous accent!
    Thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches!

    Reply
  211. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romans are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were places in England or even Wales that saw them independent to the whole not true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  212. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romans are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were places in England or even Wales that saw them independent to the whole not true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  213. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romans are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were places in England or even Wales that saw them independent to the whole not true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  214. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romans are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were places in England or even Wales that saw them independent to the whole not true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  215. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romans are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were places in England or even Wales that saw them independent to the whole not true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  216. Thanks for letting me share your blog Patricia and Mary Jo. Thanks for adding your thoughts. Glad you took Cultural Geography at Syracuse – a course that I taught there 2000-2002!

    Reply
  217. Thanks for letting me share your blog Patricia and Mary Jo. Thanks for adding your thoughts. Glad you took Cultural Geography at Syracuse – a course that I taught there 2000-2002!

    Reply
  218. Thanks for letting me share your blog Patricia and Mary Jo. Thanks for adding your thoughts. Glad you took Cultural Geography at Syracuse – a course that I taught there 2000-2002!

    Reply
  219. Thanks for letting me share your blog Patricia and Mary Jo. Thanks for adding your thoughts. Glad you took Cultural Geography at Syracuse – a course that I taught there 2000-2002!

    Reply
  220. Thanks for letting me share your blog Patricia and Mary Jo. Thanks for adding your thoughts. Glad you took Cultural Geography at Syracuse – a course that I taught there 2000-2002!

    Reply
  221. I’m so pleased that people are enjoying this topic. Sorry I can’t keep up with everyone that is posting, but thanks to all of you!

    Reply
  222. I’m so pleased that people are enjoying this topic. Sorry I can’t keep up with everyone that is posting, but thanks to all of you!

    Reply
  223. I’m so pleased that people are enjoying this topic. Sorry I can’t keep up with everyone that is posting, but thanks to all of you!

    Reply
  224. I’m so pleased that people are enjoying this topic. Sorry I can’t keep up with everyone that is posting, but thanks to all of you!

    Reply
  225. I’m so pleased that people are enjoying this topic. Sorry I can’t keep up with everyone that is posting, but thanks to all of you!

    Reply
  226. Hi, Euan! It’s a pleasure to read about your studies, and about the thoughts of romance readers and writers. Although it’s very late in the day, I wanted to add in my perspective. I was born and raised in eastern Kentucky, where a goodly number of the population is of Scots ancestry. One of my grandmothers, for example, was a Murray. Many of my ancestors came into eastern Kentucky in the latter 1700s and early 1800s. While the image of a brawny man in a kilt is sufficient reason to choose a romance novel (!!), I’ve always felt an almost literal kinship to the characters in the stories. I know what it’s like to grow up where you’re related to many local families, and also to hear commentary on a family based on generations of my ancestors knowing their ancestors (“those [name] have never been any account!”), something Scottish stories emphasize. The Highland terrain has some similarities to where I was raised as well. There have been theories that the Scottish clan approach to community is partially the source of the feuding in eastern Kentucky, something I experienced as an observer and knew of historically in my family. At the very least, the fierce connection to place and family along with the sense that no one had better try to take either from one that characterizes the Scotland of romance novels resonates with me as an early echo of my “place”.
    Another reason, likely associated with the above, is that the men in the Scottish books are typically men of action and activity. They fight alongside their men, they are involved in the daily running of their holdings, and they know how to do many of the things they ask their dependents to do. The men I grew up around didn’t wear suits very often, but they knew how to hunt, farm, repair things, build things, cook things, and at the end of the day burp babies. Very hands on. Many also served in the military. The Scottish heroes tend to be that way, practical heroes. I admire that very much. While I love a good Regency, even my favorites in that realm are the heroes who get their hands dirty at something other than playing cards or clasping the hand of a dance partner. So, in my case, Scotland-based romances are high on my list because I feel a historical connection to place and I feel a romantic connection to the type of men usually portrayed.
    (Yes, TMI, but hey, you asked. :D)

    Reply
  227. Hi, Euan! It’s a pleasure to read about your studies, and about the thoughts of romance readers and writers. Although it’s very late in the day, I wanted to add in my perspective. I was born and raised in eastern Kentucky, where a goodly number of the population is of Scots ancestry. One of my grandmothers, for example, was a Murray. Many of my ancestors came into eastern Kentucky in the latter 1700s and early 1800s. While the image of a brawny man in a kilt is sufficient reason to choose a romance novel (!!), I’ve always felt an almost literal kinship to the characters in the stories. I know what it’s like to grow up where you’re related to many local families, and also to hear commentary on a family based on generations of my ancestors knowing their ancestors (“those [name] have never been any account!”), something Scottish stories emphasize. The Highland terrain has some similarities to where I was raised as well. There have been theories that the Scottish clan approach to community is partially the source of the feuding in eastern Kentucky, something I experienced as an observer and knew of historically in my family. At the very least, the fierce connection to place and family along with the sense that no one had better try to take either from one that characterizes the Scotland of romance novels resonates with me as an early echo of my “place”.
    Another reason, likely associated with the above, is that the men in the Scottish books are typically men of action and activity. They fight alongside their men, they are involved in the daily running of their holdings, and they know how to do many of the things they ask their dependents to do. The men I grew up around didn’t wear suits very often, but they knew how to hunt, farm, repair things, build things, cook things, and at the end of the day burp babies. Very hands on. Many also served in the military. The Scottish heroes tend to be that way, practical heroes. I admire that very much. While I love a good Regency, even my favorites in that realm are the heroes who get their hands dirty at something other than playing cards or clasping the hand of a dance partner. So, in my case, Scotland-based romances are high on my list because I feel a historical connection to place and I feel a romantic connection to the type of men usually portrayed.
    (Yes, TMI, but hey, you asked. :D)

    Reply
  228. Hi, Euan! It’s a pleasure to read about your studies, and about the thoughts of romance readers and writers. Although it’s very late in the day, I wanted to add in my perspective. I was born and raised in eastern Kentucky, where a goodly number of the population is of Scots ancestry. One of my grandmothers, for example, was a Murray. Many of my ancestors came into eastern Kentucky in the latter 1700s and early 1800s. While the image of a brawny man in a kilt is sufficient reason to choose a romance novel (!!), I’ve always felt an almost literal kinship to the characters in the stories. I know what it’s like to grow up where you’re related to many local families, and also to hear commentary on a family based on generations of my ancestors knowing their ancestors (“those [name] have never been any account!”), something Scottish stories emphasize. The Highland terrain has some similarities to where I was raised as well. There have been theories that the Scottish clan approach to community is partially the source of the feuding in eastern Kentucky, something I experienced as an observer and knew of historically in my family. At the very least, the fierce connection to place and family along with the sense that no one had better try to take either from one that characterizes the Scotland of romance novels resonates with me as an early echo of my “place”.
    Another reason, likely associated with the above, is that the men in the Scottish books are typically men of action and activity. They fight alongside their men, they are involved in the daily running of their holdings, and they know how to do many of the things they ask their dependents to do. The men I grew up around didn’t wear suits very often, but they knew how to hunt, farm, repair things, build things, cook things, and at the end of the day burp babies. Very hands on. Many also served in the military. The Scottish heroes tend to be that way, practical heroes. I admire that very much. While I love a good Regency, even my favorites in that realm are the heroes who get their hands dirty at something other than playing cards or clasping the hand of a dance partner. So, in my case, Scotland-based romances are high on my list because I feel a historical connection to place and I feel a romantic connection to the type of men usually portrayed.
    (Yes, TMI, but hey, you asked. :D)

    Reply
  229. Hi, Euan! It’s a pleasure to read about your studies, and about the thoughts of romance readers and writers. Although it’s very late in the day, I wanted to add in my perspective. I was born and raised in eastern Kentucky, where a goodly number of the population is of Scots ancestry. One of my grandmothers, for example, was a Murray. Many of my ancestors came into eastern Kentucky in the latter 1700s and early 1800s. While the image of a brawny man in a kilt is sufficient reason to choose a romance novel (!!), I’ve always felt an almost literal kinship to the characters in the stories. I know what it’s like to grow up where you’re related to many local families, and also to hear commentary on a family based on generations of my ancestors knowing their ancestors (“those [name] have never been any account!”), something Scottish stories emphasize. The Highland terrain has some similarities to where I was raised as well. There have been theories that the Scottish clan approach to community is partially the source of the feuding in eastern Kentucky, something I experienced as an observer and knew of historically in my family. At the very least, the fierce connection to place and family along with the sense that no one had better try to take either from one that characterizes the Scotland of romance novels resonates with me as an early echo of my “place”.
    Another reason, likely associated with the above, is that the men in the Scottish books are typically men of action and activity. They fight alongside their men, they are involved in the daily running of their holdings, and they know how to do many of the things they ask their dependents to do. The men I grew up around didn’t wear suits very often, but they knew how to hunt, farm, repair things, build things, cook things, and at the end of the day burp babies. Very hands on. Many also served in the military. The Scottish heroes tend to be that way, practical heroes. I admire that very much. While I love a good Regency, even my favorites in that realm are the heroes who get their hands dirty at something other than playing cards or clasping the hand of a dance partner. So, in my case, Scotland-based romances are high on my list because I feel a historical connection to place and I feel a romantic connection to the type of men usually portrayed.
    (Yes, TMI, but hey, you asked. :D)

    Reply
  230. Hi, Euan! It’s a pleasure to read about your studies, and about the thoughts of romance readers and writers. Although it’s very late in the day, I wanted to add in my perspective. I was born and raised in eastern Kentucky, where a goodly number of the population is of Scots ancestry. One of my grandmothers, for example, was a Murray. Many of my ancestors came into eastern Kentucky in the latter 1700s and early 1800s. While the image of a brawny man in a kilt is sufficient reason to choose a romance novel (!!), I’ve always felt an almost literal kinship to the characters in the stories. I know what it’s like to grow up where you’re related to many local families, and also to hear commentary on a family based on generations of my ancestors knowing their ancestors (“those [name] have never been any account!”), something Scottish stories emphasize. The Highland terrain has some similarities to where I was raised as well. There have been theories that the Scottish clan approach to community is partially the source of the feuding in eastern Kentucky, something I experienced as an observer and knew of historically in my family. At the very least, the fierce connection to place and family along with the sense that no one had better try to take either from one that characterizes the Scotland of romance novels resonates with me as an early echo of my “place”.
    Another reason, likely associated with the above, is that the men in the Scottish books are typically men of action and activity. They fight alongside their men, they are involved in the daily running of their holdings, and they know how to do many of the things they ask their dependents to do. The men I grew up around didn’t wear suits very often, but they knew how to hunt, farm, repair things, build things, cook things, and at the end of the day burp babies. Very hands on. Many also served in the military. The Scottish heroes tend to be that way, practical heroes. I admire that very much. While I love a good Regency, even my favorites in that realm are the heroes who get their hands dirty at something other than playing cards or clasping the hand of a dance partner. So, in my case, Scotland-based romances are high on my list because I feel a historical connection to place and I feel a romantic connection to the type of men usually portrayed.
    (Yes, TMI, but hey, you asked. :D)

    Reply
  231. Re the Outlander/Cross Stitch title: I did some Googling and found something which purports to come from the author herself:
    “Okay, so I’ve gotten an email from Diana’s assistant Janice. Diana herself is in a time crunch doing copy-edits for her next book. But here’s the story from Janice about the first book’s title:
    “Yes, CROSS STITCH (play on a stitch in time) was Diana’s working title. She sold the book first in the US. The marketing dept didn’t like CROSS STITCH as they felt it sounded too much like embroidery/sewing. So Diana came up with OUTLANDER, which they liked as it sounded adventurous. When she sold the book in the UK, that publisher felt OUTLANDER sounded wrong and asked if she had another title. She proposed CROSS STITCH. They liked it and so it was. There is a bit of dispute on why the UK publisher didn’t like OUTLANDER, but ultimately it was most likely a personal choice of the editor and Diana, as a new author, didn’t push the issue. [grin]””
    I have to say the title Cross Stitch does nothing for me!
    I don’t know if this point has come up in your researches, but I wonder if one reason why Scottish romances are so popular with Americans is the clan system and the role and power of the clan chief (at least as popularly understood). This enables the author and reader to have a hero who is all-powerful in his world. One often hears how there are a remarkable number of Dukes in Regency romances – clan chiefs could be the equivalent!

    Reply
  232. Re the Outlander/Cross Stitch title: I did some Googling and found something which purports to come from the author herself:
    “Okay, so I’ve gotten an email from Diana’s assistant Janice. Diana herself is in a time crunch doing copy-edits for her next book. But here’s the story from Janice about the first book’s title:
    “Yes, CROSS STITCH (play on a stitch in time) was Diana’s working title. She sold the book first in the US. The marketing dept didn’t like CROSS STITCH as they felt it sounded too much like embroidery/sewing. So Diana came up with OUTLANDER, which they liked as it sounded adventurous. When she sold the book in the UK, that publisher felt OUTLANDER sounded wrong and asked if she had another title. She proposed CROSS STITCH. They liked it and so it was. There is a bit of dispute on why the UK publisher didn’t like OUTLANDER, but ultimately it was most likely a personal choice of the editor and Diana, as a new author, didn’t push the issue. [grin]””
    I have to say the title Cross Stitch does nothing for me!
    I don’t know if this point has come up in your researches, but I wonder if one reason why Scottish romances are so popular with Americans is the clan system and the role and power of the clan chief (at least as popularly understood). This enables the author and reader to have a hero who is all-powerful in his world. One often hears how there are a remarkable number of Dukes in Regency romances – clan chiefs could be the equivalent!

    Reply
  233. Re the Outlander/Cross Stitch title: I did some Googling and found something which purports to come from the author herself:
    “Okay, so I’ve gotten an email from Diana’s assistant Janice. Diana herself is in a time crunch doing copy-edits for her next book. But here’s the story from Janice about the first book’s title:
    “Yes, CROSS STITCH (play on a stitch in time) was Diana’s working title. She sold the book first in the US. The marketing dept didn’t like CROSS STITCH as they felt it sounded too much like embroidery/sewing. So Diana came up with OUTLANDER, which they liked as it sounded adventurous. When she sold the book in the UK, that publisher felt OUTLANDER sounded wrong and asked if she had another title. She proposed CROSS STITCH. They liked it and so it was. There is a bit of dispute on why the UK publisher didn’t like OUTLANDER, but ultimately it was most likely a personal choice of the editor and Diana, as a new author, didn’t push the issue. [grin]””
    I have to say the title Cross Stitch does nothing for me!
    I don’t know if this point has come up in your researches, but I wonder if one reason why Scottish romances are so popular with Americans is the clan system and the role and power of the clan chief (at least as popularly understood). This enables the author and reader to have a hero who is all-powerful in his world. One often hears how there are a remarkable number of Dukes in Regency romances – clan chiefs could be the equivalent!

    Reply
  234. Re the Outlander/Cross Stitch title: I did some Googling and found something which purports to come from the author herself:
    “Okay, so I’ve gotten an email from Diana’s assistant Janice. Diana herself is in a time crunch doing copy-edits for her next book. But here’s the story from Janice about the first book’s title:
    “Yes, CROSS STITCH (play on a stitch in time) was Diana’s working title. She sold the book first in the US. The marketing dept didn’t like CROSS STITCH as they felt it sounded too much like embroidery/sewing. So Diana came up with OUTLANDER, which they liked as it sounded adventurous. When she sold the book in the UK, that publisher felt OUTLANDER sounded wrong and asked if she had another title. She proposed CROSS STITCH. They liked it and so it was. There is a bit of dispute on why the UK publisher didn’t like OUTLANDER, but ultimately it was most likely a personal choice of the editor and Diana, as a new author, didn’t push the issue. [grin]””
    I have to say the title Cross Stitch does nothing for me!
    I don’t know if this point has come up in your researches, but I wonder if one reason why Scottish romances are so popular with Americans is the clan system and the role and power of the clan chief (at least as popularly understood). This enables the author and reader to have a hero who is all-powerful in his world. One often hears how there are a remarkable number of Dukes in Regency romances – clan chiefs could be the equivalent!

    Reply
  235. Re the Outlander/Cross Stitch title: I did some Googling and found something which purports to come from the author herself:
    “Okay, so I’ve gotten an email from Diana’s assistant Janice. Diana herself is in a time crunch doing copy-edits for her next book. But here’s the story from Janice about the first book’s title:
    “Yes, CROSS STITCH (play on a stitch in time) was Diana’s working title. She sold the book first in the US. The marketing dept didn’t like CROSS STITCH as they felt it sounded too much like embroidery/sewing. So Diana came up with OUTLANDER, which they liked as it sounded adventurous. When she sold the book in the UK, that publisher felt OUTLANDER sounded wrong and asked if she had another title. She proposed CROSS STITCH. They liked it and so it was. There is a bit of dispute on why the UK publisher didn’t like OUTLANDER, but ultimately it was most likely a personal choice of the editor and Diana, as a new author, didn’t push the issue. [grin]””
    I have to say the title Cross Stitch does nothing for me!
    I don’t know if this point has come up in your researches, but I wonder if one reason why Scottish romances are so popular with Americans is the clan system and the role and power of the clan chief (at least as popularly understood). This enables the author and reader to have a hero who is all-powerful in his world. One often hears how there are a remarkable number of Dukes in Regency romances – clan chiefs could be the equivalent!

    Reply
  236. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romances are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were few places in England or even Wales that were independent to the whole, not so true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  237. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romances are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were few places in England or even Wales that were independent to the whole, not so true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  238. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romances are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were few places in England or even Wales that were independent to the whole, not so true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  239. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romances are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were few places in England or even Wales that were independent to the whole, not so true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  240. I think for me the appeal with Scottish romance is the theme of the “underdog” in their history whether from forces within or without. I came back to reading romance historicals set in Scotland and England from historical fiction after reading OUTLANDER IN ’94. I read romance since I was 14 but school got in the way of recreational reading. I loved the sweeping historicals of KATHERINE by Anya Seton and DESIREE by Anne Marie Salinko but then I found Dorothy Dunnett’s Lynmond series and Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOWS that brought me back to Scotland. Unfortunately, there were fewer authors like this and I switch to romance set in Scotland including may of the authors who have commented here. What I have found since the 90’s is that a number of the Scottish romances authors have expanded the genre whether by writing in periods not usually done.. like Jillian’s Hunter’s A DEEPER MAGIC. Now we have Scottish romances set in the 1600’s with it’s combined crowns, it’s political and religious strife and early Jacobite stirings (English romances set in this period were common) in romance and yet still set in Scotland.
    Also for someone like me who wants a lot of history in my reading I can blend both history and romance in more romances now because the level of research many Scottish romance writers do whether it is to place their H/H in the historical events of the period or they want to place them in Scotland and the history is minor. I especially like those authors who like Blythe Gifford and Amanda Scott write in periods and locations (Rievers/ the Scottish Borders) not typical in Scottish romances until recently, and authors like Susan King/Susan who write both romance and historical fiction with appeal to their larger readership. Also there are those authors like Marsha Canham ( MIDNIGHT HONOR) who takes real persons and creates a fictional account of their lives and yet meets all the qualifications of a typical romance ( Jacobite 1746) vs a straight historical. Then a reader who loved Barbara Erskine’s KINGDOM OF SHADOW ( a dual storyline of past/present of genetic memory historical) that told of the story of Isobel Buchan (MacDuff) who hung from the ramparts of Berwick castle after 1306, could revisit that character in Monica McCarty’s VIPER, part of her “Guard Series” and though the book plots were vastly different they appeal to romance readers.
    As others have said it is the “warrior” spirit, but maybe its more of one of “independent spirit” tied to their land and their history because they were never conquered by the Romans nor the Normans or the English crown, and only when they were the victims of by the British crown with their manipulation of the Darian Scheme leading to the act of Union in 1707 that they were conquered but if the YES campaign is any indication that Scottish independent spirit is still alive. Maybe the regency ton romances are the only popular because by then in British/English history there were few places in England or even Wales that were independent to the whole, not so true at least in the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

    Reply
  241. I know I said my opinion wasn’t relevant since I’m not a US reader but I was wondering why no-one’s mentioned Nigel Tranter. Maybe his books never sold in the US? Also, they’re not romances but they do tend to have romantic elements and to me the way they depict Scottish history seems a lot more realistic than what you find in romances which have Highlanders wandering around reiving in the Borders etc.

    Reply
  242. I know I said my opinion wasn’t relevant since I’m not a US reader but I was wondering why no-one’s mentioned Nigel Tranter. Maybe his books never sold in the US? Also, they’re not romances but they do tend to have romantic elements and to me the way they depict Scottish history seems a lot more realistic than what you find in romances which have Highlanders wandering around reiving in the Borders etc.

    Reply
  243. I know I said my opinion wasn’t relevant since I’m not a US reader but I was wondering why no-one’s mentioned Nigel Tranter. Maybe his books never sold in the US? Also, they’re not romances but they do tend to have romantic elements and to me the way they depict Scottish history seems a lot more realistic than what you find in romances which have Highlanders wandering around reiving in the Borders etc.

    Reply
  244. I know I said my opinion wasn’t relevant since I’m not a US reader but I was wondering why no-one’s mentioned Nigel Tranter. Maybe his books never sold in the US? Also, they’re not romances but they do tend to have romantic elements and to me the way they depict Scottish history seems a lot more realistic than what you find in romances which have Highlanders wandering around reiving in the Borders etc.

    Reply
  245. I know I said my opinion wasn’t relevant since I’m not a US reader but I was wondering why no-one’s mentioned Nigel Tranter. Maybe his books never sold in the US? Also, they’re not romances but they do tend to have romantic elements and to me the way they depict Scottish history seems a lot more realistic than what you find in romances which have Highlanders wandering around reiving in the Borders etc.

    Reply
  246. Hmm. That last sentence wasn’t clear. I wasn’t saying that all Scottish-set historical romances ignore the history, just that I’ve come across some which, in my opinion, dealt with it very badly.

    Reply
  247. Hmm. That last sentence wasn’t clear. I wasn’t saying that all Scottish-set historical romances ignore the history, just that I’ve come across some which, in my opinion, dealt with it very badly.

    Reply
  248. Hmm. That last sentence wasn’t clear. I wasn’t saying that all Scottish-set historical romances ignore the history, just that I’ve come across some which, in my opinion, dealt with it very badly.

    Reply
  249. Hmm. That last sentence wasn’t clear. I wasn’t saying that all Scottish-set historical romances ignore the history, just that I’ve come across some which, in my opinion, dealt with it very badly.

    Reply
  250. Hmm. That last sentence wasn’t clear. I wasn’t saying that all Scottish-set historical romances ignore the history, just that I’ve come across some which, in my opinion, dealt with it very badly.

    Reply
  251. Laura,
    Your thoughts are appreciated – it doesn’t matter where you’re from for this blog!
    Jody, nice to hear from you. That’s quite a commentary. I think the underdog theme is a popular one, and because Scottish clans, as popularly understood, tie together land, family and genealogy, I think that makes them a good source of romance storylines.
    One thing that is emerging is that Scotland the place is the genre, but after that authors have flexibility to center on differnt time periods and locations within Scotland, and even move into paranormals and contemporaries (or a combination of both!) I’d never heard of Terry Spear’s Highlander werewolves: http://terryspear.com/id64.html That’s quite a combination!
    Susanna, there’s never TMI! Thanks for your comments – the immigrant connections between Scotland and the US are not as strong as they once were.
    HJ, thanks for that digging about Diana Gabaldon, I never knew. I agree that “Outlander” is a better title 🙂

    Reply
  252. Laura,
    Your thoughts are appreciated – it doesn’t matter where you’re from for this blog!
    Jody, nice to hear from you. That’s quite a commentary. I think the underdog theme is a popular one, and because Scottish clans, as popularly understood, tie together land, family and genealogy, I think that makes them a good source of romance storylines.
    One thing that is emerging is that Scotland the place is the genre, but after that authors have flexibility to center on differnt time periods and locations within Scotland, and even move into paranormals and contemporaries (or a combination of both!) I’d never heard of Terry Spear’s Highlander werewolves: http://terryspear.com/id64.html That’s quite a combination!
    Susanna, there’s never TMI! Thanks for your comments – the immigrant connections between Scotland and the US are not as strong as they once were.
    HJ, thanks for that digging about Diana Gabaldon, I never knew. I agree that “Outlander” is a better title 🙂

    Reply
  253. Laura,
    Your thoughts are appreciated – it doesn’t matter where you’re from for this blog!
    Jody, nice to hear from you. That’s quite a commentary. I think the underdog theme is a popular one, and because Scottish clans, as popularly understood, tie together land, family and genealogy, I think that makes them a good source of romance storylines.
    One thing that is emerging is that Scotland the place is the genre, but after that authors have flexibility to center on differnt time periods and locations within Scotland, and even move into paranormals and contemporaries (or a combination of both!) I’d never heard of Terry Spear’s Highlander werewolves: http://terryspear.com/id64.html That’s quite a combination!
    Susanna, there’s never TMI! Thanks for your comments – the immigrant connections between Scotland and the US are not as strong as they once were.
    HJ, thanks for that digging about Diana Gabaldon, I never knew. I agree that “Outlander” is a better title 🙂

    Reply
  254. Laura,
    Your thoughts are appreciated – it doesn’t matter where you’re from for this blog!
    Jody, nice to hear from you. That’s quite a commentary. I think the underdog theme is a popular one, and because Scottish clans, as popularly understood, tie together land, family and genealogy, I think that makes them a good source of romance storylines.
    One thing that is emerging is that Scotland the place is the genre, but after that authors have flexibility to center on differnt time periods and locations within Scotland, and even move into paranormals and contemporaries (or a combination of both!) I’d never heard of Terry Spear’s Highlander werewolves: http://terryspear.com/id64.html That’s quite a combination!
    Susanna, there’s never TMI! Thanks for your comments – the immigrant connections between Scotland and the US are not as strong as they once were.
    HJ, thanks for that digging about Diana Gabaldon, I never knew. I agree that “Outlander” is a better title 🙂

    Reply
  255. Laura,
    Your thoughts are appreciated – it doesn’t matter where you’re from for this blog!
    Jody, nice to hear from you. That’s quite a commentary. I think the underdog theme is a popular one, and because Scottish clans, as popularly understood, tie together land, family and genealogy, I think that makes them a good source of romance storylines.
    One thing that is emerging is that Scotland the place is the genre, but after that authors have flexibility to center on differnt time periods and locations within Scotland, and even move into paranormals and contemporaries (or a combination of both!) I’d never heard of Terry Spear’s Highlander werewolves: http://terryspear.com/id64.html That’s quite a combination!
    Susanna, there’s never TMI! Thanks for your comments – the immigrant connections between Scotland and the US are not as strong as they once were.
    HJ, thanks for that digging about Diana Gabaldon, I never knew. I agree that “Outlander” is a better title 🙂

    Reply
  256. I think the appeal of the Scottish romance (mostly historical, though I expect that to change) is that many of the values we think of as American–family loyalty, thrift, hard work, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency–were part of the heritage of the Scots who tamed the American wilderness.
    For the first several hundred years of American colonial history, we largely populated the US eastern seaboard. As the Jacobites fled, and the Clearances picked up steam with the development of hardier varieties of sheep, Scottish and Scotch-Irish emigration exploded (ca 1800). In the ensuing 50 years, the American continent was settled more or less coast to coast, and to a great extent as a function of “the disposable people” who arrived from Scotland and northern Ireland. These people were dauntless, tough, creative, and tenacious as all get out.
    In this sense, mainstream American identity was forged not only of immigrant stock, but especially of Scottish immigrant stock.
    My theory, which you are welcome to legitimate with a lot of post docs and flagons of ale.

    Reply
  257. I think the appeal of the Scottish romance (mostly historical, though I expect that to change) is that many of the values we think of as American–family loyalty, thrift, hard work, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency–were part of the heritage of the Scots who tamed the American wilderness.
    For the first several hundred years of American colonial history, we largely populated the US eastern seaboard. As the Jacobites fled, and the Clearances picked up steam with the development of hardier varieties of sheep, Scottish and Scotch-Irish emigration exploded (ca 1800). In the ensuing 50 years, the American continent was settled more or less coast to coast, and to a great extent as a function of “the disposable people” who arrived from Scotland and northern Ireland. These people were dauntless, tough, creative, and tenacious as all get out.
    In this sense, mainstream American identity was forged not only of immigrant stock, but especially of Scottish immigrant stock.
    My theory, which you are welcome to legitimate with a lot of post docs and flagons of ale.

    Reply
  258. I think the appeal of the Scottish romance (mostly historical, though I expect that to change) is that many of the values we think of as American–family loyalty, thrift, hard work, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency–were part of the heritage of the Scots who tamed the American wilderness.
    For the first several hundred years of American colonial history, we largely populated the US eastern seaboard. As the Jacobites fled, and the Clearances picked up steam with the development of hardier varieties of sheep, Scottish and Scotch-Irish emigration exploded (ca 1800). In the ensuing 50 years, the American continent was settled more or less coast to coast, and to a great extent as a function of “the disposable people” who arrived from Scotland and northern Ireland. These people were dauntless, tough, creative, and tenacious as all get out.
    In this sense, mainstream American identity was forged not only of immigrant stock, but especially of Scottish immigrant stock.
    My theory, which you are welcome to legitimate with a lot of post docs and flagons of ale.

    Reply
  259. I think the appeal of the Scottish romance (mostly historical, though I expect that to change) is that many of the values we think of as American–family loyalty, thrift, hard work, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency–were part of the heritage of the Scots who tamed the American wilderness.
    For the first several hundred years of American colonial history, we largely populated the US eastern seaboard. As the Jacobites fled, and the Clearances picked up steam with the development of hardier varieties of sheep, Scottish and Scotch-Irish emigration exploded (ca 1800). In the ensuing 50 years, the American continent was settled more or less coast to coast, and to a great extent as a function of “the disposable people” who arrived from Scotland and northern Ireland. These people were dauntless, tough, creative, and tenacious as all get out.
    In this sense, mainstream American identity was forged not only of immigrant stock, but especially of Scottish immigrant stock.
    My theory, which you are welcome to legitimate with a lot of post docs and flagons of ale.

    Reply
  260. I think the appeal of the Scottish romance (mostly historical, though I expect that to change) is that many of the values we think of as American–family loyalty, thrift, hard work, resourcefulness, self-sufficiency–were part of the heritage of the Scots who tamed the American wilderness.
    For the first several hundred years of American colonial history, we largely populated the US eastern seaboard. As the Jacobites fled, and the Clearances picked up steam with the development of hardier varieties of sheep, Scottish and Scotch-Irish emigration exploded (ca 1800). In the ensuing 50 years, the American continent was settled more or less coast to coast, and to a great extent as a function of “the disposable people” who arrived from Scotland and northern Ireland. These people were dauntless, tough, creative, and tenacious as all get out.
    In this sense, mainstream American identity was forged not only of immigrant stock, but especially of Scottish immigrant stock.
    My theory, which you are welcome to legitimate with a lot of post docs and flagons of ale.

    Reply
  261. Euen: The Burns poem was said out loud and I still had problems with it. However, that might have been due to the person reading it. She was a Scottish WWII war bride and she had a very very thick brogue. But it didn’t really matter because I loved to listen to her. The highlight of my time around her was when she said the Lord’s Prayer in Gaelic.
    Books: one of my favorite ones is The Secret by Julie Garwood (brings a smile every time.) Others: The Templar’s Seduction by Mary Reed McCall, Jude Deveraux’s Highland Velvet. If you like to mix a little paranormal in, Lynn Kurland has a wonderful series.

    Reply
  262. Euen: The Burns poem was said out loud and I still had problems with it. However, that might have been due to the person reading it. She was a Scottish WWII war bride and she had a very very thick brogue. But it didn’t really matter because I loved to listen to her. The highlight of my time around her was when she said the Lord’s Prayer in Gaelic.
    Books: one of my favorite ones is The Secret by Julie Garwood (brings a smile every time.) Others: The Templar’s Seduction by Mary Reed McCall, Jude Deveraux’s Highland Velvet. If you like to mix a little paranormal in, Lynn Kurland has a wonderful series.

    Reply
  263. Euen: The Burns poem was said out loud and I still had problems with it. However, that might have been due to the person reading it. She was a Scottish WWII war bride and she had a very very thick brogue. But it didn’t really matter because I loved to listen to her. The highlight of my time around her was when she said the Lord’s Prayer in Gaelic.
    Books: one of my favorite ones is The Secret by Julie Garwood (brings a smile every time.) Others: The Templar’s Seduction by Mary Reed McCall, Jude Deveraux’s Highland Velvet. If you like to mix a little paranormal in, Lynn Kurland has a wonderful series.

    Reply
  264. Euen: The Burns poem was said out loud and I still had problems with it. However, that might have been due to the person reading it. She was a Scottish WWII war bride and she had a very very thick brogue. But it didn’t really matter because I loved to listen to her. The highlight of my time around her was when she said the Lord’s Prayer in Gaelic.
    Books: one of my favorite ones is The Secret by Julie Garwood (brings a smile every time.) Others: The Templar’s Seduction by Mary Reed McCall, Jude Deveraux’s Highland Velvet. If you like to mix a little paranormal in, Lynn Kurland has a wonderful series.

    Reply
  265. Euen: The Burns poem was said out loud and I still had problems with it. However, that might have been due to the person reading it. She was a Scottish WWII war bride and she had a very very thick brogue. But it didn’t really matter because I loved to listen to her. The highlight of my time around her was when she said the Lord’s Prayer in Gaelic.
    Books: one of my favorite ones is The Secret by Julie Garwood (brings a smile every time.) Others: The Templar’s Seduction by Mary Reed McCall, Jude Deveraux’s Highland Velvet. If you like to mix a little paranormal in, Lynn Kurland has a wonderful series.

    Reply
  266. Kay, thanks for the update. A strong accent can make anything difficult to understand. Try reading Burns out loud yourself – that’s how I got the hang of it 🙂
    Julie Garwood’s “The Secret” was one of the first hit Scottish historicals, I think it was enjoyed by a lot of readers.

    Reply
  267. Kay, thanks for the update. A strong accent can make anything difficult to understand. Try reading Burns out loud yourself – that’s how I got the hang of it 🙂
    Julie Garwood’s “The Secret” was one of the first hit Scottish historicals, I think it was enjoyed by a lot of readers.

    Reply
  268. Kay, thanks for the update. A strong accent can make anything difficult to understand. Try reading Burns out loud yourself – that’s how I got the hang of it 🙂
    Julie Garwood’s “The Secret” was one of the first hit Scottish historicals, I think it was enjoyed by a lot of readers.

    Reply
  269. Kay, thanks for the update. A strong accent can make anything difficult to understand. Try reading Burns out loud yourself – that’s how I got the hang of it 🙂
    Julie Garwood’s “The Secret” was one of the first hit Scottish historicals, I think it was enjoyed by a lot of readers.

    Reply
  270. Kay, thanks for the update. A strong accent can make anything difficult to understand. Try reading Burns out loud yourself – that’s how I got the hang of it 🙂
    Julie Garwood’s “The Secret” was one of the first hit Scottish historicals, I think it was enjoyed by a lot of readers.

    Reply
  271. Grace,
    There certainly is something to the impact of Scottish immigrants on mainstream US identity. Thanks for your theory and I’ll take you up on those flagons of ale!

    Reply
  272. Grace,
    There certainly is something to the impact of Scottish immigrants on mainstream US identity. Thanks for your theory and I’ll take you up on those flagons of ale!

    Reply
  273. Grace,
    There certainly is something to the impact of Scottish immigrants on mainstream US identity. Thanks for your theory and I’ll take you up on those flagons of ale!

    Reply
  274. Grace,
    There certainly is something to the impact of Scottish immigrants on mainstream US identity. Thanks for your theory and I’ll take you up on those flagons of ale!

    Reply
  275. Grace,
    There certainly is something to the impact of Scottish immigrants on mainstream US identity. Thanks for your theory and I’ll take you up on those flagons of ale!

    Reply
  276. Wonderful interview, Susan and Euan, and great responses by everyone! Fascinating insights, especially about the broader range of society playing principal parts in many Scottish romances.
    Some of the aspects of Scottish medieval romances are also present in English medieval romances, and the style of dress, warrior code etc would have been much the same, and yet the latter are not as popular at the moment, so there has to be a geographical component. Very interesting.
    I have to admit to having little interest in Scottish set romances now, whereas I loved them when I was young, especially Jacobite ones.I found Jacobites madly romantic.
    These days the post 1745 Jacobites turn up occasionally in my Georgian series as the villains/enemies!
    What this says about time, getting older, or me, I don’t know.
    BTW, another fan of Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles here. Have you read them, Euan?
    Jo

    Reply
  277. Wonderful interview, Susan and Euan, and great responses by everyone! Fascinating insights, especially about the broader range of society playing principal parts in many Scottish romances.
    Some of the aspects of Scottish medieval romances are also present in English medieval romances, and the style of dress, warrior code etc would have been much the same, and yet the latter are not as popular at the moment, so there has to be a geographical component. Very interesting.
    I have to admit to having little interest in Scottish set romances now, whereas I loved them when I was young, especially Jacobite ones.I found Jacobites madly romantic.
    These days the post 1745 Jacobites turn up occasionally in my Georgian series as the villains/enemies!
    What this says about time, getting older, or me, I don’t know.
    BTW, another fan of Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles here. Have you read them, Euan?
    Jo

    Reply
  278. Wonderful interview, Susan and Euan, and great responses by everyone! Fascinating insights, especially about the broader range of society playing principal parts in many Scottish romances.
    Some of the aspects of Scottish medieval romances are also present in English medieval romances, and the style of dress, warrior code etc would have been much the same, and yet the latter are not as popular at the moment, so there has to be a geographical component. Very interesting.
    I have to admit to having little interest in Scottish set romances now, whereas I loved them when I was young, especially Jacobite ones.I found Jacobites madly romantic.
    These days the post 1745 Jacobites turn up occasionally in my Georgian series as the villains/enemies!
    What this says about time, getting older, or me, I don’t know.
    BTW, another fan of Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles here. Have you read them, Euan?
    Jo

    Reply
  279. Wonderful interview, Susan and Euan, and great responses by everyone! Fascinating insights, especially about the broader range of society playing principal parts in many Scottish romances.
    Some of the aspects of Scottish medieval romances are also present in English medieval romances, and the style of dress, warrior code etc would have been much the same, and yet the latter are not as popular at the moment, so there has to be a geographical component. Very interesting.
    I have to admit to having little interest in Scottish set romances now, whereas I loved them when I was young, especially Jacobite ones.I found Jacobites madly romantic.
    These days the post 1745 Jacobites turn up occasionally in my Georgian series as the villains/enemies!
    What this says about time, getting older, or me, I don’t know.
    BTW, another fan of Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles here. Have you read them, Euan?
    Jo

    Reply
  280. Wonderful interview, Susan and Euan, and great responses by everyone! Fascinating insights, especially about the broader range of society playing principal parts in many Scottish romances.
    Some of the aspects of Scottish medieval romances are also present in English medieval romances, and the style of dress, warrior code etc would have been much the same, and yet the latter are not as popular at the moment, so there has to be a geographical component. Very interesting.
    I have to admit to having little interest in Scottish set romances now, whereas I loved them when I was young, especially Jacobite ones.I found Jacobites madly romantic.
    These days the post 1745 Jacobites turn up occasionally in my Georgian series as the villains/enemies!
    What this says about time, getting older, or me, I don’t know.
    BTW, another fan of Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles here. Have you read them, Euan?
    Jo

    Reply
  281. I must say this was a most interesting interview today! I love all historical romances (heavy on the historical), but my faves are the older eras (Viking, Celtic, Medieval, early Scots)…with my most fave being Scottish Romances. I can’t exactly explain why that is, except one reason may be that I spent an entire Summer in the late 1980’s wandering through the British Isles, the old tombs and churches castles and battle sites. I fell in love with it all. I, too, loved Edinburgh and visiting Greyfriar Bobby’s grave. I loved the countryside, the people’s love of their own history and sense of tradition. I like the endurance and toughness of the men and women in the days of old. I am 1/4 Scots and am proud of my heritage! I think it would be interesting for you to read some of the oldest writers of Scottish Romance (Arnette Lamb, Hannah Howell) in addition to Julie Garwood…and compare how their stories differ from the more recent writers of Scottish Romance (Tanya Anne Crosby, Diana Gabaldon, Maya Banks) in addition to Karen Marie Moning…and see what the differences and similarities are. I would be interested in knowing what they are. I’m glad I got to “meet” you today on Word Wenches.

    Reply
  282. I must say this was a most interesting interview today! I love all historical romances (heavy on the historical), but my faves are the older eras (Viking, Celtic, Medieval, early Scots)…with my most fave being Scottish Romances. I can’t exactly explain why that is, except one reason may be that I spent an entire Summer in the late 1980’s wandering through the British Isles, the old tombs and churches castles and battle sites. I fell in love with it all. I, too, loved Edinburgh and visiting Greyfriar Bobby’s grave. I loved the countryside, the people’s love of their own history and sense of tradition. I like the endurance and toughness of the men and women in the days of old. I am 1/4 Scots and am proud of my heritage! I think it would be interesting for you to read some of the oldest writers of Scottish Romance (Arnette Lamb, Hannah Howell) in addition to Julie Garwood…and compare how their stories differ from the more recent writers of Scottish Romance (Tanya Anne Crosby, Diana Gabaldon, Maya Banks) in addition to Karen Marie Moning…and see what the differences and similarities are. I would be interested in knowing what they are. I’m glad I got to “meet” you today on Word Wenches.

    Reply
  283. I must say this was a most interesting interview today! I love all historical romances (heavy on the historical), but my faves are the older eras (Viking, Celtic, Medieval, early Scots)…with my most fave being Scottish Romances. I can’t exactly explain why that is, except one reason may be that I spent an entire Summer in the late 1980’s wandering through the British Isles, the old tombs and churches castles and battle sites. I fell in love with it all. I, too, loved Edinburgh and visiting Greyfriar Bobby’s grave. I loved the countryside, the people’s love of their own history and sense of tradition. I like the endurance and toughness of the men and women in the days of old. I am 1/4 Scots and am proud of my heritage! I think it would be interesting for you to read some of the oldest writers of Scottish Romance (Arnette Lamb, Hannah Howell) in addition to Julie Garwood…and compare how their stories differ from the more recent writers of Scottish Romance (Tanya Anne Crosby, Diana Gabaldon, Maya Banks) in addition to Karen Marie Moning…and see what the differences and similarities are. I would be interested in knowing what they are. I’m glad I got to “meet” you today on Word Wenches.

    Reply
  284. I must say this was a most interesting interview today! I love all historical romances (heavy on the historical), but my faves are the older eras (Viking, Celtic, Medieval, early Scots)…with my most fave being Scottish Romances. I can’t exactly explain why that is, except one reason may be that I spent an entire Summer in the late 1980’s wandering through the British Isles, the old tombs and churches castles and battle sites. I fell in love with it all. I, too, loved Edinburgh and visiting Greyfriar Bobby’s grave. I loved the countryside, the people’s love of their own history and sense of tradition. I like the endurance and toughness of the men and women in the days of old. I am 1/4 Scots and am proud of my heritage! I think it would be interesting for you to read some of the oldest writers of Scottish Romance (Arnette Lamb, Hannah Howell) in addition to Julie Garwood…and compare how their stories differ from the more recent writers of Scottish Romance (Tanya Anne Crosby, Diana Gabaldon, Maya Banks) in addition to Karen Marie Moning…and see what the differences and similarities are. I would be interested in knowing what they are. I’m glad I got to “meet” you today on Word Wenches.

    Reply
  285. I must say this was a most interesting interview today! I love all historical romances (heavy on the historical), but my faves are the older eras (Viking, Celtic, Medieval, early Scots)…with my most fave being Scottish Romances. I can’t exactly explain why that is, except one reason may be that I spent an entire Summer in the late 1980’s wandering through the British Isles, the old tombs and churches castles and battle sites. I fell in love with it all. I, too, loved Edinburgh and visiting Greyfriar Bobby’s grave. I loved the countryside, the people’s love of their own history and sense of tradition. I like the endurance and toughness of the men and women in the days of old. I am 1/4 Scots and am proud of my heritage! I think it would be interesting for you to read some of the oldest writers of Scottish Romance (Arnette Lamb, Hannah Howell) in addition to Julie Garwood…and compare how their stories differ from the more recent writers of Scottish Romance (Tanya Anne Crosby, Diana Gabaldon, Maya Banks) in addition to Karen Marie Moning…and see what the differences and similarities are. I would be interested in knowing what they are. I’m glad I got to “meet” you today on Word Wenches.

    Reply
  286. I’m grabbing a few minutes to eat lunch, but more importantly to reply to everyone on Word Wenches 🙂 Thanks again for the kind words about my interview with Susan. It was fun to do! If anyone wants to send me their thoughts about Scottish romances after this blog tour is over, please email me:

      I’d love to hear more!
      Jo, I haven’t read Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles, but it has been recommneded by a few people posting comments in the last couple of days, so I’ll have to find time to do that. And, of course, I agree there must a geographical component! The image and reputation of Scotland as a place is attractive to both readers and writers.
      Janice, thanks for adding your thoughts. Greyfriar’s Bobby’s grave is about 2 miles north of where I grew up – I know the area well. You just take the no.23 bus… Did you know that one cafe that J.K. Rowling wrote her “Harry Potter” series in overlooks Greyfriars?
      I think one thing that has changed from the early-1990s (Garwood, etc.) to today is that the intimate scenes between hero and heroine have become quite a bit racier. Also, writers like Susan Fraser King, Blythe Gifford, Margaret Mallory and Terri Brisbin, who I spoke with during this research, are very interested in being true to the history, and portraying little details, like wildlife, journey times, distances, religious beliefs, etc. accurately without getting in the way of a good story!
    Reply
  287. I’m grabbing a few minutes to eat lunch, but more importantly to reply to everyone on Word Wenches 🙂 Thanks again for the kind words about my interview with Susan. It was fun to do! If anyone wants to send me their thoughts about Scottish romances after this blog tour is over, please email me:

      I’d love to hear more!
      Jo, I haven’t read Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles, but it has been recommneded by a few people posting comments in the last couple of days, so I’ll have to find time to do that. And, of course, I agree there must a geographical component! The image and reputation of Scotland as a place is attractive to both readers and writers.
      Janice, thanks for adding your thoughts. Greyfriar’s Bobby’s grave is about 2 miles north of where I grew up – I know the area well. You just take the no.23 bus… Did you know that one cafe that J.K. Rowling wrote her “Harry Potter” series in overlooks Greyfriars?
      I think one thing that has changed from the early-1990s (Garwood, etc.) to today is that the intimate scenes between hero and heroine have become quite a bit racier. Also, writers like Susan Fraser King, Blythe Gifford, Margaret Mallory and Terri Brisbin, who I spoke with during this research, are very interested in being true to the history, and portraying little details, like wildlife, journey times, distances, religious beliefs, etc. accurately without getting in the way of a good story!
    Reply
  288. I’m grabbing a few minutes to eat lunch, but more importantly to reply to everyone on Word Wenches 🙂 Thanks again for the kind words about my interview with Susan. It was fun to do! If anyone wants to send me their thoughts about Scottish romances after this blog tour is over, please email me:

      I’d love to hear more!
      Jo, I haven’t read Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles, but it has been recommneded by a few people posting comments in the last couple of days, so I’ll have to find time to do that. And, of course, I agree there must a geographical component! The image and reputation of Scotland as a place is attractive to both readers and writers.
      Janice, thanks for adding your thoughts. Greyfriar’s Bobby’s grave is about 2 miles north of where I grew up – I know the area well. You just take the no.23 bus… Did you know that one cafe that J.K. Rowling wrote her “Harry Potter” series in overlooks Greyfriars?
      I think one thing that has changed from the early-1990s (Garwood, etc.) to today is that the intimate scenes between hero and heroine have become quite a bit racier. Also, writers like Susan Fraser King, Blythe Gifford, Margaret Mallory and Terri Brisbin, who I spoke with during this research, are very interested in being true to the history, and portraying little details, like wildlife, journey times, distances, religious beliefs, etc. accurately without getting in the way of a good story!
    Reply
  289. I’m grabbing a few minutes to eat lunch, but more importantly to reply to everyone on Word Wenches 🙂 Thanks again for the kind words about my interview with Susan. It was fun to do! If anyone wants to send me their thoughts about Scottish romances after this blog tour is over, please email me:

      I’d love to hear more!
      Jo, I haven’t read Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles, but it has been recommneded by a few people posting comments in the last couple of days, so I’ll have to find time to do that. And, of course, I agree there must a geographical component! The image and reputation of Scotland as a place is attractive to both readers and writers.
      Janice, thanks for adding your thoughts. Greyfriar’s Bobby’s grave is about 2 miles north of where I grew up – I know the area well. You just take the no.23 bus… Did you know that one cafe that J.K. Rowling wrote her “Harry Potter” series in overlooks Greyfriars?
      I think one thing that has changed from the early-1990s (Garwood, etc.) to today is that the intimate scenes between hero and heroine have become quite a bit racier. Also, writers like Susan Fraser King, Blythe Gifford, Margaret Mallory and Terri Brisbin, who I spoke with during this research, are very interested in being true to the history, and portraying little details, like wildlife, journey times, distances, religious beliefs, etc. accurately without getting in the way of a good story!
    Reply
  290. I’m grabbing a few minutes to eat lunch, but more importantly to reply to everyone on Word Wenches 🙂 Thanks again for the kind words about my interview with Susan. It was fun to do! If anyone wants to send me their thoughts about Scottish romances after this blog tour is over, please email me:

      I’d love to hear more!
      Jo, I haven’t read Dunnett’s Lymond Chronicles, but it has been recommneded by a few people posting comments in the last couple of days, so I’ll have to find time to do that. And, of course, I agree there must a geographical component! The image and reputation of Scotland as a place is attractive to both readers and writers.
      Janice, thanks for adding your thoughts. Greyfriar’s Bobby’s grave is about 2 miles north of where I grew up – I know the area well. You just take the no.23 bus… Did you know that one cafe that J.K. Rowling wrote her “Harry Potter” series in overlooks Greyfriars?
      I think one thing that has changed from the early-1990s (Garwood, etc.) to today is that the intimate scenes between hero and heroine have become quite a bit racier. Also, writers like Susan Fraser King, Blythe Gifford, Margaret Mallory and Terri Brisbin, who I spoke with during this research, are very interested in being true to the history, and portraying little details, like wildlife, journey times, distances, religious beliefs, etc. accurately without getting in the way of a good story!
    Reply
  291. I love Scottish romance! I wish there were some movies set in Medieval Scotland that had an HEA. I like to learn while a read too, so I really enjoyed Monica McCarty’s books that incorporate a lot of what really or may have happened.

    Reply
  292. I love Scottish romance! I wish there were some movies set in Medieval Scotland that had an HEA. I like to learn while a read too, so I really enjoyed Monica McCarty’s books that incorporate a lot of what really or may have happened.

    Reply
  293. I love Scottish romance! I wish there were some movies set in Medieval Scotland that had an HEA. I like to learn while a read too, so I really enjoyed Monica McCarty’s books that incorporate a lot of what really or may have happened.

    Reply
  294. I love Scottish romance! I wish there were some movies set in Medieval Scotland that had an HEA. I like to learn while a read too, so I really enjoyed Monica McCarty’s books that incorporate a lot of what really or may have happened.

    Reply
  295. I love Scottish romance! I wish there were some movies set in Medieval Scotland that had an HEA. I like to learn while a read too, so I really enjoyed Monica McCarty’s books that incorporate a lot of what really or may have happened.

    Reply
  296. There are a lot of comments and I may have missed someone mentioning ‘Outlander’ by Diana Gabaldon and most of the books by Bertrice Small. Off the top of my head, those are my favorites. As to why I love Scottish romance, well, I love all romance. I do read many other genres, but I always return to romance in some form or another. 🙂

    Reply
  297. There are a lot of comments and I may have missed someone mentioning ‘Outlander’ by Diana Gabaldon and most of the books by Bertrice Small. Off the top of my head, those are my favorites. As to why I love Scottish romance, well, I love all romance. I do read many other genres, but I always return to romance in some form or another. 🙂

    Reply
  298. There are a lot of comments and I may have missed someone mentioning ‘Outlander’ by Diana Gabaldon and most of the books by Bertrice Small. Off the top of my head, those are my favorites. As to why I love Scottish romance, well, I love all romance. I do read many other genres, but I always return to romance in some form or another. 🙂

    Reply
  299. There are a lot of comments and I may have missed someone mentioning ‘Outlander’ by Diana Gabaldon and most of the books by Bertrice Small. Off the top of my head, those are my favorites. As to why I love Scottish romance, well, I love all romance. I do read many other genres, but I always return to romance in some form or another. 🙂

    Reply
  300. There are a lot of comments and I may have missed someone mentioning ‘Outlander’ by Diana Gabaldon and most of the books by Bertrice Small. Off the top of my head, those are my favorites. As to why I love Scottish romance, well, I love all romance. I do read many other genres, but I always return to romance in some form or another. 🙂

    Reply
  301. Yeah… the accent is it for me. The kilt is great and we romanticize a period, but bottom line….It’s the accent.
    And for my two cents – i love all of Grace Burrows books.. who commented here 🙂

    Reply
  302. Yeah… the accent is it for me. The kilt is great and we romanticize a period, but bottom line….It’s the accent.
    And for my two cents – i love all of Grace Burrows books.. who commented here 🙂

    Reply
  303. Yeah… the accent is it for me. The kilt is great and we romanticize a period, but bottom line….It’s the accent.
    And for my two cents – i love all of Grace Burrows books.. who commented here 🙂

    Reply
  304. Yeah… the accent is it for me. The kilt is great and we romanticize a period, but bottom line….It’s the accent.
    And for my two cents – i love all of Grace Burrows books.. who commented here 🙂

    Reply
  305. Yeah… the accent is it for me. The kilt is great and we romanticize a period, but bottom line….It’s the accent.
    And for my two cents – i love all of Grace Burrows books.. who commented here 🙂

    Reply
  306. I loved the article and post today. Thank you! Scottish romance is one of my favorites, probably because I’m from Clan Stuart!

    Reply
  307. I loved the article and post today. Thank you! Scottish romance is one of my favorites, probably because I’m from Clan Stuart!

    Reply
  308. I loved the article and post today. Thank you! Scottish romance is one of my favorites, probably because I’m from Clan Stuart!

    Reply
  309. I loved the article and post today. Thank you! Scottish romance is one of my favorites, probably because I’m from Clan Stuart!

    Reply
  310. I loved the article and post today. Thank you! Scottish romance is one of my favorites, probably because I’m from Clan Stuart!

    Reply
  311. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned Mary Elgin. Highland Masquerade and Man from the Mist were among the first Scottish romances I remember reading

    Reply
  312. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned Mary Elgin. Highland Masquerade and Man from the Mist were among the first Scottish romances I remember reading

    Reply
  313. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned Mary Elgin. Highland Masquerade and Man from the Mist were among the first Scottish romances I remember reading

    Reply
  314. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned Mary Elgin. Highland Masquerade and Man from the Mist were among the first Scottish romances I remember reading

    Reply
  315. I’m surprised that no one has mentioned Mary Elgin. Highland Masquerade and Man from the Mist were among the first Scottish romances I remember reading

    Reply

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