Summer Reading

137_3774 Susan Sarah here… in muggy Maryland, where it has been so hot and sweltery that we’ve scarcely gone outside for the past week. Stepping out the door is like getting slapped with a hot, wet washcloth. As I understand it, we’re in some crazy geographical pocket in this area that traps heat and humidity like a bowl holds steam.

And that’s perfect weather for reading in a nice air-conditioned room! I had a summer-reading blog planned for today, but Loretta’s Beach Read Blog on Monday was so fabu that it’s a hard act to follow. So I’ll go with a twist on the summer reading theme. With the heat driving so many of us inside, or to the beach, or perhaps (if it’s not too hot where you are), to a lovely hammock in a shady spot ….

Sun_2  It’s been a while since we called for a reading game, so let’s have some fun with that today. Whatever the temperature is where you live — take that number, find the corresponding page in the book you’re currently reading, and quote a little something from the book!  Just a brief snippet — a sentence or two, whatever strikes you on that page. I’ll post a longer excerpt, but then, I hope you’ll indulge me, as it’s my Blog Day!  🙂

I happen to be reading the galley pages for my December Avon, TO WED A HIGHLAND BRIDE (and I’m reading them slowly, carefully, in the painstaking way that galley-reading requires, with red pencil in hand Just In Case — but the Avon production department has done their usual excellent job, and the page proofs are very clean, yay!).  I’m inside, though it’s not as horrid out there today as last week. Our temperatures have finally come down a little — it’s only supposed to be 94 today.

94 degrees … let’s see … what’s on page 94 of TO WED A HIGHLAND BRIDE by Sarah Gabriel:

First, a little set-up … Our hero, James MacCarran, Viscount Struan, formerly of the Highland Watch and now a professor of natural physics and geology at Edinburgh University, has traveled into the Highlands to the house he has inherited from his grandmother … he’s there to honor some decidely odd requests in her will: he must complete a manuscript of fairy lore that she was writing, and he must find himself a Highland fairy bride. Oh right, he thinks, that sounds next to impossible … Meanwhile, James finds himself stranded in some very bad weather with a very lovely and rather mysterious local girl, Elspeth MacArthur, who knows rather more about fairies than she’s willing to admit …and while she is strongly attracted to the new viscount, she is not about to marry a Lowlander, and she’s not about to give up the secret she and her family have been protecting for generations ….

(and yes, I confess, it’s a built-in PR opp to be reading my galleys just now, but hey, that’s one of the benefits of an author blog! *g*)

Twahbscan_3    …James poured himself another cup of tea, and added to her cup when she held it out. “While I’m here in the glen, I intend to explore some the rock formations in these hills. If agate was found nearby, that could have real significance for my work.”
   “If you wander these hills, you may even encounter the Daoine Sith,” she said.
   “The—dowin-shee?” He looked at her, puzzled.
   “The people of peace, in Gaelic. It is one of the many names we use for the fairy folk. They live in various places in the earth, but the caves and hills are their special territory in this glen. Do geologists ever take into account the otherwordly creatures who inhabit the subterranean earth?” She smiled.
   “Not if they value their reputations. Fancy and science do not mix well in academia, I assure you.” He sat forward. “For now, though, I have agreed to study fancy on behalf of my grandmother and her legacy of work.”
   “Perhaps you will learn something about rocks to surprise you. Fairies are plentiful among caves and live inside hills,” she said, smiling mischievously.
   “I do not expect to encounter any. But I’ve made a promise and I will honor it. Tell me about this curious fairy riding custom. I suppose you know all about it?”
   “I do. They ride at the time-between-times, when the curtain between our world and theirs is very thin—dawn, twilight, midnight, mist, and so on.”
   He tapped fingers on the table, thoughtful. “At times when visibility is poor enough to allow for tricks of the eye and mind. I see.”
   "I think you do not, actually,” she murmured. “Though you could if you want.”
   “Well, the custom seems to have frightened the living wits out of some of my staff. Between the banshee in the foyer, the ghosts in the house, and the garden fairies, two of the maidservants packed up in haste and left for Edinburgh.”
   “Southrons,” she said with a little huff. “Highlanders do not mind such things.”
   “Even the Highland staff has gone, now. They avoid the place this time of year.”
   “They are not foolish enough to risk being taken by the Fey folk. You should not be here yourself, nor should I.”
   “I will not be intimidated by nonsensical tales.” He smiled then. “But I am not surprised you are an authority on this, being part fairy yourself.”
   Elspeth caught her breath. “What do you mean?”
   “One of the housemaids must have seen you in the garden, and took you for a fairy. She packed her things and departed.”
   “Me? She might have seen one of the Struan fairies, but not me, unless it was just before you came outside.”
   “Ah. Of course there’s an explanation.” He sat back. “Entertaining stories are part and parcel of folklore, but no more than that, to my mind. By the way, I understand that your grandfather is very knowledgeable concerning local traditions. I thought it would be good to speak with him myself regarding my grandmother’s research.”
   “Will you speak with him before or after he learns that we spent tonight alone at Struan House?” Seeing his quick, wry expression, Elspeth laughed a little. Sitting here with him, quiet and peaceful, she liked him very much, despite the stubborn skepticism that seemed part and parcel to him. She stood.

   Struan took the lamp from the big pine table. “I’d best close up the house. There are no servants here to attend to that, either.”
   “A Highland laird often sees to the shutting of his house, with or without servants. Even in fine houses, it is the laird’s responsibility to bolt the doors.”
   “I hope locking up is custom rather than necessity in this glen,” he said.
   “We have not had cattle raiders or feuding clans for two generations and more. There are some smugglers in the hills, but they stay to themselves except for bringing whiskey along the lochs and rivers to the sea.” She paused. “What disturbs the peace of a house in this glen, sir, is not kept out by bolts, but they be of iron.”
   “Iron keeps the fairies away.” He nodded. “I read about it recently in my grandmother’s research.”
  “If the wildfolk want to come in, they will find a way.”
   He laughed softly. She knew he thought it all harmless superstition, yet she found his practical approach intriguing, wholly masculine, a bit of a challenge. She tilted her head, wondering about him. Standing in that cozy, quiet kitchen while rain pounded at the windows, she felt an unexpected sense of ease and comfort in his company. She did not want this night, this visit, to end quickly.
   Tender, unforgettable kisses shared months earlier had stayed with her, and as she recalled those, gazing at him, she could almost feel his hands upon her again. And an urge to be in his arms again, to experience not only the kisses but the passion and the cherishing that had been part of them, made her breath deepen, made her yearn. Love, the thought came to her then. Love feels like this.

TO WED A HIGHLAND BRIDE will be out December first — when the weather will be delightfully cool, oh ok maybe even so c-c-cold that we’ll be missing the swelter of August. For now, I hope you all enjoyed a little preview.

So, back to our reading game for this hot, sunny summer day — whatever the temperature is where you live, take that number, find the corresponding page in the book you’re currently reading … and quote a brief something from the page. Be sure to identify the book and the author!

Stay cool!

~Susan Sarah Towedahighlandbride_crop

 

90 thoughts on “Summer Reading”

  1. Oh, a reading game! These are always fun.
    Right now it’s 74 in Seattle. It got to 80 today, so we’re comfy, barely on the warm side. I got back from a week with my family in Alabama yesterday, where we had highs above 100 every single day we were there. So all day I’ve been simply gloating that I can walk outside without all the energy draining from my body the instant I step out the door. I love this city, I really do, not least for our gorgeous summers.
    Anyway, my current read is PATRIOT BATTLES: HOW THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE WAS FOUGHT, by Michael Stephenson. Military history with a heavy dose of myth-busting. Page 74 is in a chapter about the officer corps of the competing armies, and here are my favorite lines:
    “Continental officers seem to have been a fractious lot (not unlike their British confreres). An exasperated John Adams exclaimed that he was ‘wearied to Death with the Wrangles between military officers, high and low. They Quarrell like Cats and Dogs. They worry one another like Mastiffs Scrambling for Rank and Pay like Apes for Nuts.'”
    (I always love 18th century Capitalization. It’s so much more Dramatic than our Modern Styles.)

    Reply
  2. Oh, a reading game! These are always fun.
    Right now it’s 74 in Seattle. It got to 80 today, so we’re comfy, barely on the warm side. I got back from a week with my family in Alabama yesterday, where we had highs above 100 every single day we were there. So all day I’ve been simply gloating that I can walk outside without all the energy draining from my body the instant I step out the door. I love this city, I really do, not least for our gorgeous summers.
    Anyway, my current read is PATRIOT BATTLES: HOW THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE WAS FOUGHT, by Michael Stephenson. Military history with a heavy dose of myth-busting. Page 74 is in a chapter about the officer corps of the competing armies, and here are my favorite lines:
    “Continental officers seem to have been a fractious lot (not unlike their British confreres). An exasperated John Adams exclaimed that he was ‘wearied to Death with the Wrangles between military officers, high and low. They Quarrell like Cats and Dogs. They worry one another like Mastiffs Scrambling for Rank and Pay like Apes for Nuts.'”
    (I always love 18th century Capitalization. It’s so much more Dramatic than our Modern Styles.)

    Reply
  3. Oh, a reading game! These are always fun.
    Right now it’s 74 in Seattle. It got to 80 today, so we’re comfy, barely on the warm side. I got back from a week with my family in Alabama yesterday, where we had highs above 100 every single day we were there. So all day I’ve been simply gloating that I can walk outside without all the energy draining from my body the instant I step out the door. I love this city, I really do, not least for our gorgeous summers.
    Anyway, my current read is PATRIOT BATTLES: HOW THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE WAS FOUGHT, by Michael Stephenson. Military history with a heavy dose of myth-busting. Page 74 is in a chapter about the officer corps of the competing armies, and here are my favorite lines:
    “Continental officers seem to have been a fractious lot (not unlike their British confreres). An exasperated John Adams exclaimed that he was ‘wearied to Death with the Wrangles between military officers, high and low. They Quarrell like Cats and Dogs. They worry one another like Mastiffs Scrambling for Rank and Pay like Apes for Nuts.'”
    (I always love 18th century Capitalization. It’s so much more Dramatic than our Modern Styles.)

    Reply
  4. Oh, a reading game! These are always fun.
    Right now it’s 74 in Seattle. It got to 80 today, so we’re comfy, barely on the warm side. I got back from a week with my family in Alabama yesterday, where we had highs above 100 every single day we were there. So all day I’ve been simply gloating that I can walk outside without all the energy draining from my body the instant I step out the door. I love this city, I really do, not least for our gorgeous summers.
    Anyway, my current read is PATRIOT BATTLES: HOW THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE WAS FOUGHT, by Michael Stephenson. Military history with a heavy dose of myth-busting. Page 74 is in a chapter about the officer corps of the competing armies, and here are my favorite lines:
    “Continental officers seem to have been a fractious lot (not unlike their British confreres). An exasperated John Adams exclaimed that he was ‘wearied to Death with the Wrangles between military officers, high and low. They Quarrell like Cats and Dogs. They worry one another like Mastiffs Scrambling for Rank and Pay like Apes for Nuts.'”
    (I always love 18th century Capitalization. It’s so much more Dramatic than our Modern Styles.)

    Reply
  5. Oh, a reading game! These are always fun.
    Right now it’s 74 in Seattle. It got to 80 today, so we’re comfy, barely on the warm side. I got back from a week with my family in Alabama yesterday, where we had highs above 100 every single day we were there. So all day I’ve been simply gloating that I can walk outside without all the energy draining from my body the instant I step out the door. I love this city, I really do, not least for our gorgeous summers.
    Anyway, my current read is PATRIOT BATTLES: HOW THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE WAS FOUGHT, by Michael Stephenson. Military history with a heavy dose of myth-busting. Page 74 is in a chapter about the officer corps of the competing armies, and here are my favorite lines:
    “Continental officers seem to have been a fractious lot (not unlike their British confreres). An exasperated John Adams exclaimed that he was ‘wearied to Death with the Wrangles between military officers, high and low. They Quarrell like Cats and Dogs. They worry one another like Mastiffs Scrambling for Rank and Pay like Apes for Nuts.'”
    (I always love 18th century Capitalization. It’s so much more Dramatic than our Modern Styles.)

    Reply
  6. From Sherrie:
    Oh, goody! I love this game! It is currently 66 degrees here in the wilderness not far from Seattle. Since I am rereading Loretta’s LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, my excerpt comes from page 66 of this book.
    Set-up: Jessica Trent has a priceless Russian icon that the Marquess of Dain covets. She won’t sell it to him unless he stops corrupting her sapskull younger brother with drinking and gambling. Dain (a notorious bad boy) threatens to ruin Jessica’s reputation right there in the cafe if she won’t sell him the icon. He then proceeds to use all his outrageous charm at a pretend seduction–while avid cafe patrons watch. (He’s unbuttoning her glove and whispering nonsense to her in Italian.)
    But Jessica turns the tables on Dain in an absolutely hilarious example of one-upmanship–she threatens to ruin HIS reputation as a bad boy! *g* Dain is famous for having nothing to do with genteel ladies or virgins. If word gets out that the infamous Dain was actually seen “wooing” Jessica–a lady and a virgin–his reputation as a bad boy will be ruined. Jessica knows this, and tells Dain that if he doesn’t stop, word will get out:
    “The Marquess of Dain has been seen in the company of a *lady*,” she said. “He has been seen and heard wooing her.” She looked up, her silver eyes gleaming. “It was lovely. I had no idea Italian was so … moving.”
    “I was talking about drains,” he said tightly.”
    … “Dain,” she said in a low, hard voice, “if you do not release my hand this instant, I shall kiss you in front of everybody.”
    He had a ghastly suspicion he’d kiss her back–in front of witnesses–Dain, Beelzebub himself, kissing a lady–a *virgin*. He crushed his panic. “Miss Trent, ” he said, his own tones equally low and hard, “I’d like to see you try.”

    Reply
  7. From Sherrie:
    Oh, goody! I love this game! It is currently 66 degrees here in the wilderness not far from Seattle. Since I am rereading Loretta’s LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, my excerpt comes from page 66 of this book.
    Set-up: Jessica Trent has a priceless Russian icon that the Marquess of Dain covets. She won’t sell it to him unless he stops corrupting her sapskull younger brother with drinking and gambling. Dain (a notorious bad boy) threatens to ruin Jessica’s reputation right there in the cafe if she won’t sell him the icon. He then proceeds to use all his outrageous charm at a pretend seduction–while avid cafe patrons watch. (He’s unbuttoning her glove and whispering nonsense to her in Italian.)
    But Jessica turns the tables on Dain in an absolutely hilarious example of one-upmanship–she threatens to ruin HIS reputation as a bad boy! *g* Dain is famous for having nothing to do with genteel ladies or virgins. If word gets out that the infamous Dain was actually seen “wooing” Jessica–a lady and a virgin–his reputation as a bad boy will be ruined. Jessica knows this, and tells Dain that if he doesn’t stop, word will get out:
    “The Marquess of Dain has been seen in the company of a *lady*,” she said. “He has been seen and heard wooing her.” She looked up, her silver eyes gleaming. “It was lovely. I had no idea Italian was so … moving.”
    “I was talking about drains,” he said tightly.”
    … “Dain,” she said in a low, hard voice, “if you do not release my hand this instant, I shall kiss you in front of everybody.”
    He had a ghastly suspicion he’d kiss her back–in front of witnesses–Dain, Beelzebub himself, kissing a lady–a *virgin*. He crushed his panic. “Miss Trent, ” he said, his own tones equally low and hard, “I’d like to see you try.”

    Reply
  8. From Sherrie:
    Oh, goody! I love this game! It is currently 66 degrees here in the wilderness not far from Seattle. Since I am rereading Loretta’s LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, my excerpt comes from page 66 of this book.
    Set-up: Jessica Trent has a priceless Russian icon that the Marquess of Dain covets. She won’t sell it to him unless he stops corrupting her sapskull younger brother with drinking and gambling. Dain (a notorious bad boy) threatens to ruin Jessica’s reputation right there in the cafe if she won’t sell him the icon. He then proceeds to use all his outrageous charm at a pretend seduction–while avid cafe patrons watch. (He’s unbuttoning her glove and whispering nonsense to her in Italian.)
    But Jessica turns the tables on Dain in an absolutely hilarious example of one-upmanship–she threatens to ruin HIS reputation as a bad boy! *g* Dain is famous for having nothing to do with genteel ladies or virgins. If word gets out that the infamous Dain was actually seen “wooing” Jessica–a lady and a virgin–his reputation as a bad boy will be ruined. Jessica knows this, and tells Dain that if he doesn’t stop, word will get out:
    “The Marquess of Dain has been seen in the company of a *lady*,” she said. “He has been seen and heard wooing her.” She looked up, her silver eyes gleaming. “It was lovely. I had no idea Italian was so … moving.”
    “I was talking about drains,” he said tightly.”
    … “Dain,” she said in a low, hard voice, “if you do not release my hand this instant, I shall kiss you in front of everybody.”
    He had a ghastly suspicion he’d kiss her back–in front of witnesses–Dain, Beelzebub himself, kissing a lady–a *virgin*. He crushed his panic. “Miss Trent, ” he said, his own tones equally low and hard, “I’d like to see you try.”

    Reply
  9. From Sherrie:
    Oh, goody! I love this game! It is currently 66 degrees here in the wilderness not far from Seattle. Since I am rereading Loretta’s LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, my excerpt comes from page 66 of this book.
    Set-up: Jessica Trent has a priceless Russian icon that the Marquess of Dain covets. She won’t sell it to him unless he stops corrupting her sapskull younger brother with drinking and gambling. Dain (a notorious bad boy) threatens to ruin Jessica’s reputation right there in the cafe if she won’t sell him the icon. He then proceeds to use all his outrageous charm at a pretend seduction–while avid cafe patrons watch. (He’s unbuttoning her glove and whispering nonsense to her in Italian.)
    But Jessica turns the tables on Dain in an absolutely hilarious example of one-upmanship–she threatens to ruin HIS reputation as a bad boy! *g* Dain is famous for having nothing to do with genteel ladies or virgins. If word gets out that the infamous Dain was actually seen “wooing” Jessica–a lady and a virgin–his reputation as a bad boy will be ruined. Jessica knows this, and tells Dain that if he doesn’t stop, word will get out:
    “The Marquess of Dain has been seen in the company of a *lady*,” she said. “He has been seen and heard wooing her.” She looked up, her silver eyes gleaming. “It was lovely. I had no idea Italian was so … moving.”
    “I was talking about drains,” he said tightly.”
    … “Dain,” she said in a low, hard voice, “if you do not release my hand this instant, I shall kiss you in front of everybody.”
    He had a ghastly suspicion he’d kiss her back–in front of witnesses–Dain, Beelzebub himself, kissing a lady–a *virgin*. He crushed his panic. “Miss Trent, ” he said, his own tones equally low and hard, “I’d like to see you try.”

    Reply
  10. From Sherrie:
    Oh, goody! I love this game! It is currently 66 degrees here in the wilderness not far from Seattle. Since I am rereading Loretta’s LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, my excerpt comes from page 66 of this book.
    Set-up: Jessica Trent has a priceless Russian icon that the Marquess of Dain covets. She won’t sell it to him unless he stops corrupting her sapskull younger brother with drinking and gambling. Dain (a notorious bad boy) threatens to ruin Jessica’s reputation right there in the cafe if she won’t sell him the icon. He then proceeds to use all his outrageous charm at a pretend seduction–while avid cafe patrons watch. (He’s unbuttoning her glove and whispering nonsense to her in Italian.)
    But Jessica turns the tables on Dain in an absolutely hilarious example of one-upmanship–she threatens to ruin HIS reputation as a bad boy! *g* Dain is famous for having nothing to do with genteel ladies or virgins. If word gets out that the infamous Dain was actually seen “wooing” Jessica–a lady and a virgin–his reputation as a bad boy will be ruined. Jessica knows this, and tells Dain that if he doesn’t stop, word will get out:
    “The Marquess of Dain has been seen in the company of a *lady*,” she said. “He has been seen and heard wooing her.” She looked up, her silver eyes gleaming. “It was lovely. I had no idea Italian was so … moving.”
    “I was talking about drains,” he said tightly.”
    … “Dain,” she said in a low, hard voice, “if you do not release my hand this instant, I shall kiss you in front of everybody.”
    He had a ghastly suspicion he’d kiss her back–in front of witnesses–Dain, Beelzebub himself, kissing a lady–a *virgin*. He crushed his panic. “Miss Trent, ” he said, his own tones equally low and hard, “I’d like to see you try.”

    Reply
  11. It’s 54 on my shaded porch at 9 AM in Maine. Brr. Thanks for teasing us w/ TWAHB!
    I’m reading Janet Mullany’s hilarious Rules of Gentility. Go read it!There’s actually only one paragraph on this page, but it’s pretty good:
    As my sister-in-law says, I have no idea how to deal with women of quality. All the ladies who are considered diamonds of the first water amongst this season’s debutantes, all possessed of fortune, represent only feminine bundles of flaws to me.

    Reply
  12. It’s 54 on my shaded porch at 9 AM in Maine. Brr. Thanks for teasing us w/ TWAHB!
    I’m reading Janet Mullany’s hilarious Rules of Gentility. Go read it!There’s actually only one paragraph on this page, but it’s pretty good:
    As my sister-in-law says, I have no idea how to deal with women of quality. All the ladies who are considered diamonds of the first water amongst this season’s debutantes, all possessed of fortune, represent only feminine bundles of flaws to me.

    Reply
  13. It’s 54 on my shaded porch at 9 AM in Maine. Brr. Thanks for teasing us w/ TWAHB!
    I’m reading Janet Mullany’s hilarious Rules of Gentility. Go read it!There’s actually only one paragraph on this page, but it’s pretty good:
    As my sister-in-law says, I have no idea how to deal with women of quality. All the ladies who are considered diamonds of the first water amongst this season’s debutantes, all possessed of fortune, represent only feminine bundles of flaws to me.

    Reply
  14. It’s 54 on my shaded porch at 9 AM in Maine. Brr. Thanks for teasing us w/ TWAHB!
    I’m reading Janet Mullany’s hilarious Rules of Gentility. Go read it!There’s actually only one paragraph on this page, but it’s pretty good:
    As my sister-in-law says, I have no idea how to deal with women of quality. All the ladies who are considered diamonds of the first water amongst this season’s debutantes, all possessed of fortune, represent only feminine bundles of flaws to me.

    Reply
  15. It’s 54 on my shaded porch at 9 AM in Maine. Brr. Thanks for teasing us w/ TWAHB!
    I’m reading Janet Mullany’s hilarious Rules of Gentility. Go read it!There’s actually only one paragraph on this page, but it’s pretty good:
    As my sister-in-law says, I have no idea how to deal with women of quality. All the ladies who are considered diamonds of the first water amongst this season’s debutantes, all possessed of fortune, represent only feminine bundles of flaws to me.

    Reply
  16. Sherrie–you’re reading one of my favs! I didn’t care for Lord of the Scoundrels until I had read it 3 times:)
    I’m in Heyer’s “Cotillion.”
    The dialog almost makes up for the “no sex” feature of vintage 1953 Regencies:
    A blush flooded her cheeks; she stammered she knew not what; and cast an almost frightened look up into his face.
    “Don’t run away, will you?” he said quizzically. “I like Freddy’s engagement very well, you know. It has done him a great deal of good.”
    “Sir-Lord Legerwood!” she said desperately. “I cannot–”
    “You cannot talk to me in the open street. Very true! You shall tell me all about it next week, when I return to town. I must go now.”
    The characters are so multi-layered, and no two exactly alike.

    Reply
  17. Sherrie–you’re reading one of my favs! I didn’t care for Lord of the Scoundrels until I had read it 3 times:)
    I’m in Heyer’s “Cotillion.”
    The dialog almost makes up for the “no sex” feature of vintage 1953 Regencies:
    A blush flooded her cheeks; she stammered she knew not what; and cast an almost frightened look up into his face.
    “Don’t run away, will you?” he said quizzically. “I like Freddy’s engagement very well, you know. It has done him a great deal of good.”
    “Sir-Lord Legerwood!” she said desperately. “I cannot–”
    “You cannot talk to me in the open street. Very true! You shall tell me all about it next week, when I return to town. I must go now.”
    The characters are so multi-layered, and no two exactly alike.

    Reply
  18. Sherrie–you’re reading one of my favs! I didn’t care for Lord of the Scoundrels until I had read it 3 times:)
    I’m in Heyer’s “Cotillion.”
    The dialog almost makes up for the “no sex” feature of vintage 1953 Regencies:
    A blush flooded her cheeks; she stammered she knew not what; and cast an almost frightened look up into his face.
    “Don’t run away, will you?” he said quizzically. “I like Freddy’s engagement very well, you know. It has done him a great deal of good.”
    “Sir-Lord Legerwood!” she said desperately. “I cannot–”
    “You cannot talk to me in the open street. Very true! You shall tell me all about it next week, when I return to town. I must go now.”
    The characters are so multi-layered, and no two exactly alike.

    Reply
  19. Sherrie–you’re reading one of my favs! I didn’t care for Lord of the Scoundrels until I had read it 3 times:)
    I’m in Heyer’s “Cotillion.”
    The dialog almost makes up for the “no sex” feature of vintage 1953 Regencies:
    A blush flooded her cheeks; she stammered she knew not what; and cast an almost frightened look up into his face.
    “Don’t run away, will you?” he said quizzically. “I like Freddy’s engagement very well, you know. It has done him a great deal of good.”
    “Sir-Lord Legerwood!” she said desperately. “I cannot–”
    “You cannot talk to me in the open street. Very true! You shall tell me all about it next week, when I return to town. I must go now.”
    The characters are so multi-layered, and no two exactly alike.

    Reply
  20. Sherrie–you’re reading one of my favs! I didn’t care for Lord of the Scoundrels until I had read it 3 times:)
    I’m in Heyer’s “Cotillion.”
    The dialog almost makes up for the “no sex” feature of vintage 1953 Regencies:
    A blush flooded her cheeks; she stammered she knew not what; and cast an almost frightened look up into his face.
    “Don’t run away, will you?” he said quizzically. “I like Freddy’s engagement very well, you know. It has done him a great deal of good.”
    “Sir-Lord Legerwood!” she said desperately. “I cannot–”
    “You cannot talk to me in the open street. Very true! You shall tell me all about it next week, when I return to town. I must go now.”
    The characters are so multi-layered, and no two exactly alike.

    Reply
  21. From Sherrie:
    Beth, COTILLION is one of my very favorite Heyers, and Lord Legerwood my favorite secondary character. He had Hero’s number the moment he met her, and treated her with such amused kindness.
    It is now 83 degrees outside, and I can’t resist quoting from page 83 of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS again:
    Set-up: A very irritated Jessica is stomping home from a party, and an equally irritated Lord Dain is insisting on escorting her because the streets at night are dangerous. She doesn’t want his escort, and they are walking and arguing. He refuses to leave her alone, so she kicks him in the ankle out of sheer frustration. He laughs at her, which infuriates Jessica:
    “You great drunken jackass!” she cried. “How dare you?” She tore off her bonnet and whacked him in the chest with it.
    “I did *not* give you leave to use my Christian name.” She whacked him again. “And I am *not* a ha’pennyworth of a chit, you thickheaded ox!” Whack, whack, whack.
    Dain gazed down in profound puzzlement. He saw a flimsy wisp of a female attempting, apparently, to do him an injury with a bit of millinery.

    Reply
  22. From Sherrie:
    Beth, COTILLION is one of my very favorite Heyers, and Lord Legerwood my favorite secondary character. He had Hero’s number the moment he met her, and treated her with such amused kindness.
    It is now 83 degrees outside, and I can’t resist quoting from page 83 of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS again:
    Set-up: A very irritated Jessica is stomping home from a party, and an equally irritated Lord Dain is insisting on escorting her because the streets at night are dangerous. She doesn’t want his escort, and they are walking and arguing. He refuses to leave her alone, so she kicks him in the ankle out of sheer frustration. He laughs at her, which infuriates Jessica:
    “You great drunken jackass!” she cried. “How dare you?” She tore off her bonnet and whacked him in the chest with it.
    “I did *not* give you leave to use my Christian name.” She whacked him again. “And I am *not* a ha’pennyworth of a chit, you thickheaded ox!” Whack, whack, whack.
    Dain gazed down in profound puzzlement. He saw a flimsy wisp of a female attempting, apparently, to do him an injury with a bit of millinery.

    Reply
  23. From Sherrie:
    Beth, COTILLION is one of my very favorite Heyers, and Lord Legerwood my favorite secondary character. He had Hero’s number the moment he met her, and treated her with such amused kindness.
    It is now 83 degrees outside, and I can’t resist quoting from page 83 of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS again:
    Set-up: A very irritated Jessica is stomping home from a party, and an equally irritated Lord Dain is insisting on escorting her because the streets at night are dangerous. She doesn’t want his escort, and they are walking and arguing. He refuses to leave her alone, so she kicks him in the ankle out of sheer frustration. He laughs at her, which infuriates Jessica:
    “You great drunken jackass!” she cried. “How dare you?” She tore off her bonnet and whacked him in the chest with it.
    “I did *not* give you leave to use my Christian name.” She whacked him again. “And I am *not* a ha’pennyworth of a chit, you thickheaded ox!” Whack, whack, whack.
    Dain gazed down in profound puzzlement. He saw a flimsy wisp of a female attempting, apparently, to do him an injury with a bit of millinery.

    Reply
  24. From Sherrie:
    Beth, COTILLION is one of my very favorite Heyers, and Lord Legerwood my favorite secondary character. He had Hero’s number the moment he met her, and treated her with such amused kindness.
    It is now 83 degrees outside, and I can’t resist quoting from page 83 of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS again:
    Set-up: A very irritated Jessica is stomping home from a party, and an equally irritated Lord Dain is insisting on escorting her because the streets at night are dangerous. She doesn’t want his escort, and they are walking and arguing. He refuses to leave her alone, so she kicks him in the ankle out of sheer frustration. He laughs at her, which infuriates Jessica:
    “You great drunken jackass!” she cried. “How dare you?” She tore off her bonnet and whacked him in the chest with it.
    “I did *not* give you leave to use my Christian name.” She whacked him again. “And I am *not* a ha’pennyworth of a chit, you thickheaded ox!” Whack, whack, whack.
    Dain gazed down in profound puzzlement. He saw a flimsy wisp of a female attempting, apparently, to do him an injury with a bit of millinery.

    Reply
  25. From Sherrie:
    Beth, COTILLION is one of my very favorite Heyers, and Lord Legerwood my favorite secondary character. He had Hero’s number the moment he met her, and treated her with such amused kindness.
    It is now 83 degrees outside, and I can’t resist quoting from page 83 of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS again:
    Set-up: A very irritated Jessica is stomping home from a party, and an equally irritated Lord Dain is insisting on escorting her because the streets at night are dangerous. She doesn’t want his escort, and they are walking and arguing. He refuses to leave her alone, so she kicks him in the ankle out of sheer frustration. He laughs at her, which infuriates Jessica:
    “You great drunken jackass!” she cried. “How dare you?” She tore off her bonnet and whacked him in the chest with it.
    “I did *not* give you leave to use my Christian name.” She whacked him again. “And I am *not* a ha’pennyworth of a chit, you thickheaded ox!” Whack, whack, whack.
    Dain gazed down in profound puzzlement. He saw a flimsy wisp of a female attempting, apparently, to do him an injury with a bit of millinery.

    Reply
  26. 104 degrees down in the barn….probably 98 outside…here in Southern California back country.
    Nora Robert’s “High Noon” page 104.
    “When his cell phone, he was studying a trio of broken windows. He kept studying them while he pulled it out. ‘yeah,this is Duncan. What? When? How?'”
    Page 98…
    “Not this way, she couldn’t die this way.Unable to look into the eyes of who killed her. Who took her away from her baby.”
    It’s a good book

    Reply
  27. 104 degrees down in the barn….probably 98 outside…here in Southern California back country.
    Nora Robert’s “High Noon” page 104.
    “When his cell phone, he was studying a trio of broken windows. He kept studying them while he pulled it out. ‘yeah,this is Duncan. What? When? How?'”
    Page 98…
    “Not this way, she couldn’t die this way.Unable to look into the eyes of who killed her. Who took her away from her baby.”
    It’s a good book

    Reply
  28. 104 degrees down in the barn….probably 98 outside…here in Southern California back country.
    Nora Robert’s “High Noon” page 104.
    “When his cell phone, he was studying a trio of broken windows. He kept studying them while he pulled it out. ‘yeah,this is Duncan. What? When? How?'”
    Page 98…
    “Not this way, she couldn’t die this way.Unable to look into the eyes of who killed her. Who took her away from her baby.”
    It’s a good book

    Reply
  29. 104 degrees down in the barn….probably 98 outside…here in Southern California back country.
    Nora Robert’s “High Noon” page 104.
    “When his cell phone, he was studying a trio of broken windows. He kept studying them while he pulled it out. ‘yeah,this is Duncan. What? When? How?'”
    Page 98…
    “Not this way, she couldn’t die this way.Unable to look into the eyes of who killed her. Who took her away from her baby.”
    It’s a good book

    Reply
  30. 104 degrees down in the barn….probably 98 outside…here in Southern California back country.
    Nora Robert’s “High Noon” page 104.
    “When his cell phone, he was studying a trio of broken windows. He kept studying them while he pulled it out. ‘yeah,this is Duncan. What? When? How?'”
    Page 98…
    “Not this way, she couldn’t die this way.Unable to look into the eyes of who killed her. Who took her away from her baby.”
    It’s a good book

    Reply
  31. Here in Georgia it’s a ghastly 100 degrees.
    From page 100 of Miranda Jarrett’s The Adventurous Bride, where our hero, Lord John, our heroine, Lady Mary, her sister and their governess are touring a cathedral in France:
    “So tell us, friar,” John asked, pausing to study the vast tiled floor of the Amiens Cathédrale Notre-Dame, stretching through the nave before them. “Is it true that the Romish worshipers would crawl on their knees along this very floor, clear to the altar?”
    The old monk that was their guide nodded solemnly, his tonsured head gleaming faintly in the half-light that filtered down from the clerestory. “It is true, my lord. You see the pattern in which the tiles are laid, a labyrinth twisting like a snail’s shell. The most faithful pilgrims would pray and follow every turn upon their knees, and offer up their pain as an unworthy gift to God.”
    This is a fun book — a romance, tour guide, and art history lesson in one.

    Reply
  32. Here in Georgia it’s a ghastly 100 degrees.
    From page 100 of Miranda Jarrett’s The Adventurous Bride, where our hero, Lord John, our heroine, Lady Mary, her sister and their governess are touring a cathedral in France:
    “So tell us, friar,” John asked, pausing to study the vast tiled floor of the Amiens Cathédrale Notre-Dame, stretching through the nave before them. “Is it true that the Romish worshipers would crawl on their knees along this very floor, clear to the altar?”
    The old monk that was their guide nodded solemnly, his tonsured head gleaming faintly in the half-light that filtered down from the clerestory. “It is true, my lord. You see the pattern in which the tiles are laid, a labyrinth twisting like a snail’s shell. The most faithful pilgrims would pray and follow every turn upon their knees, and offer up their pain as an unworthy gift to God.”
    This is a fun book — a romance, tour guide, and art history lesson in one.

    Reply
  33. Here in Georgia it’s a ghastly 100 degrees.
    From page 100 of Miranda Jarrett’s The Adventurous Bride, where our hero, Lord John, our heroine, Lady Mary, her sister and their governess are touring a cathedral in France:
    “So tell us, friar,” John asked, pausing to study the vast tiled floor of the Amiens Cathédrale Notre-Dame, stretching through the nave before them. “Is it true that the Romish worshipers would crawl on their knees along this very floor, clear to the altar?”
    The old monk that was their guide nodded solemnly, his tonsured head gleaming faintly in the half-light that filtered down from the clerestory. “It is true, my lord. You see the pattern in which the tiles are laid, a labyrinth twisting like a snail’s shell. The most faithful pilgrims would pray and follow every turn upon their knees, and offer up their pain as an unworthy gift to God.”
    This is a fun book — a romance, tour guide, and art history lesson in one.

    Reply
  34. Here in Georgia it’s a ghastly 100 degrees.
    From page 100 of Miranda Jarrett’s The Adventurous Bride, where our hero, Lord John, our heroine, Lady Mary, her sister and their governess are touring a cathedral in France:
    “So tell us, friar,” John asked, pausing to study the vast tiled floor of the Amiens Cathédrale Notre-Dame, stretching through the nave before them. “Is it true that the Romish worshipers would crawl on their knees along this very floor, clear to the altar?”
    The old monk that was their guide nodded solemnly, his tonsured head gleaming faintly in the half-light that filtered down from the clerestory. “It is true, my lord. You see the pattern in which the tiles are laid, a labyrinth twisting like a snail’s shell. The most faithful pilgrims would pray and follow every turn upon their knees, and offer up their pain as an unworthy gift to God.”
    This is a fun book — a romance, tour guide, and art history lesson in one.

    Reply
  35. Here in Georgia it’s a ghastly 100 degrees.
    From page 100 of Miranda Jarrett’s The Adventurous Bride, where our hero, Lord John, our heroine, Lady Mary, her sister and their governess are touring a cathedral in France:
    “So tell us, friar,” John asked, pausing to study the vast tiled floor of the Amiens Cathédrale Notre-Dame, stretching through the nave before them. “Is it true that the Romish worshipers would crawl on their knees along this very floor, clear to the altar?”
    The old monk that was their guide nodded solemnly, his tonsured head gleaming faintly in the half-light that filtered down from the clerestory. “It is true, my lord. You see the pattern in which the tiles are laid, a labyrinth twisting like a snail’s shell. The most faithful pilgrims would pray and follow every turn upon their knees, and offer up their pain as an unworthy gift to God.”
    This is a fun book — a romance, tour guide, and art history lesson in one.

    Reply
  36. Oh, reading game! Loved the clips from Lord of Scoundrels, and the new Sarah Gabriel sound delicious, too.
    So–I have here bound galleys of Sharon Shinn’s next book, READER AND RAELYNX, the wonderful conclusion of her 12 Houses series. It’s 90 degrees north of Baltimore, and here’s a bit from page 90.
    In this fantasy world (which is also very romantic), people with magical abilities are called mystics. Two women who are powerful mystics have furnished a cottage for one of the their companions and his new (mystic) bride:
    Kirra said, “I hope Ellynor is happy here, so far from her family.”
    Senneth followed her out the door. “Funny–I’m always happiest whem my family is farthest away.”
    “And I when I am either setting out to see them or preparing to leave,” Kirra said.
    “Butthen, we’re unnatural.”
    “Mystics,” Kirra said darkly. “Never just like everybody else.”
    But one of the delights of this series is the way a disparate group of people have made a family out of themselves (and fallen in love along the way, too!)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  37. Oh, reading game! Loved the clips from Lord of Scoundrels, and the new Sarah Gabriel sound delicious, too.
    So–I have here bound galleys of Sharon Shinn’s next book, READER AND RAELYNX, the wonderful conclusion of her 12 Houses series. It’s 90 degrees north of Baltimore, and here’s a bit from page 90.
    In this fantasy world (which is also very romantic), people with magical abilities are called mystics. Two women who are powerful mystics have furnished a cottage for one of the their companions and his new (mystic) bride:
    Kirra said, “I hope Ellynor is happy here, so far from her family.”
    Senneth followed her out the door. “Funny–I’m always happiest whem my family is farthest away.”
    “And I when I am either setting out to see them or preparing to leave,” Kirra said.
    “Butthen, we’re unnatural.”
    “Mystics,” Kirra said darkly. “Never just like everybody else.”
    But one of the delights of this series is the way a disparate group of people have made a family out of themselves (and fallen in love along the way, too!)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  38. Oh, reading game! Loved the clips from Lord of Scoundrels, and the new Sarah Gabriel sound delicious, too.
    So–I have here bound galleys of Sharon Shinn’s next book, READER AND RAELYNX, the wonderful conclusion of her 12 Houses series. It’s 90 degrees north of Baltimore, and here’s a bit from page 90.
    In this fantasy world (which is also very romantic), people with magical abilities are called mystics. Two women who are powerful mystics have furnished a cottage for one of the their companions and his new (mystic) bride:
    Kirra said, “I hope Ellynor is happy here, so far from her family.”
    Senneth followed her out the door. “Funny–I’m always happiest whem my family is farthest away.”
    “And I when I am either setting out to see them or preparing to leave,” Kirra said.
    “Butthen, we’re unnatural.”
    “Mystics,” Kirra said darkly. “Never just like everybody else.”
    But one of the delights of this series is the way a disparate group of people have made a family out of themselves (and fallen in love along the way, too!)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  39. Oh, reading game! Loved the clips from Lord of Scoundrels, and the new Sarah Gabriel sound delicious, too.
    So–I have here bound galleys of Sharon Shinn’s next book, READER AND RAELYNX, the wonderful conclusion of her 12 Houses series. It’s 90 degrees north of Baltimore, and here’s a bit from page 90.
    In this fantasy world (which is also very romantic), people with magical abilities are called mystics. Two women who are powerful mystics have furnished a cottage for one of the their companions and his new (mystic) bride:
    Kirra said, “I hope Ellynor is happy here, so far from her family.”
    Senneth followed her out the door. “Funny–I’m always happiest whem my family is farthest away.”
    “And I when I am either setting out to see them or preparing to leave,” Kirra said.
    “Butthen, we’re unnatural.”
    “Mystics,” Kirra said darkly. “Never just like everybody else.”
    But one of the delights of this series is the way a disparate group of people have made a family out of themselves (and fallen in love along the way, too!)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  40. Oh, reading game! Loved the clips from Lord of Scoundrels, and the new Sarah Gabriel sound delicious, too.
    So–I have here bound galleys of Sharon Shinn’s next book, READER AND RAELYNX, the wonderful conclusion of her 12 Houses series. It’s 90 degrees north of Baltimore, and here’s a bit from page 90.
    In this fantasy world (which is also very romantic), people with magical abilities are called mystics. Two women who are powerful mystics have furnished a cottage for one of the their companions and his new (mystic) bride:
    Kirra said, “I hope Ellynor is happy here, so far from her family.”
    Senneth followed her out the door. “Funny–I’m always happiest whem my family is farthest away.”
    “And I when I am either setting out to see them or preparing to leave,” Kirra said.
    “Butthen, we’re unnatural.”
    “Mystics,” Kirra said darkly. “Never just like everybody else.”
    But one of the delights of this series is the way a disparate group of people have made a family out of themselves (and fallen in love along the way, too!)
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  41. I polished off “Cotillion” and now am trying to finish Susan’s “Swan Maiden.” I can’t find a snippet to quote that stands on its own, but the chemistry between Gawain and Juliana is entertaining. I like a resourceful, sassy heroine!

    Reply
  42. I polished off “Cotillion” and now am trying to finish Susan’s “Swan Maiden.” I can’t find a snippet to quote that stands on its own, but the chemistry between Gawain and Juliana is entertaining. I like a resourceful, sassy heroine!

    Reply
  43. I polished off “Cotillion” and now am trying to finish Susan’s “Swan Maiden.” I can’t find a snippet to quote that stands on its own, but the chemistry between Gawain and Juliana is entertaining. I like a resourceful, sassy heroine!

    Reply
  44. I polished off “Cotillion” and now am trying to finish Susan’s “Swan Maiden.” I can’t find a snippet to quote that stands on its own, but the chemistry between Gawain and Juliana is entertaining. I like a resourceful, sassy heroine!

    Reply
  45. I polished off “Cotillion” and now am trying to finish Susan’s “Swan Maiden.” I can’t find a snippet to quote that stands on its own, but the chemistry between Gawain and Juliana is entertaining. I like a resourceful, sassy heroine!

    Reply
  46. Mary Jo, I’m so jealous I could spit!
    It’s 76 degrees here, I’m reading _Ecstasy_ by Nicole Jordan, and astonishingly enough, it is not a sex scene! What were the odds of that!
    “I am acquainted with your unsavory reputation, sir! You are a notorious gamester, your mother was an Irish nobody, and it is common knowledge that you murdered your uncle!”

    Reply
  47. Mary Jo, I’m so jealous I could spit!
    It’s 76 degrees here, I’m reading _Ecstasy_ by Nicole Jordan, and astonishingly enough, it is not a sex scene! What were the odds of that!
    “I am acquainted with your unsavory reputation, sir! You are a notorious gamester, your mother was an Irish nobody, and it is common knowledge that you murdered your uncle!”

    Reply
  48. Mary Jo, I’m so jealous I could spit!
    It’s 76 degrees here, I’m reading _Ecstasy_ by Nicole Jordan, and astonishingly enough, it is not a sex scene! What were the odds of that!
    “I am acquainted with your unsavory reputation, sir! You are a notorious gamester, your mother was an Irish nobody, and it is common knowledge that you murdered your uncle!”

    Reply
  49. Mary Jo, I’m so jealous I could spit!
    It’s 76 degrees here, I’m reading _Ecstasy_ by Nicole Jordan, and astonishingly enough, it is not a sex scene! What were the odds of that!
    “I am acquainted with your unsavory reputation, sir! You are a notorious gamester, your mother was an Irish nobody, and it is common knowledge that you murdered your uncle!”

    Reply
  50. Mary Jo, I’m so jealous I could spit!
    It’s 76 degrees here, I’m reading _Ecstasy_ by Nicole Jordan, and astonishingly enough, it is not a sex scene! What were the odds of that!
    “I am acquainted with your unsavory reputation, sir! You are a notorious gamester, your mother was an Irish nobody, and it is common knowledge that you murdered your uncle!”

    Reply
  51. It’s 82 here in the SF Bay Area.
    From page 82 of Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad:
    Rochdale went back inside and poured himself another glass of wine. He tossed it back and congratulated himself on the progress made tonight. That kiss had unnerved her – hell, it had very nearly unnerved *him* – and she was confused. He needed to make the next move before her head cleared. He had devised a plan, too. He knew her weak spot, and his plan would play right into it.

    Reply
  52. It’s 82 here in the SF Bay Area.
    From page 82 of Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad:
    Rochdale went back inside and poured himself another glass of wine. He tossed it back and congratulated himself on the progress made tonight. That kiss had unnerved her – hell, it had very nearly unnerved *him* – and she was confused. He needed to make the next move before her head cleared. He had devised a plan, too. He knew her weak spot, and his plan would play right into it.

    Reply
  53. It’s 82 here in the SF Bay Area.
    From page 82 of Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad:
    Rochdale went back inside and poured himself another glass of wine. He tossed it back and congratulated himself on the progress made tonight. That kiss had unnerved her – hell, it had very nearly unnerved *him* – and she was confused. He needed to make the next move before her head cleared. He had devised a plan, too. He knew her weak spot, and his plan would play right into it.

    Reply
  54. It’s 82 here in the SF Bay Area.
    From page 82 of Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad:
    Rochdale went back inside and poured himself another glass of wine. He tossed it back and congratulated himself on the progress made tonight. That kiss had unnerved her – hell, it had very nearly unnerved *him* – and she was confused. He needed to make the next move before her head cleared. He had devised a plan, too. He knew her weak spot, and his plan would play right into it.

    Reply
  55. It’s 82 here in the SF Bay Area.
    From page 82 of Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad:
    Rochdale went back inside and poured himself another glass of wine. He tossed it back and congratulated himself on the progress made tonight. That kiss had unnerved her – hell, it had very nearly unnerved *him* – and she was confused. He needed to make the next move before her head cleared. He had devised a plan, too. He knew her weak spot, and his plan would play right into it.

    Reply
  56. Jane, I’m also reading Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad! Today I lunched at the coast in Depoe Bay, Oregon. It’s 64 there right now, so here’s a bit from page 64:
    It had been a stroke of pure spontaneous brilliance that had made him set the masquerade ball as the date for collecting his winnings. She had no doubt been tying herself into knots all week, just thinking about it. And he would take pleasure in untying each and every one of them while he kissed her into oblivion.

    Reply
  57. Jane, I’m also reading Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad! Today I lunched at the coast in Depoe Bay, Oregon. It’s 64 there right now, so here’s a bit from page 64:
    It had been a stroke of pure spontaneous brilliance that had made him set the masquerade ball as the date for collecting his winnings. She had no doubt been tying herself into knots all week, just thinking about it. And he would take pleasure in untying each and every one of them while he kissed her into oblivion.

    Reply
  58. Jane, I’m also reading Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad! Today I lunched at the coast in Depoe Bay, Oregon. It’s 64 there right now, so here’s a bit from page 64:
    It had been a stroke of pure spontaneous brilliance that had made him set the masquerade ball as the date for collecting his winnings. She had no doubt been tying herself into knots all week, just thinking about it. And he would take pleasure in untying each and every one of them while he kissed her into oblivion.

    Reply
  59. Jane, I’m also reading Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad! Today I lunched at the coast in Depoe Bay, Oregon. It’s 64 there right now, so here’s a bit from page 64:
    It had been a stroke of pure spontaneous brilliance that had made him set the masquerade ball as the date for collecting his winnings. She had no doubt been tying herself into knots all week, just thinking about it. And he would take pleasure in untying each and every one of them while he kissed her into oblivion.

    Reply
  60. Jane, I’m also reading Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad! Today I lunched at the coast in Depoe Bay, Oregon. It’s 64 there right now, so here’s a bit from page 64:
    It had been a stroke of pure spontaneous brilliance that had made him set the masquerade ball as the date for collecting his winnings. She had no doubt been tying herself into knots all week, just thinking about it. And he would take pleasure in untying each and every one of them while he kissed her into oblivion.

    Reply
  61. It’s not terribly hot here in Victoria, and I’m not actually reading anything substantial at the moment, but I am listening to Dorothy L Sayers Gaudy Night, unabridged, which of course is a romantic one.
    I’m loving the cool white-hot passion in Peter and Harriet’s growing tumult. It’s a brilliant portrait of a mind resisting passion and failing.
    Jo

    Reply
  62. It’s not terribly hot here in Victoria, and I’m not actually reading anything substantial at the moment, but I am listening to Dorothy L Sayers Gaudy Night, unabridged, which of course is a romantic one.
    I’m loving the cool white-hot passion in Peter and Harriet’s growing tumult. It’s a brilliant portrait of a mind resisting passion and failing.
    Jo

    Reply
  63. It’s not terribly hot here in Victoria, and I’m not actually reading anything substantial at the moment, but I am listening to Dorothy L Sayers Gaudy Night, unabridged, which of course is a romantic one.
    I’m loving the cool white-hot passion in Peter and Harriet’s growing tumult. It’s a brilliant portrait of a mind resisting passion and failing.
    Jo

    Reply
  64. It’s not terribly hot here in Victoria, and I’m not actually reading anything substantial at the moment, but I am listening to Dorothy L Sayers Gaudy Night, unabridged, which of course is a romantic one.
    I’m loving the cool white-hot passion in Peter and Harriet’s growing tumult. It’s a brilliant portrait of a mind resisting passion and failing.
    Jo

    Reply
  65. It’s not terribly hot here in Victoria, and I’m not actually reading anything substantial at the moment, but I am listening to Dorothy L Sayers Gaudy Night, unabridged, which of course is a romantic one.
    I’m loving the cool white-hot passion in Peter and Harriet’s growing tumult. It’s a brilliant portrait of a mind resisting passion and failing.
    Jo

    Reply
  66. I LOVE the Wimsey/Vane series – have you read the Jill Paton Walsh ‘sequels’? The most recent, “A Presumption of Death” is better, I think, than “Thrones, Dominations”? I re-read them all the time…and I love the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walter Video too…. the BBC did a good job on that….
    Left my book at home. Will participate tonight. (-;

    Reply
  67. I LOVE the Wimsey/Vane series – have you read the Jill Paton Walsh ‘sequels’? The most recent, “A Presumption of Death” is better, I think, than “Thrones, Dominations”? I re-read them all the time…and I love the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walter Video too…. the BBC did a good job on that….
    Left my book at home. Will participate tonight. (-;

    Reply
  68. I LOVE the Wimsey/Vane series – have you read the Jill Paton Walsh ‘sequels’? The most recent, “A Presumption of Death” is better, I think, than “Thrones, Dominations”? I re-read them all the time…and I love the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walter Video too…. the BBC did a good job on that….
    Left my book at home. Will participate tonight. (-;

    Reply
  69. I LOVE the Wimsey/Vane series – have you read the Jill Paton Walsh ‘sequels’? The most recent, “A Presumption of Death” is better, I think, than “Thrones, Dominations”? I re-read them all the time…and I love the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walter Video too…. the BBC did a good job on that….
    Left my book at home. Will participate tonight. (-;

    Reply
  70. I LOVE the Wimsey/Vane series – have you read the Jill Paton Walsh ‘sequels’? The most recent, “A Presumption of Death” is better, I think, than “Thrones, Dominations”? I re-read them all the time…and I love the Edward Petherbridge/Harriet Walter Video too…. the BBC did a good job on that….
    Left my book at home. Will participate tonight. (-;

    Reply
  71. I, too, am sweltering outside Baltimore, where it is 86 and muggy at 6:30 p.m.! :>( So here is something from Connie Willis, _To Say Nothing of the Dog_ (not exactly the genre, but a hilarious book by a great author). The speaker is an Oxford don, circa 1888:
    “One of my pupils, Tuttle Minor, told me he’d seen a white gudgeon just here along the bank [of the Thames] while practicing for the Eights. Nice boy, wretched recitations and worse penmanship, but very sound on fish.”
    The quote doesn’t do the book justice, but I highly recommend it!

    Reply
  72. I, too, am sweltering outside Baltimore, where it is 86 and muggy at 6:30 p.m.! :>( So here is something from Connie Willis, _To Say Nothing of the Dog_ (not exactly the genre, but a hilarious book by a great author). The speaker is an Oxford don, circa 1888:
    “One of my pupils, Tuttle Minor, told me he’d seen a white gudgeon just here along the bank [of the Thames] while practicing for the Eights. Nice boy, wretched recitations and worse penmanship, but very sound on fish.”
    The quote doesn’t do the book justice, but I highly recommend it!

    Reply
  73. I, too, am sweltering outside Baltimore, where it is 86 and muggy at 6:30 p.m.! :>( So here is something from Connie Willis, _To Say Nothing of the Dog_ (not exactly the genre, but a hilarious book by a great author). The speaker is an Oxford don, circa 1888:
    “One of my pupils, Tuttle Minor, told me he’d seen a white gudgeon just here along the bank [of the Thames] while practicing for the Eights. Nice boy, wretched recitations and worse penmanship, but very sound on fish.”
    The quote doesn’t do the book justice, but I highly recommend it!

    Reply
  74. I, too, am sweltering outside Baltimore, where it is 86 and muggy at 6:30 p.m.! :>( So here is something from Connie Willis, _To Say Nothing of the Dog_ (not exactly the genre, but a hilarious book by a great author). The speaker is an Oxford don, circa 1888:
    “One of my pupils, Tuttle Minor, told me he’d seen a white gudgeon just here along the bank [of the Thames] while practicing for the Eights. Nice boy, wretched recitations and worse penmanship, but very sound on fish.”
    The quote doesn’t do the book justice, but I highly recommend it!

    Reply
  75. I, too, am sweltering outside Baltimore, where it is 86 and muggy at 6:30 p.m.! :>( So here is something from Connie Willis, _To Say Nothing of the Dog_ (not exactly the genre, but a hilarious book by a great author). The speaker is an Oxford don, circa 1888:
    “One of my pupils, Tuttle Minor, told me he’d seen a white gudgeon just here along the bank [of the Thames] while practicing for the Eights. Nice boy, wretched recitations and worse penmanship, but very sound on fish.”
    The quote doesn’t do the book justice, but I highly recommend it!

    Reply
  76. It’s 74 degrees–at 10pm! I am doing work reading, as my blog whimpers, specifically Christopher Hibbert’s Venice: The Biography of a City. From page 74: “…in March 1513 it was announced that Venice and France had signed a treaty whereby each would come to the other’s help against any enemies that moved against either of them. These hypothetical enemies, it was made clear, included the Pope.”

    Reply
  77. It’s 74 degrees–at 10pm! I am doing work reading, as my blog whimpers, specifically Christopher Hibbert’s Venice: The Biography of a City. From page 74: “…in March 1513 it was announced that Venice and France had signed a treaty whereby each would come to the other’s help against any enemies that moved against either of them. These hypothetical enemies, it was made clear, included the Pope.”

    Reply
  78. It’s 74 degrees–at 10pm! I am doing work reading, as my blog whimpers, specifically Christopher Hibbert’s Venice: The Biography of a City. From page 74: “…in March 1513 it was announced that Venice and France had signed a treaty whereby each would come to the other’s help against any enemies that moved against either of them. These hypothetical enemies, it was made clear, included the Pope.”

    Reply
  79. It’s 74 degrees–at 10pm! I am doing work reading, as my blog whimpers, specifically Christopher Hibbert’s Venice: The Biography of a City. From page 74: “…in March 1513 it was announced that Venice and France had signed a treaty whereby each would come to the other’s help against any enemies that moved against either of them. These hypothetical enemies, it was made clear, included the Pope.”

    Reply
  80. It’s 74 degrees–at 10pm! I am doing work reading, as my blog whimpers, specifically Christopher Hibbert’s Venice: The Biography of a City. From page 74: “…in March 1513 it was announced that Venice and France had signed a treaty whereby each would come to the other’s help against any enemies that moved against either of them. These hypothetical enemies, it was made clear, included the Pope.”

    Reply
  81. Ok then….since it’s 2:30 am and no sleep, it’s re-reading favourites time…
    I’m reading Jo’s Three Heroes and it’s 88 degrees here (not kidding) and about to rain, I hope. (Oh – sorry – The Demon’s Mistress – first in the collection).
    “She did weep, though she did not mean to, wept deeply in his arms, against the devil on his naked chest, because gentleness, she found, went deeper into the soul than hard passion, and the thought of its loss was like ripping roots from her heart.”
    (Maria, still refusing to marry Van because of their age difference, despite loving him….or perhaps because of loving him. Misguided of course, but noble in intention.) Got to go – have to finish readinbg this to see how he overcomes the resistance. I should remember but I don’t, of course.

    Reply
  82. Ok then….since it’s 2:30 am and no sleep, it’s re-reading favourites time…
    I’m reading Jo’s Three Heroes and it’s 88 degrees here (not kidding) and about to rain, I hope. (Oh – sorry – The Demon’s Mistress – first in the collection).
    “She did weep, though she did not mean to, wept deeply in his arms, against the devil on his naked chest, because gentleness, she found, went deeper into the soul than hard passion, and the thought of its loss was like ripping roots from her heart.”
    (Maria, still refusing to marry Van because of their age difference, despite loving him….or perhaps because of loving him. Misguided of course, but noble in intention.) Got to go – have to finish readinbg this to see how he overcomes the resistance. I should remember but I don’t, of course.

    Reply
  83. Ok then….since it’s 2:30 am and no sleep, it’s re-reading favourites time…
    I’m reading Jo’s Three Heroes and it’s 88 degrees here (not kidding) and about to rain, I hope. (Oh – sorry – The Demon’s Mistress – first in the collection).
    “She did weep, though she did not mean to, wept deeply in his arms, against the devil on his naked chest, because gentleness, she found, went deeper into the soul than hard passion, and the thought of its loss was like ripping roots from her heart.”
    (Maria, still refusing to marry Van because of their age difference, despite loving him….or perhaps because of loving him. Misguided of course, but noble in intention.) Got to go – have to finish readinbg this to see how he overcomes the resistance. I should remember but I don’t, of course.

    Reply
  84. Ok then….since it’s 2:30 am and no sleep, it’s re-reading favourites time…
    I’m reading Jo’s Three Heroes and it’s 88 degrees here (not kidding) and about to rain, I hope. (Oh – sorry – The Demon’s Mistress – first in the collection).
    “She did weep, though she did not mean to, wept deeply in his arms, against the devil on his naked chest, because gentleness, she found, went deeper into the soul than hard passion, and the thought of its loss was like ripping roots from her heart.”
    (Maria, still refusing to marry Van because of their age difference, despite loving him….or perhaps because of loving him. Misguided of course, but noble in intention.) Got to go – have to finish readinbg this to see how he overcomes the resistance. I should remember but I don’t, of course.

    Reply
  85. Ok then….since it’s 2:30 am and no sleep, it’s re-reading favourites time…
    I’m reading Jo’s Three Heroes and it’s 88 degrees here (not kidding) and about to rain, I hope. (Oh – sorry – The Demon’s Mistress – first in the collection).
    “She did weep, though she did not mean to, wept deeply in his arms, against the devil on his naked chest, because gentleness, she found, went deeper into the soul than hard passion, and the thought of its loss was like ripping roots from her heart.”
    (Maria, still refusing to marry Van because of their age difference, despite loving him….or perhaps because of loving him. Misguided of course, but noble in intention.) Got to go – have to finish readinbg this to see how he overcomes the resistance. I should remember but I don’t, of course.

    Reply
  86. I have fallen in the crack between books, but the next one promises much…
    “I returned from the City about three o’clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life […] The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me sick, I couldn’t get enough exercise, and the amusements of London seemed as flat as soda-water.”
    “The Thirty-nine Steps” by John Buchan. p.1

    Reply
  87. I have fallen in the crack between books, but the next one promises much…
    “I returned from the City about three o’clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life […] The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me sick, I couldn’t get enough exercise, and the amusements of London seemed as flat as soda-water.”
    “The Thirty-nine Steps” by John Buchan. p.1

    Reply
  88. I have fallen in the crack between books, but the next one promises much…
    “I returned from the City about three o’clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life […] The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me sick, I couldn’t get enough exercise, and the amusements of London seemed as flat as soda-water.”
    “The Thirty-nine Steps” by John Buchan. p.1

    Reply
  89. I have fallen in the crack between books, but the next one promises much…
    “I returned from the City about three o’clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life […] The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me sick, I couldn’t get enough exercise, and the amusements of London seemed as flat as soda-water.”
    “The Thirty-nine Steps” by John Buchan. p.1

    Reply
  90. I have fallen in the crack between books, but the next one promises much…
    “I returned from the City about three o’clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life […] The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me sick, I couldn’t get enough exercise, and the amusements of London seemed as flat as soda-water.”
    “The Thirty-nine Steps” by John Buchan. p.1

    Reply

Leave a Comment