What Are You Reading Today?

062406_1503aSusan here
– realizing we're already nearing the end of summer (scarcely believable),
and many of us are busy with homes, families, vacations, work, and just trying to eke that last
little bit of summer out of the days. So let's take a short blog break today and play
a reading game, something we like to do now and then here in Wenchland.

What Are You
Reading Today?

I’m sure, like me, you’re in the
midst of reading several books at once in a range of
Stack of books genres — fiction and nonfiction . . . . so please mention tell us about more than one book if you like.   

Now, pick up a book
(or e-book) that you're currently reading, and go to page 44. (if it’s an e-book,
tap through to any screen).
Choose a sentence or two – and if you would be so kind, type
that into the Comments area, including book title and author, to share with us. 

I love the endless variations in what we’re reading — and I love a quick peek inside books that I might not have found otherwise. It's like a browse through a bookstore. And since
this is a game, there's a prize. I'll send an autographed copy of one of my
historical romances to a winner chosen at random from the comments area.

I’m reading more than one book, so here are a few samplings:


OneonlyivanPage 44 of The One and Only Ivan by
Katherine Applegate
(I love this YA story, as told by a sideshow gorilla):

Sometimes
Julia draws me. I am an elegant fellow in her pictures, with my silver back
gleaming like moon on moss. I never look angry, the way I do on the fading
billboards by the highway.

I always
look a bit sad, though.


QuietcainPage 44
of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan
Cain (very interesting look at introverts — I'm decidedly one, so I'm learning a lot…) 

“Good
luck finding an introvert around here,” says one.

“This
school is predicated on extroversion,” adds the other. “Your grades and social
status depend on it. It’s just the norm here. Everyone around you is speaking
up and being social and going out.”

“Isn’t
there anyone on the quieter side?” I ask.

They look
at me curiously. “I couldn’t tell you,” says the first student dismissively.


GonegirlPage 44
of Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (a compelling read that keeps us unsure who's who and for what reason)

 We made
small talk, the cops and I, about the July Fourth fireworks and the weather,
while my hands were tested for gunshot residue and the slick inside of my cheek
was cotton-tipped. Pretending it was normal, a trip to the dentist.

And lastly . . . I plucked an older book off the shelf the other day, after hearing the news of the death of Barbara Mertz — Barbara Michaels and Elizabeth Peters — who gave us so many wonderful books. She left an incredible legacy behind. As a longtime fan, I am forever grateful that she devoted so much of her life to writing. 


Crocodile-on-the-SandbankPage 44 of Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (a great book by a great lady):

Emerson's jaw dropped. "Good God," he said. "A woman with an enquiring mind. Is it possible?"

 Your
turn! What are YOU reading just now, and what's on page 44?

There could be a giveaway book in it for
you — we could all use another book, right? 🙂

Susan

 

190 thoughts on “What Are You Reading Today?”

  1. I chose one of my recent favorites, The Passion of the Purple Plumeria by Lauren Willig. From location 1000, “Especially if one of them started screaming. The second either of them yelled bloddy murder, I’d be back down that hall like a shot, tea or no tea.”

    Reply
  2. I chose one of my recent favorites, The Passion of the Purple Plumeria by Lauren Willig. From location 1000, “Especially if one of them started screaming. The second either of them yelled bloddy murder, I’d be back down that hall like a shot, tea or no tea.”

    Reply
  3. I chose one of my recent favorites, The Passion of the Purple Plumeria by Lauren Willig. From location 1000, “Especially if one of them started screaming. The second either of them yelled bloddy murder, I’d be back down that hall like a shot, tea or no tea.”

    Reply
  4. I chose one of my recent favorites, The Passion of the Purple Plumeria by Lauren Willig. From location 1000, “Especially if one of them started screaming. The second either of them yelled bloddy murder, I’d be back down that hall like a shot, tea or no tea.”

    Reply
  5. I chose one of my recent favorites, The Passion of the Purple Plumeria by Lauren Willig. From location 1000, “Especially if one of them started screaming. The second either of them yelled bloddy murder, I’d be back down that hall like a shot, tea or no tea.”

    Reply
  6. Not in it for the giveaway, but here’s what I read last night. 🙂
    “Three ladies were then presented to His Majesty; he kissed them all affectionately on the lips, and I remarked that he seemed to take most pleasure in kissing the prettiest of the three. Let not this mode of greeting scandalise you; it is the custom in this country, and many ladies would be displeased should you fail to salute them thus; still some of the ladies who have traveled in foreign countries now offer their cheeks instead of their lips.”
    A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I. and George II.: The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to his Family
    Translated by Madame van Muyden

    Reply
  7. Not in it for the giveaway, but here’s what I read last night. 🙂
    “Three ladies were then presented to His Majesty; he kissed them all affectionately on the lips, and I remarked that he seemed to take most pleasure in kissing the prettiest of the three. Let not this mode of greeting scandalise you; it is the custom in this country, and many ladies would be displeased should you fail to salute them thus; still some of the ladies who have traveled in foreign countries now offer their cheeks instead of their lips.”
    A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I. and George II.: The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to his Family
    Translated by Madame van Muyden

    Reply
  8. Not in it for the giveaway, but here’s what I read last night. 🙂
    “Three ladies were then presented to His Majesty; he kissed them all affectionately on the lips, and I remarked that he seemed to take most pleasure in kissing the prettiest of the three. Let not this mode of greeting scandalise you; it is the custom in this country, and many ladies would be displeased should you fail to salute them thus; still some of the ladies who have traveled in foreign countries now offer their cheeks instead of their lips.”
    A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I. and George II.: The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to his Family
    Translated by Madame van Muyden

    Reply
  9. Not in it for the giveaway, but here’s what I read last night. 🙂
    “Three ladies were then presented to His Majesty; he kissed them all affectionately on the lips, and I remarked that he seemed to take most pleasure in kissing the prettiest of the three. Let not this mode of greeting scandalise you; it is the custom in this country, and many ladies would be displeased should you fail to salute them thus; still some of the ladies who have traveled in foreign countries now offer their cheeks instead of their lips.”
    A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I. and George II.: The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to his Family
    Translated by Madame van Muyden

    Reply
  10. Not in it for the giveaway, but here’s what I read last night. 🙂
    “Three ladies were then presented to His Majesty; he kissed them all affectionately on the lips, and I remarked that he seemed to take most pleasure in kissing the prettiest of the three. Let not this mode of greeting scandalise you; it is the custom in this country, and many ladies would be displeased should you fail to salute them thus; still some of the ladies who have traveled in foreign countries now offer their cheeks instead of their lips.”
    A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I. and George II.: The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to his Family
    Translated by Madame van Muyden

    Reply
  11. “Perhaps like Jody Baxter in The Yearling, I’m a bit “addled with April” – finding excuses to delay the farm chores.” A. Carman Clark in From the Orange Mailbox..Notes From a Few Country Acres (1985)

    Reply
  12. “Perhaps like Jody Baxter in The Yearling, I’m a bit “addled with April” – finding excuses to delay the farm chores.” A. Carman Clark in From the Orange Mailbox..Notes From a Few Country Acres (1985)

    Reply
  13. “Perhaps like Jody Baxter in The Yearling, I’m a bit “addled with April” – finding excuses to delay the farm chores.” A. Carman Clark in From the Orange Mailbox..Notes From a Few Country Acres (1985)

    Reply
  14. “Perhaps like Jody Baxter in The Yearling, I’m a bit “addled with April” – finding excuses to delay the farm chores.” A. Carman Clark in From the Orange Mailbox..Notes From a Few Country Acres (1985)

    Reply
  15. “Perhaps like Jody Baxter in The Yearling, I’m a bit “addled with April” – finding excuses to delay the farm chores.” A. Carman Clark in From the Orange Mailbox..Notes From a Few Country Acres (1985)

    Reply
  16. “He was up to something, though Esther had no idea what. Percival worried about Peter, about the duke, about the infantry in the colonies, and about the king’s health. And her husband worried about her.” (p44 of The Duke & His Duchess by Grace Burrowes)

    Reply
  17. “He was up to something, though Esther had no idea what. Percival worried about Peter, about the duke, about the infantry in the colonies, and about the king’s health. And her husband worried about her.” (p44 of The Duke & His Duchess by Grace Burrowes)

    Reply
  18. “He was up to something, though Esther had no idea what. Percival worried about Peter, about the duke, about the infantry in the colonies, and about the king’s health. And her husband worried about her.” (p44 of The Duke & His Duchess by Grace Burrowes)

    Reply
  19. “He was up to something, though Esther had no idea what. Percival worried about Peter, about the duke, about the infantry in the colonies, and about the king’s health. And her husband worried about her.” (p44 of The Duke & His Duchess by Grace Burrowes)

    Reply
  20. “He was up to something, though Esther had no idea what. Percival worried about Peter, about the duke, about the infantry in the colonies, and about the king’s health. And her husband worried about her.” (p44 of The Duke & His Duchess by Grace Burrowes)

    Reply
  21. “Oh, she knows about my lechery,” Hunter assured him. “It’s one of her favorite things about me.” A Summer Affair, Susan Wiggs (ebook) and
    The next thing she knew, Brad was sailing backward, colliding with one of the concrete pillars that supported the floors above. Sean had finished parking the car. p 44 Just Kate, Linda Lael Miller
    I have to read a “real” book for every ebook…

    Reply
  22. “Oh, she knows about my lechery,” Hunter assured him. “It’s one of her favorite things about me.” A Summer Affair, Susan Wiggs (ebook) and
    The next thing she knew, Brad was sailing backward, colliding with one of the concrete pillars that supported the floors above. Sean had finished parking the car. p 44 Just Kate, Linda Lael Miller
    I have to read a “real” book for every ebook…

    Reply
  23. “Oh, she knows about my lechery,” Hunter assured him. “It’s one of her favorite things about me.” A Summer Affair, Susan Wiggs (ebook) and
    The next thing she knew, Brad was sailing backward, colliding with one of the concrete pillars that supported the floors above. Sean had finished parking the car. p 44 Just Kate, Linda Lael Miller
    I have to read a “real” book for every ebook…

    Reply
  24. “Oh, she knows about my lechery,” Hunter assured him. “It’s one of her favorite things about me.” A Summer Affair, Susan Wiggs (ebook) and
    The next thing she knew, Brad was sailing backward, colliding with one of the concrete pillars that supported the floors above. Sean had finished parking the car. p 44 Just Kate, Linda Lael Miller
    I have to read a “real” book for every ebook…

    Reply
  25. “Oh, she knows about my lechery,” Hunter assured him. “It’s one of her favorite things about me.” A Summer Affair, Susan Wiggs (ebook) and
    The next thing she knew, Brad was sailing backward, colliding with one of the concrete pillars that supported the floors above. Sean had finished parking the car. p 44 Just Kate, Linda Lael Miller
    I have to read a “real” book for every ebook…

    Reply
  26. “Her professional mask is genuinely scary, and in her mouth the word ‘delusion’ rankles for reasons he can’t quite define.”
    p. 44 Poppet by Mo Hayder

    Reply
  27. “Her professional mask is genuinely scary, and in her mouth the word ‘delusion’ rankles for reasons he can’t quite define.”
    p. 44 Poppet by Mo Hayder

    Reply
  28. “Her professional mask is genuinely scary, and in her mouth the word ‘delusion’ rankles for reasons he can’t quite define.”
    p. 44 Poppet by Mo Hayder

    Reply
  29. “Her professional mask is genuinely scary, and in her mouth the word ‘delusion’ rankles for reasons he can’t quite define.”
    p. 44 Poppet by Mo Hayder

    Reply
  30. “Her professional mask is genuinely scary, and in her mouth the word ‘delusion’ rankles for reasons he can’t quite define.”
    p. 44 Poppet by Mo Hayder

    Reply
  31. p.44 – In front of me stands one of the most valuable paintings stolen in the greatest unsolved art theft in history. The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro

    Reply
  32. p.44 – In front of me stands one of the most valuable paintings stolen in the greatest unsolved art theft in history. The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro

    Reply
  33. p.44 – In front of me stands one of the most valuable paintings stolen in the greatest unsolved art theft in history. The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro

    Reply
  34. p.44 – In front of me stands one of the most valuable paintings stolen in the greatest unsolved art theft in history. The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro

    Reply
  35. p.44 – In front of me stands one of the most valuable paintings stolen in the greatest unsolved art theft in history. The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro

    Reply
  36. My non-fiction reading today is a book that I looked at and discarded as useful for a recent freelance project but which fascinated me nonetheless.
    “In each context of interpretation, the volume of sound acquires diverse meanings: high volume of music in a discotheque shortens proxemics by erasing limits and identities among participants and creating the effect of a common musical bubble. Sexual desire and a craving for intimacy are often enunciated by smooth music to shorten proxemics. Silence can indicate extended or intimate proxemics depending on the interpretive context: in one case it signifies indifference or refusal of contact and in the second such intimacy that there is no need of words.” —Everyday Aesthetics : Prosaics, The Play of Culture and Social Identities by Katya Mandoki, p. 156
    I woke up this morning thinking that today was a Mary Oliver-poem-kind-of-day, and so I’m rereading selectively from A Thousand Mornings. This bit is from a prose poem about counting the leaves on a tree.
    “Of course I have to give up, but by then I’m half crazy with the wonder of it—the abundance of the leaves, the quietness of the branches, the hopelessness of my efforts. And I am in that delicious and important place, roaring with laughter, full of earth-praise.” –“Foolishness? No, It’s Not” A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver, p. 5
    I just started the new Grace Burrowes book, one of last Tuesday’s new releases. (I’ve already read and loved Jo’s Seduction in Silk.)
    “Not two years into public school, Tye had understood why Duty and Honor must be elevated so high in the esteem of the budding flowers of English manhood: Duty and Honor were required to fill a boy’s vision so he might lose sight— if not entirely then at least substantially— of his Resentments.”
    Once Upon a Tartan (MacGregor Trilogy #2), Kindle Location 976, Grace Burrowes

    Reply
  37. My non-fiction reading today is a book that I looked at and discarded as useful for a recent freelance project but which fascinated me nonetheless.
    “In each context of interpretation, the volume of sound acquires diverse meanings: high volume of music in a discotheque shortens proxemics by erasing limits and identities among participants and creating the effect of a common musical bubble. Sexual desire and a craving for intimacy are often enunciated by smooth music to shorten proxemics. Silence can indicate extended or intimate proxemics depending on the interpretive context: in one case it signifies indifference or refusal of contact and in the second such intimacy that there is no need of words.” —Everyday Aesthetics : Prosaics, The Play of Culture and Social Identities by Katya Mandoki, p. 156
    I woke up this morning thinking that today was a Mary Oliver-poem-kind-of-day, and so I’m rereading selectively from A Thousand Mornings. This bit is from a prose poem about counting the leaves on a tree.
    “Of course I have to give up, but by then I’m half crazy with the wonder of it—the abundance of the leaves, the quietness of the branches, the hopelessness of my efforts. And I am in that delicious and important place, roaring with laughter, full of earth-praise.” –“Foolishness? No, It’s Not” A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver, p. 5
    I just started the new Grace Burrowes book, one of last Tuesday’s new releases. (I’ve already read and loved Jo’s Seduction in Silk.)
    “Not two years into public school, Tye had understood why Duty and Honor must be elevated so high in the esteem of the budding flowers of English manhood: Duty and Honor were required to fill a boy’s vision so he might lose sight— if not entirely then at least substantially— of his Resentments.”
    Once Upon a Tartan (MacGregor Trilogy #2), Kindle Location 976, Grace Burrowes

    Reply
  38. My non-fiction reading today is a book that I looked at and discarded as useful for a recent freelance project but which fascinated me nonetheless.
    “In each context of interpretation, the volume of sound acquires diverse meanings: high volume of music in a discotheque shortens proxemics by erasing limits and identities among participants and creating the effect of a common musical bubble. Sexual desire and a craving for intimacy are often enunciated by smooth music to shorten proxemics. Silence can indicate extended or intimate proxemics depending on the interpretive context: in one case it signifies indifference or refusal of contact and in the second such intimacy that there is no need of words.” —Everyday Aesthetics : Prosaics, The Play of Culture and Social Identities by Katya Mandoki, p. 156
    I woke up this morning thinking that today was a Mary Oliver-poem-kind-of-day, and so I’m rereading selectively from A Thousand Mornings. This bit is from a prose poem about counting the leaves on a tree.
    “Of course I have to give up, but by then I’m half crazy with the wonder of it—the abundance of the leaves, the quietness of the branches, the hopelessness of my efforts. And I am in that delicious and important place, roaring with laughter, full of earth-praise.” –“Foolishness? No, It’s Not” A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver, p. 5
    I just started the new Grace Burrowes book, one of last Tuesday’s new releases. (I’ve already read and loved Jo’s Seduction in Silk.)
    “Not two years into public school, Tye had understood why Duty and Honor must be elevated so high in the esteem of the budding flowers of English manhood: Duty and Honor were required to fill a boy’s vision so he might lose sight— if not entirely then at least substantially— of his Resentments.”
    Once Upon a Tartan (MacGregor Trilogy #2), Kindle Location 976, Grace Burrowes

    Reply
  39. My non-fiction reading today is a book that I looked at and discarded as useful for a recent freelance project but which fascinated me nonetheless.
    “In each context of interpretation, the volume of sound acquires diverse meanings: high volume of music in a discotheque shortens proxemics by erasing limits and identities among participants and creating the effect of a common musical bubble. Sexual desire and a craving for intimacy are often enunciated by smooth music to shorten proxemics. Silence can indicate extended or intimate proxemics depending on the interpretive context: in one case it signifies indifference or refusal of contact and in the second such intimacy that there is no need of words.” —Everyday Aesthetics : Prosaics, The Play of Culture and Social Identities by Katya Mandoki, p. 156
    I woke up this morning thinking that today was a Mary Oliver-poem-kind-of-day, and so I’m rereading selectively from A Thousand Mornings. This bit is from a prose poem about counting the leaves on a tree.
    “Of course I have to give up, but by then I’m half crazy with the wonder of it—the abundance of the leaves, the quietness of the branches, the hopelessness of my efforts. And I am in that delicious and important place, roaring with laughter, full of earth-praise.” –“Foolishness? No, It’s Not” A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver, p. 5
    I just started the new Grace Burrowes book, one of last Tuesday’s new releases. (I’ve already read and loved Jo’s Seduction in Silk.)
    “Not two years into public school, Tye had understood why Duty and Honor must be elevated so high in the esteem of the budding flowers of English manhood: Duty and Honor were required to fill a boy’s vision so he might lose sight— if not entirely then at least substantially— of his Resentments.”
    Once Upon a Tartan (MacGregor Trilogy #2), Kindle Location 976, Grace Burrowes

    Reply
  40. My non-fiction reading today is a book that I looked at and discarded as useful for a recent freelance project but which fascinated me nonetheless.
    “In each context of interpretation, the volume of sound acquires diverse meanings: high volume of music in a discotheque shortens proxemics by erasing limits and identities among participants and creating the effect of a common musical bubble. Sexual desire and a craving for intimacy are often enunciated by smooth music to shorten proxemics. Silence can indicate extended or intimate proxemics depending on the interpretive context: in one case it signifies indifference or refusal of contact and in the second such intimacy that there is no need of words.” —Everyday Aesthetics : Prosaics, The Play of Culture and Social Identities by Katya Mandoki, p. 156
    I woke up this morning thinking that today was a Mary Oliver-poem-kind-of-day, and so I’m rereading selectively from A Thousand Mornings. This bit is from a prose poem about counting the leaves on a tree.
    “Of course I have to give up, but by then I’m half crazy with the wonder of it—the abundance of the leaves, the quietness of the branches, the hopelessness of my efforts. And I am in that delicious and important place, roaring with laughter, full of earth-praise.” –“Foolishness? No, It’s Not” A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver, p. 5
    I just started the new Grace Burrowes book, one of last Tuesday’s new releases. (I’ve already read and loved Jo’s Seduction in Silk.)
    “Not two years into public school, Tye had understood why Duty and Honor must be elevated so high in the esteem of the budding flowers of English manhood: Duty and Honor were required to fill a boy’s vision so he might lose sight— if not entirely then at least substantially— of his Resentments.”
    Once Upon a Tartan (MacGregor Trilogy #2), Kindle Location 976, Grace Burrowes

    Reply
  41. “Are you always this outspoken,Lady Isobel?” He found unexpectedly,that his ill temper had vanished,although not his guilt.He was enjoying her prickles – it was a novelty to be fenced with over dinner.
    Page 44 Regency Rumours by Louise Allen.
    What larger difficulty,character flaw,or past experience threatens to make it impossible for hero and heroine to be happy together forever?
    page 44 On Writing Romance – Leigh Michaels
    I am trying to improve !!

    Reply
  42. “Are you always this outspoken,Lady Isobel?” He found unexpectedly,that his ill temper had vanished,although not his guilt.He was enjoying her prickles – it was a novelty to be fenced with over dinner.
    Page 44 Regency Rumours by Louise Allen.
    What larger difficulty,character flaw,or past experience threatens to make it impossible for hero and heroine to be happy together forever?
    page 44 On Writing Romance – Leigh Michaels
    I am trying to improve !!

    Reply
  43. “Are you always this outspoken,Lady Isobel?” He found unexpectedly,that his ill temper had vanished,although not his guilt.He was enjoying her prickles – it was a novelty to be fenced with over dinner.
    Page 44 Regency Rumours by Louise Allen.
    What larger difficulty,character flaw,or past experience threatens to make it impossible for hero and heroine to be happy together forever?
    page 44 On Writing Romance – Leigh Michaels
    I am trying to improve !!

    Reply
  44. “Are you always this outspoken,Lady Isobel?” He found unexpectedly,that his ill temper had vanished,although not his guilt.He was enjoying her prickles – it was a novelty to be fenced with over dinner.
    Page 44 Regency Rumours by Louise Allen.
    What larger difficulty,character flaw,or past experience threatens to make it impossible for hero and heroine to be happy together forever?
    page 44 On Writing Romance – Leigh Michaels
    I am trying to improve !!

    Reply
  45. “Are you always this outspoken,Lady Isobel?” He found unexpectedly,that his ill temper had vanished,although not his guilt.He was enjoying her prickles – it was a novelty to be fenced with over dinner.
    Page 44 Regency Rumours by Louise Allen.
    What larger difficulty,character flaw,or past experience threatens to make it impossible for hero and heroine to be happy together forever?
    page 44 On Writing Romance – Leigh Michaels
    I am trying to improve !!

    Reply
  46. The Queen’s Vow by C. W. Gortner. Pg. 44
    Glancing at her now as she handed our valises to a retainer, I had no doubt she was up to the task.

    Reply
  47. The Queen’s Vow by C. W. Gortner. Pg. 44
    Glancing at her now as she handed our valises to a retainer, I had no doubt she was up to the task.

    Reply
  48. The Queen’s Vow by C. W. Gortner. Pg. 44
    Glancing at her now as she handed our valises to a retainer, I had no doubt she was up to the task.

    Reply
  49. The Queen’s Vow by C. W. Gortner. Pg. 44
    Glancing at her now as she handed our valises to a retainer, I had no doubt she was up to the task.

    Reply
  50. The Queen’s Vow by C. W. Gortner. Pg. 44
    Glancing at her now as she handed our valises to a retainer, I had no doubt she was up to the task.

    Reply
  51. location 102: The Magicians Nephew, CS Lewis
    It was so dark that they couldn’t see one another at all and it made no difference whether you kept your eyes shut or opened.

    Reply
  52. location 102: The Magicians Nephew, CS Lewis
    It was so dark that they couldn’t see one another at all and it made no difference whether you kept your eyes shut or opened.

    Reply
  53. location 102: The Magicians Nephew, CS Lewis
    It was so dark that they couldn’t see one another at all and it made no difference whether you kept your eyes shut or opened.

    Reply
  54. location 102: The Magicians Nephew, CS Lewis
    It was so dark that they couldn’t see one another at all and it made no difference whether you kept your eyes shut or opened.

    Reply
  55. location 102: The Magicians Nephew, CS Lewis
    It was so dark that they couldn’t see one another at all and it made no difference whether you kept your eyes shut or opened.

    Reply
  56. The Secret Scroll, Dawn Aldridge Poore, pg. 44:
    “Aunt Hen,” I said in warning, “don’t start on me now. My nerves are frazzled enough as it is.”
    “You’d make a beautiful bride.”
    I felt the urgent need to go to crawl into a quiet, dark corner with a cup of tea and did just that.
    The Forest, Edward Rutherford, pg. 44
    But it was not the cool reception that claimed Adela’s attention. What really struck her was the other woman’s appearance. What had she expected Hugh de Martell’s wife to look like?
    Ten Poems to Say Goodbye, Roger Housden, pg. 44
    Dorianne Laux becomes her grief in this poem (How It Will Happen, When). She inhabits it with every limb and cell of her being. She breathes it in, drinks it down, shakes and shudders with it; lies exhausted with it.
    Susan – Quiet is now on the TBR list! Thank you.
    Janga – LOVE Mary Oliver. Such genius.

    Reply
  57. The Secret Scroll, Dawn Aldridge Poore, pg. 44:
    “Aunt Hen,” I said in warning, “don’t start on me now. My nerves are frazzled enough as it is.”
    “You’d make a beautiful bride.”
    I felt the urgent need to go to crawl into a quiet, dark corner with a cup of tea and did just that.
    The Forest, Edward Rutherford, pg. 44
    But it was not the cool reception that claimed Adela’s attention. What really struck her was the other woman’s appearance. What had she expected Hugh de Martell’s wife to look like?
    Ten Poems to Say Goodbye, Roger Housden, pg. 44
    Dorianne Laux becomes her grief in this poem (How It Will Happen, When). She inhabits it with every limb and cell of her being. She breathes it in, drinks it down, shakes and shudders with it; lies exhausted with it.
    Susan – Quiet is now on the TBR list! Thank you.
    Janga – LOVE Mary Oliver. Such genius.

    Reply
  58. The Secret Scroll, Dawn Aldridge Poore, pg. 44:
    “Aunt Hen,” I said in warning, “don’t start on me now. My nerves are frazzled enough as it is.”
    “You’d make a beautiful bride.”
    I felt the urgent need to go to crawl into a quiet, dark corner with a cup of tea and did just that.
    The Forest, Edward Rutherford, pg. 44
    But it was not the cool reception that claimed Adela’s attention. What really struck her was the other woman’s appearance. What had she expected Hugh de Martell’s wife to look like?
    Ten Poems to Say Goodbye, Roger Housden, pg. 44
    Dorianne Laux becomes her grief in this poem (How It Will Happen, When). She inhabits it with every limb and cell of her being. She breathes it in, drinks it down, shakes and shudders with it; lies exhausted with it.
    Susan – Quiet is now on the TBR list! Thank you.
    Janga – LOVE Mary Oliver. Such genius.

    Reply
  59. The Secret Scroll, Dawn Aldridge Poore, pg. 44:
    “Aunt Hen,” I said in warning, “don’t start on me now. My nerves are frazzled enough as it is.”
    “You’d make a beautiful bride.”
    I felt the urgent need to go to crawl into a quiet, dark corner with a cup of tea and did just that.
    The Forest, Edward Rutherford, pg. 44
    But it was not the cool reception that claimed Adela’s attention. What really struck her was the other woman’s appearance. What had she expected Hugh de Martell’s wife to look like?
    Ten Poems to Say Goodbye, Roger Housden, pg. 44
    Dorianne Laux becomes her grief in this poem (How It Will Happen, When). She inhabits it with every limb and cell of her being. She breathes it in, drinks it down, shakes and shudders with it; lies exhausted with it.
    Susan – Quiet is now on the TBR list! Thank you.
    Janga – LOVE Mary Oliver. Such genius.

    Reply
  60. The Secret Scroll, Dawn Aldridge Poore, pg. 44:
    “Aunt Hen,” I said in warning, “don’t start on me now. My nerves are frazzled enough as it is.”
    “You’d make a beautiful bride.”
    I felt the urgent need to go to crawl into a quiet, dark corner with a cup of tea and did just that.
    The Forest, Edward Rutherford, pg. 44
    But it was not the cool reception that claimed Adela’s attention. What really struck her was the other woman’s appearance. What had she expected Hugh de Martell’s wife to look like?
    Ten Poems to Say Goodbye, Roger Housden, pg. 44
    Dorianne Laux becomes her grief in this poem (How It Will Happen, When). She inhabits it with every limb and cell of her being. She breathes it in, drinks it down, shakes and shudders with it; lies exhausted with it.
    Susan – Quiet is now on the TBR list! Thank you.
    Janga – LOVE Mary Oliver. Such genius.

    Reply
  61. Just finished “Orchid” by Jayne Castle (JAK).
    Page 44 “But that was not the whole of it and he knew it.”
    On my Kindle…
    “Dark Powers” by Rebecca York. 28%
    “The lock turned, and Laurel faced the door, watching as he came in carrying a tray, studying him but trying not to be obvious.”
    I like this kind of post…seeing what others are reading.

    Reply
  62. Just finished “Orchid” by Jayne Castle (JAK).
    Page 44 “But that was not the whole of it and he knew it.”
    On my Kindle…
    “Dark Powers” by Rebecca York. 28%
    “The lock turned, and Laurel faced the door, watching as he came in carrying a tray, studying him but trying not to be obvious.”
    I like this kind of post…seeing what others are reading.

    Reply
  63. Just finished “Orchid” by Jayne Castle (JAK).
    Page 44 “But that was not the whole of it and he knew it.”
    On my Kindle…
    “Dark Powers” by Rebecca York. 28%
    “The lock turned, and Laurel faced the door, watching as he came in carrying a tray, studying him but trying not to be obvious.”
    I like this kind of post…seeing what others are reading.

    Reply
  64. Just finished “Orchid” by Jayne Castle (JAK).
    Page 44 “But that was not the whole of it and he knew it.”
    On my Kindle…
    “Dark Powers” by Rebecca York. 28%
    “The lock turned, and Laurel faced the door, watching as he came in carrying a tray, studying him but trying not to be obvious.”
    I like this kind of post…seeing what others are reading.

    Reply
  65. Just finished “Orchid” by Jayne Castle (JAK).
    Page 44 “But that was not the whole of it and he knew it.”
    On my Kindle…
    “Dark Powers” by Rebecca York. 28%
    “The lock turned, and Laurel faced the door, watching as he came in carrying a tray, studying him but trying not to be obvious.”
    I like this kind of post…seeing what others are reading.

    Reply
  66. “Not a clue. Maybe your pathologist can hazard a guess. Is he a good man?”
    p 44 – “Water Like a Stone” by Deborah Crombie
    “Han van Meegeren’s artistic career, which began with prizes and one-man shows, quickly lost its early promise.”
    p 44 – “The Forger’s Spell” by Edward Dolnick
    “I won’t let him escape,” Michael said, his voice like hot stones falling on a drum. “And when the time comes, I’ll be the one to end him and I’ll act alone.”
    p 44 – “Desire Wears Diamonds” by Renee Bernard

    Reply
  67. “Not a clue. Maybe your pathologist can hazard a guess. Is he a good man?”
    p 44 – “Water Like a Stone” by Deborah Crombie
    “Han van Meegeren’s artistic career, which began with prizes and one-man shows, quickly lost its early promise.”
    p 44 – “The Forger’s Spell” by Edward Dolnick
    “I won’t let him escape,” Michael said, his voice like hot stones falling on a drum. “And when the time comes, I’ll be the one to end him and I’ll act alone.”
    p 44 – “Desire Wears Diamonds” by Renee Bernard

    Reply
  68. “Not a clue. Maybe your pathologist can hazard a guess. Is he a good man?”
    p 44 – “Water Like a Stone” by Deborah Crombie
    “Han van Meegeren’s artistic career, which began with prizes and one-man shows, quickly lost its early promise.”
    p 44 – “The Forger’s Spell” by Edward Dolnick
    “I won’t let him escape,” Michael said, his voice like hot stones falling on a drum. “And when the time comes, I’ll be the one to end him and I’ll act alone.”
    p 44 – “Desire Wears Diamonds” by Renee Bernard

    Reply
  69. “Not a clue. Maybe your pathologist can hazard a guess. Is he a good man?”
    p 44 – “Water Like a Stone” by Deborah Crombie
    “Han van Meegeren’s artistic career, which began with prizes and one-man shows, quickly lost its early promise.”
    p 44 – “The Forger’s Spell” by Edward Dolnick
    “I won’t let him escape,” Michael said, his voice like hot stones falling on a drum. “And when the time comes, I’ll be the one to end him and I’ll act alone.”
    p 44 – “Desire Wears Diamonds” by Renee Bernard

    Reply
  70. “Not a clue. Maybe your pathologist can hazard a guess. Is he a good man?”
    p 44 – “Water Like a Stone” by Deborah Crombie
    “Han van Meegeren’s artistic career, which began with prizes and one-man shows, quickly lost its early promise.”
    p 44 – “The Forger’s Spell” by Edward Dolnick
    “I won’t let him escape,” Michael said, his voice like hot stones falling on a drum. “And when the time comes, I’ll be the one to end him and I’ll act alone.”
    p 44 – “Desire Wears Diamonds” by Renee Bernard

    Reply
  71. Today he wore regular clothing, no longer his sharp military uniform, but it made him no less imposing. – loc 1643,Blame It On Bath, Caroline Linden.

    Reply
  72. Today he wore regular clothing, no longer his sharp military uniform, but it made him no less imposing. – loc 1643,Blame It On Bath, Caroline Linden.

    Reply
  73. Today he wore regular clothing, no longer his sharp military uniform, but it made him no less imposing. – loc 1643,Blame It On Bath, Caroline Linden.

    Reply
  74. Today he wore regular clothing, no longer his sharp military uniform, but it made him no less imposing. – loc 1643,Blame It On Bath, Caroline Linden.

    Reply
  75. Today he wore regular clothing, no longer his sharp military uniform, but it made him no less imposing. – loc 1643,Blame It On Bath, Caroline Linden.

    Reply
  76. “Tarzan showed not the slightest surprise or interest in the discovery. Inherent in him was a calloused familiarity with violent death.”
    p 44 – “Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar” by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    “After 1860 the blacksmith could depend more and more on a ready supply of mild steel fresh from the mill.”
    p 44 – “The Art of Blacksmithing” by Alex W. Bealer
    “Blythe was astonished that a member of the English upper classes would speak so candidly about his financial woes to a relative stranger. Conditions at Barton Hall must be dire indeed, she reflected.”
    p 44 – “A Cottage by the Sea” by Ciji Ware
    Thanks – this post is great fun!

    Reply
  77. “Tarzan showed not the slightest surprise or interest in the discovery. Inherent in him was a calloused familiarity with violent death.”
    p 44 – “Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar” by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    “After 1860 the blacksmith could depend more and more on a ready supply of mild steel fresh from the mill.”
    p 44 – “The Art of Blacksmithing” by Alex W. Bealer
    “Blythe was astonished that a member of the English upper classes would speak so candidly about his financial woes to a relative stranger. Conditions at Barton Hall must be dire indeed, she reflected.”
    p 44 – “A Cottage by the Sea” by Ciji Ware
    Thanks – this post is great fun!

    Reply
  78. “Tarzan showed not the slightest surprise or interest in the discovery. Inherent in him was a calloused familiarity with violent death.”
    p 44 – “Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar” by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    “After 1860 the blacksmith could depend more and more on a ready supply of mild steel fresh from the mill.”
    p 44 – “The Art of Blacksmithing” by Alex W. Bealer
    “Blythe was astonished that a member of the English upper classes would speak so candidly about his financial woes to a relative stranger. Conditions at Barton Hall must be dire indeed, she reflected.”
    p 44 – “A Cottage by the Sea” by Ciji Ware
    Thanks – this post is great fun!

    Reply
  79. “Tarzan showed not the slightest surprise or interest in the discovery. Inherent in him was a calloused familiarity with violent death.”
    p 44 – “Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar” by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    “After 1860 the blacksmith could depend more and more on a ready supply of mild steel fresh from the mill.”
    p 44 – “The Art of Blacksmithing” by Alex W. Bealer
    “Blythe was astonished that a member of the English upper classes would speak so candidly about his financial woes to a relative stranger. Conditions at Barton Hall must be dire indeed, she reflected.”
    p 44 – “A Cottage by the Sea” by Ciji Ware
    Thanks – this post is great fun!

    Reply
  80. “Tarzan showed not the slightest surprise or interest in the discovery. Inherent in him was a calloused familiarity with violent death.”
    p 44 – “Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar” by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    “After 1860 the blacksmith could depend more and more on a ready supply of mild steel fresh from the mill.”
    p 44 – “The Art of Blacksmithing” by Alex W. Bealer
    “Blythe was astonished that a member of the English upper classes would speak so candidly about his financial woes to a relative stranger. Conditions at Barton Hall must be dire indeed, she reflected.”
    p 44 – “A Cottage by the Sea” by Ciji Ware
    Thanks – this post is great fun!

    Reply
  81. I am going back and forth between two books, as usual.
    “Mrs. Milmont was suitably impressed by the grandness of Chanely — a large, stately home that might have been a castle. An expanse of marbled floor in the hallway laid out in black and white squares like a chessboard first caught her eye, and before any close scrutiny of the surroundings could be completed, the guests were ushered into the Blue Saloon by the housekeeper, Mrs. Robinson, a woman of genteel birth and impoverished background. Mrs. Milmont had hoped to scout around downstairs before the arrival of Sir Hillary, but her hope was thwarted.”
    — Aunt Sophie’s Diamonds by Joan Smith
    “Were flying saucers some odd, unknown natural phenomenon? Were they mechanical objects, and if so, whose? A communist stratagem? War nerves? Hoaxes? A new fad? Rubbish? Everyone wondered, no one knew.”
    — UFOs and the National Security State by Richard M. Dolan

    Reply
  82. I am going back and forth between two books, as usual.
    “Mrs. Milmont was suitably impressed by the grandness of Chanely — a large, stately home that might have been a castle. An expanse of marbled floor in the hallway laid out in black and white squares like a chessboard first caught her eye, and before any close scrutiny of the surroundings could be completed, the guests were ushered into the Blue Saloon by the housekeeper, Mrs. Robinson, a woman of genteel birth and impoverished background. Mrs. Milmont had hoped to scout around downstairs before the arrival of Sir Hillary, but her hope was thwarted.”
    — Aunt Sophie’s Diamonds by Joan Smith
    “Were flying saucers some odd, unknown natural phenomenon? Were they mechanical objects, and if so, whose? A communist stratagem? War nerves? Hoaxes? A new fad? Rubbish? Everyone wondered, no one knew.”
    — UFOs and the National Security State by Richard M. Dolan

    Reply
  83. I am going back and forth between two books, as usual.
    “Mrs. Milmont was suitably impressed by the grandness of Chanely — a large, stately home that might have been a castle. An expanse of marbled floor in the hallway laid out in black and white squares like a chessboard first caught her eye, and before any close scrutiny of the surroundings could be completed, the guests were ushered into the Blue Saloon by the housekeeper, Mrs. Robinson, a woman of genteel birth and impoverished background. Mrs. Milmont had hoped to scout around downstairs before the arrival of Sir Hillary, but her hope was thwarted.”
    — Aunt Sophie’s Diamonds by Joan Smith
    “Were flying saucers some odd, unknown natural phenomenon? Were they mechanical objects, and if so, whose? A communist stratagem? War nerves? Hoaxes? A new fad? Rubbish? Everyone wondered, no one knew.”
    — UFOs and the National Security State by Richard M. Dolan

    Reply
  84. I am going back and forth between two books, as usual.
    “Mrs. Milmont was suitably impressed by the grandness of Chanely — a large, stately home that might have been a castle. An expanse of marbled floor in the hallway laid out in black and white squares like a chessboard first caught her eye, and before any close scrutiny of the surroundings could be completed, the guests were ushered into the Blue Saloon by the housekeeper, Mrs. Robinson, a woman of genteel birth and impoverished background. Mrs. Milmont had hoped to scout around downstairs before the arrival of Sir Hillary, but her hope was thwarted.”
    — Aunt Sophie’s Diamonds by Joan Smith
    “Were flying saucers some odd, unknown natural phenomenon? Were they mechanical objects, and if so, whose? A communist stratagem? War nerves? Hoaxes? A new fad? Rubbish? Everyone wondered, no one knew.”
    — UFOs and the National Security State by Richard M. Dolan

    Reply
  85. I am going back and forth between two books, as usual.
    “Mrs. Milmont was suitably impressed by the grandness of Chanely — a large, stately home that might have been a castle. An expanse of marbled floor in the hallway laid out in black and white squares like a chessboard first caught her eye, and before any close scrutiny of the surroundings could be completed, the guests were ushered into the Blue Saloon by the housekeeper, Mrs. Robinson, a woman of genteel birth and impoverished background. Mrs. Milmont had hoped to scout around downstairs before the arrival of Sir Hillary, but her hope was thwarted.”
    — Aunt Sophie’s Diamonds by Joan Smith
    “Were flying saucers some odd, unknown natural phenomenon? Were they mechanical objects, and if so, whose? A communist stratagem? War nerves? Hoaxes? A new fad? Rubbish? Everyone wondered, no one knew.”
    — UFOs and the National Security State by Richard M. Dolan

    Reply
  86. “She expected him to be a gentleman and he wasn’t sure how. The one compliment he’d given her apparently wasn’t proper. If their marriage lasted beyond dinner tonight, he’d be surprised.” Give Me A Texas Outlaw, by Jodi Thomas…

    Reply
  87. “She expected him to be a gentleman and he wasn’t sure how. The one compliment he’d given her apparently wasn’t proper. If their marriage lasted beyond dinner tonight, he’d be surprised.” Give Me A Texas Outlaw, by Jodi Thomas…

    Reply
  88. “She expected him to be a gentleman and he wasn’t sure how. The one compliment he’d given her apparently wasn’t proper. If their marriage lasted beyond dinner tonight, he’d be surprised.” Give Me A Texas Outlaw, by Jodi Thomas…

    Reply
  89. “She expected him to be a gentleman and he wasn’t sure how. The one compliment he’d given her apparently wasn’t proper. If their marriage lasted beyond dinner tonight, he’d be surprised.” Give Me A Texas Outlaw, by Jodi Thomas…

    Reply
  90. “She expected him to be a gentleman and he wasn’t sure how. The one compliment he’d given her apparently wasn’t proper. If their marriage lasted beyond dinner tonight, he’d be surprised.” Give Me A Texas Outlaw, by Jodi Thomas…

    Reply
  91. Fabulous choices, great snippets! What a great sampling range of books, thank you for sharing these reads.
    Some of them are so interesting, I must check into them–and some are already in my TBR pile and I’ve got to move them up in the queue (Burrowes, Gortner, Crombie). And some of them I’m also reading (Shapiro, Art Forger).
    I seem to read seven or eight books at once, and rotate through them until one catches fire and I have to finish that one above all others, and then I go back to the endlessly turning ferris wheel of books. 😉

    Reply
  92. Fabulous choices, great snippets! What a great sampling range of books, thank you for sharing these reads.
    Some of them are so interesting, I must check into them–and some are already in my TBR pile and I’ve got to move them up in the queue (Burrowes, Gortner, Crombie). And some of them I’m also reading (Shapiro, Art Forger).
    I seem to read seven or eight books at once, and rotate through them until one catches fire and I have to finish that one above all others, and then I go back to the endlessly turning ferris wheel of books. 😉

    Reply
  93. Fabulous choices, great snippets! What a great sampling range of books, thank you for sharing these reads.
    Some of them are so interesting, I must check into them–and some are already in my TBR pile and I’ve got to move them up in the queue (Burrowes, Gortner, Crombie). And some of them I’m also reading (Shapiro, Art Forger).
    I seem to read seven or eight books at once, and rotate through them until one catches fire and I have to finish that one above all others, and then I go back to the endlessly turning ferris wheel of books. 😉

    Reply
  94. Fabulous choices, great snippets! What a great sampling range of books, thank you for sharing these reads.
    Some of them are so interesting, I must check into them–and some are already in my TBR pile and I’ve got to move them up in the queue (Burrowes, Gortner, Crombie). And some of them I’m also reading (Shapiro, Art Forger).
    I seem to read seven or eight books at once, and rotate through them until one catches fire and I have to finish that one above all others, and then I go back to the endlessly turning ferris wheel of books. 😉

    Reply
  95. Fabulous choices, great snippets! What a great sampling range of books, thank you for sharing these reads.
    Some of them are so interesting, I must check into them–and some are already in my TBR pile and I’ve got to move them up in the queue (Burrowes, Gortner, Crombie). And some of them I’m also reading (Shapiro, Art Forger).
    I seem to read seven or eight books at once, and rotate through them until one catches fire and I have to finish that one above all others, and then I go back to the endlessly turning ferris wheel of books. 😉

    Reply
  96. Since I have very little time at the moment, I´m only reading one book.
    Funnily enough, I am reading Jo Beverleys A SCANDALOUS COUNTESS 🙂
    “The loud knock at her boudoir door startled Georgia into blotting her letter. Before she could respond, her mother had entered the room”.

    Reply
  97. Since I have very little time at the moment, I´m only reading one book.
    Funnily enough, I am reading Jo Beverleys A SCANDALOUS COUNTESS 🙂
    “The loud knock at her boudoir door startled Georgia into blotting her letter. Before she could respond, her mother had entered the room”.

    Reply
  98. Since I have very little time at the moment, I´m only reading one book.
    Funnily enough, I am reading Jo Beverleys A SCANDALOUS COUNTESS 🙂
    “The loud knock at her boudoir door startled Georgia into blotting her letter. Before she could respond, her mother had entered the room”.

    Reply
  99. Since I have very little time at the moment, I´m only reading one book.
    Funnily enough, I am reading Jo Beverleys A SCANDALOUS COUNTESS 🙂
    “The loud knock at her boudoir door startled Georgia into blotting her letter. Before she could respond, her mother had entered the room”.

    Reply
  100. Since I have very little time at the moment, I´m only reading one book.
    Funnily enough, I am reading Jo Beverleys A SCANDALOUS COUNTESS 🙂
    “The loud knock at her boudoir door startled Georgia into blotting her letter. Before she could respond, her mother had entered the room”.

    Reply
  101. I am currently reading “Ethan” by Grace Burrowes. Hart’s mother, the baroness, is talking him into leaving. She even takes off her pearls and gives them to him to sell so he will have money to travel.

    Reply
  102. I am currently reading “Ethan” by Grace Burrowes. Hart’s mother, the baroness, is talking him into leaving. She even takes off her pearls and gives them to him to sell so he will have money to travel.

    Reply
  103. I am currently reading “Ethan” by Grace Burrowes. Hart’s mother, the baroness, is talking him into leaving. She even takes off her pearls and gives them to him to sell so he will have money to travel.

    Reply
  104. I am currently reading “Ethan” by Grace Burrowes. Hart’s mother, the baroness, is talking him into leaving. She even takes off her pearls and gives them to him to sell so he will have money to travel.

    Reply
  105. I am currently reading “Ethan” by Grace Burrowes. Hart’s mother, the baroness, is talking him into leaving. She even takes off her pearls and gives them to him to sell so he will have money to travel.

    Reply
  106. Currently I am reading Kasey Michaels book “What A Lady Needs”.It is an excellent book in her Redgrave family series. I am almost finished with the book and have enjoyed it.From p.44-” Don’t ask me to be perfect and then continually test me,Val,or you’ll be sorry you ever began this farce. Although I suspect you already are!”

    Reply
  107. Currently I am reading Kasey Michaels book “What A Lady Needs”.It is an excellent book in her Redgrave family series. I am almost finished with the book and have enjoyed it.From p.44-” Don’t ask me to be perfect and then continually test me,Val,or you’ll be sorry you ever began this farce. Although I suspect you already are!”

    Reply
  108. Currently I am reading Kasey Michaels book “What A Lady Needs”.It is an excellent book in her Redgrave family series. I am almost finished with the book and have enjoyed it.From p.44-” Don’t ask me to be perfect and then continually test me,Val,or you’ll be sorry you ever began this farce. Although I suspect you already are!”

    Reply
  109. Currently I am reading Kasey Michaels book “What A Lady Needs”.It is an excellent book in her Redgrave family series. I am almost finished with the book and have enjoyed it.From p.44-” Don’t ask me to be perfect and then continually test me,Val,or you’ll be sorry you ever began this farce. Although I suspect you already are!”

    Reply
  110. Currently I am reading Kasey Michaels book “What A Lady Needs”.It is an excellent book in her Redgrave family series. I am almost finished with the book and have enjoyed it.From p.44-” Don’t ask me to be perfect and then continually test me,Val,or you’ll be sorry you ever began this farce. Although I suspect you already are!”

    Reply
  111. “The Duke had cavalry too, but the Duke had no faith in horsemen, whether Dutch or English. His German cavalry was first class, but sadly few in numbers, while the Duke’s English cavalrymen were mere fools on horseback; expensive and touchy, prone to insanity, and utter strangers to discipline. The Dutch-Belgian horsemen, for all the Duke cared, could have packed their bags and ridden home right now.”
    WATERLOO by Bernard Cromwell

    Reply
  112. “The Duke had cavalry too, but the Duke had no faith in horsemen, whether Dutch or English. His German cavalry was first class, but sadly few in numbers, while the Duke’s English cavalrymen were mere fools on horseback; expensive and touchy, prone to insanity, and utter strangers to discipline. The Dutch-Belgian horsemen, for all the Duke cared, could have packed their bags and ridden home right now.”
    WATERLOO by Bernard Cromwell

    Reply
  113. “The Duke had cavalry too, but the Duke had no faith in horsemen, whether Dutch or English. His German cavalry was first class, but sadly few in numbers, while the Duke’s English cavalrymen were mere fools on horseback; expensive and touchy, prone to insanity, and utter strangers to discipline. The Dutch-Belgian horsemen, for all the Duke cared, could have packed their bags and ridden home right now.”
    WATERLOO by Bernard Cromwell

    Reply
  114. “The Duke had cavalry too, but the Duke had no faith in horsemen, whether Dutch or English. His German cavalry was first class, but sadly few in numbers, while the Duke’s English cavalrymen were mere fools on horseback; expensive and touchy, prone to insanity, and utter strangers to discipline. The Dutch-Belgian horsemen, for all the Duke cared, could have packed their bags and ridden home right now.”
    WATERLOO by Bernard Cromwell

    Reply
  115. “The Duke had cavalry too, but the Duke had no faith in horsemen, whether Dutch or English. His German cavalry was first class, but sadly few in numbers, while the Duke’s English cavalrymen were mere fools on horseback; expensive and touchy, prone to insanity, and utter strangers to discipline. The Dutch-Belgian horsemen, for all the Duke cared, could have packed their bags and ridden home right now.”
    WATERLOO by Bernard Cromwell

    Reply
  116. “…I love ramblers. To me they represent the essence of Britishness, a little bit like morris dancers and train-spotters, which might seem like being damned with faint praise but really there is no greater praise. These are all folk who pursue their enthusiasms without self-consciousness, in open view of people who almost ritually scoff at them.” from page 44 of Cream Teas, Traffic Jams and Sunburn. The Great british Hioliday by Brian Viner

    Reply
  117. “…I love ramblers. To me they represent the essence of Britishness, a little bit like morris dancers and train-spotters, which might seem like being damned with faint praise but really there is no greater praise. These are all folk who pursue their enthusiasms without self-consciousness, in open view of people who almost ritually scoff at them.” from page 44 of Cream Teas, Traffic Jams and Sunburn. The Great british Hioliday by Brian Viner

    Reply
  118. “…I love ramblers. To me they represent the essence of Britishness, a little bit like morris dancers and train-spotters, which might seem like being damned with faint praise but really there is no greater praise. These are all folk who pursue their enthusiasms without self-consciousness, in open view of people who almost ritually scoff at them.” from page 44 of Cream Teas, Traffic Jams and Sunburn. The Great british Hioliday by Brian Viner

    Reply
  119. “…I love ramblers. To me they represent the essence of Britishness, a little bit like morris dancers and train-spotters, which might seem like being damned with faint praise but really there is no greater praise. These are all folk who pursue their enthusiasms without self-consciousness, in open view of people who almost ritually scoff at them.” from page 44 of Cream Teas, Traffic Jams and Sunburn. The Great british Hioliday by Brian Viner

    Reply
  120. “…I love ramblers. To me they represent the essence of Britishness, a little bit like morris dancers and train-spotters, which might seem like being damned with faint praise but really there is no greater praise. These are all folk who pursue their enthusiasms without self-consciousness, in open view of people who almost ritually scoff at them.” from page 44 of Cream Teas, Traffic Jams and Sunburn. The Great british Hioliday by Brian Viner

    Reply
  121. I love Elizabeth Peter’s books.
    Unlike you, (and my DH)I can only read one book at a time. Last night I finished up an ARC of Collette Cameron’s Viscount’s Vow. Here is my selection from page 44.
    “Miss Caruthers felt faint while we danced. She swooned on the terrace. I brought her in here to recover.” Blister it all, the story sounded preposterous even to his ears.

    Reply
  122. I love Elizabeth Peter’s books.
    Unlike you, (and my DH)I can only read one book at a time. Last night I finished up an ARC of Collette Cameron’s Viscount’s Vow. Here is my selection from page 44.
    “Miss Caruthers felt faint while we danced. She swooned on the terrace. I brought her in here to recover.” Blister it all, the story sounded preposterous even to his ears.

    Reply
  123. I love Elizabeth Peter’s books.
    Unlike you, (and my DH)I can only read one book at a time. Last night I finished up an ARC of Collette Cameron’s Viscount’s Vow. Here is my selection from page 44.
    “Miss Caruthers felt faint while we danced. She swooned on the terrace. I brought her in here to recover.” Blister it all, the story sounded preposterous even to his ears.

    Reply
  124. I love Elizabeth Peter’s books.
    Unlike you, (and my DH)I can only read one book at a time. Last night I finished up an ARC of Collette Cameron’s Viscount’s Vow. Here is my selection from page 44.
    “Miss Caruthers felt faint while we danced. She swooned on the terrace. I brought her in here to recover.” Blister it all, the story sounded preposterous even to his ears.

    Reply
  125. I love Elizabeth Peter’s books.
    Unlike you, (and my DH)I can only read one book at a time. Last night I finished up an ARC of Collette Cameron’s Viscount’s Vow. Here is my selection from page 44.
    “Miss Caruthers felt faint while we danced. She swooned on the terrace. I brought her in here to recover.” Blister it all, the story sounded preposterous even to his ears.

    Reply
  126. Goodbye to a River – John Graves “There was no guarantee the weather would stay good; I doubted that it intended to…”
    Rubbed Out – Riley Adams “Cherry turned as red as her hair, ‘Well alright then, but it wasn’t really like that.’ ”

    Reply
  127. Goodbye to a River – John Graves “There was no guarantee the weather would stay good; I doubted that it intended to…”
    Rubbed Out – Riley Adams “Cherry turned as red as her hair, ‘Well alright then, but it wasn’t really like that.’ ”

    Reply
  128. Goodbye to a River – John Graves “There was no guarantee the weather would stay good; I doubted that it intended to…”
    Rubbed Out – Riley Adams “Cherry turned as red as her hair, ‘Well alright then, but it wasn’t really like that.’ ”

    Reply
  129. Goodbye to a River – John Graves “There was no guarantee the weather would stay good; I doubted that it intended to…”
    Rubbed Out – Riley Adams “Cherry turned as red as her hair, ‘Well alright then, but it wasn’t really like that.’ ”

    Reply
  130. Goodbye to a River – John Graves “There was no guarantee the weather would stay good; I doubted that it intended to…”
    Rubbed Out – Riley Adams “Cherry turned as red as her hair, ‘Well alright then, but it wasn’t really like that.’ ”

    Reply
  131. I haven’t decided on a new fiction read yet – just finished Take Me Under last night. (And I actually have Elizabeth Peter’s book sitting on my nightstand as a possible new read tonight.)
    But I have a stack of books with me now which I’m currently reading for my PhD including Digital Anthropology (Edited by Horst and Miller) which on page 44 states “Even in virtual worlds, traces of history endure.”
    and
    Terry Senft’s CamGirls: Celebrity & Community in the age of Social Networks
    From page 44: “”Just because some women do porn, doesn’t mean that i do, or that I have to.””

    Reply
  132. I haven’t decided on a new fiction read yet – just finished Take Me Under last night. (And I actually have Elizabeth Peter’s book sitting on my nightstand as a possible new read tonight.)
    But I have a stack of books with me now which I’m currently reading for my PhD including Digital Anthropology (Edited by Horst and Miller) which on page 44 states “Even in virtual worlds, traces of history endure.”
    and
    Terry Senft’s CamGirls: Celebrity & Community in the age of Social Networks
    From page 44: “”Just because some women do porn, doesn’t mean that i do, or that I have to.””

    Reply
  133. I haven’t decided on a new fiction read yet – just finished Take Me Under last night. (And I actually have Elizabeth Peter’s book sitting on my nightstand as a possible new read tonight.)
    But I have a stack of books with me now which I’m currently reading for my PhD including Digital Anthropology (Edited by Horst and Miller) which on page 44 states “Even in virtual worlds, traces of history endure.”
    and
    Terry Senft’s CamGirls: Celebrity & Community in the age of Social Networks
    From page 44: “”Just because some women do porn, doesn’t mean that i do, or that I have to.””

    Reply
  134. I haven’t decided on a new fiction read yet – just finished Take Me Under last night. (And I actually have Elizabeth Peter’s book sitting on my nightstand as a possible new read tonight.)
    But I have a stack of books with me now which I’m currently reading for my PhD including Digital Anthropology (Edited by Horst and Miller) which on page 44 states “Even in virtual worlds, traces of history endure.”
    and
    Terry Senft’s CamGirls: Celebrity & Community in the age of Social Networks
    From page 44: “”Just because some women do porn, doesn’t mean that i do, or that I have to.””

    Reply
  135. I haven’t decided on a new fiction read yet – just finished Take Me Under last night. (And I actually have Elizabeth Peter’s book sitting on my nightstand as a possible new read tonight.)
    But I have a stack of books with me now which I’m currently reading for my PhD including Digital Anthropology (Edited by Horst and Miller) which on page 44 states “Even in virtual worlds, traces of history endure.”
    and
    Terry Senft’s CamGirls: Celebrity & Community in the age of Social Networks
    From page 44: “”Just because some women do porn, doesn’t mean that i do, or that I have to.””

    Reply
  136. Reading Golden Afternoon, the second volume in M.M. Kaye’s autobiography. Don’t have it with me to cite from p. 44, unfortunately.
    Finished recently an ARC of Shady Characters, by Keith Houston, which makes punctuation fun.

    Reply
  137. Reading Golden Afternoon, the second volume in M.M. Kaye’s autobiography. Don’t have it with me to cite from p. 44, unfortunately.
    Finished recently an ARC of Shady Characters, by Keith Houston, which makes punctuation fun.

    Reply
  138. Reading Golden Afternoon, the second volume in M.M. Kaye’s autobiography. Don’t have it with me to cite from p. 44, unfortunately.
    Finished recently an ARC of Shady Characters, by Keith Houston, which makes punctuation fun.

    Reply
  139. Reading Golden Afternoon, the second volume in M.M. Kaye’s autobiography. Don’t have it with me to cite from p. 44, unfortunately.
    Finished recently an ARC of Shady Characters, by Keith Houston, which makes punctuation fun.

    Reply
  140. Reading Golden Afternoon, the second volume in M.M. Kaye’s autobiography. Don’t have it with me to cite from p. 44, unfortunately.
    Finished recently an ARC of Shady Characters, by Keith Houston, which makes punctuation fun.

    Reply
  141. And he’d bought a bottle of Australian red wine – Jacob’s Creek – which he told me “the guy at the supermarket said was ‘very drinkable.'”
    “That’s high praise from a guy at a supermarket,” I said.
    p.44 from Five Days, by Douglas Kennedy

    Reply
  142. And he’d bought a bottle of Australian red wine – Jacob’s Creek – which he told me “the guy at the supermarket said was ‘very drinkable.'”
    “That’s high praise from a guy at a supermarket,” I said.
    p.44 from Five Days, by Douglas Kennedy

    Reply
  143. And he’d bought a bottle of Australian red wine – Jacob’s Creek – which he told me “the guy at the supermarket said was ‘very drinkable.'”
    “That’s high praise from a guy at a supermarket,” I said.
    p.44 from Five Days, by Douglas Kennedy

    Reply
  144. And he’d bought a bottle of Australian red wine – Jacob’s Creek – which he told me “the guy at the supermarket said was ‘very drinkable.'”
    “That’s high praise from a guy at a supermarket,” I said.
    p.44 from Five Days, by Douglas Kennedy

    Reply
  145. And he’d bought a bottle of Australian red wine – Jacob’s Creek – which he told me “the guy at the supermarket said was ‘very drinkable.'”
    “That’s high praise from a guy at a supermarket,” I said.
    p.44 from Five Days, by Douglas Kennedy

    Reply
  146. Rather than flipping through the ebooks and manuscripts I have “live” on my Kindle, I headed for Amazon, grinning to beat the band, to buy the book version of Crocodile on the Sandbank, which I haven’t read in ages. Love Emerson!

    Reply
  147. Rather than flipping through the ebooks and manuscripts I have “live” on my Kindle, I headed for Amazon, grinning to beat the band, to buy the book version of Crocodile on the Sandbank, which I haven’t read in ages. Love Emerson!

    Reply
  148. Rather than flipping through the ebooks and manuscripts I have “live” on my Kindle, I headed for Amazon, grinning to beat the band, to buy the book version of Crocodile on the Sandbank, which I haven’t read in ages. Love Emerson!

    Reply
  149. Rather than flipping through the ebooks and manuscripts I have “live” on my Kindle, I headed for Amazon, grinning to beat the band, to buy the book version of Crocodile on the Sandbank, which I haven’t read in ages. Love Emerson!

    Reply
  150. Rather than flipping through the ebooks and manuscripts I have “live” on my Kindle, I headed for Amazon, grinning to beat the band, to buy the book version of Crocodile on the Sandbank, which I haven’t read in ages. Love Emerson!

    Reply
  151. Oh, I was sad to learn of Barbara Mertz’s death. I love crocodile on the sandbank, such a fun and funny book.
    Among the currently open books-
    Aren’t I a Woman?, Deborah Gray White: To this end, Southern men claimed that slavery uplifted white women. It was argued that only those women at the very lowest rung of society debased themselves by having Illicit sex. For those in the middle and upper strata of society slavery had an ameliorative effect.
    Smilla’s Sense of Snow, Peter Hoag: my only spiritual brother is Newton, I was moved when, at the university, they introduced us to the passage in Principia Mathematica, Book One, where he tips a bucket full of water and uses the tiled surface of the water to argue that there is Absolute Space inside and surrounding the rotating earth and the turning sun and the tumbling stars,whic makes it impossible to find any constant starting point or initial system or fixed point in life. Absolute Space – that which stands still, that which we can cling to.
    To have and to code, Debora Geary: – the server did try to verify you were an employee. It didn’t, however, object to Donald Duck, ostensibly located in the CEO’s office, hitching a ride ride back to the secure server on a random error message. A couple of dekes around security measures that were as nimble as Truck, and Daniel was in. He took a left turn at Human Resources and had Donald Duck apply for a couple of jobs. Added a zero to everyone’s next paycheck…

    Reply
  152. Oh, I was sad to learn of Barbara Mertz’s death. I love crocodile on the sandbank, such a fun and funny book.
    Among the currently open books-
    Aren’t I a Woman?, Deborah Gray White: To this end, Southern men claimed that slavery uplifted white women. It was argued that only those women at the very lowest rung of society debased themselves by having Illicit sex. For those in the middle and upper strata of society slavery had an ameliorative effect.
    Smilla’s Sense of Snow, Peter Hoag: my only spiritual brother is Newton, I was moved when, at the university, they introduced us to the passage in Principia Mathematica, Book One, where he tips a bucket full of water and uses the tiled surface of the water to argue that there is Absolute Space inside and surrounding the rotating earth and the turning sun and the tumbling stars,whic makes it impossible to find any constant starting point or initial system or fixed point in life. Absolute Space – that which stands still, that which we can cling to.
    To have and to code, Debora Geary: – the server did try to verify you were an employee. It didn’t, however, object to Donald Duck, ostensibly located in the CEO’s office, hitching a ride ride back to the secure server on a random error message. A couple of dekes around security measures that were as nimble as Truck, and Daniel was in. He took a left turn at Human Resources and had Donald Duck apply for a couple of jobs. Added a zero to everyone’s next paycheck…

    Reply
  153. Oh, I was sad to learn of Barbara Mertz’s death. I love crocodile on the sandbank, such a fun and funny book.
    Among the currently open books-
    Aren’t I a Woman?, Deborah Gray White: To this end, Southern men claimed that slavery uplifted white women. It was argued that only those women at the very lowest rung of society debased themselves by having Illicit sex. For those in the middle and upper strata of society slavery had an ameliorative effect.
    Smilla’s Sense of Snow, Peter Hoag: my only spiritual brother is Newton, I was moved when, at the university, they introduced us to the passage in Principia Mathematica, Book One, where he tips a bucket full of water and uses the tiled surface of the water to argue that there is Absolute Space inside and surrounding the rotating earth and the turning sun and the tumbling stars,whic makes it impossible to find any constant starting point or initial system or fixed point in life. Absolute Space – that which stands still, that which we can cling to.
    To have and to code, Debora Geary: – the server did try to verify you were an employee. It didn’t, however, object to Donald Duck, ostensibly located in the CEO’s office, hitching a ride ride back to the secure server on a random error message. A couple of dekes around security measures that were as nimble as Truck, and Daniel was in. He took a left turn at Human Resources and had Donald Duck apply for a couple of jobs. Added a zero to everyone’s next paycheck…

    Reply
  154. Oh, I was sad to learn of Barbara Mertz’s death. I love crocodile on the sandbank, such a fun and funny book.
    Among the currently open books-
    Aren’t I a Woman?, Deborah Gray White: To this end, Southern men claimed that slavery uplifted white women. It was argued that only those women at the very lowest rung of society debased themselves by having Illicit sex. For those in the middle and upper strata of society slavery had an ameliorative effect.
    Smilla’s Sense of Snow, Peter Hoag: my only spiritual brother is Newton, I was moved when, at the university, they introduced us to the passage in Principia Mathematica, Book One, where he tips a bucket full of water and uses the tiled surface of the water to argue that there is Absolute Space inside and surrounding the rotating earth and the turning sun and the tumbling stars,whic makes it impossible to find any constant starting point or initial system or fixed point in life. Absolute Space – that which stands still, that which we can cling to.
    To have and to code, Debora Geary: – the server did try to verify you were an employee. It didn’t, however, object to Donald Duck, ostensibly located in the CEO’s office, hitching a ride ride back to the secure server on a random error message. A couple of dekes around security measures that were as nimble as Truck, and Daniel was in. He took a left turn at Human Resources and had Donald Duck apply for a couple of jobs. Added a zero to everyone’s next paycheck…

    Reply
  155. Oh, I was sad to learn of Barbara Mertz’s death. I love crocodile on the sandbank, such a fun and funny book.
    Among the currently open books-
    Aren’t I a Woman?, Deborah Gray White: To this end, Southern men claimed that slavery uplifted white women. It was argued that only those women at the very lowest rung of society debased themselves by having Illicit sex. For those in the middle and upper strata of society slavery had an ameliorative effect.
    Smilla’s Sense of Snow, Peter Hoag: my only spiritual brother is Newton, I was moved when, at the university, they introduced us to the passage in Principia Mathematica, Book One, where he tips a bucket full of water and uses the tiled surface of the water to argue that there is Absolute Space inside and surrounding the rotating earth and the turning sun and the tumbling stars,whic makes it impossible to find any constant starting point or initial system or fixed point in life. Absolute Space – that which stands still, that which we can cling to.
    To have and to code, Debora Geary: – the server did try to verify you were an employee. It didn’t, however, object to Donald Duck, ostensibly located in the CEO’s office, hitching a ride ride back to the secure server on a random error message. A couple of dekes around security measures that were as nimble as Truck, and Daniel was in. He took a left turn at Human Resources and had Donald Duck apply for a couple of jobs. Added a zero to everyone’s next paycheck…

    Reply
  156. “I liked my Sobranies, but I loved a good cigar. It was like French-kissing fire.
    Page 44: A Spear of Summer Grass by Deanna Raybourn

    Reply
  157. “I liked my Sobranies, but I loved a good cigar. It was like French-kissing fire.
    Page 44: A Spear of Summer Grass by Deanna Raybourn

    Reply
  158. “I liked my Sobranies, but I loved a good cigar. It was like French-kissing fire.
    Page 44: A Spear of Summer Grass by Deanna Raybourn

    Reply
  159. “I liked my Sobranies, but I loved a good cigar. It was like French-kissing fire.
    Page 44: A Spear of Summer Grass by Deanna Raybourn

    Reply
  160. “I liked my Sobranies, but I loved a good cigar. It was like French-kissing fire.
    Page 44: A Spear of Summer Grass by Deanna Raybourn

    Reply
  161. I am in the process of reading several books at once as usual.
    Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen: pg 44 “Oh, these odious gigs!” said Isabella, looking up, “how I destest them.” But this detestation, though so just, was of short duration, for she looked again and exclaimed,”Delightful! Mr. Morland and my brother!” “Good heaven! ’tis James!” was uttered at the same moment by Catherine; and, on catching the young men’s eyes, the horse was immediately checked ..
    The Mummy’s Mirror, by Dawn Aldridge Poore. pg 44 ” I think Lymond was planning to tour the interior quite extensively while I was planning to stay close to Cairo. For all I know, the man may have even gone to Ethiopia by now.” Owen laughed. ” I feel sure the two of you will run into each other. Say hello for me.”

    Reply
  162. I am in the process of reading several books at once as usual.
    Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen: pg 44 “Oh, these odious gigs!” said Isabella, looking up, “how I destest them.” But this detestation, though so just, was of short duration, for she looked again and exclaimed,”Delightful! Mr. Morland and my brother!” “Good heaven! ’tis James!” was uttered at the same moment by Catherine; and, on catching the young men’s eyes, the horse was immediately checked ..
    The Mummy’s Mirror, by Dawn Aldridge Poore. pg 44 ” I think Lymond was planning to tour the interior quite extensively while I was planning to stay close to Cairo. For all I know, the man may have even gone to Ethiopia by now.” Owen laughed. ” I feel sure the two of you will run into each other. Say hello for me.”

    Reply
  163. I am in the process of reading several books at once as usual.
    Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen: pg 44 “Oh, these odious gigs!” said Isabella, looking up, “how I destest them.” But this detestation, though so just, was of short duration, for she looked again and exclaimed,”Delightful! Mr. Morland and my brother!” “Good heaven! ’tis James!” was uttered at the same moment by Catherine; and, on catching the young men’s eyes, the horse was immediately checked ..
    The Mummy’s Mirror, by Dawn Aldridge Poore. pg 44 ” I think Lymond was planning to tour the interior quite extensively while I was planning to stay close to Cairo. For all I know, the man may have even gone to Ethiopia by now.” Owen laughed. ” I feel sure the two of you will run into each other. Say hello for me.”

    Reply
  164. I am in the process of reading several books at once as usual.
    Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen: pg 44 “Oh, these odious gigs!” said Isabella, looking up, “how I destest them.” But this detestation, though so just, was of short duration, for she looked again and exclaimed,”Delightful! Mr. Morland and my brother!” “Good heaven! ’tis James!” was uttered at the same moment by Catherine; and, on catching the young men’s eyes, the horse was immediately checked ..
    The Mummy’s Mirror, by Dawn Aldridge Poore. pg 44 ” I think Lymond was planning to tour the interior quite extensively while I was planning to stay close to Cairo. For all I know, the man may have even gone to Ethiopia by now.” Owen laughed. ” I feel sure the two of you will run into each other. Say hello for me.”

    Reply
  165. I am in the process of reading several books at once as usual.
    Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen: pg 44 “Oh, these odious gigs!” said Isabella, looking up, “how I destest them.” But this detestation, though so just, was of short duration, for she looked again and exclaimed,”Delightful! Mr. Morland and my brother!” “Good heaven! ’tis James!” was uttered at the same moment by Catherine; and, on catching the young men’s eyes, the horse was immediately checked ..
    The Mummy’s Mirror, by Dawn Aldridge Poore. pg 44 ” I think Lymond was planning to tour the interior quite extensively while I was planning to stay close to Cairo. For all I know, the man may have even gone to Ethiopia by now.” Owen laughed. ” I feel sure the two of you will run into each other. Say hello for me.”

    Reply
  166. The Prince of Pleasure and his Regency, by the novelist, J.B.Priestley, published in 1969 and discovered recently in a second-hand bookshop.’I am not trying to moralise, but too much has been made, to please popular fancy, of the roistering and rip-roaring life of the Regency dandies and rakes. A longer look shows the fog of boredom creeping over them, and not infrequently a moonless night of despair.’

    Reply
  167. The Prince of Pleasure and his Regency, by the novelist, J.B.Priestley, published in 1969 and discovered recently in a second-hand bookshop.’I am not trying to moralise, but too much has been made, to please popular fancy, of the roistering and rip-roaring life of the Regency dandies and rakes. A longer look shows the fog of boredom creeping over them, and not infrequently a moonless night of despair.’

    Reply
  168. The Prince of Pleasure and his Regency, by the novelist, J.B.Priestley, published in 1969 and discovered recently in a second-hand bookshop.’I am not trying to moralise, but too much has been made, to please popular fancy, of the roistering and rip-roaring life of the Regency dandies and rakes. A longer look shows the fog of boredom creeping over them, and not infrequently a moonless night of despair.’

    Reply
  169. The Prince of Pleasure and his Regency, by the novelist, J.B.Priestley, published in 1969 and discovered recently in a second-hand bookshop.’I am not trying to moralise, but too much has been made, to please popular fancy, of the roistering and rip-roaring life of the Regency dandies and rakes. A longer look shows the fog of boredom creeping over them, and not infrequently a moonless night of despair.’

    Reply
  170. The Prince of Pleasure and his Regency, by the novelist, J.B.Priestley, published in 1969 and discovered recently in a second-hand bookshop.’I am not trying to moralise, but too much has been made, to please popular fancy, of the roistering and rip-roaring life of the Regency dandies and rakes. A longer look shows the fog of boredom creeping over them, and not infrequently a moonless night of despair.’

    Reply
  171. Funny read for the end of summer: First Grave on the Right, Darynda Jones.
    “I know,” I said, trying not to sound annoyed. “But seriously, if I die two weeks before Christmas, I’m totally coming back to haunt you. Forever. And trust me, I know how.”

    Reply
  172. Funny read for the end of summer: First Grave on the Right, Darynda Jones.
    “I know,” I said, trying not to sound annoyed. “But seriously, if I die two weeks before Christmas, I’m totally coming back to haunt you. Forever. And trust me, I know how.”

    Reply
  173. Funny read for the end of summer: First Grave on the Right, Darynda Jones.
    “I know,” I said, trying not to sound annoyed. “But seriously, if I die two weeks before Christmas, I’m totally coming back to haunt you. Forever. And trust me, I know how.”

    Reply
  174. Funny read for the end of summer: First Grave on the Right, Darynda Jones.
    “I know,” I said, trying not to sound annoyed. “But seriously, if I die two weeks before Christmas, I’m totally coming back to haunt you. Forever. And trust me, I know how.”

    Reply
  175. Funny read for the end of summer: First Grave on the Right, Darynda Jones.
    “I know,” I said, trying not to sound annoyed. “But seriously, if I die two weeks before Christmas, I’m totally coming back to haunt you. Forever. And trust me, I know how.”

    Reply

Leave a Comment