Surprises along the way

Charlieflying
Hi, it's the Jo and Charlie show! Of course we took Charlie to England with us and he went for a little fly on windy Dartmoor. (This is a sort of photo blog, but Typepad doesn't really have a way of previewing exactly how pictures will show, so forgive the layout probrems.)

He also met a redheaded wench. As she was naked, he gallantly gave her his second-best sparkly cloak. What a hero!Charlie1
Charlietor

He also did some research for me.

Another kind of hero!

That's a very interesting book, BTW, especially in the context of my Grail novella, and is my first surprise along the way. It suggests that the terraces around the tor, or hill, at Glastonbury, Somerset, are not exactly terraces but the paths of a labyrinth that circles up to the top. A labyrinth, of course, is not a maze but a laid-out path used for meditation and spiritual enlightenment.

There was a monastery at the top of Glastonbury Tor, of which only a tower remains and it has been a center of myth and mystery since pre-Christian times.

Tormine

Sometimes Charlie prefers lighter reading.
Charlietsw

Yes, The Secret Wedding is flying off shelves right now. Rush out and make sure you have your copy!
Readers report that it's exciting, enthralling, and even funny. See relevant picture of cat. πŸ™‚

The image is from this excellent site of old illustrations.

Manxcat

If you like excerpts, and haven't already read the ones from The Secret Wedding, they are here.

Got to keep plugging the book! πŸ™‚

But what about the other surprises along the way? They both relate to royalty.

You know how sometimes you see something and the brain halts to something that doesn't quite make sense. In Falmouth, a coastal town in Devon, I saw a Georgian house with this sign.

King Charles

Parish Church

Coffee Shop

Now it looked like a Georgian coffee shop.Kchbuilddng

Churches sometimes run coffee shops.

There was a church on the other side of the road.

But where did King Charles come in?

Then I saw the church sign.

Kchsign
 

There's more about this church here.

I had no idea that Charles I had been canonized! Research showed this subject to be even more fascinating. There is an established Society of King Charles The Martyr, and more than one church dedicated to him.

He is the only person to be canonized by the Church of England. (Wikipedia adds "after the Reformation.") You can read the full article here.

But most astonishing to me, there are churches dedicated to King Charles the Martyr in the republican USA! Here's the web site of one.

If anyone here knows more about this, please share. Are you as surprised as I am?

My other surprise was at Truro Cathedral in Cornwall.

If you're familiar with Cathedrals you'll know that they usually have ranks of carved saints at the front, sometimes with an occasional important person of the time. Here's Exeter Cathedral, unfortunately part-shrouded by maintenance work.Exetercath 

So I glance up at the carved figures — and my brain halts to try to compute what it's seeing. Alongside a medieval king…

Truroking

is that Edward VII?

Huh?

It is, you know. Exeter is a modern cathedral in the gothic style, built in the late 19th century. Edward laid the cornerstone before the death of his mother, Queen Victoria, so this must have been added later. Victoria is there, too, of course, and also, I think Palmerstone.

The things one finds along the way.

Have you ever come across something that makes you stop to try and make sense of it? Tell me more.

Have you seen The Secret Wedding in stores yet? Where? How many copies? Where was it displayed?

Have you read it yet? Did you like it?

One thing about having one one new book out a year, it gets its full share of my doting authorial fussing. πŸ™‚

And the Wenches are going to be trying something new that we hope you'll like — downloadable bookmarks. Check back over the next two days, and as soon as they're ready, I'll announce it. We'd appreciate feedback about how well this works for you.Tswsm

All best wishes,

Jo πŸ™‚

145 thoughts on “Surprises along the way”

  1. I’m so enjoying the armchair travel, Jo.
    I get out early from work today and plan to go shopping. There had better be a copy of The Secret Wedding somewhere in my town or I’ll contemplate moving. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  2. I’m so enjoying the armchair travel, Jo.
    I get out early from work today and plan to go shopping. There had better be a copy of The Secret Wedding somewhere in my town or I’ll contemplate moving. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  3. I’m so enjoying the armchair travel, Jo.
    I get out early from work today and plan to go shopping. There had better be a copy of The Secret Wedding somewhere in my town or I’ll contemplate moving. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  4. I’m so enjoying the armchair travel, Jo.
    I get out early from work today and plan to go shopping. There had better be a copy of The Secret Wedding somewhere in my town or I’ll contemplate moving. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  5. I’m so enjoying the armchair travel, Jo.
    I get out early from work today and plan to go shopping. There had better be a copy of The Secret Wedding somewhere in my town or I’ll contemplate moving. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  6. **snip**
    One thing about having one one new book out a year, it gets its full share of my doting authorial fussing. πŸ™‚
    **end snip **
    Do you prefer writing only one book a year? I see authors writing two and three books a year, and I wonder how they do it. I also wonder if the books are as good as they could be.

    Reply
  7. **snip**
    One thing about having one one new book out a year, it gets its full share of my doting authorial fussing. πŸ™‚
    **end snip **
    Do you prefer writing only one book a year? I see authors writing two and three books a year, and I wonder how they do it. I also wonder if the books are as good as they could be.

    Reply
  8. **snip**
    One thing about having one one new book out a year, it gets its full share of my doting authorial fussing. πŸ™‚
    **end snip **
    Do you prefer writing only one book a year? I see authors writing two and three books a year, and I wonder how they do it. I also wonder if the books are as good as they could be.

    Reply
  9. **snip**
    One thing about having one one new book out a year, it gets its full share of my doting authorial fussing. πŸ™‚
    **end snip **
    Do you prefer writing only one book a year? I see authors writing two and three books a year, and I wonder how they do it. I also wonder if the books are as good as they could be.

    Reply
  10. **snip**
    One thing about having one one new book out a year, it gets its full share of my doting authorial fussing. πŸ™‚
    **end snip **
    Do you prefer writing only one book a year? I see authors writing two and three books a year, and I wonder how they do it. I also wonder if the books are as good as they could be.

    Reply
  11. My Amazon preorder shipped on the 5th too, and I’m still waiting for it to arrive. But I did see The Secret Wedding at Kroger this morning, Jo. Such a sighting usually means that copies are on shelves at the other grocery chains and at WalMart.

    Reply
  12. My Amazon preorder shipped on the 5th too, and I’m still waiting for it to arrive. But I did see The Secret Wedding at Kroger this morning, Jo. Such a sighting usually means that copies are on shelves at the other grocery chains and at WalMart.

    Reply
  13. My Amazon preorder shipped on the 5th too, and I’m still waiting for it to arrive. But I did see The Secret Wedding at Kroger this morning, Jo. Such a sighting usually means that copies are on shelves at the other grocery chains and at WalMart.

    Reply
  14. My Amazon preorder shipped on the 5th too, and I’m still waiting for it to arrive. But I did see The Secret Wedding at Kroger this morning, Jo. Such a sighting usually means that copies are on shelves at the other grocery chains and at WalMart.

    Reply
  15. My Amazon preorder shipped on the 5th too, and I’m still waiting for it to arrive. But I did see The Secret Wedding at Kroger this morning, Jo. Such a sighting usually means that copies are on shelves at the other grocery chains and at WalMart.

    Reply
  16. Jo, I would so much like to have you as my tour guide! I would have looked at Saint King Charles and not even lifted an eyebrow. I’d no idea he’d been canonized.
    I am almost finished reading THE SECRET WEDDING! Besides being an ace storyteller, I love your use of a mysterious cat (and fanged rabbits – LOL!) to add another layer of richness to your always-fascinating stories. (I remember the pack of otherworldly cats in DANGEROUS JOY.) Anyway, back to THE SECRET WEDDING: it’s a great read and I’m enjoying it immensely!

    Reply
  17. Jo, I would so much like to have you as my tour guide! I would have looked at Saint King Charles and not even lifted an eyebrow. I’d no idea he’d been canonized.
    I am almost finished reading THE SECRET WEDDING! Besides being an ace storyteller, I love your use of a mysterious cat (and fanged rabbits – LOL!) to add another layer of richness to your always-fascinating stories. (I remember the pack of otherworldly cats in DANGEROUS JOY.) Anyway, back to THE SECRET WEDDING: it’s a great read and I’m enjoying it immensely!

    Reply
  18. Jo, I would so much like to have you as my tour guide! I would have looked at Saint King Charles and not even lifted an eyebrow. I’d no idea he’d been canonized.
    I am almost finished reading THE SECRET WEDDING! Besides being an ace storyteller, I love your use of a mysterious cat (and fanged rabbits – LOL!) to add another layer of richness to your always-fascinating stories. (I remember the pack of otherworldly cats in DANGEROUS JOY.) Anyway, back to THE SECRET WEDDING: it’s a great read and I’m enjoying it immensely!

    Reply
  19. Jo, I would so much like to have you as my tour guide! I would have looked at Saint King Charles and not even lifted an eyebrow. I’d no idea he’d been canonized.
    I am almost finished reading THE SECRET WEDDING! Besides being an ace storyteller, I love your use of a mysterious cat (and fanged rabbits – LOL!) to add another layer of richness to your always-fascinating stories. (I remember the pack of otherworldly cats in DANGEROUS JOY.) Anyway, back to THE SECRET WEDDING: it’s a great read and I’m enjoying it immensely!

    Reply
  20. Jo, I would so much like to have you as my tour guide! I would have looked at Saint King Charles and not even lifted an eyebrow. I’d no idea he’d been canonized.
    I am almost finished reading THE SECRET WEDDING! Besides being an ace storyteller, I love your use of a mysterious cat (and fanged rabbits – LOL!) to add another layer of richness to your always-fascinating stories. (I remember the pack of otherworldly cats in DANGEROUS JOY.) Anyway, back to THE SECRET WEDDING: it’s a great read and I’m enjoying it immensely!

    Reply
  21. OK, Jo, I’ll take the bait. How can I resist Saint King Charles? *g*
    I can’t add much to the “martyrdom” of Charles I beyond what you already have in your links. Here’s one more, dedicated to the Society of King Charles the Martyr:
    http://www.skcm.org
    It’s fascinating to consider how different interpretations of what was basically the same religion could lead to beheading a king, deposing the religion of the majority of the population, and twenty years or so of civil war. All that 17th century conflict was much in the minds of the American founding fathers 100 years later when they insisted on the separation of church and state.
    Worshiping Charles I as a saint was such a convenience for his battered supporters: they could simultaneously (though illegally) honor their murdered king, lament their lost way of life, and the martyrdom of the leader of their church. It’s interesting how prints of the saintly Charles became “underground” art, and how his followers wore special jewelry in his honor that was much like the religious reliquaries memorializing Roman Catholic saints on the continent.
    I even wrote one such necklace into ROYAL HARLOT, a gift from Roger Palmer to Barbara Villiers:
    I set down my fork, and opened the little hinged box. Nestled inside was a chain and pendant framed in herringbone silver-gilt, a faceted glass heart. Buried deep within the heart for safe-keeping was a cypher wrought of twisted golden wire, so finely made that it might have been the work of dainty fairy-fingers, rather than mortal man’s.
    β€œIt’s a C and an R, of course,” Roger explained. β€œFor Carolus Regnum. Charles the king. They first were made to honor our martyred sovereign, but now the followers to his royal son wear them as well. You’ve shown yourself to me to be worthy of our party, and with this around your throat, others will recognize your loyalty as well.”
    All this saintly good-will helped pave the way for the restoration of Charles I’s son to the throne — though no one ever called Charles II a saint. *G*
    BTW — I can report that THE SECRET WEDDING has been on the shelves here in PA since last week.
    Welcome home!

    Reply
  22. OK, Jo, I’ll take the bait. How can I resist Saint King Charles? *g*
    I can’t add much to the “martyrdom” of Charles I beyond what you already have in your links. Here’s one more, dedicated to the Society of King Charles the Martyr:
    http://www.skcm.org
    It’s fascinating to consider how different interpretations of what was basically the same religion could lead to beheading a king, deposing the religion of the majority of the population, and twenty years or so of civil war. All that 17th century conflict was much in the minds of the American founding fathers 100 years later when they insisted on the separation of church and state.
    Worshiping Charles I as a saint was such a convenience for his battered supporters: they could simultaneously (though illegally) honor their murdered king, lament their lost way of life, and the martyrdom of the leader of their church. It’s interesting how prints of the saintly Charles became “underground” art, and how his followers wore special jewelry in his honor that was much like the religious reliquaries memorializing Roman Catholic saints on the continent.
    I even wrote one such necklace into ROYAL HARLOT, a gift from Roger Palmer to Barbara Villiers:
    I set down my fork, and opened the little hinged box. Nestled inside was a chain and pendant framed in herringbone silver-gilt, a faceted glass heart. Buried deep within the heart for safe-keeping was a cypher wrought of twisted golden wire, so finely made that it might have been the work of dainty fairy-fingers, rather than mortal man’s.
    β€œIt’s a C and an R, of course,” Roger explained. β€œFor Carolus Regnum. Charles the king. They first were made to honor our martyred sovereign, but now the followers to his royal son wear them as well. You’ve shown yourself to me to be worthy of our party, and with this around your throat, others will recognize your loyalty as well.”
    All this saintly good-will helped pave the way for the restoration of Charles I’s son to the throne — though no one ever called Charles II a saint. *G*
    BTW — I can report that THE SECRET WEDDING has been on the shelves here in PA since last week.
    Welcome home!

    Reply
  23. OK, Jo, I’ll take the bait. How can I resist Saint King Charles? *g*
    I can’t add much to the “martyrdom” of Charles I beyond what you already have in your links. Here’s one more, dedicated to the Society of King Charles the Martyr:
    http://www.skcm.org
    It’s fascinating to consider how different interpretations of what was basically the same religion could lead to beheading a king, deposing the religion of the majority of the population, and twenty years or so of civil war. All that 17th century conflict was much in the minds of the American founding fathers 100 years later when they insisted on the separation of church and state.
    Worshiping Charles I as a saint was such a convenience for his battered supporters: they could simultaneously (though illegally) honor their murdered king, lament their lost way of life, and the martyrdom of the leader of their church. It’s interesting how prints of the saintly Charles became “underground” art, and how his followers wore special jewelry in his honor that was much like the religious reliquaries memorializing Roman Catholic saints on the continent.
    I even wrote one such necklace into ROYAL HARLOT, a gift from Roger Palmer to Barbara Villiers:
    I set down my fork, and opened the little hinged box. Nestled inside was a chain and pendant framed in herringbone silver-gilt, a faceted glass heart. Buried deep within the heart for safe-keeping was a cypher wrought of twisted golden wire, so finely made that it might have been the work of dainty fairy-fingers, rather than mortal man’s.
    β€œIt’s a C and an R, of course,” Roger explained. β€œFor Carolus Regnum. Charles the king. They first were made to honor our martyred sovereign, but now the followers to his royal son wear them as well. You’ve shown yourself to me to be worthy of our party, and with this around your throat, others will recognize your loyalty as well.”
    All this saintly good-will helped pave the way for the restoration of Charles I’s son to the throne — though no one ever called Charles II a saint. *G*
    BTW — I can report that THE SECRET WEDDING has been on the shelves here in PA since last week.
    Welcome home!

    Reply
  24. OK, Jo, I’ll take the bait. How can I resist Saint King Charles? *g*
    I can’t add much to the “martyrdom” of Charles I beyond what you already have in your links. Here’s one more, dedicated to the Society of King Charles the Martyr:
    http://www.skcm.org
    It’s fascinating to consider how different interpretations of what was basically the same religion could lead to beheading a king, deposing the religion of the majority of the population, and twenty years or so of civil war. All that 17th century conflict was much in the minds of the American founding fathers 100 years later when they insisted on the separation of church and state.
    Worshiping Charles I as a saint was such a convenience for his battered supporters: they could simultaneously (though illegally) honor their murdered king, lament their lost way of life, and the martyrdom of the leader of their church. It’s interesting how prints of the saintly Charles became “underground” art, and how his followers wore special jewelry in his honor that was much like the religious reliquaries memorializing Roman Catholic saints on the continent.
    I even wrote one such necklace into ROYAL HARLOT, a gift from Roger Palmer to Barbara Villiers:
    I set down my fork, and opened the little hinged box. Nestled inside was a chain and pendant framed in herringbone silver-gilt, a faceted glass heart. Buried deep within the heart for safe-keeping was a cypher wrought of twisted golden wire, so finely made that it might have been the work of dainty fairy-fingers, rather than mortal man’s.
    β€œIt’s a C and an R, of course,” Roger explained. β€œFor Carolus Regnum. Charles the king. They first were made to honor our martyred sovereign, but now the followers to his royal son wear them as well. You’ve shown yourself to me to be worthy of our party, and with this around your throat, others will recognize your loyalty as well.”
    All this saintly good-will helped pave the way for the restoration of Charles I’s son to the throne — though no one ever called Charles II a saint. *G*
    BTW — I can report that THE SECRET WEDDING has been on the shelves here in PA since last week.
    Welcome home!

    Reply
  25. OK, Jo, I’ll take the bait. How can I resist Saint King Charles? *g*
    I can’t add much to the “martyrdom” of Charles I beyond what you already have in your links. Here’s one more, dedicated to the Society of King Charles the Martyr:
    http://www.skcm.org
    It’s fascinating to consider how different interpretations of what was basically the same religion could lead to beheading a king, deposing the religion of the majority of the population, and twenty years or so of civil war. All that 17th century conflict was much in the minds of the American founding fathers 100 years later when they insisted on the separation of church and state.
    Worshiping Charles I as a saint was such a convenience for his battered supporters: they could simultaneously (though illegally) honor their murdered king, lament their lost way of life, and the martyrdom of the leader of their church. It’s interesting how prints of the saintly Charles became “underground” art, and how his followers wore special jewelry in his honor that was much like the religious reliquaries memorializing Roman Catholic saints on the continent.
    I even wrote one such necklace into ROYAL HARLOT, a gift from Roger Palmer to Barbara Villiers:
    I set down my fork, and opened the little hinged box. Nestled inside was a chain and pendant framed in herringbone silver-gilt, a faceted glass heart. Buried deep within the heart for safe-keeping was a cypher wrought of twisted golden wire, so finely made that it might have been the work of dainty fairy-fingers, rather than mortal man’s.
    β€œIt’s a C and an R, of course,” Roger explained. β€œFor Carolus Regnum. Charles the king. They first were made to honor our martyred sovereign, but now the followers to his royal son wear them as well. You’ve shown yourself to me to be worthy of our party, and with this around your throat, others will recognize your loyalty as well.”
    All this saintly good-will helped pave the way for the restoration of Charles I’s son to the throne — though no one ever called Charles II a saint. *G*
    BTW — I can report that THE SECRET WEDDING has been on the shelves here in PA since last week.
    Welcome home!

    Reply
  26. Hi, Jo,
    Welcome back!
    I found “The Secret Wedding” today at Border’s in Annapolis, MD. They had at least ten, arrayed with one facing out.
    Set to be a big seller!
    Laura

    Reply
  27. Hi, Jo,
    Welcome back!
    I found “The Secret Wedding” today at Border’s in Annapolis, MD. They had at least ten, arrayed with one facing out.
    Set to be a big seller!
    Laura

    Reply
  28. Hi, Jo,
    Welcome back!
    I found “The Secret Wedding” today at Border’s in Annapolis, MD. They had at least ten, arrayed with one facing out.
    Set to be a big seller!
    Laura

    Reply
  29. Hi, Jo,
    Welcome back!
    I found “The Secret Wedding” today at Border’s in Annapolis, MD. They had at least ten, arrayed with one facing out.
    Set to be a big seller!
    Laura

    Reply
  30. Hi, Jo,
    Welcome back!
    I found “The Secret Wedding” today at Border’s in Annapolis, MD. They had at least ten, arrayed with one facing out.
    Set to be a big seller!
    Laura

    Reply
  31. I’ll admit that the idea of Charles I as a saint make me blink. Being no fan of Stuarts or their divine right of kings ideology, I’ve always been inclined the think Charles had it coming.
    Are any miracles attributed to him? Or isn’t that required for Anglican saints? πŸ™‚
    Still, I can see the value of having a cult that disappointed royalists could venerate. And he certainly does represent the value of separating church and state!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  32. I’ll admit that the idea of Charles I as a saint make me blink. Being no fan of Stuarts or their divine right of kings ideology, I’ve always been inclined the think Charles had it coming.
    Are any miracles attributed to him? Or isn’t that required for Anglican saints? πŸ™‚
    Still, I can see the value of having a cult that disappointed royalists could venerate. And he certainly does represent the value of separating church and state!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  33. I’ll admit that the idea of Charles I as a saint make me blink. Being no fan of Stuarts or their divine right of kings ideology, I’ve always been inclined the think Charles had it coming.
    Are any miracles attributed to him? Or isn’t that required for Anglican saints? πŸ™‚
    Still, I can see the value of having a cult that disappointed royalists could venerate. And he certainly does represent the value of separating church and state!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  34. I’ll admit that the idea of Charles I as a saint make me blink. Being no fan of Stuarts or their divine right of kings ideology, I’ve always been inclined the think Charles had it coming.
    Are any miracles attributed to him? Or isn’t that required for Anglican saints? πŸ™‚
    Still, I can see the value of having a cult that disappointed royalists could venerate. And he certainly does represent the value of separating church and state!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  35. I’ll admit that the idea of Charles I as a saint make me blink. Being no fan of Stuarts or their divine right of kings ideology, I’ve always been inclined the think Charles had it coming.
    Are any miracles attributed to him? Or isn’t that required for Anglican saints? πŸ™‚
    Still, I can see the value of having a cult that disappointed royalists could venerate. And he certainly does represent the value of separating church and state!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  36. I knew about Glastonbury because it’s the culmination of my grail/chalice trilogy for my July release, but Saint King Charles is a bit of a shocker. They’ll just let anybody be saints, don’t they? “G”
    My copy of SECRET WEDDING arrived from BAM several days ago, but I’m plodding through a final edit on the next Magic e-release and haven’t had a chance to open it. It’s my prize for getting my work done.

    Reply
  37. I knew about Glastonbury because it’s the culmination of my grail/chalice trilogy for my July release, but Saint King Charles is a bit of a shocker. They’ll just let anybody be saints, don’t they? “G”
    My copy of SECRET WEDDING arrived from BAM several days ago, but I’m plodding through a final edit on the next Magic e-release and haven’t had a chance to open it. It’s my prize for getting my work done.

    Reply
  38. I knew about Glastonbury because it’s the culmination of my grail/chalice trilogy for my July release, but Saint King Charles is a bit of a shocker. They’ll just let anybody be saints, don’t they? “G”
    My copy of SECRET WEDDING arrived from BAM several days ago, but I’m plodding through a final edit on the next Magic e-release and haven’t had a chance to open it. It’s my prize for getting my work done.

    Reply
  39. I knew about Glastonbury because it’s the culmination of my grail/chalice trilogy for my July release, but Saint King Charles is a bit of a shocker. They’ll just let anybody be saints, don’t they? “G”
    My copy of SECRET WEDDING arrived from BAM several days ago, but I’m plodding through a final edit on the next Magic e-release and haven’t had a chance to open it. It’s my prize for getting my work done.

    Reply
  40. I knew about Glastonbury because it’s the culmination of my grail/chalice trilogy for my July release, but Saint King Charles is a bit of a shocker. They’ll just let anybody be saints, don’t they? “G”
    My copy of SECRET WEDDING arrived from BAM several days ago, but I’m plodding through a final edit on the next Magic e-release and haven’t had a chance to open it. It’s my prize for getting my work done.

    Reply
  41. The sanctified king is interesting, isn’t it? As for miracles, I think martyrdom is a straight pass, no proof required, but I haven’t checked that.
    Now everyone, look up, look waaaaay up (that’ll only resonate with Canadians who’ve watched The Friendly Giant) and in our right hand panel you’ll see a new entry “Additional Pages.” That’s where you’ll find the downloadable bookmarks for The Secret Wedding and for Susan Fraser King’s Lady Macbeth.
    Print out and trim and you’ll have a special gift from the Wenches. And there’ll be more to come in the future.
    These are large files, so if you have a slow connection, they could take a while.
    Let us know what you think.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  42. The sanctified king is interesting, isn’t it? As for miracles, I think martyrdom is a straight pass, no proof required, but I haven’t checked that.
    Now everyone, look up, look waaaaay up (that’ll only resonate with Canadians who’ve watched The Friendly Giant) and in our right hand panel you’ll see a new entry “Additional Pages.” That’s where you’ll find the downloadable bookmarks for The Secret Wedding and for Susan Fraser King’s Lady Macbeth.
    Print out and trim and you’ll have a special gift from the Wenches. And there’ll be more to come in the future.
    These are large files, so if you have a slow connection, they could take a while.
    Let us know what you think.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  43. The sanctified king is interesting, isn’t it? As for miracles, I think martyrdom is a straight pass, no proof required, but I haven’t checked that.
    Now everyone, look up, look waaaaay up (that’ll only resonate with Canadians who’ve watched The Friendly Giant) and in our right hand panel you’ll see a new entry “Additional Pages.” That’s where you’ll find the downloadable bookmarks for The Secret Wedding and for Susan Fraser King’s Lady Macbeth.
    Print out and trim and you’ll have a special gift from the Wenches. And there’ll be more to come in the future.
    These are large files, so if you have a slow connection, they could take a while.
    Let us know what you think.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  44. The sanctified king is interesting, isn’t it? As for miracles, I think martyrdom is a straight pass, no proof required, but I haven’t checked that.
    Now everyone, look up, look waaaaay up (that’ll only resonate with Canadians who’ve watched The Friendly Giant) and in our right hand panel you’ll see a new entry “Additional Pages.” That’s where you’ll find the downloadable bookmarks for The Secret Wedding and for Susan Fraser King’s Lady Macbeth.
    Print out and trim and you’ll have a special gift from the Wenches. And there’ll be more to come in the future.
    These are large files, so if you have a slow connection, they could take a while.
    Let us know what you think.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  45. The sanctified king is interesting, isn’t it? As for miracles, I think martyrdom is a straight pass, no proof required, but I haven’t checked that.
    Now everyone, look up, look waaaaay up (that’ll only resonate with Canadians who’ve watched The Friendly Giant) and in our right hand panel you’ll see a new entry “Additional Pages.” That’s where you’ll find the downloadable bookmarks for The Secret Wedding and for Susan Fraser King’s Lady Macbeth.
    Print out and trim and you’ll have a special gift from the Wenches. And there’ll be more to come in the future.
    These are large files, so if you have a slow connection, they could take a while.
    Let us know what you think.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  46. Thanks for the interesting characters and motif in the series that includes Secret Wedding, purchased, I think, about March 23 or so in Battle Ground, Wa. I am researching a contemporary cozy set in Oregon Writer Colony’s log chateau in Rockaway, only it’s an ancestral home in mythical Sea Rock in my novel. Research is new to me and I have been very busy talking to law enforcement, lawyers who know about property, and all kinds of other things- busy busy, but I’m glad to know it’s par for the course.

    Reply
  47. Thanks for the interesting characters and motif in the series that includes Secret Wedding, purchased, I think, about March 23 or so in Battle Ground, Wa. I am researching a contemporary cozy set in Oregon Writer Colony’s log chateau in Rockaway, only it’s an ancestral home in mythical Sea Rock in my novel. Research is new to me and I have been very busy talking to law enforcement, lawyers who know about property, and all kinds of other things- busy busy, but I’m glad to know it’s par for the course.

    Reply
  48. Thanks for the interesting characters and motif in the series that includes Secret Wedding, purchased, I think, about March 23 or so in Battle Ground, Wa. I am researching a contemporary cozy set in Oregon Writer Colony’s log chateau in Rockaway, only it’s an ancestral home in mythical Sea Rock in my novel. Research is new to me and I have been very busy talking to law enforcement, lawyers who know about property, and all kinds of other things- busy busy, but I’m glad to know it’s par for the course.

    Reply
  49. Thanks for the interesting characters and motif in the series that includes Secret Wedding, purchased, I think, about March 23 or so in Battle Ground, Wa. I am researching a contemporary cozy set in Oregon Writer Colony’s log chateau in Rockaway, only it’s an ancestral home in mythical Sea Rock in my novel. Research is new to me and I have been very busy talking to law enforcement, lawyers who know about property, and all kinds of other things- busy busy, but I’m glad to know it’s par for the course.

    Reply
  50. Thanks for the interesting characters and motif in the series that includes Secret Wedding, purchased, I think, about March 23 or so in Battle Ground, Wa. I am researching a contemporary cozy set in Oregon Writer Colony’s log chateau in Rockaway, only it’s an ancestral home in mythical Sea Rock in my novel. Research is new to me and I have been very busy talking to law enforcement, lawyers who know about property, and all kinds of other things- busy busy, but I’m glad to know it’s par for the course.

    Reply
  51. I just read The Secret Wedding. Wonderful wonderful wonderful!!!! Fortunately, there were several copies at Barnes and Noble (Durham, NC), with one facing out. What book are you working on now?

    Reply
  52. I just read The Secret Wedding. Wonderful wonderful wonderful!!!! Fortunately, there were several copies at Barnes and Noble (Durham, NC), with one facing out. What book are you working on now?

    Reply
  53. I just read The Secret Wedding. Wonderful wonderful wonderful!!!! Fortunately, there were several copies at Barnes and Noble (Durham, NC), with one facing out. What book are you working on now?

    Reply
  54. I just read The Secret Wedding. Wonderful wonderful wonderful!!!! Fortunately, there were several copies at Barnes and Noble (Durham, NC), with one facing out. What book are you working on now?

    Reply
  55. I just read The Secret Wedding. Wonderful wonderful wonderful!!!! Fortunately, there were several copies at Barnes and Noble (Durham, NC), with one facing out. What book are you working on now?

    Reply
  56. I think Truro Cathedral and Exeter Cathedral got mixed up in your post! For Exeter Cathedral is certainly NOT a 19th century cathedral – rather it was finished in 1400. It was restored in the 19th century, and there was severe bomb damage during world war 2 (that destroyed much of the medieval glass windows).
    http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/history/BriefHistory.ashx
    Truro Cathedral, on the other hand, was build in the 19th century.
    http://www.trurocathedral.org.uk/cathedral-story/story2.html#cht8
    Exeter is well known for its beautiful carved saints, the best preserved in the UK if I remember correctly….
    And I am looking forward to reading the Secret Wedding very much indeed! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  57. I think Truro Cathedral and Exeter Cathedral got mixed up in your post! For Exeter Cathedral is certainly NOT a 19th century cathedral – rather it was finished in 1400. It was restored in the 19th century, and there was severe bomb damage during world war 2 (that destroyed much of the medieval glass windows).
    http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/history/BriefHistory.ashx
    Truro Cathedral, on the other hand, was build in the 19th century.
    http://www.trurocathedral.org.uk/cathedral-story/story2.html#cht8
    Exeter is well known for its beautiful carved saints, the best preserved in the UK if I remember correctly….
    And I am looking forward to reading the Secret Wedding very much indeed! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  58. I think Truro Cathedral and Exeter Cathedral got mixed up in your post! For Exeter Cathedral is certainly NOT a 19th century cathedral – rather it was finished in 1400. It was restored in the 19th century, and there was severe bomb damage during world war 2 (that destroyed much of the medieval glass windows).
    http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/history/BriefHistory.ashx
    Truro Cathedral, on the other hand, was build in the 19th century.
    http://www.trurocathedral.org.uk/cathedral-story/story2.html#cht8
    Exeter is well known for its beautiful carved saints, the best preserved in the UK if I remember correctly….
    And I am looking forward to reading the Secret Wedding very much indeed! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  59. I think Truro Cathedral and Exeter Cathedral got mixed up in your post! For Exeter Cathedral is certainly NOT a 19th century cathedral – rather it was finished in 1400. It was restored in the 19th century, and there was severe bomb damage during world war 2 (that destroyed much of the medieval glass windows).
    http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/history/BriefHistory.ashx
    Truro Cathedral, on the other hand, was build in the 19th century.
    http://www.trurocathedral.org.uk/cathedral-story/story2.html#cht8
    Exeter is well known for its beautiful carved saints, the best preserved in the UK if I remember correctly….
    And I am looking forward to reading the Secret Wedding very much indeed! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  60. I think Truro Cathedral and Exeter Cathedral got mixed up in your post! For Exeter Cathedral is certainly NOT a 19th century cathedral – rather it was finished in 1400. It was restored in the 19th century, and there was severe bomb damage during world war 2 (that destroyed much of the medieval glass windows).
    http://www.exeter-cathedral.org.uk/history/BriefHistory.ashx
    Truro Cathedral, on the other hand, was build in the 19th century.
    http://www.trurocathedral.org.uk/cathedral-story/story2.html#cht8
    Exeter is well known for its beautiful carved saints, the best preserved in the UK if I remember correctly….
    And I am looking forward to reading the Secret Wedding very much indeed! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  61. Hi Jo,
    I live in perth W.Australia and the Secet Wedding is selling well. I have just got my copy and will start reading it later today. best wishes
    Elizabeth rainbird

    Reply
  62. Hi Jo,
    I live in perth W.Australia and the Secet Wedding is selling well. I have just got my copy and will start reading it later today. best wishes
    Elizabeth rainbird

    Reply
  63. Hi Jo,
    I live in perth W.Australia and the Secet Wedding is selling well. I have just got my copy and will start reading it later today. best wishes
    Elizabeth rainbird

    Reply
  64. Hi Jo,
    I live in perth W.Australia and the Secet Wedding is selling well. I have just got my copy and will start reading it later today. best wishes
    Elizabeth rainbird

    Reply
  65. Hi Jo,
    I live in perth W.Australia and the Secet Wedding is selling well. I have just got my copy and will start reading it later today. best wishes
    Elizabeth rainbird

    Reply
  66. I saw an ample stack in the B&N in Marina Del Rey CA, on the upfront “new/recommended” shelves, right next to Mary Balogh’s latest. Oddly, there were no copies of either one under B on the romance shelves.
    Oh well – I got mine πŸ™‚

    Reply
  67. I saw an ample stack in the B&N in Marina Del Rey CA, on the upfront “new/recommended” shelves, right next to Mary Balogh’s latest. Oddly, there were no copies of either one under B on the romance shelves.
    Oh well – I got mine πŸ™‚

    Reply
  68. I saw an ample stack in the B&N in Marina Del Rey CA, on the upfront “new/recommended” shelves, right next to Mary Balogh’s latest. Oddly, there were no copies of either one under B on the romance shelves.
    Oh well – I got mine πŸ™‚

    Reply
  69. I saw an ample stack in the B&N in Marina Del Rey CA, on the upfront “new/recommended” shelves, right next to Mary Balogh’s latest. Oddly, there were no copies of either one under B on the romance shelves.
    Oh well – I got mine πŸ™‚

    Reply
  70. I saw an ample stack in the B&N in Marina Del Rey CA, on the upfront “new/recommended” shelves, right next to Mary Balogh’s latest. Oddly, there were no copies of either one under B on the romance shelves.
    Oh well – I got mine πŸ™‚

    Reply
  71. To wait so patiently and then read it in 2 sessions(work got in the way!!)and its over aaarggggg!!!
    But I loved it,, well worth the wait and so to the next one. I get to spend Good Friday in your part of the world, hope its not raining.

    Reply
  72. To wait so patiently and then read it in 2 sessions(work got in the way!!)and its over aaarggggg!!!
    But I loved it,, well worth the wait and so to the next one. I get to spend Good Friday in your part of the world, hope its not raining.

    Reply
  73. To wait so patiently and then read it in 2 sessions(work got in the way!!)and its over aaarggggg!!!
    But I loved it,, well worth the wait and so to the next one. I get to spend Good Friday in your part of the world, hope its not raining.

    Reply
  74. To wait so patiently and then read it in 2 sessions(work got in the way!!)and its over aaarggggg!!!
    But I loved it,, well worth the wait and so to the next one. I get to spend Good Friday in your part of the world, hope its not raining.

    Reply
  75. To wait so patiently and then read it in 2 sessions(work got in the way!!)and its over aaarggggg!!!
    But I loved it,, well worth the wait and so to the next one. I get to spend Good Friday in your part of the world, hope its not raining.

    Reply
  76. The Secret Wedding came. It’s wonderful. I chortled with joy over a plot that turns on the precise day that Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act went into effect.

    Reply
  77. The Secret Wedding came. It’s wonderful. I chortled with joy over a plot that turns on the precise day that Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act went into effect.

    Reply
  78. The Secret Wedding came. It’s wonderful. I chortled with joy over a plot that turns on the precise day that Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act went into effect.

    Reply
  79. The Secret Wedding came. It’s wonderful. I chortled with joy over a plot that turns on the precise day that Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act went into effect.

    Reply
  80. The Secret Wedding came. It’s wonderful. I chortled with joy over a plot that turns on the precise day that Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act went into effect.

    Reply
  81. LizA, thanks for pointing that out! I didn’t mean to imply that Exeter cathedral is the modern one, but I can see that it’s easy to read it that way.
    Elizabeth, thanks for the report from Australia. πŸ™‚
    Thanks to everyone who’s enjoyed the book. We authors need this reassurance.
    Virginia, I don’t know why my plots so often turn up the need for these details. It took some digging to find out when the Act came into force.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  82. LizA, thanks for pointing that out! I didn’t mean to imply that Exeter cathedral is the modern one, but I can see that it’s easy to read it that way.
    Elizabeth, thanks for the report from Australia. πŸ™‚
    Thanks to everyone who’s enjoyed the book. We authors need this reassurance.
    Virginia, I don’t know why my plots so often turn up the need for these details. It took some digging to find out when the Act came into force.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  83. LizA, thanks for pointing that out! I didn’t mean to imply that Exeter cathedral is the modern one, but I can see that it’s easy to read it that way.
    Elizabeth, thanks for the report from Australia. πŸ™‚
    Thanks to everyone who’s enjoyed the book. We authors need this reassurance.
    Virginia, I don’t know why my plots so often turn up the need for these details. It took some digging to find out when the Act came into force.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  84. LizA, thanks for pointing that out! I didn’t mean to imply that Exeter cathedral is the modern one, but I can see that it’s easy to read it that way.
    Elizabeth, thanks for the report from Australia. πŸ™‚
    Thanks to everyone who’s enjoyed the book. We authors need this reassurance.
    Virginia, I don’t know why my plots so often turn up the need for these details. It took some digging to find out when the Act came into force.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  85. LizA, thanks for pointing that out! I didn’t mean to imply that Exeter cathedral is the modern one, but I can see that it’s easy to read it that way.
    Elizabeth, thanks for the report from Australia. πŸ™‚
    Thanks to everyone who’s enjoyed the book. We authors need this reassurance.
    Virginia, I don’t know why my plots so often turn up the need for these details. It took some digging to find out when the Act came into force.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  86. I hated to finish Secret Wedding because now I have to waiiit for the next one. Seriously, did enjoy the whole story but the scenes with Christian’s family were wonderful. He is so overwhelmed and yet he loves them. Thank you so much for the pleasure!
    Donna

    Reply
  87. I hated to finish Secret Wedding because now I have to waiiit for the next one. Seriously, did enjoy the whole story but the scenes with Christian’s family were wonderful. He is so overwhelmed and yet he loves them. Thank you so much for the pleasure!
    Donna

    Reply
  88. I hated to finish Secret Wedding because now I have to waiiit for the next one. Seriously, did enjoy the whole story but the scenes with Christian’s family were wonderful. He is so overwhelmed and yet he loves them. Thank you so much for the pleasure!
    Donna

    Reply
  89. I hated to finish Secret Wedding because now I have to waiiit for the next one. Seriously, did enjoy the whole story but the scenes with Christian’s family were wonderful. He is so overwhelmed and yet he loves them. Thank you so much for the pleasure!
    Donna

    Reply
  90. I hated to finish Secret Wedding because now I have to waiiit for the next one. Seriously, did enjoy the whole story but the scenes with Christian’s family were wonderful. He is so overwhelmed and yet he loves them. Thank you so much for the pleasure!
    Donna

    Reply
  91. I found my copy a week ago at a small local grocery store. Of course, I gulped it down in one sitting. I will now re-read it several times over the next year and re-read all the other interelated books as well.
    Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.

    Reply
  92. I found my copy a week ago at a small local grocery store. Of course, I gulped it down in one sitting. I will now re-read it several times over the next year and re-read all the other interelated books as well.
    Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.

    Reply
  93. I found my copy a week ago at a small local grocery store. Of course, I gulped it down in one sitting. I will now re-read it several times over the next year and re-read all the other interelated books as well.
    Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.

    Reply
  94. I found my copy a week ago at a small local grocery store. Of course, I gulped it down in one sitting. I will now re-read it several times over the next year and re-read all the other interelated books as well.
    Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.

    Reply
  95. I found my copy a week ago at a small local grocery store. Of course, I gulped it down in one sitting. I will now re-read it several times over the next year and re-read all the other interelated books as well.
    Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.

    Reply
  96. I RECEIVED MY COPY OF THE SECRET
    WEDDING FROM AMAZON 2 WEEKS AGO
    AND I LOVED IT. MY FAVORITE
    MALLOREN IN BRAND BUT ALTHOUGH
    NOT A MALLOREN I REALLY LIKE
    CHRISTIAN. I’M GOING TO GO BACK
    AND REREAD THE ENTIRE MALLOREN
    SERIES AGAIN WHILE I PATIENTLY
    WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK WHICH I
    ASSUME WILL BE THORN. LOVE YOUR
    BOOKS JO KEEP THEM COMING.

    Reply
  97. I RECEIVED MY COPY OF THE SECRET
    WEDDING FROM AMAZON 2 WEEKS AGO
    AND I LOVED IT. MY FAVORITE
    MALLOREN IN BRAND BUT ALTHOUGH
    NOT A MALLOREN I REALLY LIKE
    CHRISTIAN. I’M GOING TO GO BACK
    AND REREAD THE ENTIRE MALLOREN
    SERIES AGAIN WHILE I PATIENTLY
    WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK WHICH I
    ASSUME WILL BE THORN. LOVE YOUR
    BOOKS JO KEEP THEM COMING.

    Reply
  98. I RECEIVED MY COPY OF THE SECRET
    WEDDING FROM AMAZON 2 WEEKS AGO
    AND I LOVED IT. MY FAVORITE
    MALLOREN IN BRAND BUT ALTHOUGH
    NOT A MALLOREN I REALLY LIKE
    CHRISTIAN. I’M GOING TO GO BACK
    AND REREAD THE ENTIRE MALLOREN
    SERIES AGAIN WHILE I PATIENTLY
    WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK WHICH I
    ASSUME WILL BE THORN. LOVE YOUR
    BOOKS JO KEEP THEM COMING.

    Reply
  99. I RECEIVED MY COPY OF THE SECRET
    WEDDING FROM AMAZON 2 WEEKS AGO
    AND I LOVED IT. MY FAVORITE
    MALLOREN IN BRAND BUT ALTHOUGH
    NOT A MALLOREN I REALLY LIKE
    CHRISTIAN. I’M GOING TO GO BACK
    AND REREAD THE ENTIRE MALLOREN
    SERIES AGAIN WHILE I PATIENTLY
    WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK WHICH I
    ASSUME WILL BE THORN. LOVE YOUR
    BOOKS JO KEEP THEM COMING.

    Reply
  100. I RECEIVED MY COPY OF THE SECRET
    WEDDING FROM AMAZON 2 WEEKS AGO
    AND I LOVED IT. MY FAVORITE
    MALLOREN IN BRAND BUT ALTHOUGH
    NOT A MALLOREN I REALLY LIKE
    CHRISTIAN. I’M GOING TO GO BACK
    AND REREAD THE ENTIRE MALLOREN
    SERIES AGAIN WHILE I PATIENTLY
    WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK WHICH I
    ASSUME WILL BE THORN. LOVE YOUR
    BOOKS JO KEEP THEM COMING.

    Reply
  101. Jo here.
    “Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.”
    That’s what I say when people want me to start complicated role playing games. I have my own. *G* I do play some simple games, though, like Zuma.
    Thanks, Barbara. So glad you enjoyed it.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  102. Jo here.
    “Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.”
    That’s what I say when people want me to start complicated role playing games. I have my own. *G* I do play some simple games, though, like Zuma.
    Thanks, Barbara. So glad you enjoyed it.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  103. Jo here.
    “Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.”
    That’s what I say when people want me to start complicated role playing games. I have my own. *G* I do play some simple games, though, like Zuma.
    Thanks, Barbara. So glad you enjoyed it.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  104. Jo here.
    “Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.”
    That’s what I say when people want me to start complicated role playing games. I have my own. *G* I do play some simple games, though, like Zuma.
    Thanks, Barbara. So glad you enjoyed it.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  105. Jo here.
    “Thanks for the alternate universe Jo. Some people play video games. We play in the Jo Beverley dimension.”
    That’s what I say when people want me to start complicated role playing games. I have my own. *G* I do play some simple games, though, like Zuma.
    Thanks, Barbara. So glad you enjoyed it.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  106. I found The Secret Wedding at a Barnes and Noble in Sacramento, CA, last week, where many copies were displayed in the New Romance Releases section.
    I finished reading the book today – very fine writing and wonderful to see Rothgar, Diana, Petra, and other beloved Malloren characters.
    My most favorite moment was p. 345 – when Caro and Christian discover the truth at the same time. I especially liked Christian – great character.
    EA

    Reply
  107. I found The Secret Wedding at a Barnes and Noble in Sacramento, CA, last week, where many copies were displayed in the New Romance Releases section.
    I finished reading the book today – very fine writing and wonderful to see Rothgar, Diana, Petra, and other beloved Malloren characters.
    My most favorite moment was p. 345 – when Caro and Christian discover the truth at the same time. I especially liked Christian – great character.
    EA

    Reply
  108. I found The Secret Wedding at a Barnes and Noble in Sacramento, CA, last week, where many copies were displayed in the New Romance Releases section.
    I finished reading the book today – very fine writing and wonderful to see Rothgar, Diana, Petra, and other beloved Malloren characters.
    My most favorite moment was p. 345 – when Caro and Christian discover the truth at the same time. I especially liked Christian – great character.
    EA

    Reply
  109. I found The Secret Wedding at a Barnes and Noble in Sacramento, CA, last week, where many copies were displayed in the New Romance Releases section.
    I finished reading the book today – very fine writing and wonderful to see Rothgar, Diana, Petra, and other beloved Malloren characters.
    My most favorite moment was p. 345 – when Caro and Christian discover the truth at the same time. I especially liked Christian – great character.
    EA

    Reply
  110. I found The Secret Wedding at a Barnes and Noble in Sacramento, CA, last week, where many copies were displayed in the New Romance Releases section.
    I finished reading the book today – very fine writing and wonderful to see Rothgar, Diana, Petra, and other beloved Malloren characters.
    My most favorite moment was p. 345 – when Caro and Christian discover the truth at the same time. I especially liked Christian – great character.
    EA

    Reply

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