On Book Signings

Mom_thumbnail_12Sunday, and Edith here!

Sherrie passed on a question that Mary Kennedy asked about how authors feel about book signings. I had to answer it.

>>>I’d like to know how authors at booksignings would like signees to behave. I’ve only been to one book signing, and it was horrible. I didn’t know what to say so I didn’t say anything – just got my book signed and left. The bad thing is that I was the only one there with two tables of authors. Now I have a phobia of book signings!>>>

A phobia? Because the authors mobbed you? Covered you with kisses and hugged you near to death? They should have.

A booksigning is a chance for an author to meet readers, sop up praise and humbly but enthusiastically explain the mental processes which led to the birth of the book in front of her/him!

Wonderful, right?

Only it doesn’t always work that way. You’d be surprised at how many authors have a phobia about books signings too. One of my author friends likened them to hooking: waiting for a customer, humming “Ten cents a dance.”

I can’t speak for other wenches, but can confidently say that sometimes, if you’re not into whips and chains, or being a self-flagellator, or on the brinnk of hanging yourself, there is no better way to experience pain, loss of ego, and experience a day in the life of an earthworm, than to be an author at a book signiing. (Unless of course, you write about Da Vinci’s secrets or are named King or Roberts, that is.)

Mind, some signings are superb and fulfill all technicolor dreams: with lots of avid readers in attendance, flowers and fresh water for them and the author’s throat, which is needed because so many readers ask so many questions.

Not all signings are like that.

Many are like the one you attended. Two tables of authors – one reader. (And you didn’t ask directions to the restroom? That’s what most authors expect at that kind of signing.)

I remember some particularly interesting ones.

Like a group signing at a Convention, when I sat next to a very popular author, who had leagues of fans lining up to adore her. They got so thick they had to lean over me to get to her. I had more breasts in my face than Casanova in his wildest dreams. It was not fun. The only thing said to me was: “Could you move over so I can put my books down for her to sign?”

Ah, yes.

Yet there was the time a reader came to see me from three states away, with some of my old books or me to sign.

There was the day when a tiny bookstore in a mall set me up at a bridge table in front of it. I sat there with my pile of books. Because there was a treasure in the book, I had put a little pirate’s chest loaded with golden foil covered chocolate coins on the table too. Aside from a sneaky little boy who kept coming by and snitching coins, not much was asked of me except for directions to the restrooms, of course.
Restroom_1
Author as bathroom maven: Oh the humanity!

But there was a golden moment in it for me too. See, the mall was on the main street of Hicksville (really) and that street was called “Broadway.” They had a marquee in front of the mall with my name on it. When evening came, my husband took photos. The next day he showed them to me, so I could see, as he said: “my name in lights on Broadway.” Oh my. The memory of him, and that moment, is still hearwarming.

Then there was the time that a persistent questioner at a signing kept me talkiing for another half hour. He came up to me at the end and said, “Sounds interesting. I have to read something you wrote someday.”

There are so many stories! Good and bad. I’m sure the other wenches have their share too. But as to the question?

What should you do at a signing?

Talk to the author, even if you don’t know him/her from a hole in the ground. Ask anything. Say “Nice Cover” or “Looks interesting” or whatever comes to mind. If they seem a little stiff, it’s because
they’re trying not to look too eager.

And remember, if you do know the author, anything – anything – you say will be appreciated.

You are, after all, why we’re there.

64 thoughts on “On Book Signings”

  1. Oh, Edith. I’m laughing. I’m crying. What a great insight into the whole uncomfortable process. For the author: a natural, modest reluctance to toot her own horn. For the reader: a fear of being the ultimate geeky fangirl. Both reading and writing are such solitary pursuits it doesn’t seem book signings quite fit the bill.
    Wonderful question. Wonderful answer.

    Reply
  2. Oh, Edith. I’m laughing. I’m crying. What a great insight into the whole uncomfortable process. For the author: a natural, modest reluctance to toot her own horn. For the reader: a fear of being the ultimate geeky fangirl. Both reading and writing are such solitary pursuits it doesn’t seem book signings quite fit the bill.
    Wonderful question. Wonderful answer.

    Reply
  3. Oh, Edith. I’m laughing. I’m crying. What a great insight into the whole uncomfortable process. For the author: a natural, modest reluctance to toot her own horn. For the reader: a fear of being the ultimate geeky fangirl. Both reading and writing are such solitary pursuits it doesn’t seem book signings quite fit the bill.
    Wonderful question. Wonderful answer.

    Reply
  4. Oh, Edith. I’m laughing. I’m crying. What a great insight into the whole uncomfortable process. For the author: a natural, modest reluctance to toot her own horn. For the reader: a fear of being the ultimate geeky fangirl. Both reading and writing are such solitary pursuits it doesn’t seem book signings quite fit the bill.
    Wonderful question. Wonderful answer.

    Reply
  5. “They got so thick they had to lean over me to get to her. I had more breasts in my face than Casanova in his wildest dreams.”
    ***
    This had me laughing out loud!
    šŸ˜€

    Reply
  6. “They got so thick they had to lean over me to get to her. I had more breasts in my face than Casanova in his wildest dreams.”
    ***
    This had me laughing out loud!
    šŸ˜€

    Reply
  7. “They got so thick they had to lean over me to get to her. I had more breasts in my face than Casanova in his wildest dreams.”
    ***
    This had me laughing out loud!
    šŸ˜€

    Reply
  8. “They got so thick they had to lean over me to get to her. I had more breasts in my face than Casanova in his wildest dreams.”
    ***
    This had me laughing out loud!
    šŸ˜€

    Reply
  9. Yikes! I’ve never been to one of these, but it sounds horribly like going thru a wedding reception line when your date knows everyone and you don’t.

    Reply
  10. Yikes! I’ve never been to one of these, but it sounds horribly like going thru a wedding reception line when your date knows everyone and you don’t.

    Reply
  11. Yikes! I’ve never been to one of these, but it sounds horribly like going thru a wedding reception line when your date knows everyone and you don’t.

    Reply
  12. Yikes! I’ve never been to one of these, but it sounds horribly like going thru a wedding reception line when your date knows everyone and you don’t.

    Reply
  13. Edith. Wonderful post. An excellent example of why I love your work. You elicit such a wide range of emotion from me in such a very short period of time. I laughed. I cried. I sympathized. And I loved the story about your dh. What a wonderful man.
    And, thank you Mary for such an insightful question. I’ve been to two book signings, both horribly uncomfortable for me. Nervously standing in line, I was so afraid I would offend (and be disappointed by) the authors, about whom Iā€™d already formed a hard and fast opinion via their work. The authors, of course, did not disappoint, but I blathered on like a groupie, saying nothing intelligible, I’m sure. And what could they do but dutifully nod and answer back with an obligatory smile. Ugh.
    Nina, not likely to go back

    Reply
  14. Edith. Wonderful post. An excellent example of why I love your work. You elicit such a wide range of emotion from me in such a very short period of time. I laughed. I cried. I sympathized. And I loved the story about your dh. What a wonderful man.
    And, thank you Mary for such an insightful question. I’ve been to two book signings, both horribly uncomfortable for me. Nervously standing in line, I was so afraid I would offend (and be disappointed by) the authors, about whom Iā€™d already formed a hard and fast opinion via their work. The authors, of course, did not disappoint, but I blathered on like a groupie, saying nothing intelligible, I’m sure. And what could they do but dutifully nod and answer back with an obligatory smile. Ugh.
    Nina, not likely to go back

    Reply
  15. Edith. Wonderful post. An excellent example of why I love your work. You elicit such a wide range of emotion from me in such a very short period of time. I laughed. I cried. I sympathized. And I loved the story about your dh. What a wonderful man.
    And, thank you Mary for such an insightful question. I’ve been to two book signings, both horribly uncomfortable for me. Nervously standing in line, I was so afraid I would offend (and be disappointed by) the authors, about whom Iā€™d already formed a hard and fast opinion via their work. The authors, of course, did not disappoint, but I blathered on like a groupie, saying nothing intelligible, I’m sure. And what could they do but dutifully nod and answer back with an obligatory smile. Ugh.
    Nina, not likely to go back

    Reply
  16. Edith. Wonderful post. An excellent example of why I love your work. You elicit such a wide range of emotion from me in such a very short period of time. I laughed. I cried. I sympathized. And I loved the story about your dh. What a wonderful man.
    And, thank you Mary for such an insightful question. I’ve been to two book signings, both horribly uncomfortable for me. Nervously standing in line, I was so afraid I would offend (and be disappointed by) the authors, about whom Iā€™d already formed a hard and fast opinion via their work. The authors, of course, did not disappoint, but I blathered on like a groupie, saying nothing intelligible, I’m sure. And what could they do but dutifully nod and answer back with an obligatory smile. Ugh.
    Nina, not likely to go back

    Reply
  17. Great post, Edith!
    I’m named King–but my booksigning experiences are more like yours than that other King’s! *g*
    Your post brings back a few booksigning memories that make me want to cringe — though there have been lots of wonderful signings too, and others that are a hoot. It’s not the easiest part of an author’s career. Sometimes all you can do is laugh….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  18. Great post, Edith!
    I’m named King–but my booksigning experiences are more like yours than that other King’s! *g*
    Your post brings back a few booksigning memories that make me want to cringe — though there have been lots of wonderful signings too, and others that are a hoot. It’s not the easiest part of an author’s career. Sometimes all you can do is laugh….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  19. Great post, Edith!
    I’m named King–but my booksigning experiences are more like yours than that other King’s! *g*
    Your post brings back a few booksigning memories that make me want to cringe — though there have been lots of wonderful signings too, and others that are a hoot. It’s not the easiest part of an author’s career. Sometimes all you can do is laugh….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  20. Great post, Edith!
    I’m named King–but my booksigning experiences are more like yours than that other King’s! *g*
    Your post brings back a few booksigning memories that make me want to cringe — though there have been lots of wonderful signings too, and others that are a hoot. It’s not the easiest part of an author’s career. Sometimes all you can do is laugh….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  21. Oh Nina – Go to another one, please. That’s the whole point. An author at a signing loves blathering. It’s far, far better than staring at your bookmarks, pretending not to care that the bookstore is echoing.

    Reply
  22. Oh Nina – Go to another one, please. That’s the whole point. An author at a signing loves blathering. It’s far, far better than staring at your bookmarks, pretending not to care that the bookstore is echoing.

    Reply
  23. Oh Nina – Go to another one, please. That’s the whole point. An author at a signing loves blathering. It’s far, far better than staring at your bookmarks, pretending not to care that the bookstore is echoing.

    Reply
  24. Oh Nina – Go to another one, please. That’s the whole point. An author at a signing loves blathering. It’s far, far better than staring at your bookmarks, pretending not to care that the bookstore is echoing.

    Reply
  25. I only went to one booksigning thus far in my life and that was back in October with the big NJ one. I’m all of like 15 minutes away from it. And boy was I nervous meeting all the authors! But I got over it soon enough and it was just fine. I can’t imagine being on the other end of it though. I don’t want to, actually! LOL šŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  26. I only went to one booksigning thus far in my life and that was back in October with the big NJ one. I’m all of like 15 minutes away from it. And boy was I nervous meeting all the authors! But I got over it soon enough and it was just fine. I can’t imagine being on the other end of it though. I don’t want to, actually! LOL šŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  27. I only went to one booksigning thus far in my life and that was back in October with the big NJ one. I’m all of like 15 minutes away from it. And boy was I nervous meeting all the authors! But I got over it soon enough and it was just fine. I can’t imagine being on the other end of it though. I don’t want to, actually! LOL šŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  28. I only went to one booksigning thus far in my life and that was back in October with the big NJ one. I’m all of like 15 minutes away from it. And boy was I nervous meeting all the authors! But I got over it soon enough and it was just fine. I can’t imagine being on the other end of it though. I don’t want to, actually! LOL šŸ™‚
    Lois

    Reply
  29. Most authors can list the horrors of booksignings (like the foot fetishist!, but no one can list them as humorously as our Lady Layton. “G”
    I think the problem tends to be that most writers are introverts, if not downright shy, and most avid bookreaders are the same. Socializing is not our thing. But I’m here to second Edith–please, please stop and say hi. Talk to us before we fall on our faces. I hardly ever do booksignings these days unless there are a ton of other authors there I can talk to. Too horribly humiliating otherwise.

    Reply
  30. Most authors can list the horrors of booksignings (like the foot fetishist!, but no one can list them as humorously as our Lady Layton. “G”
    I think the problem tends to be that most writers are introverts, if not downright shy, and most avid bookreaders are the same. Socializing is not our thing. But I’m here to second Edith–please, please stop and say hi. Talk to us before we fall on our faces. I hardly ever do booksignings these days unless there are a ton of other authors there I can talk to. Too horribly humiliating otherwise.

    Reply
  31. Most authors can list the horrors of booksignings (like the foot fetishist!, but no one can list them as humorously as our Lady Layton. “G”
    I think the problem tends to be that most writers are introverts, if not downright shy, and most avid bookreaders are the same. Socializing is not our thing. But I’m here to second Edith–please, please stop and say hi. Talk to us before we fall on our faces. I hardly ever do booksignings these days unless there are a ton of other authors there I can talk to. Too horribly humiliating otherwise.

    Reply
  32. Most authors can list the horrors of booksignings (like the foot fetishist!, but no one can list them as humorously as our Lady Layton. “G”
    I think the problem tends to be that most writers are introverts, if not downright shy, and most avid bookreaders are the same. Socializing is not our thing. But I’m here to second Edith–please, please stop and say hi. Talk to us before we fall on our faces. I hardly ever do booksignings these days unless there are a ton of other authors there I can talk to. Too horribly humiliating otherwise.

    Reply
  33. Great post, Edith. You have brilliantly captured the booksigning experience.
    I’ll third Edith & Pat, Nina: Do go to another one. Listening to a reader talking about our books makes overcoming the introversion & enduring the various humiliations all worthwhile. We don’t care if the talk is coherent or not. I, too, no longer sign books unless there will be a group of authors to talk to. The best experiences for me have always been at writers’ conferences: lots of readers and lots of writers make for positive energy and a happy time.

    Reply
  34. Great post, Edith. You have brilliantly captured the booksigning experience.
    I’ll third Edith & Pat, Nina: Do go to another one. Listening to a reader talking about our books makes overcoming the introversion & enduring the various humiliations all worthwhile. We don’t care if the talk is coherent or not. I, too, no longer sign books unless there will be a group of authors to talk to. The best experiences for me have always been at writers’ conferences: lots of readers and lots of writers make for positive energy and a happy time.

    Reply
  35. Great post, Edith. You have brilliantly captured the booksigning experience.
    I’ll third Edith & Pat, Nina: Do go to another one. Listening to a reader talking about our books makes overcoming the introversion & enduring the various humiliations all worthwhile. We don’t care if the talk is coherent or not. I, too, no longer sign books unless there will be a group of authors to talk to. The best experiences for me have always been at writers’ conferences: lots of readers and lots of writers make for positive energy and a happy time.

    Reply
  36. Great post, Edith. You have brilliantly captured the booksigning experience.
    I’ll third Edith & Pat, Nina: Do go to another one. Listening to a reader talking about our books makes overcoming the introversion & enduring the various humiliations all worthwhile. We don’t care if the talk is coherent or not. I, too, no longer sign books unless there will be a group of authors to talk to. The best experiences for me have always been at writers’ conferences: lots of readers and lots of writers make for positive energy and a happy time.

    Reply
  37. The first book signing I ever attended was for Alton Brown, so of course it was mobbed–a packed-out Q&A session followed by a 45-minute wait to get our cookbooks signed and picture taken.
    Since then I’ve been to a few signings where the author wasn’t also a Food Network star. šŸ™‚ I always feel awkward at those group conference booksignings because it’s not like I’m going to get a book signed by each of 30 or 50 authors, and yet there they all are, gazing out at the crowd so hopefully as I try not to meet their eyes while making a beeline for my favorite author’s table! I feel so bad for the ones getting little or no attention while the line at Ms. Famous Bestseller’s table snakes halfway around the room.
    Incidentally, is it a faux pas to have a favorite author sign several of his/her books just for yourself? At the last conference signing I attended, I’d picked out three favorites of a prolific author’s work. When I got to the front of his line, he asked who I wanted them signed for, and seemed kind of surprised when I said they were all for me. Was I being fangirlish and gauche–is there some kind of “one book per signing, unless the others are presents for friends” rule?

    Reply
  38. The first book signing I ever attended was for Alton Brown, so of course it was mobbed–a packed-out Q&A session followed by a 45-minute wait to get our cookbooks signed and picture taken.
    Since then I’ve been to a few signings where the author wasn’t also a Food Network star. šŸ™‚ I always feel awkward at those group conference booksignings because it’s not like I’m going to get a book signed by each of 30 or 50 authors, and yet there they all are, gazing out at the crowd so hopefully as I try not to meet their eyes while making a beeline for my favorite author’s table! I feel so bad for the ones getting little or no attention while the line at Ms. Famous Bestseller’s table snakes halfway around the room.
    Incidentally, is it a faux pas to have a favorite author sign several of his/her books just for yourself? At the last conference signing I attended, I’d picked out three favorites of a prolific author’s work. When I got to the front of his line, he asked who I wanted them signed for, and seemed kind of surprised when I said they were all for me. Was I being fangirlish and gauche–is there some kind of “one book per signing, unless the others are presents for friends” rule?

    Reply
  39. The first book signing I ever attended was for Alton Brown, so of course it was mobbed–a packed-out Q&A session followed by a 45-minute wait to get our cookbooks signed and picture taken.
    Since then I’ve been to a few signings where the author wasn’t also a Food Network star. šŸ™‚ I always feel awkward at those group conference booksignings because it’s not like I’m going to get a book signed by each of 30 or 50 authors, and yet there they all are, gazing out at the crowd so hopefully as I try not to meet their eyes while making a beeline for my favorite author’s table! I feel so bad for the ones getting little or no attention while the line at Ms. Famous Bestseller’s table snakes halfway around the room.
    Incidentally, is it a faux pas to have a favorite author sign several of his/her books just for yourself? At the last conference signing I attended, I’d picked out three favorites of a prolific author’s work. When I got to the front of his line, he asked who I wanted them signed for, and seemed kind of surprised when I said they were all for me. Was I being fangirlish and gauche–is there some kind of “one book per signing, unless the others are presents for friends” rule?

    Reply
  40. The first book signing I ever attended was for Alton Brown, so of course it was mobbed–a packed-out Q&A session followed by a 45-minute wait to get our cookbooks signed and picture taken.
    Since then I’ve been to a few signings where the author wasn’t also a Food Network star. šŸ™‚ I always feel awkward at those group conference booksignings because it’s not like I’m going to get a book signed by each of 30 or 50 authors, and yet there they all are, gazing out at the crowd so hopefully as I try not to meet their eyes while making a beeline for my favorite author’s table! I feel so bad for the ones getting little or no attention while the line at Ms. Famous Bestseller’s table snakes halfway around the room.
    Incidentally, is it a faux pas to have a favorite author sign several of his/her books just for yourself? At the last conference signing I attended, I’d picked out three favorites of a prolific author’s work. When I got to the front of his line, he asked who I wanted them signed for, and seemed kind of surprised when I said they were all for me. Was I being fangirlish and gauche–is there some kind of “one book per signing, unless the others are presents for friends” rule?

    Reply
  41. I am not a shy person when I meet people socially– I tend to ask them about their work. But, I think, knowing what to say when you know and admire someone’s work, but don’t know them personally, can be tricky. How do you go beyond ” I love your books, I think they are terrific”. Yet, when I really like a book, I feel (or imagine is probably more accurate) a strong sense of connection with the author. That’s probably because of values, and something about character, and uses of words. So I might feel like I have something in common with the author. (Of course.,so might hundreds of readers.) But the author doesn’t know me from Adam, and I don’t know the author as a person beyond the book. So, I find myself not quite wanting to be just a gushing fan, because that is so boring, but without an anchor for a more interesting conversation. What do you want readers to talk with you about at book signings?
    I like this blog, because you pose questions to us and it becomes a way to engage with authors.It’s much easier to respond if there is some kind of a context And, in this setting there is a little time to think before inserting foot in mouth.
    Merry

    Reply
  42. I am not a shy person when I meet people socially– I tend to ask them about their work. But, I think, knowing what to say when you know and admire someone’s work, but don’t know them personally, can be tricky. How do you go beyond ” I love your books, I think they are terrific”. Yet, when I really like a book, I feel (or imagine is probably more accurate) a strong sense of connection with the author. That’s probably because of values, and something about character, and uses of words. So I might feel like I have something in common with the author. (Of course.,so might hundreds of readers.) But the author doesn’t know me from Adam, and I don’t know the author as a person beyond the book. So, I find myself not quite wanting to be just a gushing fan, because that is so boring, but without an anchor for a more interesting conversation. What do you want readers to talk with you about at book signings?
    I like this blog, because you pose questions to us and it becomes a way to engage with authors.It’s much easier to respond if there is some kind of a context And, in this setting there is a little time to think before inserting foot in mouth.
    Merry

    Reply
  43. I am not a shy person when I meet people socially– I tend to ask them about their work. But, I think, knowing what to say when you know and admire someone’s work, but don’t know them personally, can be tricky. How do you go beyond ” I love your books, I think they are terrific”. Yet, when I really like a book, I feel (or imagine is probably more accurate) a strong sense of connection with the author. That’s probably because of values, and something about character, and uses of words. So I might feel like I have something in common with the author. (Of course.,so might hundreds of readers.) But the author doesn’t know me from Adam, and I don’t know the author as a person beyond the book. So, I find myself not quite wanting to be just a gushing fan, because that is so boring, but without an anchor for a more interesting conversation. What do you want readers to talk with you about at book signings?
    I like this blog, because you pose questions to us and it becomes a way to engage with authors.It’s much easier to respond if there is some kind of a context And, in this setting there is a little time to think before inserting foot in mouth.
    Merry

    Reply
  44. I am not a shy person when I meet people socially– I tend to ask them about their work. But, I think, knowing what to say when you know and admire someone’s work, but don’t know them personally, can be tricky. How do you go beyond ” I love your books, I think they are terrific”. Yet, when I really like a book, I feel (or imagine is probably more accurate) a strong sense of connection with the author. That’s probably because of values, and something about character, and uses of words. So I might feel like I have something in common with the author. (Of course.,so might hundreds of readers.) But the author doesn’t know me from Adam, and I don’t know the author as a person beyond the book. So, I find myself not quite wanting to be just a gushing fan, because that is so boring, but without an anchor for a more interesting conversation. What do you want readers to talk with you about at book signings?
    I like this blog, because you pose questions to us and it becomes a way to engage with authors.It’s much easier to respond if there is some kind of a context And, in this setting there is a little time to think before inserting foot in mouth.
    Merry

    Reply
  45. Great post, Edith! Every writer imagines what booksignings will be, with an adoring throng rushing up to buy your book, and they are always, always so…so not that.
    But now all shy Wenchling-readers have the instant greeting to any of us at a booksigning: just sidle up to the table and say “Wench”, and I promise you’ll be greeted like a long-lost rich uncle. *G*

    Reply
  46. Great post, Edith! Every writer imagines what booksignings will be, with an adoring throng rushing up to buy your book, and they are always, always so…so not that.
    But now all shy Wenchling-readers have the instant greeting to any of us at a booksigning: just sidle up to the table and say “Wench”, and I promise you’ll be greeted like a long-lost rich uncle. *G*

    Reply
  47. Great post, Edith! Every writer imagines what booksignings will be, with an adoring throng rushing up to buy your book, and they are always, always so…so not that.
    But now all shy Wenchling-readers have the instant greeting to any of us at a booksigning: just sidle up to the table and say “Wench”, and I promise you’ll be greeted like a long-lost rich uncle. *G*

    Reply
  48. Great post, Edith! Every writer imagines what booksignings will be, with an adoring throng rushing up to buy your book, and they are always, always so…so not that.
    But now all shy Wenchling-readers have the instant greeting to any of us at a booksigning: just sidle up to the table and say “Wench”, and I promise you’ll be greeted like a long-lost rich uncle. *G*

    Reply
  49. Thanks for the insight, Edith. I promise to give booksignings another try sometime. Part of my problem was that there were so many authors! I felt like I was on stage, and I am so not a public speaker. I prefer this kind of interaction because I don’t have to SEE the reactions to my comments (and I can preview them). I can definitely understand why authors want to booksign in groups. If I were an author, I’d be one of those reclusive ones like they used to be when nobody knew what authors looked like. Of course, these days you have to market yourself so it’s probably just as well!

    Reply
  50. Thanks for the insight, Edith. I promise to give booksignings another try sometime. Part of my problem was that there were so many authors! I felt like I was on stage, and I am so not a public speaker. I prefer this kind of interaction because I don’t have to SEE the reactions to my comments (and I can preview them). I can definitely understand why authors want to booksign in groups. If I were an author, I’d be one of those reclusive ones like they used to be when nobody knew what authors looked like. Of course, these days you have to market yourself so it’s probably just as well!

    Reply
  51. Thanks for the insight, Edith. I promise to give booksignings another try sometime. Part of my problem was that there were so many authors! I felt like I was on stage, and I am so not a public speaker. I prefer this kind of interaction because I don’t have to SEE the reactions to my comments (and I can preview them). I can definitely understand why authors want to booksign in groups. If I were an author, I’d be one of those reclusive ones like they used to be when nobody knew what authors looked like. Of course, these days you have to market yourself so it’s probably just as well!

    Reply
  52. Thanks for the insight, Edith. I promise to give booksignings another try sometime. Part of my problem was that there were so many authors! I felt like I was on stage, and I am so not a public speaker. I prefer this kind of interaction because I don’t have to SEE the reactions to my comments (and I can preview them). I can definitely understand why authors want to booksign in groups. If I were an author, I’d be one of those reclusive ones like they used to be when nobody knew what authors looked like. Of course, these days you have to market yourself so it’s probably just as well!

    Reply
  53. Boy, skip a few days and miss a great topic. I got a laugh out of the Broadway Mall, which has been promoted from its Mid-Island days. I have also behaved like a complete idiot at signings. My most burning humiliation involves a crazy weekend, where I met Nora Roberts, Pat Gaffney, and a few more. Left that signing and drove down state to catch Mary Jo at a what turned out to be a WalMart opening. They had her parked in front of luggage and Doritos, and my sister and I were the only ones there for some time. Mary Jo had a visitor, who turned out to be Susan/Sarah ( who we also read and were thrilled to see)and we all were talking and I ASKED SUSAN IF SHE COULD READ. As soon as the words were out of my mouth I realized how it sounded. I felt so stupid. Of course I ment if she was able to enjoy others work, or as a writer found it difficult to expose herself to it. It was years ago, and I still cringe when I think about it.
    I usually hit the signings at Book Review, so I’ll keep my eyes open for you Edith, and you wont be alone. I promise to use the secret password.

    Reply
  54. Boy, skip a few days and miss a great topic. I got a laugh out of the Broadway Mall, which has been promoted from its Mid-Island days. I have also behaved like a complete idiot at signings. My most burning humiliation involves a crazy weekend, where I met Nora Roberts, Pat Gaffney, and a few more. Left that signing and drove down state to catch Mary Jo at a what turned out to be a WalMart opening. They had her parked in front of luggage and Doritos, and my sister and I were the only ones there for some time. Mary Jo had a visitor, who turned out to be Susan/Sarah ( who we also read and were thrilled to see)and we all were talking and I ASKED SUSAN IF SHE COULD READ. As soon as the words were out of my mouth I realized how it sounded. I felt so stupid. Of course I ment if she was able to enjoy others work, or as a writer found it difficult to expose herself to it. It was years ago, and I still cringe when I think about it.
    I usually hit the signings at Book Review, so I’ll keep my eyes open for you Edith, and you wont be alone. I promise to use the secret password.

    Reply
  55. Boy, skip a few days and miss a great topic. I got a laugh out of the Broadway Mall, which has been promoted from its Mid-Island days. I have also behaved like a complete idiot at signings. My most burning humiliation involves a crazy weekend, where I met Nora Roberts, Pat Gaffney, and a few more. Left that signing and drove down state to catch Mary Jo at a what turned out to be a WalMart opening. They had her parked in front of luggage and Doritos, and my sister and I were the only ones there for some time. Mary Jo had a visitor, who turned out to be Susan/Sarah ( who we also read and were thrilled to see)and we all were talking and I ASKED SUSAN IF SHE COULD READ. As soon as the words were out of my mouth I realized how it sounded. I felt so stupid. Of course I ment if she was able to enjoy others work, or as a writer found it difficult to expose herself to it. It was years ago, and I still cringe when I think about it.
    I usually hit the signings at Book Review, so I’ll keep my eyes open for you Edith, and you wont be alone. I promise to use the secret password.

    Reply
  56. Boy, skip a few days and miss a great topic. I got a laugh out of the Broadway Mall, which has been promoted from its Mid-Island days. I have also behaved like a complete idiot at signings. My most burning humiliation involves a crazy weekend, where I met Nora Roberts, Pat Gaffney, and a few more. Left that signing and drove down state to catch Mary Jo at a what turned out to be a WalMart opening. They had her parked in front of luggage and Doritos, and my sister and I were the only ones there for some time. Mary Jo had a visitor, who turned out to be Susan/Sarah ( who we also read and were thrilled to see)and we all were talking and I ASKED SUSAN IF SHE COULD READ. As soon as the words were out of my mouth I realized how it sounded. I felt so stupid. Of course I ment if she was able to enjoy others work, or as a writer found it difficult to expose herself to it. It was years ago, and I still cringe when I think about it.
    I usually hit the signings at Book Review, so I’ll keep my eyes open for you Edith, and you wont be alone. I promise to use the secret password.

    Reply
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