Summer Lockdown Playhouse

Pimpernel poster By Mary Jo

In a summer where most of us have not been getting out as much as usual, I decided it would be fun to dig out older movies we've enjoyed watching on Saturday nights.  In the nature of things, many have had historical setting because, not surprisingly I like historical movies. (Most of what we've seen has been DVDs, which I consider a more reliable technology than streaming, which is fine when it works–until it doesn't.)

So the first we watched was The Scarlet Pimpernel, a great romantic adventure story. It's been filmed several times, but the version I love (and own) is the 1982 film starring Anthony Andrews and Jane Seymour.  Andrews plays Sir Percy Blakeney, a fop by day and a rescuer of French aristocrats from the guillotine.  He's a Georgian super hero, brilliant, Sneaky, gorgeous, and a passionately in love with his wife, the French actress Marguerite St. Just, whom he can no longer trust.

Marguerite is played by Jane Seymour, who is also gorgeous and baffled by why her doting husband has turned cold. This version diverges in some ways from Baroness Orczy's books, and I don't care.  <G> It's rousing a great fun.

BONUS: did I mention that Anthony Andrews and Jane Seymour are both gorgeous? 

As a side note, the easiest way to tell when a movie was made is by the hair styles of the women.  Jane Seymour has a lot of '80s hair!

Joseph_fiennes_shakespeare_in-_loveAnother historical movie I love is Shakespeare in Love, (1998) which I consider the Shakespeare_in_Love_1998_Posterperfect English major's movie. (And indeed, I was an English major. <G>)  A somewhat neurotic young Will Shakespeare is played by Joseph Fiennes.  Gwyneth Paltrow plays Viola de Lesseps, a stage struck young woman of good birth.  At the time (1593) it was illegal for women to appear on a stage, so she disguises herself as a young man and wins the part of Juliet in the new play Shakespeare has written, which is fumbling its way to being produced. 

Will and Viola have a brief passionate affair which has no future.  The mistaken identities and cross dressing and misunderstandings are typical of Shakespearean comedies, and the writing is very witty, full of writer and theater jokes.  The movie won masses of awards, including 7 Oscars, and is funny, clever, and romantic.  The ending is not a traditional HEA, but is satisfying.

BONUS: Judi Dench as Queen Elizabeth the Great! (She won an Oscar in the role.)

Amazinggrace--larger posterA particularly favorite historical movie of mine is Amazing Grace (2006), the story of William Wilberforce, the British reformer and politician who spent decades fighting in Parliament in eventually successful effort to ban the slave trade. 

One reason I like the movie so much is the accuracy of the history, which I know because I researched it for one of my historicals, A Distant Magic (currently out of print, but an ebook version will be coming.)  A Distant Magic is built around the 18th Century British abolition movement and included many of the same historical figures.

BONUSES: Three gorgeous actors: Ioan Gruffudd as Wilberforce, Rufus Sewell as the enormously important Amazing Grace another posterClarkson, and Benedict Cumberbatch as Wilberforce's friend and ally, Prime Minister William Pitt!.  There is also the charming romance of Wilberforce and his future wife, Barbara Spooner.

Chariots-of-fire--large posterAnother favorite was Chariots of Fire, inspired by the true stories of two British athletes competing in the 1924 Olympics, which were held in Paris.  Scottish missionary Eric Liddell born in China and intends to return to China to take up missionary work, but as one line in the movie says, "God made me for a purpose and that purpose is China, but he also made me fast!."  The other lead character is Harold Abrahams, a Jewish anomaly in the lily white precincts of Cambridge, but he's a talented and determined athlete who runs as a way to combat prejudice.  Some liberties are taken with the facts, but the overall story is true and very entertaining.

BONUS: The Oscar winning musical score by Vangelis. The opening scene of the movie shows a group of athletes in training along a beach and the thrumming beat of the music is stunning.

Chariots running

Sister Act PosterWe also watched again two blockbuster comedies that would be considered contemporary except that they're now old enough to be almost historical. <G>  Beverly Hills Cop (1984) is a comedy adventure that instantly made Eddie Murphy an international star because of his versatile brilliance.  

Sister Act (1992) stars Whoopi Goldberg as a Reno lounge singer who witnesses a mob hit and is placed in a San Francisco convent for protection.  The movie is hilarious as Whoopi first horrifies, than transforms the convent through music.

BONUS: the music is great!

I believe all of these movies have trailers on youtube.com, and are available as DVDs or for some of them, streaming services.

Have you enjoyed any of these oldies but goodies? Or would you like to suggest some of your old favorites?

Happy watching!

Mary Jo

195 thoughts on “Summer Lockdown Playhouse”

  1. As I have mentioned before, onn genreal movies aren’t my thing. But I like a Scarlet Pimpernel (I’m not sure it is the same version) and I remember Amazing Grace with fondness; I also own and frequently reread A Distant Magic.

    Reply
  2. As I have mentioned before, onn genreal movies aren’t my thing. But I like a Scarlet Pimpernel (I’m not sure it is the same version) and I remember Amazing Grace with fondness; I also own and frequently reread A Distant Magic.

    Reply
  3. As I have mentioned before, onn genreal movies aren’t my thing. But I like a Scarlet Pimpernel (I’m not sure it is the same version) and I remember Amazing Grace with fondness; I also own and frequently reread A Distant Magic.

    Reply
  4. As I have mentioned before, onn genreal movies aren’t my thing. But I like a Scarlet Pimpernel (I’m not sure it is the same version) and I remember Amazing Grace with fondness; I also own and frequently reread A Distant Magic.

    Reply
  5. As I have mentioned before, onn genreal movies aren’t my thing. But I like a Scarlet Pimpernel (I’m not sure it is the same version) and I remember Amazing Grace with fondness; I also own and frequently reread A Distant Magic.

    Reply
  6. I love old movies. There are so many that I enjoy, that it is had to pick favorites. Singin In The Rain, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Meet Me In St. Louis, Christmas Story – are just a few.
    I especially love movies from the 30s – not sure why – I just do. My favorite from that era is 42nd Street. Fun post.

    Reply
  7. I love old movies. There are so many that I enjoy, that it is had to pick favorites. Singin In The Rain, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Meet Me In St. Louis, Christmas Story – are just a few.
    I especially love movies from the 30s – not sure why – I just do. My favorite from that era is 42nd Street. Fun post.

    Reply
  8. I love old movies. There are so many that I enjoy, that it is had to pick favorites. Singin In The Rain, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Meet Me In St. Louis, Christmas Story – are just a few.
    I especially love movies from the 30s – not sure why – I just do. My favorite from that era is 42nd Street. Fun post.

    Reply
  9. I love old movies. There are so many that I enjoy, that it is had to pick favorites. Singin In The Rain, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Meet Me In St. Louis, Christmas Story – are just a few.
    I especially love movies from the 30s – not sure why – I just do. My favorite from that era is 42nd Street. Fun post.

    Reply
  10. I love old movies. There are so many that I enjoy, that it is had to pick favorites. Singin In The Rain, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Meet Me In St. Louis, Christmas Story – are just a few.
    I especially love movies from the 30s – not sure why – I just do. My favorite from that era is 42nd Street. Fun post.

    Reply
  11. Wonderful choices. I’ve been debating on getting a streaming service (like I need another one) to see Scarlett Pimpernel. Fortunately my schedule is filled with English gardens, something one can do without undue worry.

    Reply
  12. Wonderful choices. I’ve been debating on getting a streaming service (like I need another one) to see Scarlett Pimpernel. Fortunately my schedule is filled with English gardens, something one can do without undue worry.

    Reply
  13. Wonderful choices. I’ve been debating on getting a streaming service (like I need another one) to see Scarlett Pimpernel. Fortunately my schedule is filled with English gardens, something one can do without undue worry.

    Reply
  14. Wonderful choices. I’ve been debating on getting a streaming service (like I need another one) to see Scarlett Pimpernel. Fortunately my schedule is filled with English gardens, something one can do without undue worry.

    Reply
  15. Wonderful choices. I’ve been debating on getting a streaming service (like I need another one) to see Scarlett Pimpernel. Fortunately my schedule is filled with English gardens, something one can do without undue worry.

    Reply
  16. Old movies are pretty much the only ones I watch these days. My favorite Pimpernel is the older one, with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. (She was so beautiful.)

    Reply
  17. Old movies are pretty much the only ones I watch these days. My favorite Pimpernel is the older one, with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. (She was so beautiful.)

    Reply
  18. Old movies are pretty much the only ones I watch these days. My favorite Pimpernel is the older one, with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. (She was so beautiful.)

    Reply
  19. Old movies are pretty much the only ones I watch these days. My favorite Pimpernel is the older one, with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. (She was so beautiful.)

    Reply
  20. Old movies are pretty much the only ones I watch these days. My favorite Pimpernel is the older one, with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. (She was so beautiful.)

    Reply
  21. I love old movies. A lot of people hate black and white movies, but if they are good enough, you don’t miss the color.
    I love the clothes and the general luxury of Astaire/Rogers’ movies, especially “Shall We Dance.” “Notorious,” with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, is Hitchcock’s most romantic movie with a ending that is straight out of a romance novel. If you haven’t seen the divine Cary Grant in “North by Northwest,” you are missing out. Hepburn and Tracy are perfect in “The African Queen.” If you want a warm family movie (not realistic, but wonderful), “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” will leave a smile on your face. My all-time favorite movie with a great, great romance and a riveting plot is “On the Waterfront” with the legendary Marlon Brando. If you want a stylish farce about a naive man (Henry Fonda) who falls for a con woman (Barbara Stanwyck), “The Lady Eve” is a classic. (Look at the previews first. Either you love it–as I do–or you don’t.) If I had to award the most touching romance, it would go to 1935’s “A Tale of Two Cities,” the best adaption of Dickens’ novel, IMO.

    Reply
  22. I love old movies. A lot of people hate black and white movies, but if they are good enough, you don’t miss the color.
    I love the clothes and the general luxury of Astaire/Rogers’ movies, especially “Shall We Dance.” “Notorious,” with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, is Hitchcock’s most romantic movie with a ending that is straight out of a romance novel. If you haven’t seen the divine Cary Grant in “North by Northwest,” you are missing out. Hepburn and Tracy are perfect in “The African Queen.” If you want a warm family movie (not realistic, but wonderful), “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” will leave a smile on your face. My all-time favorite movie with a great, great romance and a riveting plot is “On the Waterfront” with the legendary Marlon Brando. If you want a stylish farce about a naive man (Henry Fonda) who falls for a con woman (Barbara Stanwyck), “The Lady Eve” is a classic. (Look at the previews first. Either you love it–as I do–or you don’t.) If I had to award the most touching romance, it would go to 1935’s “A Tale of Two Cities,” the best adaption of Dickens’ novel, IMO.

    Reply
  23. I love old movies. A lot of people hate black and white movies, but if they are good enough, you don’t miss the color.
    I love the clothes and the general luxury of Astaire/Rogers’ movies, especially “Shall We Dance.” “Notorious,” with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, is Hitchcock’s most romantic movie with a ending that is straight out of a romance novel. If you haven’t seen the divine Cary Grant in “North by Northwest,” you are missing out. Hepburn and Tracy are perfect in “The African Queen.” If you want a warm family movie (not realistic, but wonderful), “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” will leave a smile on your face. My all-time favorite movie with a great, great romance and a riveting plot is “On the Waterfront” with the legendary Marlon Brando. If you want a stylish farce about a naive man (Henry Fonda) who falls for a con woman (Barbara Stanwyck), “The Lady Eve” is a classic. (Look at the previews first. Either you love it–as I do–or you don’t.) If I had to award the most touching romance, it would go to 1935’s “A Tale of Two Cities,” the best adaption of Dickens’ novel, IMO.

    Reply
  24. I love old movies. A lot of people hate black and white movies, but if they are good enough, you don’t miss the color.
    I love the clothes and the general luxury of Astaire/Rogers’ movies, especially “Shall We Dance.” “Notorious,” with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, is Hitchcock’s most romantic movie with a ending that is straight out of a romance novel. If you haven’t seen the divine Cary Grant in “North by Northwest,” you are missing out. Hepburn and Tracy are perfect in “The African Queen.” If you want a warm family movie (not realistic, but wonderful), “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” will leave a smile on your face. My all-time favorite movie with a great, great romance and a riveting plot is “On the Waterfront” with the legendary Marlon Brando. If you want a stylish farce about a naive man (Henry Fonda) who falls for a con woman (Barbara Stanwyck), “The Lady Eve” is a classic. (Look at the previews first. Either you love it–as I do–or you don’t.) If I had to award the most touching romance, it would go to 1935’s “A Tale of Two Cities,” the best adaption of Dickens’ novel, IMO.

    Reply
  25. I love old movies. A lot of people hate black and white movies, but if they are good enough, you don’t miss the color.
    I love the clothes and the general luxury of Astaire/Rogers’ movies, especially “Shall We Dance.” “Notorious,” with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, is Hitchcock’s most romantic movie with a ending that is straight out of a romance novel. If you haven’t seen the divine Cary Grant in “North by Northwest,” you are missing out. Hepburn and Tracy are perfect in “The African Queen.” If you want a warm family movie (not realistic, but wonderful), “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” will leave a smile on your face. My all-time favorite movie with a great, great romance and a riveting plot is “On the Waterfront” with the legendary Marlon Brando. If you want a stylish farce about a naive man (Henry Fonda) who falls for a con woman (Barbara Stanwyck), “The Lady Eve” is a classic. (Look at the previews first. Either you love it–as I do–or you don’t.) If I had to award the most touching romance, it would go to 1935’s “A Tale of Two Cities,” the best adaption of Dickens’ novel, IMO.

    Reply
  26. I’m not generally a movie watcher, but nonetheless I enjoyed your post, Mary Jo. My father recommended the book, The Scarlet Pimpernel, to me when I was a teen and I quite enjoyed it. In due time, I recommended it to my teen daughter who so enjoyed it that she went on to read half a dozen sequels that I hadn’t known existed!
    The most recent movie I’ve seen is Yesterday starring Himesh Patel; I quite liked it.

    Reply
  27. I’m not generally a movie watcher, but nonetheless I enjoyed your post, Mary Jo. My father recommended the book, The Scarlet Pimpernel, to me when I was a teen and I quite enjoyed it. In due time, I recommended it to my teen daughter who so enjoyed it that she went on to read half a dozen sequels that I hadn’t known existed!
    The most recent movie I’ve seen is Yesterday starring Himesh Patel; I quite liked it.

    Reply
  28. I’m not generally a movie watcher, but nonetheless I enjoyed your post, Mary Jo. My father recommended the book, The Scarlet Pimpernel, to me when I was a teen and I quite enjoyed it. In due time, I recommended it to my teen daughter who so enjoyed it that she went on to read half a dozen sequels that I hadn’t known existed!
    The most recent movie I’ve seen is Yesterday starring Himesh Patel; I quite liked it.

    Reply
  29. I’m not generally a movie watcher, but nonetheless I enjoyed your post, Mary Jo. My father recommended the book, The Scarlet Pimpernel, to me when I was a teen and I quite enjoyed it. In due time, I recommended it to my teen daughter who so enjoyed it that she went on to read half a dozen sequels that I hadn’t known existed!
    The most recent movie I’ve seen is Yesterday starring Himesh Patel; I quite liked it.

    Reply
  30. I’m not generally a movie watcher, but nonetheless I enjoyed your post, Mary Jo. My father recommended the book, The Scarlet Pimpernel, to me when I was a teen and I quite enjoyed it. In due time, I recommended it to my teen daughter who so enjoyed it that she went on to read half a dozen sequels that I hadn’t known existed!
    The most recent movie I’ve seen is Yesterday starring Himesh Patel; I quite liked it.

    Reply
  31. “Yesterday” was such a lovely film. After I saw it I told people that it wasn’t a musical but had lots of great music, wasn’t a romance but had a love story within it, and wasn’t really SF/F but had a magical event that set the plot in motion. Highly recommended.

    Reply
  32. “Yesterday” was such a lovely film. After I saw it I told people that it wasn’t a musical but had lots of great music, wasn’t a romance but had a love story within it, and wasn’t really SF/F but had a magical event that set the plot in motion. Highly recommended.

    Reply
  33. “Yesterday” was such a lovely film. After I saw it I told people that it wasn’t a musical but had lots of great music, wasn’t a romance but had a love story within it, and wasn’t really SF/F but had a magical event that set the plot in motion. Highly recommended.

    Reply
  34. “Yesterday” was such a lovely film. After I saw it I told people that it wasn’t a musical but had lots of great music, wasn’t a romance but had a love story within it, and wasn’t really SF/F but had a magical event that set the plot in motion. Highly recommended.

    Reply
  35. “Yesterday” was such a lovely film. After I saw it I told people that it wasn’t a musical but had lots of great music, wasn’t a romance but had a love story within it, and wasn’t really SF/F but had a magical event that set the plot in motion. Highly recommended.

    Reply
  36. Kareni, how nice that the Pimpernel has become a family tradition! Yes, there are sequels. (Orczy knew which side her bread was buttered on. *G*) The Andrews/Seymour movie apparently incorporated some of the second book, ELDORADO.

    Reply
  37. Kareni, how nice that the Pimpernel has become a family tradition! Yes, there are sequels. (Orczy knew which side her bread was buttered on. *G*) The Andrews/Seymour movie apparently incorporated some of the second book, ELDORADO.

    Reply
  38. Kareni, how nice that the Pimpernel has become a family tradition! Yes, there are sequels. (Orczy knew which side her bread was buttered on. *G*) The Andrews/Seymour movie apparently incorporated some of the second book, ELDORADO.

    Reply
  39. Kareni, how nice that the Pimpernel has become a family tradition! Yes, there are sequels. (Orczy knew which side her bread was buttered on. *G*) The Andrews/Seymour movie apparently incorporated some of the second book, ELDORADO.

    Reply
  40. Kareni, how nice that the Pimpernel has become a family tradition! Yes, there are sequels. (Orczy knew which side her bread was buttered on. *G*) The Andrews/Seymour movie apparently incorporated some of the second book, ELDORADO.

    Reply
  41. I’ve seen and enjoyed all these movies except the first one. Thanks for the tip about Amazon Prime. I will head over there to watch it. I’d have to include all the Jane Austen films. And Tom Jones with Albert Finney!

    Reply
  42. I’ve seen and enjoyed all these movies except the first one. Thanks for the tip about Amazon Prime. I will head over there to watch it. I’d have to include all the Jane Austen films. And Tom Jones with Albert Finney!

    Reply
  43. I’ve seen and enjoyed all these movies except the first one. Thanks for the tip about Amazon Prime. I will head over there to watch it. I’d have to include all the Jane Austen films. And Tom Jones with Albert Finney!

    Reply
  44. I’ve seen and enjoyed all these movies except the first one. Thanks for the tip about Amazon Prime. I will head over there to watch it. I’d have to include all the Jane Austen films. And Tom Jones with Albert Finney!

    Reply
  45. I’ve seen and enjoyed all these movies except the first one. Thanks for the tip about Amazon Prime. I will head over there to watch it. I’d have to include all the Jane Austen films. And Tom Jones with Albert Finney!

    Reply
  46. Mary Jo – great fun! I haven’t seen all of the movies you mentioned, but I have seen a few. I LOVED the Jane Seymour/Anthony Andrews Scarlet Pimpernel. I read the book long before I saw the movie,and I also don’t care if they matched. And yes, they were both gorgeous. Great hair. Great accents. I thought Sister Act was great. Saw it multiple times. I may have to have a movie night with some of your other exemplars. Although I might want to add in Jane Eyre, Pride And Prejudice (Colin firth) and Ladyhawke. Happy viewing, everyone!

    Reply
  47. Mary Jo – great fun! I haven’t seen all of the movies you mentioned, but I have seen a few. I LOVED the Jane Seymour/Anthony Andrews Scarlet Pimpernel. I read the book long before I saw the movie,and I also don’t care if they matched. And yes, they were both gorgeous. Great hair. Great accents. I thought Sister Act was great. Saw it multiple times. I may have to have a movie night with some of your other exemplars. Although I might want to add in Jane Eyre, Pride And Prejudice (Colin firth) and Ladyhawke. Happy viewing, everyone!

    Reply
  48. Mary Jo – great fun! I haven’t seen all of the movies you mentioned, but I have seen a few. I LOVED the Jane Seymour/Anthony Andrews Scarlet Pimpernel. I read the book long before I saw the movie,and I also don’t care if they matched. And yes, they were both gorgeous. Great hair. Great accents. I thought Sister Act was great. Saw it multiple times. I may have to have a movie night with some of your other exemplars. Although I might want to add in Jane Eyre, Pride And Prejudice (Colin firth) and Ladyhawke. Happy viewing, everyone!

    Reply
  49. Mary Jo – great fun! I haven’t seen all of the movies you mentioned, but I have seen a few. I LOVED the Jane Seymour/Anthony Andrews Scarlet Pimpernel. I read the book long before I saw the movie,and I also don’t care if they matched. And yes, they were both gorgeous. Great hair. Great accents. I thought Sister Act was great. Saw it multiple times. I may have to have a movie night with some of your other exemplars. Although I might want to add in Jane Eyre, Pride And Prejudice (Colin firth) and Ladyhawke. Happy viewing, everyone!

    Reply
  50. Mary Jo – great fun! I haven’t seen all of the movies you mentioned, but I have seen a few. I LOVED the Jane Seymour/Anthony Andrews Scarlet Pimpernel. I read the book long before I saw the movie,and I also don’t care if they matched. And yes, they were both gorgeous. Great hair. Great accents. I thought Sister Act was great. Saw it multiple times. I may have to have a movie night with some of your other exemplars. Although I might want to add in Jane Eyre, Pride And Prejudice (Colin firth) and Ladyhawke. Happy viewing, everyone!

    Reply
  51. I’ve spent time this summer escaping by watching black and white film noir movies from the 1930s on – especially the 1950s, when all we had to worry about was atomic war. I like their sense of right and wrong; how ordinary people get sucked in over their heads; who gets sucked under, who defeats his/her circumstances, who’s just a bystander. The styles I hated then look wonderful in fuzzy black and white. The actors are wonderful – not afraid not to look perfect. The cities look livable. People are talking with each other instead of to devices in their hands. Everybody smokes and drinks as if there were no tomorrow. The marks left on them by two world wars and the Great Depression show. I always did love a good morality play.
    In that same mood I have been reading some 18th and 19th century classics that I never got around to before and finding them restful yet engrossing as well. The Old Manor House, War & Peace, Helen – that sort of thing. I’ve been rereading or listening to a lot of Georgette Heyer and Marion Chesney as well, also for that sense of another time and place.
    I’m still listening to the news, wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, checking on people, all that stuff, and like everybody else, waiting for all this to calm down and be over with.

    Reply
  52. I’ve spent time this summer escaping by watching black and white film noir movies from the 1930s on – especially the 1950s, when all we had to worry about was atomic war. I like their sense of right and wrong; how ordinary people get sucked in over their heads; who gets sucked under, who defeats his/her circumstances, who’s just a bystander. The styles I hated then look wonderful in fuzzy black and white. The actors are wonderful – not afraid not to look perfect. The cities look livable. People are talking with each other instead of to devices in their hands. Everybody smokes and drinks as if there were no tomorrow. The marks left on them by two world wars and the Great Depression show. I always did love a good morality play.
    In that same mood I have been reading some 18th and 19th century classics that I never got around to before and finding them restful yet engrossing as well. The Old Manor House, War & Peace, Helen – that sort of thing. I’ve been rereading or listening to a lot of Georgette Heyer and Marion Chesney as well, also for that sense of another time and place.
    I’m still listening to the news, wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, checking on people, all that stuff, and like everybody else, waiting for all this to calm down and be over with.

    Reply
  53. I’ve spent time this summer escaping by watching black and white film noir movies from the 1930s on – especially the 1950s, when all we had to worry about was atomic war. I like their sense of right and wrong; how ordinary people get sucked in over their heads; who gets sucked under, who defeats his/her circumstances, who’s just a bystander. The styles I hated then look wonderful in fuzzy black and white. The actors are wonderful – not afraid not to look perfect. The cities look livable. People are talking with each other instead of to devices in their hands. Everybody smokes and drinks as if there were no tomorrow. The marks left on them by two world wars and the Great Depression show. I always did love a good morality play.
    In that same mood I have been reading some 18th and 19th century classics that I never got around to before and finding them restful yet engrossing as well. The Old Manor House, War & Peace, Helen – that sort of thing. I’ve been rereading or listening to a lot of Georgette Heyer and Marion Chesney as well, also for that sense of another time and place.
    I’m still listening to the news, wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, checking on people, all that stuff, and like everybody else, waiting for all this to calm down and be over with.

    Reply
  54. I’ve spent time this summer escaping by watching black and white film noir movies from the 1930s on – especially the 1950s, when all we had to worry about was atomic war. I like their sense of right and wrong; how ordinary people get sucked in over their heads; who gets sucked under, who defeats his/her circumstances, who’s just a bystander. The styles I hated then look wonderful in fuzzy black and white. The actors are wonderful – not afraid not to look perfect. The cities look livable. People are talking with each other instead of to devices in their hands. Everybody smokes and drinks as if there were no tomorrow. The marks left on them by two world wars and the Great Depression show. I always did love a good morality play.
    In that same mood I have been reading some 18th and 19th century classics that I never got around to before and finding them restful yet engrossing as well. The Old Manor House, War & Peace, Helen – that sort of thing. I’ve been rereading or listening to a lot of Georgette Heyer and Marion Chesney as well, also for that sense of another time and place.
    I’m still listening to the news, wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, checking on people, all that stuff, and like everybody else, waiting for all this to calm down and be over with.

    Reply
  55. I’ve spent time this summer escaping by watching black and white film noir movies from the 1930s on – especially the 1950s, when all we had to worry about was atomic war. I like their sense of right and wrong; how ordinary people get sucked in over their heads; who gets sucked under, who defeats his/her circumstances, who’s just a bystander. The styles I hated then look wonderful in fuzzy black and white. The actors are wonderful – not afraid not to look perfect. The cities look livable. People are talking with each other instead of to devices in their hands. Everybody smokes and drinks as if there were no tomorrow. The marks left on them by two world wars and the Great Depression show. I always did love a good morality play.
    In that same mood I have been reading some 18th and 19th century classics that I never got around to before and finding them restful yet engrossing as well. The Old Manor House, War & Peace, Helen – that sort of thing. I’ve been rereading or listening to a lot of Georgette Heyer and Marion Chesney as well, also for that sense of another time and place.
    I’m still listening to the news, wearing a mask, avoiding crowds, checking on people, all that stuff, and like everybody else, waiting for all this to calm down and be over with.

    Reply
  56. Mary T: I don’t rememver 42nd Street as a movie; I was privileged to see it on the stage in New York city (probably in 1980); I saw Jerry Orbach as the lead. It’s a performance I will never forget!

    Reply
  57. Mary T: I don’t rememver 42nd Street as a movie; I was privileged to see it on the stage in New York city (probably in 1980); I saw Jerry Orbach as the lead. It’s a performance I will never forget!

    Reply
  58. Mary T: I don’t rememver 42nd Street as a movie; I was privileged to see it on the stage in New York city (probably in 1980); I saw Jerry Orbach as the lead. It’s a performance I will never forget!

    Reply
  59. Mary T: I don’t rememver 42nd Street as a movie; I was privileged to see it on the stage in New York city (probably in 1980); I saw Jerry Orbach as the lead. It’s a performance I will never forget!

    Reply
  60. Mary T: I don’t rememver 42nd Street as a movie; I was privileged to see it on the stage in New York city (probably in 1980); I saw Jerry Orbach as the lead. It’s a performance I will never forget!

    Reply
  61. Sue, that is wonderful. I was never fortunate enough to see it on the stage. I recently saw the stage production on PBS. I was impressed by how well it was done. But there is nothing like a live stage production is there?

    Reply
  62. Sue, that is wonderful. I was never fortunate enough to see it on the stage. I recently saw the stage production on PBS. I was impressed by how well it was done. But there is nothing like a live stage production is there?

    Reply
  63. Sue, that is wonderful. I was never fortunate enough to see it on the stage. I recently saw the stage production on PBS. I was impressed by how well it was done. But there is nothing like a live stage production is there?

    Reply
  64. Sue, that is wonderful. I was never fortunate enough to see it on the stage. I recently saw the stage production on PBS. I was impressed by how well it was done. But there is nothing like a live stage production is there?

    Reply
  65. Sue, that is wonderful. I was never fortunate enough to see it on the stage. I recently saw the stage production on PBS. I was impressed by how well it was done. But there is nothing like a live stage production is there?

    Reply
  66. Well, it’s pretty clear that fans of the Word Wenches are fans of old movies, isn’t it? Thanks, Mary Jo, for this wonderful post! I fell in love with Anthony Andrews when he starred in “Danger UXB”, a BBC and Masterpiece Theatre TV production, which I watched, then purchased the VCR tapes and now own on DVD. It’s many episodes with complex characters, thrilling adventures, and a sigh-worthy romance. That led me to Anthony Andrews in a version of Ivanhoe and then to Scarlet Pimpernel. The Ivanhoe is flawed, but gorgeous to watch, and everything you’ve said about Pimpernel I second!
    Recently have been on a Rufus Sewell binge; love him in Cold Comfort Farm (hilarious), Dangerous Beauty (heartbreaking), Middlemarch (frustrating!), as Aurelio Zen, and as Lord Melbourne in the recent Victoria series, and as Petruchio in the Shakespeare Re-Told version of The Taming of The Shrew, in which he is absolutely amazing.
    Have also been watching musicals, started at Fred and Ginger, then the more modern classics: My Fair Lady; Hello, Dolly; Sound of Music, etc.
    And I remember fondly the afternoon a friend and I saw Elizabeth, with Cate Blanchett and Joseph Fiennes, then walked into the adjoining screen in the multiplex and saw Shakespeare in Love! THAT was a great afternoon!

    Reply
  67. Well, it’s pretty clear that fans of the Word Wenches are fans of old movies, isn’t it? Thanks, Mary Jo, for this wonderful post! I fell in love with Anthony Andrews when he starred in “Danger UXB”, a BBC and Masterpiece Theatre TV production, which I watched, then purchased the VCR tapes and now own on DVD. It’s many episodes with complex characters, thrilling adventures, and a sigh-worthy romance. That led me to Anthony Andrews in a version of Ivanhoe and then to Scarlet Pimpernel. The Ivanhoe is flawed, but gorgeous to watch, and everything you’ve said about Pimpernel I second!
    Recently have been on a Rufus Sewell binge; love him in Cold Comfort Farm (hilarious), Dangerous Beauty (heartbreaking), Middlemarch (frustrating!), as Aurelio Zen, and as Lord Melbourne in the recent Victoria series, and as Petruchio in the Shakespeare Re-Told version of The Taming of The Shrew, in which he is absolutely amazing.
    Have also been watching musicals, started at Fred and Ginger, then the more modern classics: My Fair Lady; Hello, Dolly; Sound of Music, etc.
    And I remember fondly the afternoon a friend and I saw Elizabeth, with Cate Blanchett and Joseph Fiennes, then walked into the adjoining screen in the multiplex and saw Shakespeare in Love! THAT was a great afternoon!

    Reply
  68. Well, it’s pretty clear that fans of the Word Wenches are fans of old movies, isn’t it? Thanks, Mary Jo, for this wonderful post! I fell in love with Anthony Andrews when he starred in “Danger UXB”, a BBC and Masterpiece Theatre TV production, which I watched, then purchased the VCR tapes and now own on DVD. It’s many episodes with complex characters, thrilling adventures, and a sigh-worthy romance. That led me to Anthony Andrews in a version of Ivanhoe and then to Scarlet Pimpernel. The Ivanhoe is flawed, but gorgeous to watch, and everything you’ve said about Pimpernel I second!
    Recently have been on a Rufus Sewell binge; love him in Cold Comfort Farm (hilarious), Dangerous Beauty (heartbreaking), Middlemarch (frustrating!), as Aurelio Zen, and as Lord Melbourne in the recent Victoria series, and as Petruchio in the Shakespeare Re-Told version of The Taming of The Shrew, in which he is absolutely amazing.
    Have also been watching musicals, started at Fred and Ginger, then the more modern classics: My Fair Lady; Hello, Dolly; Sound of Music, etc.
    And I remember fondly the afternoon a friend and I saw Elizabeth, with Cate Blanchett and Joseph Fiennes, then walked into the adjoining screen in the multiplex and saw Shakespeare in Love! THAT was a great afternoon!

    Reply
  69. Well, it’s pretty clear that fans of the Word Wenches are fans of old movies, isn’t it? Thanks, Mary Jo, for this wonderful post! I fell in love with Anthony Andrews when he starred in “Danger UXB”, a BBC and Masterpiece Theatre TV production, which I watched, then purchased the VCR tapes and now own on DVD. It’s many episodes with complex characters, thrilling adventures, and a sigh-worthy romance. That led me to Anthony Andrews in a version of Ivanhoe and then to Scarlet Pimpernel. The Ivanhoe is flawed, but gorgeous to watch, and everything you’ve said about Pimpernel I second!
    Recently have been on a Rufus Sewell binge; love him in Cold Comfort Farm (hilarious), Dangerous Beauty (heartbreaking), Middlemarch (frustrating!), as Aurelio Zen, and as Lord Melbourne in the recent Victoria series, and as Petruchio in the Shakespeare Re-Told version of The Taming of The Shrew, in which he is absolutely amazing.
    Have also been watching musicals, started at Fred and Ginger, then the more modern classics: My Fair Lady; Hello, Dolly; Sound of Music, etc.
    And I remember fondly the afternoon a friend and I saw Elizabeth, with Cate Blanchett and Joseph Fiennes, then walked into the adjoining screen in the multiplex and saw Shakespeare in Love! THAT was a great afternoon!

    Reply
  70. Well, it’s pretty clear that fans of the Word Wenches are fans of old movies, isn’t it? Thanks, Mary Jo, for this wonderful post! I fell in love with Anthony Andrews when he starred in “Danger UXB”, a BBC and Masterpiece Theatre TV production, which I watched, then purchased the VCR tapes and now own on DVD. It’s many episodes with complex characters, thrilling adventures, and a sigh-worthy romance. That led me to Anthony Andrews in a version of Ivanhoe and then to Scarlet Pimpernel. The Ivanhoe is flawed, but gorgeous to watch, and everything you’ve said about Pimpernel I second!
    Recently have been on a Rufus Sewell binge; love him in Cold Comfort Farm (hilarious), Dangerous Beauty (heartbreaking), Middlemarch (frustrating!), as Aurelio Zen, and as Lord Melbourne in the recent Victoria series, and as Petruchio in the Shakespeare Re-Told version of The Taming of The Shrew, in which he is absolutely amazing.
    Have also been watching musicals, started at Fred and Ginger, then the more modern classics: My Fair Lady; Hello, Dolly; Sound of Music, etc.
    And I remember fondly the afternoon a friend and I saw Elizabeth, with Cate Blanchett and Joseph Fiennes, then walked into the adjoining screen in the multiplex and saw Shakespeare in Love! THAT was a great afternoon!

    Reply
  71. For some reason, I am a sucker for movies and books taking place in Victorian times. One of my favourite movies is “Meet me in St.Louis” with Judy Garland; the Sherlock Holmes TV show starring Jeremy Brett and “The King and I” with Deborah Kerr and Yul Brenner; both “Mary Poppins” and “The Sound of Music” with Julie Andrews. Wow, must watch them again! Thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  72. For some reason, I am a sucker for movies and books taking place in Victorian times. One of my favourite movies is “Meet me in St.Louis” with Judy Garland; the Sherlock Holmes TV show starring Jeremy Brett and “The King and I” with Deborah Kerr and Yul Brenner; both “Mary Poppins” and “The Sound of Music” with Julie Andrews. Wow, must watch them again! Thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  73. For some reason, I am a sucker for movies and books taking place in Victorian times. One of my favourite movies is “Meet me in St.Louis” with Judy Garland; the Sherlock Holmes TV show starring Jeremy Brett and “The King and I” with Deborah Kerr and Yul Brenner; both “Mary Poppins” and “The Sound of Music” with Julie Andrews. Wow, must watch them again! Thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  74. For some reason, I am a sucker for movies and books taking place in Victorian times. One of my favourite movies is “Meet me in St.Louis” with Judy Garland; the Sherlock Holmes TV show starring Jeremy Brett and “The King and I” with Deborah Kerr and Yul Brenner; both “Mary Poppins” and “The Sound of Music” with Julie Andrews. Wow, must watch them again! Thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  75. For some reason, I am a sucker for movies and books taking place in Victorian times. One of my favourite movies is “Meet me in St.Louis” with Judy Garland; the Sherlock Holmes TV show starring Jeremy Brett and “The King and I” with Deborah Kerr and Yul Brenner; both “Mary Poppins” and “The Sound of Music” with Julie Andrews. Wow, must watch them again! Thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  76. Thanks for the movie tips. I’ve only seen the Leslie Howard version of “The Scarlet Pimpernel”, but I will definitely seek this one out, and also “Amazing Grace”.
    I love the old cinema noir movies. Two of my favorites are “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “Double Indemnity”. Both films are about murder. Barbara Stanwyck plays a femme fatale in the latter movie. There are no romantic HEAs in either of these films, but there is an HEA in the sense that justice is served.
    And I didn’t know there was a movie of “Cold Comfort Farm”, thanks Constance!

    Reply
  77. Thanks for the movie tips. I’ve only seen the Leslie Howard version of “The Scarlet Pimpernel”, but I will definitely seek this one out, and also “Amazing Grace”.
    I love the old cinema noir movies. Two of my favorites are “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “Double Indemnity”. Both films are about murder. Barbara Stanwyck plays a femme fatale in the latter movie. There are no romantic HEAs in either of these films, but there is an HEA in the sense that justice is served.
    And I didn’t know there was a movie of “Cold Comfort Farm”, thanks Constance!

    Reply
  78. Thanks for the movie tips. I’ve only seen the Leslie Howard version of “The Scarlet Pimpernel”, but I will definitely seek this one out, and also “Amazing Grace”.
    I love the old cinema noir movies. Two of my favorites are “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “Double Indemnity”. Both films are about murder. Barbara Stanwyck plays a femme fatale in the latter movie. There are no romantic HEAs in either of these films, but there is an HEA in the sense that justice is served.
    And I didn’t know there was a movie of “Cold Comfort Farm”, thanks Constance!

    Reply
  79. Thanks for the movie tips. I’ve only seen the Leslie Howard version of “The Scarlet Pimpernel”, but I will definitely seek this one out, and also “Amazing Grace”.
    I love the old cinema noir movies. Two of my favorites are “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “Double Indemnity”. Both films are about murder. Barbara Stanwyck plays a femme fatale in the latter movie. There are no romantic HEAs in either of these films, but there is an HEA in the sense that justice is served.
    And I didn’t know there was a movie of “Cold Comfort Farm”, thanks Constance!

    Reply
  80. Thanks for the movie tips. I’ve only seen the Leslie Howard version of “The Scarlet Pimpernel”, but I will definitely seek this one out, and also “Amazing Grace”.
    I love the old cinema noir movies. Two of my favorites are “The Postman Always Rings Twice” and “Double Indemnity”. Both films are about murder. Barbara Stanwyck plays a femme fatale in the latter movie. There are no romantic HEAs in either of these films, but there is an HEA in the sense that justice is served.
    And I didn’t know there was a movie of “Cold Comfort Farm”, thanks Constance!

    Reply
  81. I’m definitely an old movie fan. My favorite version of The Scarlet Pimpernel is with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. Love his foppish performance when he’s ‘on’ in his public persona as Sir Percy. My recorded version is somewhat grainy, but I still enjoy it. Jumping forward a several decades–yes to Sister Act. And a double Yes to Trading Places, with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd.

    Reply
  82. I’m definitely an old movie fan. My favorite version of The Scarlet Pimpernel is with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. Love his foppish performance when he’s ‘on’ in his public persona as Sir Percy. My recorded version is somewhat grainy, but I still enjoy it. Jumping forward a several decades–yes to Sister Act. And a double Yes to Trading Places, with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd.

    Reply
  83. I’m definitely an old movie fan. My favorite version of The Scarlet Pimpernel is with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. Love his foppish performance when he’s ‘on’ in his public persona as Sir Percy. My recorded version is somewhat grainy, but I still enjoy it. Jumping forward a several decades–yes to Sister Act. And a double Yes to Trading Places, with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd.

    Reply
  84. I’m definitely an old movie fan. My favorite version of The Scarlet Pimpernel is with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. Love his foppish performance when he’s ‘on’ in his public persona as Sir Percy. My recorded version is somewhat grainy, but I still enjoy it. Jumping forward a several decades–yes to Sister Act. And a double Yes to Trading Places, with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd.

    Reply
  85. I’m definitely an old movie fan. My favorite version of The Scarlet Pimpernel is with Leslie Howard and Merle Oberon. Love his foppish performance when he’s ‘on’ in his public persona as Sir Percy. My recorded version is somewhat grainy, but I still enjoy it. Jumping forward a several decades–yes to Sister Act. And a double Yes to Trading Places, with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd.

    Reply
  86. Constance, what a great double feature for a lovely of historical movies!!
    We LOVE Cold Comfort Farm! I own a copy. I think Rufus Sewell is in THE HOLIDAY, a very good contemporary comedy, though he’s an antagonist, not a hero.

    Reply
  87. Constance, what a great double feature for a lovely of historical movies!!
    We LOVE Cold Comfort Farm! I own a copy. I think Rufus Sewell is in THE HOLIDAY, a very good contemporary comedy, though he’s an antagonist, not a hero.

    Reply
  88. Constance, what a great double feature for a lovely of historical movies!!
    We LOVE Cold Comfort Farm! I own a copy. I think Rufus Sewell is in THE HOLIDAY, a very good contemporary comedy, though he’s an antagonist, not a hero.

    Reply
  89. Constance, what a great double feature for a lovely of historical movies!!
    We LOVE Cold Comfort Farm! I own a copy. I think Rufus Sewell is in THE HOLIDAY, a very good contemporary comedy, though he’s an antagonist, not a hero.

    Reply
  90. Constance, what a great double feature for a lovely of historical movies!!
    We LOVE Cold Comfort Farm! I own a copy. I think Rufus Sewell is in THE HOLIDAY, a very good contemporary comedy, though he’s an antagonist, not a hero.

    Reply
  91. My children used to believe that I could see one scene of any black and white movie and tell you the title,who starred,and at times who directed.
    I love old movies because they seem to be so wonderful.Also, I am older than dirt and have seen many old movies when they were new movies.
    Ms Putney,I have seen every one of your movies listed except Amazing Grace, not sure how that one slipped by me. In fact, I have seen most of the films mentioned by anyone here.
    I have varied favorites, but I believe for me The Best Years of Our Lives is one of the best movies I have ever seen. When Harry Met Sally, Charade, The Great Escape, The Magnificent Seven, Dial M for Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window, Two For The Road, My Fair Lady, Where Eagles Dare and on and on and on.
    I am a movie fan.
    I have even seen The Tontine, Paul Newman’s first film…based on a best seller by Thomas B Costain (yes I read the book too)Mr Newman took out an ad in a newspaper apologizing for that movie.
    Thanks so much for this post, it has reminded me of films I have not seen in a long time and that is always a lovely gift.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  92. My children used to believe that I could see one scene of any black and white movie and tell you the title,who starred,and at times who directed.
    I love old movies because they seem to be so wonderful.Also, I am older than dirt and have seen many old movies when they were new movies.
    Ms Putney,I have seen every one of your movies listed except Amazing Grace, not sure how that one slipped by me. In fact, I have seen most of the films mentioned by anyone here.
    I have varied favorites, but I believe for me The Best Years of Our Lives is one of the best movies I have ever seen. When Harry Met Sally, Charade, The Great Escape, The Magnificent Seven, Dial M for Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window, Two For The Road, My Fair Lady, Where Eagles Dare and on and on and on.
    I am a movie fan.
    I have even seen The Tontine, Paul Newman’s first film…based on a best seller by Thomas B Costain (yes I read the book too)Mr Newman took out an ad in a newspaper apologizing for that movie.
    Thanks so much for this post, it has reminded me of films I have not seen in a long time and that is always a lovely gift.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  93. My children used to believe that I could see one scene of any black and white movie and tell you the title,who starred,and at times who directed.
    I love old movies because they seem to be so wonderful.Also, I am older than dirt and have seen many old movies when they were new movies.
    Ms Putney,I have seen every one of your movies listed except Amazing Grace, not sure how that one slipped by me. In fact, I have seen most of the films mentioned by anyone here.
    I have varied favorites, but I believe for me The Best Years of Our Lives is one of the best movies I have ever seen. When Harry Met Sally, Charade, The Great Escape, The Magnificent Seven, Dial M for Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window, Two For The Road, My Fair Lady, Where Eagles Dare and on and on and on.
    I am a movie fan.
    I have even seen The Tontine, Paul Newman’s first film…based on a best seller by Thomas B Costain (yes I read the book too)Mr Newman took out an ad in a newspaper apologizing for that movie.
    Thanks so much for this post, it has reminded me of films I have not seen in a long time and that is always a lovely gift.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  94. My children used to believe that I could see one scene of any black and white movie and tell you the title,who starred,and at times who directed.
    I love old movies because they seem to be so wonderful.Also, I am older than dirt and have seen many old movies when they were new movies.
    Ms Putney,I have seen every one of your movies listed except Amazing Grace, not sure how that one slipped by me. In fact, I have seen most of the films mentioned by anyone here.
    I have varied favorites, but I believe for me The Best Years of Our Lives is one of the best movies I have ever seen. When Harry Met Sally, Charade, The Great Escape, The Magnificent Seven, Dial M for Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window, Two For The Road, My Fair Lady, Where Eagles Dare and on and on and on.
    I am a movie fan.
    I have even seen The Tontine, Paul Newman’s first film…based on a best seller by Thomas B Costain (yes I read the book too)Mr Newman took out an ad in a newspaper apologizing for that movie.
    Thanks so much for this post, it has reminded me of films I have not seen in a long time and that is always a lovely gift.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  95. My children used to believe that I could see one scene of any black and white movie and tell you the title,who starred,and at times who directed.
    I love old movies because they seem to be so wonderful.Also, I am older than dirt and have seen many old movies when they were new movies.
    Ms Putney,I have seen every one of your movies listed except Amazing Grace, not sure how that one slipped by me. In fact, I have seen most of the films mentioned by anyone here.
    I have varied favorites, but I believe for me The Best Years of Our Lives is one of the best movies I have ever seen. When Harry Met Sally, Charade, The Great Escape, The Magnificent Seven, Dial M for Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window, Two For The Road, My Fair Lady, Where Eagles Dare and on and on and on.
    I am a movie fan.
    I have even seen The Tontine, Paul Newman’s first film…based on a best seller by Thomas B Costain (yes I read the book too)Mr Newman took out an ad in a newspaper apologizing for that movie.
    Thanks so much for this post, it has reminded me of films I have not seen in a long time and that is always a lovely gift.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  96. A wonderful selection of movies Mary Jo. Anthony Andrews as the Pimpernel, simply delicious:) I love that version too.
    Amazing Grace is a fantastic film and I thought Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in the part.
    I love the oldies, they certainly are the best. I’ve watched quite a few older films myself lately. Any excuse:):)

    Reply
  97. A wonderful selection of movies Mary Jo. Anthony Andrews as the Pimpernel, simply delicious:) I love that version too.
    Amazing Grace is a fantastic film and I thought Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in the part.
    I love the oldies, they certainly are the best. I’ve watched quite a few older films myself lately. Any excuse:):)

    Reply
  98. A wonderful selection of movies Mary Jo. Anthony Andrews as the Pimpernel, simply delicious:) I love that version too.
    Amazing Grace is a fantastic film and I thought Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in the part.
    I love the oldies, they certainly are the best. I’ve watched quite a few older films myself lately. Any excuse:):)

    Reply
  99. A wonderful selection of movies Mary Jo. Anthony Andrews as the Pimpernel, simply delicious:) I love that version too.
    Amazing Grace is a fantastic film and I thought Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in the part.
    I love the oldies, they certainly are the best. I’ve watched quite a few older films myself lately. Any excuse:):)

    Reply
  100. A wonderful selection of movies Mary Jo. Anthony Andrews as the Pimpernel, simply delicious:) I love that version too.
    Amazing Grace is a fantastic film and I thought Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in the part.
    I love the oldies, they certainly are the best. I’ve watched quite a few older films myself lately. Any excuse:):)

    Reply
  101. Karin – Cold Comfort Farm is a treasure in both book and movie forms! In addition to Rufus, the movie stars Kate Beckinsale, Joanna Lumley, Ian McKellen and a lot of others whose names escape me.
    Mary Jo – I don’t know The Holiday, but am moving it to the top of my list! Thanks!

    Reply
  102. Karin – Cold Comfort Farm is a treasure in both book and movie forms! In addition to Rufus, the movie stars Kate Beckinsale, Joanna Lumley, Ian McKellen and a lot of others whose names escape me.
    Mary Jo – I don’t know The Holiday, but am moving it to the top of my list! Thanks!

    Reply
  103. Karin – Cold Comfort Farm is a treasure in both book and movie forms! In addition to Rufus, the movie stars Kate Beckinsale, Joanna Lumley, Ian McKellen and a lot of others whose names escape me.
    Mary Jo – I don’t know The Holiday, but am moving it to the top of my list! Thanks!

    Reply
  104. Karin – Cold Comfort Farm is a treasure in both book and movie forms! In addition to Rufus, the movie stars Kate Beckinsale, Joanna Lumley, Ian McKellen and a lot of others whose names escape me.
    Mary Jo – I don’t know The Holiday, but am moving it to the top of my list! Thanks!

    Reply
  105. Karin – Cold Comfort Farm is a treasure in both book and movie forms! In addition to Rufus, the movie stars Kate Beckinsale, Joanna Lumley, Ian McKellen and a lot of others whose names escape me.
    Mary Jo – I don’t know The Holiday, but am moving it to the top of my list! Thanks!

    Reply
  106. Teresa, I agree that Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in Amazing Grace. It was a terrific and highly talented cast. I don’t think the movie made as much of a splash in the US, but it’s a wonderful, powerful, and historically accurate presentation.

    Reply
  107. Teresa, I agree that Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in Amazing Grace. It was a terrific and highly talented cast. I don’t think the movie made as much of a splash in the US, but it’s a wonderful, powerful, and historically accurate presentation.

    Reply
  108. Teresa, I agree that Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in Amazing Grace. It was a terrific and highly talented cast. I don’t think the movie made as much of a splash in the US, but it’s a wonderful, powerful, and historically accurate presentation.

    Reply
  109. Teresa, I agree that Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in Amazing Grace. It was a terrific and highly talented cast. I don’t think the movie made as much of a splash in the US, but it’s a wonderful, powerful, and historically accurate presentation.

    Reply
  110. Teresa, I agree that Ioan Gruffudd was brilliant in Amazing Grace. It was a terrific and highly talented cast. I don’t think the movie made as much of a splash in the US, but it’s a wonderful, powerful, and historically accurate presentation.

    Reply
  111. Constance, THE HOLIDAY is great fun–a Christmas house swap between a Hollywood maker of movie trailers and a London journalist, both of whom have been having serious man trouble. We watch it every year over the holidays.

    Reply
  112. Constance, THE HOLIDAY is great fun–a Christmas house swap between a Hollywood maker of movie trailers and a London journalist, both of whom have been having serious man trouble. We watch it every year over the holidays.

    Reply
  113. Constance, THE HOLIDAY is great fun–a Christmas house swap between a Hollywood maker of movie trailers and a London journalist, both of whom have been having serious man trouble. We watch it every year over the holidays.

    Reply
  114. Constance, THE HOLIDAY is great fun–a Christmas house swap between a Hollywood maker of movie trailers and a London journalist, both of whom have been having serious man trouble. We watch it every year over the holidays.

    Reply
  115. Constance, THE HOLIDAY is great fun–a Christmas house swap between a Hollywood maker of movie trailers and a London journalist, both of whom have been having serious man trouble. We watch it every year over the holidays.

    Reply
  116. I’ll try this again — I clicked on preview instead of post and everything was wiped out!
    I love every one of these movies, and include the 1934 version of “Scarlet Pimpernel” which my mother loved. I watch them interchangeably.
    When “Shakespeare in Love” came out, I was working in a local playhouse. One of the actors remarked that it was “an actor’s movie”. I thought, “No, it’s a writer’s movie.” Will overheard various comments in the street, worked them into a plot, started out with “Ethel and the Pirate’s Daughter” and ended up with something that actors still stage and people still flock to see five-hundred years later!
    By the way, I think Viola initially “won” the part of Romeo and only sort of snuck in to the part of Juliet at the end, because one of my favorite scenes is when they are rehearsing and “director” Will takes the part of Juliet to prove a point. The two of them play one of the wildest, best cross-dressed love scenes ever!

    Reply
  117. I’ll try this again — I clicked on preview instead of post and everything was wiped out!
    I love every one of these movies, and include the 1934 version of “Scarlet Pimpernel” which my mother loved. I watch them interchangeably.
    When “Shakespeare in Love” came out, I was working in a local playhouse. One of the actors remarked that it was “an actor’s movie”. I thought, “No, it’s a writer’s movie.” Will overheard various comments in the street, worked them into a plot, started out with “Ethel and the Pirate’s Daughter” and ended up with something that actors still stage and people still flock to see five-hundred years later!
    By the way, I think Viola initially “won” the part of Romeo and only sort of snuck in to the part of Juliet at the end, because one of my favorite scenes is when they are rehearsing and “director” Will takes the part of Juliet to prove a point. The two of them play one of the wildest, best cross-dressed love scenes ever!

    Reply
  118. I’ll try this again — I clicked on preview instead of post and everything was wiped out!
    I love every one of these movies, and include the 1934 version of “Scarlet Pimpernel” which my mother loved. I watch them interchangeably.
    When “Shakespeare in Love” came out, I was working in a local playhouse. One of the actors remarked that it was “an actor’s movie”. I thought, “No, it’s a writer’s movie.” Will overheard various comments in the street, worked them into a plot, started out with “Ethel and the Pirate’s Daughter” and ended up with something that actors still stage and people still flock to see five-hundred years later!
    By the way, I think Viola initially “won” the part of Romeo and only sort of snuck in to the part of Juliet at the end, because one of my favorite scenes is when they are rehearsing and “director” Will takes the part of Juliet to prove a point. The two of them play one of the wildest, best cross-dressed love scenes ever!

    Reply
  119. I’ll try this again — I clicked on preview instead of post and everything was wiped out!
    I love every one of these movies, and include the 1934 version of “Scarlet Pimpernel” which my mother loved. I watch them interchangeably.
    When “Shakespeare in Love” came out, I was working in a local playhouse. One of the actors remarked that it was “an actor’s movie”. I thought, “No, it’s a writer’s movie.” Will overheard various comments in the street, worked them into a plot, started out with “Ethel and the Pirate’s Daughter” and ended up with something that actors still stage and people still flock to see five-hundred years later!
    By the way, I think Viola initially “won” the part of Romeo and only sort of snuck in to the part of Juliet at the end, because one of my favorite scenes is when they are rehearsing and “director” Will takes the part of Juliet to prove a point. The two of them play one of the wildest, best cross-dressed love scenes ever!

    Reply
  120. I’ll try this again — I clicked on preview instead of post and everything was wiped out!
    I love every one of these movies, and include the 1934 version of “Scarlet Pimpernel” which my mother loved. I watch them interchangeably.
    When “Shakespeare in Love” came out, I was working in a local playhouse. One of the actors remarked that it was “an actor’s movie”. I thought, “No, it’s a writer’s movie.” Will overheard various comments in the street, worked them into a plot, started out with “Ethel and the Pirate’s Daughter” and ended up with something that actors still stage and people still flock to see five-hundred years later!
    By the way, I think Viola initially “won” the part of Romeo and only sort of snuck in to the part of Juliet at the end, because one of my favorite scenes is when they are rehearsing and “director” Will takes the part of Juliet to prove a point. The two of them play one of the wildest, best cross-dressed love scenes ever!

    Reply
  121. Eugenia, I’m sorry you lost your first version; I’ve never actually tried to look at the preview function so I didn’t know it was evil.
    Totally agree with you that it’s both a writer’s and an actor’s movie. But you’re right about Viola–I condensed it too much. And that scene is HILARIOUS!

    Reply
  122. Eugenia, I’m sorry you lost your first version; I’ve never actually tried to look at the preview function so I didn’t know it was evil.
    Totally agree with you that it’s both a writer’s and an actor’s movie. But you’re right about Viola–I condensed it too much. And that scene is HILARIOUS!

    Reply
  123. Eugenia, I’m sorry you lost your first version; I’ve never actually tried to look at the preview function so I didn’t know it was evil.
    Totally agree with you that it’s both a writer’s and an actor’s movie. But you’re right about Viola–I condensed it too much. And that scene is HILARIOUS!

    Reply
  124. Eugenia, I’m sorry you lost your first version; I’ve never actually tried to look at the preview function so I didn’t know it was evil.
    Totally agree with you that it’s both a writer’s and an actor’s movie. But you’re right about Viola–I condensed it too much. And that scene is HILARIOUS!

    Reply
  125. Eugenia, I’m sorry you lost your first version; I’ve never actually tried to look at the preview function so I didn’t know it was evil.
    Totally agree with you that it’s both a writer’s and an actor’s movie. But you’re right about Viola–I condensed it too much. And that scene is HILARIOUS!

    Reply

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