Summer delights

Cbkrose
What with picnics and barbecues, it seemed suitable to blog about summer food. I have a book from 1853, passed down my family, which includes selections of food for August, so here we go.

For meat, they could expect to have  beef, grass lamb, mutton, veal, and buck venison.

The list of fish always amazes me. barbel, brill, carp, cod conger-eels

Let’s pause on eels. Eels were a food staple in the middle ages, gathered in basketfuls from places like the fens. The conger-eel is in a class of its own, however. Check out this web site. Trust the British to Dab
have a conger eel club!

Crabs, crayfish, dabs (I’m very familiar with that one as they were caught in Morecambe Bay, where I grew up. A dab is a small flat fish similar to plaice. But who gets plaice in North America? Shame, that. We used to buy dabs right off the fishing boats and they’d be cooked by battering and deep-frying them. Delicious.)

Dace
Dace is in italics, which means it was (is?) prime in August. Eels, flounders,  gurnets (what? I’m going to Australia in 6 days and don’t have time to look that up. Your adventure, should you choose to accept it, is to expand everyone’s knowledge on these foods.*G*)

Still on fish, note — haddock (lovely fish), herring, lobster, mackerel, mullet, oysters.

Perch and pike are also prime in August. Plaice, prawns, salmon, skate. sole, tench, thornback, turbot, whiting.

Turbot was quite a choice item, but these days it seems to be a junk fish.

On to poultry and game. Again, quite a selection. Chicken, duck,green-geese, grouse (from the 12th, of course), leveret, moor game, pigeon, plover,rabbit and turkey.

Vegetables: Artichoke, beans — French, kidney, scarlet (picture of our scarlet runner beans on right), and Windsor. Now I know the first three, butAug07beans
what are Windsor beans? The queen’s favourite?

White beets, carrots,  cauliflower, celery, cucumber, endive, finochia, leeks, lettuce, mushrooms, oniots, peas (I would have thought it a bit late for peas), potatoes, purslane, radish, salsify, scorzonera (over to you on that one!) shallots, spinach, turnip.

Fruit. Apples (a bit early, I’d think, but I’m sure they knew) — codlin, summer pearmain,and summer pippin.

Now I ask you, if there are such early apples, wouldn’t it make sense to grow them instead of shipping apples from New Zealand etc?

Back to the list — cherries, currants, damsons (a small plum used for pies. Again, delicious.) figs, filberts,gooseberries, grapes, melons,mulberries, nectarines, peaches.

A number of pears are listed — jargonelle (doesn’t that sound lovely?) Summer Bon Chretien (could almost be a movie star, couldn’t it?) and again, Windsor.

Gosh, look at this wonderful page of prints of fruits of the past. This image of Summer Bon Chretien is from there.Pear

Plums are listed as greengages or orleans, then raspberries and wild strawberries.

With all this, we certainly need something to drink! Some are less than inspiring in my opinion.
Appleade, for example. Cut two large apples into slices and pour a quart of boiling water on them. Strain and sweeten to taste. Hmmm.

Then there’s "Eau sucre" which is exactly what it sounds like. Sugar dissolved in water.

Then there’s the odd sounding Lemonade au lait. It’s basically a lemonade but then one adds milk and let it stand 12 hours. As it’s then strained, I assume it makes something cheesy. Or is the cheesy bit discarded? If so, what’s left? Anyone want to give it a go?

But let’s leave this with orgeat, often mentioned in period pieces.
Blanch and pound three-quarters of a pound of sweet almonds and thirty bitter ones with a tablespoonful of water. Stir in by degrees two pints of water and three pints of milk and strain the whole through a cloth. Dissolve half a pound of loaf sugar in a pint of water, boil, skim well, and mix with the almond water, adding two tablespoonfuls of orange-flower water and a cupful of good brandy.

A cupful of good brandy will rescue anything, says I. Though it’s a shame to use the good stuff.

Please do expand on any of these period foods, most of which had been around for a long time. Which of them appeal the most and which the least?

And how do you react to strange food in historical fiction? Have you ever been turned off by what a character was eating?

I’ll leave you with a simple dessert I always think of as English, though it may be common everywhere. It’s usually called cream and cream, and it’s simply cream poured over ice cream. The liquid cream makes a shell when it comes into contact with the cold. I prefer to use a sorbet, however, because the sharper flavours contrast well with the creamy flavor. Get the sorbet as cold as you can. Use whipping cream and only pour over as much as will cover the ice.

Apart from being delicious, this isn’t terrible wicked because it’s best in small portions. Once the ice begins to melt it all becomes a mush. Tasty must, but that’s not the point. A quarter cup of sorbet is fine, and as I said, just enough cream to coat.

Do you have a summer treat to share?

As I said above, I’m off to Australia next Monday — via Hawaii.If anyone here is going to attend the Romance Writers of Australia conference in Melbourne, I look forward to seeing you there! Because of my jaunting off to the antipodes, however, we’ve juggled the schedule a bit. My next blog will be on September 5th, when I’ll actually still be down under. So really, I’m hoping you’ll all leap in to fill the gap. I’m leaving a blog to go up, and I’m hoping it’ll stimulate lots of discussion. To help this along, I’ll give books to the three commenters I think have made the best contributions.

Ta-ta for now!

Jo πŸ™‚

130 thoughts on “Summer delights”

  1. It’s not surprising that August would have perhaps the widest variety of food of the year, but it’s fascinating to read the lists! I’ve wondered before what a ‘green-goose’ is. A tender young gosling? Or a tough old goose drenched in something like green parsley sauce? πŸ™‚
    The conger eels are–daunting. And the conger club so very British, as you say. πŸ™‚ I’ve never had the cream on cream, nor even heard of it, but it sounds quite lovely. Rather like a DIY creamsicle. (sp?)
    One of the things I learned most clearly in my years living in England was the seasonality of food. That might not be as true now since the global food distribution network has expanded enormously in the last couple of decades, but when I lived in Oxford, I became very aware of how special the first strawberries were when they appeared in late spring. Absolutely delicious, the more so for being fleeting. Not like durable plastic strawberries that can be bought most any time of the year in the U.S.
    Similarly, in winter one made do with winter vegetables like cabbage and broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Even tiny terrace house gardens oftenhad a couple of Brussels sprouts plants sturdily producing all winter. I developed quite a taste for them. (Barely cooked, still bright green, a dash of lemon juice and butter. Gray, overcooked sprouts need not apply.)
    The irony, of course, is that Western society is now going back to the locavore seasonal eating model, which produces tasty food at a much lower energy cost.
    As for why were New Zealand apples shipped when early apples can be had in Britain? Well, those Granny Smiths are delicious. Maybe the NZ apples were considered better. But there’s something special about eating the fruits of the season.
    Mary Jo, getting hungry at the thought. Peaches are magnificent now….

    Reply
  2. It’s not surprising that August would have perhaps the widest variety of food of the year, but it’s fascinating to read the lists! I’ve wondered before what a ‘green-goose’ is. A tender young gosling? Or a tough old goose drenched in something like green parsley sauce? πŸ™‚
    The conger eels are–daunting. And the conger club so very British, as you say. πŸ™‚ I’ve never had the cream on cream, nor even heard of it, but it sounds quite lovely. Rather like a DIY creamsicle. (sp?)
    One of the things I learned most clearly in my years living in England was the seasonality of food. That might not be as true now since the global food distribution network has expanded enormously in the last couple of decades, but when I lived in Oxford, I became very aware of how special the first strawberries were when they appeared in late spring. Absolutely delicious, the more so for being fleeting. Not like durable plastic strawberries that can be bought most any time of the year in the U.S.
    Similarly, in winter one made do with winter vegetables like cabbage and broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Even tiny terrace house gardens oftenhad a couple of Brussels sprouts plants sturdily producing all winter. I developed quite a taste for them. (Barely cooked, still bright green, a dash of lemon juice and butter. Gray, overcooked sprouts need not apply.)
    The irony, of course, is that Western society is now going back to the locavore seasonal eating model, which produces tasty food at a much lower energy cost.
    As for why were New Zealand apples shipped when early apples can be had in Britain? Well, those Granny Smiths are delicious. Maybe the NZ apples were considered better. But there’s something special about eating the fruits of the season.
    Mary Jo, getting hungry at the thought. Peaches are magnificent now….

    Reply
  3. It’s not surprising that August would have perhaps the widest variety of food of the year, but it’s fascinating to read the lists! I’ve wondered before what a ‘green-goose’ is. A tender young gosling? Or a tough old goose drenched in something like green parsley sauce? πŸ™‚
    The conger eels are–daunting. And the conger club so very British, as you say. πŸ™‚ I’ve never had the cream on cream, nor even heard of it, but it sounds quite lovely. Rather like a DIY creamsicle. (sp?)
    One of the things I learned most clearly in my years living in England was the seasonality of food. That might not be as true now since the global food distribution network has expanded enormously in the last couple of decades, but when I lived in Oxford, I became very aware of how special the first strawberries were when they appeared in late spring. Absolutely delicious, the more so for being fleeting. Not like durable plastic strawberries that can be bought most any time of the year in the U.S.
    Similarly, in winter one made do with winter vegetables like cabbage and broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Even tiny terrace house gardens oftenhad a couple of Brussels sprouts plants sturdily producing all winter. I developed quite a taste for them. (Barely cooked, still bright green, a dash of lemon juice and butter. Gray, overcooked sprouts need not apply.)
    The irony, of course, is that Western society is now going back to the locavore seasonal eating model, which produces tasty food at a much lower energy cost.
    As for why were New Zealand apples shipped when early apples can be had in Britain? Well, those Granny Smiths are delicious. Maybe the NZ apples were considered better. But there’s something special about eating the fruits of the season.
    Mary Jo, getting hungry at the thought. Peaches are magnificent now….

    Reply
  4. It’s not surprising that August would have perhaps the widest variety of food of the year, but it’s fascinating to read the lists! I’ve wondered before what a ‘green-goose’ is. A tender young gosling? Or a tough old goose drenched in something like green parsley sauce? πŸ™‚
    The conger eels are–daunting. And the conger club so very British, as you say. πŸ™‚ I’ve never had the cream on cream, nor even heard of it, but it sounds quite lovely. Rather like a DIY creamsicle. (sp?)
    One of the things I learned most clearly in my years living in England was the seasonality of food. That might not be as true now since the global food distribution network has expanded enormously in the last couple of decades, but when I lived in Oxford, I became very aware of how special the first strawberries were when they appeared in late spring. Absolutely delicious, the more so for being fleeting. Not like durable plastic strawberries that can be bought most any time of the year in the U.S.
    Similarly, in winter one made do with winter vegetables like cabbage and broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Even tiny terrace house gardens oftenhad a couple of Brussels sprouts plants sturdily producing all winter. I developed quite a taste for them. (Barely cooked, still bright green, a dash of lemon juice and butter. Gray, overcooked sprouts need not apply.)
    The irony, of course, is that Western society is now going back to the locavore seasonal eating model, which produces tasty food at a much lower energy cost.
    As for why were New Zealand apples shipped when early apples can be had in Britain? Well, those Granny Smiths are delicious. Maybe the NZ apples were considered better. But there’s something special about eating the fruits of the season.
    Mary Jo, getting hungry at the thought. Peaches are magnificent now….

    Reply
  5. It’s not surprising that August would have perhaps the widest variety of food of the year, but it’s fascinating to read the lists! I’ve wondered before what a ‘green-goose’ is. A tender young gosling? Or a tough old goose drenched in something like green parsley sauce? πŸ™‚
    The conger eels are–daunting. And the conger club so very British, as you say. πŸ™‚ I’ve never had the cream on cream, nor even heard of it, but it sounds quite lovely. Rather like a DIY creamsicle. (sp?)
    One of the things I learned most clearly in my years living in England was the seasonality of food. That might not be as true now since the global food distribution network has expanded enormously in the last couple of decades, but when I lived in Oxford, I became very aware of how special the first strawberries were when they appeared in late spring. Absolutely delicious, the more so for being fleeting. Not like durable plastic strawberries that can be bought most any time of the year in the U.S.
    Similarly, in winter one made do with winter vegetables like cabbage and broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Even tiny terrace house gardens oftenhad a couple of Brussels sprouts plants sturdily producing all winter. I developed quite a taste for them. (Barely cooked, still bright green, a dash of lemon juice and butter. Gray, overcooked sprouts need not apply.)
    The irony, of course, is that Western society is now going back to the locavore seasonal eating model, which produces tasty food at a much lower energy cost.
    As for why were New Zealand apples shipped when early apples can be had in Britain? Well, those Granny Smiths are delicious. Maybe the NZ apples were considered better. But there’s something special about eating the fruits of the season.
    Mary Jo, getting hungry at the thought. Peaches are magnificent now….

    Reply
  6. This brings memories back of my childhood. I grew up in the countryside, where at one time fruit farmers had settled, so, I had a variety of fruit to pick from and all I had to do was walk from one place to another. I do remember this wonderful apple tree that had the most sour apples on it this time of the year, they later sweetened up, but I picked them when they were sour and put tons of salt on them. I usually ended up with a stomach ache, but I loved those apples. Sitting in the cherry trees was also a favorite place for me.

    Reply
  7. This brings memories back of my childhood. I grew up in the countryside, where at one time fruit farmers had settled, so, I had a variety of fruit to pick from and all I had to do was walk from one place to another. I do remember this wonderful apple tree that had the most sour apples on it this time of the year, they later sweetened up, but I picked them when they were sour and put tons of salt on them. I usually ended up with a stomach ache, but I loved those apples. Sitting in the cherry trees was also a favorite place for me.

    Reply
  8. This brings memories back of my childhood. I grew up in the countryside, where at one time fruit farmers had settled, so, I had a variety of fruit to pick from and all I had to do was walk from one place to another. I do remember this wonderful apple tree that had the most sour apples on it this time of the year, they later sweetened up, but I picked them when they were sour and put tons of salt on them. I usually ended up with a stomach ache, but I loved those apples. Sitting in the cherry trees was also a favorite place for me.

    Reply
  9. This brings memories back of my childhood. I grew up in the countryside, where at one time fruit farmers had settled, so, I had a variety of fruit to pick from and all I had to do was walk from one place to another. I do remember this wonderful apple tree that had the most sour apples on it this time of the year, they later sweetened up, but I picked them when they were sour and put tons of salt on them. I usually ended up with a stomach ache, but I loved those apples. Sitting in the cherry trees was also a favorite place for me.

    Reply
  10. This brings memories back of my childhood. I grew up in the countryside, where at one time fruit farmers had settled, so, I had a variety of fruit to pick from and all I had to do was walk from one place to another. I do remember this wonderful apple tree that had the most sour apples on it this time of the year, they later sweetened up, but I picked them when they were sour and put tons of salt on them. I usually ended up with a stomach ache, but I loved those apples. Sitting in the cherry trees was also a favorite place for me.

    Reply
  11. as a young girl, my family would
    always go to w. virgina.
    my sisters and brothers cousins would alway go out and pick
    blackberrys,my grandmother would make a blackberry cobbler that
    was out of this world.we would top
    it with ice cream.
    i not sure if its was picking the berrys or eating them we enjoyed most.but we had great fun.
    and a menory we will never forget.

    Reply
  12. as a young girl, my family would
    always go to w. virgina.
    my sisters and brothers cousins would alway go out and pick
    blackberrys,my grandmother would make a blackberry cobbler that
    was out of this world.we would top
    it with ice cream.
    i not sure if its was picking the berrys or eating them we enjoyed most.but we had great fun.
    and a menory we will never forget.

    Reply
  13. as a young girl, my family would
    always go to w. virgina.
    my sisters and brothers cousins would alway go out and pick
    blackberrys,my grandmother would make a blackberry cobbler that
    was out of this world.we would top
    it with ice cream.
    i not sure if its was picking the berrys or eating them we enjoyed most.but we had great fun.
    and a menory we will never forget.

    Reply
  14. as a young girl, my family would
    always go to w. virgina.
    my sisters and brothers cousins would alway go out and pick
    blackberrys,my grandmother would make a blackberry cobbler that
    was out of this world.we would top
    it with ice cream.
    i not sure if its was picking the berrys or eating them we enjoyed most.but we had great fun.
    and a menory we will never forget.

    Reply
  15. as a young girl, my family would
    always go to w. virgina.
    my sisters and brothers cousins would alway go out and pick
    blackberrys,my grandmother would make a blackberry cobbler that
    was out of this world.we would top
    it with ice cream.
    i not sure if its was picking the berrys or eating them we enjoyed most.but we had great fun.
    and a menory we will never forget.

    Reply
  16. I’ve always had a garden and enjoyed the delights of foods in season (although right now the tomatoes have totally filled my fridge and I’ve reached the point of deciding whether to throw them at passing cars or peel and freeze them because I’ve run out of jars–it’s been a great season).
    As Kay says, green apples are edible. Since apple trees tend to be prolific and waste not, want not requires the ones that fall off early be used in some way, I’m sure they found uses for them. I can remember my mother canning applesauce in fall–um, yum!

    Reply
  17. I’ve always had a garden and enjoyed the delights of foods in season (although right now the tomatoes have totally filled my fridge and I’ve reached the point of deciding whether to throw them at passing cars or peel and freeze them because I’ve run out of jars–it’s been a great season).
    As Kay says, green apples are edible. Since apple trees tend to be prolific and waste not, want not requires the ones that fall off early be used in some way, I’m sure they found uses for them. I can remember my mother canning applesauce in fall–um, yum!

    Reply
  18. I’ve always had a garden and enjoyed the delights of foods in season (although right now the tomatoes have totally filled my fridge and I’ve reached the point of deciding whether to throw them at passing cars or peel and freeze them because I’ve run out of jars–it’s been a great season).
    As Kay says, green apples are edible. Since apple trees tend to be prolific and waste not, want not requires the ones that fall off early be used in some way, I’m sure they found uses for them. I can remember my mother canning applesauce in fall–um, yum!

    Reply
  19. I’ve always had a garden and enjoyed the delights of foods in season (although right now the tomatoes have totally filled my fridge and I’ve reached the point of deciding whether to throw them at passing cars or peel and freeze them because I’ve run out of jars–it’s been a great season).
    As Kay says, green apples are edible. Since apple trees tend to be prolific and waste not, want not requires the ones that fall off early be used in some way, I’m sure they found uses for them. I can remember my mother canning applesauce in fall–um, yum!

    Reply
  20. I’ve always had a garden and enjoyed the delights of foods in season (although right now the tomatoes have totally filled my fridge and I’ve reached the point of deciding whether to throw them at passing cars or peel and freeze them because I’ve run out of jars–it’s been a great season).
    As Kay says, green apples are edible. Since apple trees tend to be prolific and waste not, want not requires the ones that fall off early be used in some way, I’m sure they found uses for them. I can remember my mother canning applesauce in fall–um, yum!

    Reply
  21. Have a great time in Australia, Jo! I lived in Melbourne for two years, and it’s my favorite Aussie city, I think. Bring warm clothes, though — it’s winter down there!
    If you have time, go to the National Gallery of Art (easy to walk to from downtown). They usually have a winter art exhibit in July and August that’s amazing. It changes every year — one year I was there it was Impressionists, and another year it was Dutch masters. Plus, Melb has great food πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :).
    Jessica

    Reply
  22. Have a great time in Australia, Jo! I lived in Melbourne for two years, and it’s my favorite Aussie city, I think. Bring warm clothes, though — it’s winter down there!
    If you have time, go to the National Gallery of Art (easy to walk to from downtown). They usually have a winter art exhibit in July and August that’s amazing. It changes every year — one year I was there it was Impressionists, and another year it was Dutch masters. Plus, Melb has great food πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :).
    Jessica

    Reply
  23. Have a great time in Australia, Jo! I lived in Melbourne for two years, and it’s my favorite Aussie city, I think. Bring warm clothes, though — it’s winter down there!
    If you have time, go to the National Gallery of Art (easy to walk to from downtown). They usually have a winter art exhibit in July and August that’s amazing. It changes every year — one year I was there it was Impressionists, and another year it was Dutch masters. Plus, Melb has great food πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :).
    Jessica

    Reply
  24. Have a great time in Australia, Jo! I lived in Melbourne for two years, and it’s my favorite Aussie city, I think. Bring warm clothes, though — it’s winter down there!
    If you have time, go to the National Gallery of Art (easy to walk to from downtown). They usually have a winter art exhibit in July and August that’s amazing. It changes every year — one year I was there it was Impressionists, and another year it was Dutch masters. Plus, Melb has great food πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :).
    Jessica

    Reply
  25. Have a great time in Australia, Jo! I lived in Melbourne for two years, and it’s my favorite Aussie city, I think. Bring warm clothes, though — it’s winter down there!
    If you have time, go to the National Gallery of Art (easy to walk to from downtown). They usually have a winter art exhibit in July and August that’s amazing. It changes every year — one year I was there it was Impressionists, and another year it was Dutch masters. Plus, Melb has great food πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :).
    Jessica

    Reply
  26. The Conger Eel has been described…as “magnificent, mean,
    and moody”.
    Oddly enough, so have I.
    Sand dabs–delicious. A favorite of mine at Fisherman’s Wharf restaurants in San Francisco.
    Oysters in August? There’s no R in August!
    I just ordered groceries for delivery and got as a bonus got a
    free “personal watermelon.” (It’s about the size of a cantaloupe.)
    I hope the Tigress will share her simple and delicious recipe for summer pudding.
    I remember a character in Robert Neill’s THE ELEGANT WITCH (set in early 1600s) being astonished by her first taste of a new vegetable called “potato.”
    There’s a fantastic catalogue of foods in the Trimalchio’s Feast segment of the SATYRICON of Petronius Arbiter; I particularly remember hedgehogs (presumably skinned!) dipped in honey and rolled in sesame seeds. I think it’s listed in the cookbook of Apicius, of which I have a copy. I have a modest collection of cookbooks, including Apicius, a
    couple of medieval ones, and (courtesy of dear Tigress) an
    original Mrs. Beeton–who, by the way, explains the green goose:
    TO DRESS A GREEN GOOSE.
    969. INGREDIENTS.–Goose, 3 oz. of butter, pepper and salt to taste.
    _Mode_.–Geese are called green till they are about four months old, and should not be stuffed. After it has been singed and trussed, the same as in the preceding recipe, put into the body a seasoning of pepper and
    salt, and the butter to moisten it inside. Roast before a clear fire for about 3/4 hour, froth and brown it nicely, and serve with a brown gravy, and, when liked, gooseberry-sauce. This dish should be garnished with
    water-cresses.
    When my grandparents lived in Los Altos, CA, they had a large garden, including raspberries, blackberries, and and strawberries. When we visited during my childhood, I would be sent out before dinner with a coffee can to pick it full of one or t’other; we would enjoy them still warm from the bush on top of vanilla ice cream.

    Reply
  27. The Conger Eel has been described…as “magnificent, mean,
    and moody”.
    Oddly enough, so have I.
    Sand dabs–delicious. A favorite of mine at Fisherman’s Wharf restaurants in San Francisco.
    Oysters in August? There’s no R in August!
    I just ordered groceries for delivery and got as a bonus got a
    free “personal watermelon.” (It’s about the size of a cantaloupe.)
    I hope the Tigress will share her simple and delicious recipe for summer pudding.
    I remember a character in Robert Neill’s THE ELEGANT WITCH (set in early 1600s) being astonished by her first taste of a new vegetable called “potato.”
    There’s a fantastic catalogue of foods in the Trimalchio’s Feast segment of the SATYRICON of Petronius Arbiter; I particularly remember hedgehogs (presumably skinned!) dipped in honey and rolled in sesame seeds. I think it’s listed in the cookbook of Apicius, of which I have a copy. I have a modest collection of cookbooks, including Apicius, a
    couple of medieval ones, and (courtesy of dear Tigress) an
    original Mrs. Beeton–who, by the way, explains the green goose:
    TO DRESS A GREEN GOOSE.
    969. INGREDIENTS.–Goose, 3 oz. of butter, pepper and salt to taste.
    _Mode_.–Geese are called green till they are about four months old, and should not be stuffed. After it has been singed and trussed, the same as in the preceding recipe, put into the body a seasoning of pepper and
    salt, and the butter to moisten it inside. Roast before a clear fire for about 3/4 hour, froth and brown it nicely, and serve with a brown gravy, and, when liked, gooseberry-sauce. This dish should be garnished with
    water-cresses.
    When my grandparents lived in Los Altos, CA, they had a large garden, including raspberries, blackberries, and and strawberries. When we visited during my childhood, I would be sent out before dinner with a coffee can to pick it full of one or t’other; we would enjoy them still warm from the bush on top of vanilla ice cream.

    Reply
  28. The Conger Eel has been described…as “magnificent, mean,
    and moody”.
    Oddly enough, so have I.
    Sand dabs–delicious. A favorite of mine at Fisherman’s Wharf restaurants in San Francisco.
    Oysters in August? There’s no R in August!
    I just ordered groceries for delivery and got as a bonus got a
    free “personal watermelon.” (It’s about the size of a cantaloupe.)
    I hope the Tigress will share her simple and delicious recipe for summer pudding.
    I remember a character in Robert Neill’s THE ELEGANT WITCH (set in early 1600s) being astonished by her first taste of a new vegetable called “potato.”
    There’s a fantastic catalogue of foods in the Trimalchio’s Feast segment of the SATYRICON of Petronius Arbiter; I particularly remember hedgehogs (presumably skinned!) dipped in honey and rolled in sesame seeds. I think it’s listed in the cookbook of Apicius, of which I have a copy. I have a modest collection of cookbooks, including Apicius, a
    couple of medieval ones, and (courtesy of dear Tigress) an
    original Mrs. Beeton–who, by the way, explains the green goose:
    TO DRESS A GREEN GOOSE.
    969. INGREDIENTS.–Goose, 3 oz. of butter, pepper and salt to taste.
    _Mode_.–Geese are called green till they are about four months old, and should not be stuffed. After it has been singed and trussed, the same as in the preceding recipe, put into the body a seasoning of pepper and
    salt, and the butter to moisten it inside. Roast before a clear fire for about 3/4 hour, froth and brown it nicely, and serve with a brown gravy, and, when liked, gooseberry-sauce. This dish should be garnished with
    water-cresses.
    When my grandparents lived in Los Altos, CA, they had a large garden, including raspberries, blackberries, and and strawberries. When we visited during my childhood, I would be sent out before dinner with a coffee can to pick it full of one or t’other; we would enjoy them still warm from the bush on top of vanilla ice cream.

    Reply
  29. The Conger Eel has been described…as “magnificent, mean,
    and moody”.
    Oddly enough, so have I.
    Sand dabs–delicious. A favorite of mine at Fisherman’s Wharf restaurants in San Francisco.
    Oysters in August? There’s no R in August!
    I just ordered groceries for delivery and got as a bonus got a
    free “personal watermelon.” (It’s about the size of a cantaloupe.)
    I hope the Tigress will share her simple and delicious recipe for summer pudding.
    I remember a character in Robert Neill’s THE ELEGANT WITCH (set in early 1600s) being astonished by her first taste of a new vegetable called “potato.”
    There’s a fantastic catalogue of foods in the Trimalchio’s Feast segment of the SATYRICON of Petronius Arbiter; I particularly remember hedgehogs (presumably skinned!) dipped in honey and rolled in sesame seeds. I think it’s listed in the cookbook of Apicius, of which I have a copy. I have a modest collection of cookbooks, including Apicius, a
    couple of medieval ones, and (courtesy of dear Tigress) an
    original Mrs. Beeton–who, by the way, explains the green goose:
    TO DRESS A GREEN GOOSE.
    969. INGREDIENTS.–Goose, 3 oz. of butter, pepper and salt to taste.
    _Mode_.–Geese are called green till they are about four months old, and should not be stuffed. After it has been singed and trussed, the same as in the preceding recipe, put into the body a seasoning of pepper and
    salt, and the butter to moisten it inside. Roast before a clear fire for about 3/4 hour, froth and brown it nicely, and serve with a brown gravy, and, when liked, gooseberry-sauce. This dish should be garnished with
    water-cresses.
    When my grandparents lived in Los Altos, CA, they had a large garden, including raspberries, blackberries, and and strawberries. When we visited during my childhood, I would be sent out before dinner with a coffee can to pick it full of one or t’other; we would enjoy them still warm from the bush on top of vanilla ice cream.

    Reply
  30. The Conger Eel has been described…as “magnificent, mean,
    and moody”.
    Oddly enough, so have I.
    Sand dabs–delicious. A favorite of mine at Fisherman’s Wharf restaurants in San Francisco.
    Oysters in August? There’s no R in August!
    I just ordered groceries for delivery and got as a bonus got a
    free “personal watermelon.” (It’s about the size of a cantaloupe.)
    I hope the Tigress will share her simple and delicious recipe for summer pudding.
    I remember a character in Robert Neill’s THE ELEGANT WITCH (set in early 1600s) being astonished by her first taste of a new vegetable called “potato.”
    There’s a fantastic catalogue of foods in the Trimalchio’s Feast segment of the SATYRICON of Petronius Arbiter; I particularly remember hedgehogs (presumably skinned!) dipped in honey and rolled in sesame seeds. I think it’s listed in the cookbook of Apicius, of which I have a copy. I have a modest collection of cookbooks, including Apicius, a
    couple of medieval ones, and (courtesy of dear Tigress) an
    original Mrs. Beeton–who, by the way, explains the green goose:
    TO DRESS A GREEN GOOSE.
    969. INGREDIENTS.–Goose, 3 oz. of butter, pepper and salt to taste.
    _Mode_.–Geese are called green till they are about four months old, and should not be stuffed. After it has been singed and trussed, the same as in the preceding recipe, put into the body a seasoning of pepper and
    salt, and the butter to moisten it inside. Roast before a clear fire for about 3/4 hour, froth and brown it nicely, and serve with a brown gravy, and, when liked, gooseberry-sauce. This dish should be garnished with
    water-cresses.
    When my grandparents lived in Los Altos, CA, they had a large garden, including raspberries, blackberries, and and strawberries. When we visited during my childhood, I would be sent out before dinner with a coffee can to pick it full of one or t’other; we would enjoy them still warm from the bush on top of vanilla ice cream.

    Reply
  31. Homemade ice cream brings back a lot of childhood memories for me. We would have a cookout and ice cream for dessert. Those old ice cream churns took such a long time. It was hard and tiring to turn and turn the handle, but nothing tastes more like summer than ice cream you make yourself.

    Reply
  32. Homemade ice cream brings back a lot of childhood memories for me. We would have a cookout and ice cream for dessert. Those old ice cream churns took such a long time. It was hard and tiring to turn and turn the handle, but nothing tastes more like summer than ice cream you make yourself.

    Reply
  33. Homemade ice cream brings back a lot of childhood memories for me. We would have a cookout and ice cream for dessert. Those old ice cream churns took such a long time. It was hard and tiring to turn and turn the handle, but nothing tastes more like summer than ice cream you make yourself.

    Reply
  34. Homemade ice cream brings back a lot of childhood memories for me. We would have a cookout and ice cream for dessert. Those old ice cream churns took such a long time. It was hard and tiring to turn and turn the handle, but nothing tastes more like summer than ice cream you make yourself.

    Reply
  35. Homemade ice cream brings back a lot of childhood memories for me. We would have a cookout and ice cream for dessert. Those old ice cream churns took such a long time. It was hard and tiring to turn and turn the handle, but nothing tastes more like summer than ice cream you make yourself.

    Reply
  36. That’s funny that you developed a taste for brussel sprouts in England. The exact opposite happened to my parents. They lived in Suffolk in the mid-60’s and said about the only vegetable ever served was brussel sprouts. To this day, they can barely stand to look at brussel sprouts – must less eat them.

    Reply
  37. That’s funny that you developed a taste for brussel sprouts in England. The exact opposite happened to my parents. They lived in Suffolk in the mid-60’s and said about the only vegetable ever served was brussel sprouts. To this day, they can barely stand to look at brussel sprouts – must less eat them.

    Reply
  38. That’s funny that you developed a taste for brussel sprouts in England. The exact opposite happened to my parents. They lived in Suffolk in the mid-60’s and said about the only vegetable ever served was brussel sprouts. To this day, they can barely stand to look at brussel sprouts – must less eat them.

    Reply
  39. That’s funny that you developed a taste for brussel sprouts in England. The exact opposite happened to my parents. They lived in Suffolk in the mid-60’s and said about the only vegetable ever served was brussel sprouts. To this day, they can barely stand to look at brussel sprouts – must less eat them.

    Reply
  40. That’s funny that you developed a taste for brussel sprouts in England. The exact opposite happened to my parents. They lived in Suffolk in the mid-60’s and said about the only vegetable ever served was brussel sprouts. To this day, they can barely stand to look at brussel sprouts – must less eat them.

    Reply
  41. Being a California baby, I grew up with an abundance of fresh and local produce. Farmers markets seem to be a way of life here (and I love them!). I even buy my pet food there (it’s organ meat and trimmings from an organic, grass-fed butcher; good for my dog and I feel great about using what would otherwise go to waste).
    Right now the heirloom tomatoes are in season and I’m just about tap-dancing with joy! Last night I cooked dinner for friends: Lasagna served on a bed of chopped heirloom tomatoes, sautΓ©ed until hot, but still meaty in texture. Sprinkle a little fresh basil on top and you’ve in heaven.
    I may overload and have an heirloom salad for lunch . . .
    On the seasonality of food, if anyone ever wants to know what their characters might have been eating, a lot of the period cookery books on Google Books list what is in season by month.

    Reply
  42. Being a California baby, I grew up with an abundance of fresh and local produce. Farmers markets seem to be a way of life here (and I love them!). I even buy my pet food there (it’s organ meat and trimmings from an organic, grass-fed butcher; good for my dog and I feel great about using what would otherwise go to waste).
    Right now the heirloom tomatoes are in season and I’m just about tap-dancing with joy! Last night I cooked dinner for friends: Lasagna served on a bed of chopped heirloom tomatoes, sautΓ©ed until hot, but still meaty in texture. Sprinkle a little fresh basil on top and you’ve in heaven.
    I may overload and have an heirloom salad for lunch . . .
    On the seasonality of food, if anyone ever wants to know what their characters might have been eating, a lot of the period cookery books on Google Books list what is in season by month.

    Reply
  43. Being a California baby, I grew up with an abundance of fresh and local produce. Farmers markets seem to be a way of life here (and I love them!). I even buy my pet food there (it’s organ meat and trimmings from an organic, grass-fed butcher; good for my dog and I feel great about using what would otherwise go to waste).
    Right now the heirloom tomatoes are in season and I’m just about tap-dancing with joy! Last night I cooked dinner for friends: Lasagna served on a bed of chopped heirloom tomatoes, sautΓ©ed until hot, but still meaty in texture. Sprinkle a little fresh basil on top and you’ve in heaven.
    I may overload and have an heirloom salad for lunch . . .
    On the seasonality of food, if anyone ever wants to know what their characters might have been eating, a lot of the period cookery books on Google Books list what is in season by month.

    Reply
  44. Being a California baby, I grew up with an abundance of fresh and local produce. Farmers markets seem to be a way of life here (and I love them!). I even buy my pet food there (it’s organ meat and trimmings from an organic, grass-fed butcher; good for my dog and I feel great about using what would otherwise go to waste).
    Right now the heirloom tomatoes are in season and I’m just about tap-dancing with joy! Last night I cooked dinner for friends: Lasagna served on a bed of chopped heirloom tomatoes, sautΓ©ed until hot, but still meaty in texture. Sprinkle a little fresh basil on top and you’ve in heaven.
    I may overload and have an heirloom salad for lunch . . .
    On the seasonality of food, if anyone ever wants to know what their characters might have been eating, a lot of the period cookery books on Google Books list what is in season by month.

    Reply
  45. Being a California baby, I grew up with an abundance of fresh and local produce. Farmers markets seem to be a way of life here (and I love them!). I even buy my pet food there (it’s organ meat and trimmings from an organic, grass-fed butcher; good for my dog and I feel great about using what would otherwise go to waste).
    Right now the heirloom tomatoes are in season and I’m just about tap-dancing with joy! Last night I cooked dinner for friends: Lasagna served on a bed of chopped heirloom tomatoes, sautΓ©ed until hot, but still meaty in texture. Sprinkle a little fresh basil on top and you’ve in heaven.
    I may overload and have an heirloom salad for lunch . . .
    On the seasonality of food, if anyone ever wants to know what their characters might have been eating, a lot of the period cookery books on Google Books list what is in season by month.

    Reply
  46. Kalen, I love good tomatoes prepared like that, too. Yum.
    Yes, the green goose is a young goose, which I assume led to the term “a green girl”, unless that was one Heyer made up.
    Has anyone compiled a list of Heyer’s creations. One I still see in books sometimes is basilicum powder.
    She created an excellent warning never to use other author’s research.
    Making your own ice cream is easy, you know, and well worth it. There are various machines, but we have a simple one with a container that’s kept in the freezer and holds the cold. Add ingredients, turn the handle occasionally, and there you are. Makes frozen yoghurt, sorbets etc etc, and kids can do it. They love that.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  47. Kalen, I love good tomatoes prepared like that, too. Yum.
    Yes, the green goose is a young goose, which I assume led to the term “a green girl”, unless that was one Heyer made up.
    Has anyone compiled a list of Heyer’s creations. One I still see in books sometimes is basilicum powder.
    She created an excellent warning never to use other author’s research.
    Making your own ice cream is easy, you know, and well worth it. There are various machines, but we have a simple one with a container that’s kept in the freezer and holds the cold. Add ingredients, turn the handle occasionally, and there you are. Makes frozen yoghurt, sorbets etc etc, and kids can do it. They love that.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  48. Kalen, I love good tomatoes prepared like that, too. Yum.
    Yes, the green goose is a young goose, which I assume led to the term “a green girl”, unless that was one Heyer made up.
    Has anyone compiled a list of Heyer’s creations. One I still see in books sometimes is basilicum powder.
    She created an excellent warning never to use other author’s research.
    Making your own ice cream is easy, you know, and well worth it. There are various machines, but we have a simple one with a container that’s kept in the freezer and holds the cold. Add ingredients, turn the handle occasionally, and there you are. Makes frozen yoghurt, sorbets etc etc, and kids can do it. They love that.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  49. Kalen, I love good tomatoes prepared like that, too. Yum.
    Yes, the green goose is a young goose, which I assume led to the term “a green girl”, unless that was one Heyer made up.
    Has anyone compiled a list of Heyer’s creations. One I still see in books sometimes is basilicum powder.
    She created an excellent warning never to use other author’s research.
    Making your own ice cream is easy, you know, and well worth it. There are various machines, but we have a simple one with a container that’s kept in the freezer and holds the cold. Add ingredients, turn the handle occasionally, and there you are. Makes frozen yoghurt, sorbets etc etc, and kids can do it. They love that.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  50. Kalen, I love good tomatoes prepared like that, too. Yum.
    Yes, the green goose is a young goose, which I assume led to the term “a green girl”, unless that was one Heyer made up.
    Has anyone compiled a list of Heyer’s creations. One I still see in books sometimes is basilicum powder.
    She created an excellent warning never to use other author’s research.
    Making your own ice cream is easy, you know, and well worth it. There are various machines, but we have a simple one with a container that’s kept in the freezer and holds the cold. Add ingredients, turn the handle occasionally, and there you are. Makes frozen yoghurt, sorbets etc etc, and kids can do it. They love that.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  51. Good gravy! I come home from vacation, where my in-laws did nothing but throw food at me, which I tried desperately not to eat, and you guys are all talking about FOOD!! *sigh*
    Can someone tell me what stewed cucumbers are?
    And I don’t eat oysters. I unfortunately, when I was little, bit one in half that my dad offered me. Haven’t been able to think of them without gagging since then.
    I do have a Romanian cookbook from the late 1800’s if anyone ever writes about that area. It’s got some great comfort food in it πŸ˜€
    I missed you all! Glad I’m back.

    Reply
  52. Good gravy! I come home from vacation, where my in-laws did nothing but throw food at me, which I tried desperately not to eat, and you guys are all talking about FOOD!! *sigh*
    Can someone tell me what stewed cucumbers are?
    And I don’t eat oysters. I unfortunately, when I was little, bit one in half that my dad offered me. Haven’t been able to think of them without gagging since then.
    I do have a Romanian cookbook from the late 1800’s if anyone ever writes about that area. It’s got some great comfort food in it πŸ˜€
    I missed you all! Glad I’m back.

    Reply
  53. Good gravy! I come home from vacation, where my in-laws did nothing but throw food at me, which I tried desperately not to eat, and you guys are all talking about FOOD!! *sigh*
    Can someone tell me what stewed cucumbers are?
    And I don’t eat oysters. I unfortunately, when I was little, bit one in half that my dad offered me. Haven’t been able to think of them without gagging since then.
    I do have a Romanian cookbook from the late 1800’s if anyone ever writes about that area. It’s got some great comfort food in it πŸ˜€
    I missed you all! Glad I’m back.

    Reply
  54. Good gravy! I come home from vacation, where my in-laws did nothing but throw food at me, which I tried desperately not to eat, and you guys are all talking about FOOD!! *sigh*
    Can someone tell me what stewed cucumbers are?
    And I don’t eat oysters. I unfortunately, when I was little, bit one in half that my dad offered me. Haven’t been able to think of them without gagging since then.
    I do have a Romanian cookbook from the late 1800’s if anyone ever writes about that area. It’s got some great comfort food in it πŸ˜€
    I missed you all! Glad I’m back.

    Reply
  55. Good gravy! I come home from vacation, where my in-laws did nothing but throw food at me, which I tried desperately not to eat, and you guys are all talking about FOOD!! *sigh*
    Can someone tell me what stewed cucumbers are?
    And I don’t eat oysters. I unfortunately, when I was little, bit one in half that my dad offered me. Haven’t been able to think of them without gagging since then.
    I do have a Romanian cookbook from the late 1800’s if anyone ever writes about that area. It’s got some great comfort food in it πŸ˜€
    I missed you all! Glad I’m back.

    Reply
  56. Those eels are amazing! I’ve seen the hooks in kitchens for the eels to be hung from so the skin can be peeled off, but I’ve never seen it done to an eel bigger than my arm! Those congers are monsters!!!

    Reply
  57. Those eels are amazing! I’ve seen the hooks in kitchens for the eels to be hung from so the skin can be peeled off, but I’ve never seen it done to an eel bigger than my arm! Those congers are monsters!!!

    Reply
  58. Those eels are amazing! I’ve seen the hooks in kitchens for the eels to be hung from so the skin can be peeled off, but I’ve never seen it done to an eel bigger than my arm! Those congers are monsters!!!

    Reply
  59. Those eels are amazing! I’ve seen the hooks in kitchens for the eels to be hung from so the skin can be peeled off, but I’ve never seen it done to an eel bigger than my arm! Those congers are monsters!!!

    Reply
  60. Those eels are amazing! I’ve seen the hooks in kitchens for the eels to be hung from so the skin can be peeled off, but I’ve never seen it done to an eel bigger than my arm! Those congers are monsters!!!

    Reply
  61. Stewed cucumbers? Ick! It’s hard to imagine anything but watery slime.
    Can you give us an example of typical Romanian food from back then? Perhaps something unusual to most of us?
    Jo

    Reply
  62. Stewed cucumbers? Ick! It’s hard to imagine anything but watery slime.
    Can you give us an example of typical Romanian food from back then? Perhaps something unusual to most of us?
    Jo

    Reply
  63. Stewed cucumbers? Ick! It’s hard to imagine anything but watery slime.
    Can you give us an example of typical Romanian food from back then? Perhaps something unusual to most of us?
    Jo

    Reply
  64. Stewed cucumbers? Ick! It’s hard to imagine anything but watery slime.
    Can you give us an example of typical Romanian food from back then? Perhaps something unusual to most of us?
    Jo

    Reply
  65. Stewed cucumbers? Ick! It’s hard to imagine anything but watery slime.
    Can you give us an example of typical Romanian food from back then? Perhaps something unusual to most of us?
    Jo

    Reply
  66. Okay, here goes…
    Limba Afumata
    Wash a smoked tongue (beef) in a few changes of hot water and put in a casserole with water to which have been added 2 cloves, a piece of laurel leaf, a few peppercorns, one onion and 1/2 C vinegar. Boil slowly for 2 hours or until cooked. (please don’t ask me how you’d tell if it’s cooked, you just can) Peel, cut into slices, arrange on a heated plate and garnish with hard boiled eggs sliced into quarters, olives and horseradish sauce. If you wish, you may boil the smoked tongue in plain water and serve with a well seasoned sauce.
    Now, for Limba De Porc Proaspata (Fresh Pork Tongue) you need:
    Pork tongues
    2tbs. Lard
    2tbs. Flour
    chives, thyme
    1tbs. Pulverized sugar
    1pt. Wine (my kind of sauce!)
    seedless raisins
    almonds and cloves
    Prepare the pork tongues exactly like the beef tongue. While they are boiling, prepare a brown sauce as follows:
    Heat in a deep iron pan 2 Tbs of lard or bacon drippings. When very hot add 2 heaping Tbs flour, stirring constantly. When light brown, add a little finely chopped chives and a little thyme, stir, then add one Tbs of pulverized sugar while stirring. When browned, thin slowly with one pint of GOOD wine and enough liquid in which the tongues have been cooked to make a sauce, neither too thick nor too thin. Taste and if needed, add more salt and sugar. Add a handful of rinsed seedless raisins, a handful of almonds which have been first scalded, peeled and then finely sliced, and a few cloves. Stir together and add the sliced tongue. Cook slowly for 1/2 hour, then serve with lemon sauce.
    Lemon Sauce:
    6 egg yolks
    1-1/8 Tbs flour
    4 lemons
    sugar
    1-1/2 Tbs butter
    4 to 6 Tbs white wine
    In a mixing casserole, beat 6 egg yolks a little, add the flour and mix. Add one full large cup of water, the juice of 4 lemons, enough sugar to be sweet to your taste, the grated peel of one lemon, 1-1/2 Tbs of sweet butter and 4-6 Tbs VERY good wine. As you put in each of the ingredients, mix in a little, then when the last one is added, mix all together well, but gently. Now place the casserole on the flame and with constant stirring, bring to a boil, but do not let it boil. Remove from the fire and press through a sieve. Serve immediately with any kind of roast or boiled meats.
    As you can see, France has not cornered the market on cooking with wine πŸ˜† and also, almost everything contains either wine or vinegar or sour cream. (Even the desserts) and talk about a cardiologist’s delight!!
    OH! Loretta!! I got the book, thank you so very much!!
    I have lots of Ciorba recipes, (sour soups), chicken liver stew, brains balls, stuffed carp…side dishes that aren’t sauerkraut…they probably didn’t eat a lot of these kinds of things in Regency England, did they? πŸ˜€

    Reply
  67. Okay, here goes…
    Limba Afumata
    Wash a smoked tongue (beef) in a few changes of hot water and put in a casserole with water to which have been added 2 cloves, a piece of laurel leaf, a few peppercorns, one onion and 1/2 C vinegar. Boil slowly for 2 hours or until cooked. (please don’t ask me how you’d tell if it’s cooked, you just can) Peel, cut into slices, arrange on a heated plate and garnish with hard boiled eggs sliced into quarters, olives and horseradish sauce. If you wish, you may boil the smoked tongue in plain water and serve with a well seasoned sauce.
    Now, for Limba De Porc Proaspata (Fresh Pork Tongue) you need:
    Pork tongues
    2tbs. Lard
    2tbs. Flour
    chives, thyme
    1tbs. Pulverized sugar
    1pt. Wine (my kind of sauce!)
    seedless raisins
    almonds and cloves
    Prepare the pork tongues exactly like the beef tongue. While they are boiling, prepare a brown sauce as follows:
    Heat in a deep iron pan 2 Tbs of lard or bacon drippings. When very hot add 2 heaping Tbs flour, stirring constantly. When light brown, add a little finely chopped chives and a little thyme, stir, then add one Tbs of pulverized sugar while stirring. When browned, thin slowly with one pint of GOOD wine and enough liquid in which the tongues have been cooked to make a sauce, neither too thick nor too thin. Taste and if needed, add more salt and sugar. Add a handful of rinsed seedless raisins, a handful of almonds which have been first scalded, peeled and then finely sliced, and a few cloves. Stir together and add the sliced tongue. Cook slowly for 1/2 hour, then serve with lemon sauce.
    Lemon Sauce:
    6 egg yolks
    1-1/8 Tbs flour
    4 lemons
    sugar
    1-1/2 Tbs butter
    4 to 6 Tbs white wine
    In a mixing casserole, beat 6 egg yolks a little, add the flour and mix. Add one full large cup of water, the juice of 4 lemons, enough sugar to be sweet to your taste, the grated peel of one lemon, 1-1/2 Tbs of sweet butter and 4-6 Tbs VERY good wine. As you put in each of the ingredients, mix in a little, then when the last one is added, mix all together well, but gently. Now place the casserole on the flame and with constant stirring, bring to a boil, but do not let it boil. Remove from the fire and press through a sieve. Serve immediately with any kind of roast or boiled meats.
    As you can see, France has not cornered the market on cooking with wine πŸ˜† and also, almost everything contains either wine or vinegar or sour cream. (Even the desserts) and talk about a cardiologist’s delight!!
    OH! Loretta!! I got the book, thank you so very much!!
    I have lots of Ciorba recipes, (sour soups), chicken liver stew, brains balls, stuffed carp…side dishes that aren’t sauerkraut…they probably didn’t eat a lot of these kinds of things in Regency England, did they? πŸ˜€

    Reply
  68. Okay, here goes…
    Limba Afumata
    Wash a smoked tongue (beef) in a few changes of hot water and put in a casserole with water to which have been added 2 cloves, a piece of laurel leaf, a few peppercorns, one onion and 1/2 C vinegar. Boil slowly for 2 hours or until cooked. (please don’t ask me how you’d tell if it’s cooked, you just can) Peel, cut into slices, arrange on a heated plate and garnish with hard boiled eggs sliced into quarters, olives and horseradish sauce. If you wish, you may boil the smoked tongue in plain water and serve with a well seasoned sauce.
    Now, for Limba De Porc Proaspata (Fresh Pork Tongue) you need:
    Pork tongues
    2tbs. Lard
    2tbs. Flour
    chives, thyme
    1tbs. Pulverized sugar
    1pt. Wine (my kind of sauce!)
    seedless raisins
    almonds and cloves
    Prepare the pork tongues exactly like the beef tongue. While they are boiling, prepare a brown sauce as follows:
    Heat in a deep iron pan 2 Tbs of lard or bacon drippings. When very hot add 2 heaping Tbs flour, stirring constantly. When light brown, add a little finely chopped chives and a little thyme, stir, then add one Tbs of pulverized sugar while stirring. When browned, thin slowly with one pint of GOOD wine and enough liquid in which the tongues have been cooked to make a sauce, neither too thick nor too thin. Taste and if needed, add more salt and sugar. Add a handful of rinsed seedless raisins, a handful of almonds which have been first scalded, peeled and then finely sliced, and a few cloves. Stir together and add the sliced tongue. Cook slowly for 1/2 hour, then serve with lemon sauce.
    Lemon Sauce:
    6 egg yolks
    1-1/8 Tbs flour
    4 lemons
    sugar
    1-1/2 Tbs butter
    4 to 6 Tbs white wine
    In a mixing casserole, beat 6 egg yolks a little, add the flour and mix. Add one full large cup of water, the juice of 4 lemons, enough sugar to be sweet to your taste, the grated peel of one lemon, 1-1/2 Tbs of sweet butter and 4-6 Tbs VERY good wine. As you put in each of the ingredients, mix in a little, then when the last one is added, mix all together well, but gently. Now place the casserole on the flame and with constant stirring, bring to a boil, but do not let it boil. Remove from the fire and press through a sieve. Serve immediately with any kind of roast or boiled meats.
    As you can see, France has not cornered the market on cooking with wine πŸ˜† and also, almost everything contains either wine or vinegar or sour cream. (Even the desserts) and talk about a cardiologist’s delight!!
    OH! Loretta!! I got the book, thank you so very much!!
    I have lots of Ciorba recipes, (sour soups), chicken liver stew, brains balls, stuffed carp…side dishes that aren’t sauerkraut…they probably didn’t eat a lot of these kinds of things in Regency England, did they? πŸ˜€

    Reply
  69. Okay, here goes…
    Limba Afumata
    Wash a smoked tongue (beef) in a few changes of hot water and put in a casserole with water to which have been added 2 cloves, a piece of laurel leaf, a few peppercorns, one onion and 1/2 C vinegar. Boil slowly for 2 hours or until cooked. (please don’t ask me how you’d tell if it’s cooked, you just can) Peel, cut into slices, arrange on a heated plate and garnish with hard boiled eggs sliced into quarters, olives and horseradish sauce. If you wish, you may boil the smoked tongue in plain water and serve with a well seasoned sauce.
    Now, for Limba De Porc Proaspata (Fresh Pork Tongue) you need:
    Pork tongues
    2tbs. Lard
    2tbs. Flour
    chives, thyme
    1tbs. Pulverized sugar
    1pt. Wine (my kind of sauce!)
    seedless raisins
    almonds and cloves
    Prepare the pork tongues exactly like the beef tongue. While they are boiling, prepare a brown sauce as follows:
    Heat in a deep iron pan 2 Tbs of lard or bacon drippings. When very hot add 2 heaping Tbs flour, stirring constantly. When light brown, add a little finely chopped chives and a little thyme, stir, then add one Tbs of pulverized sugar while stirring. When browned, thin slowly with one pint of GOOD wine and enough liquid in which the tongues have been cooked to make a sauce, neither too thick nor too thin. Taste and if needed, add more salt and sugar. Add a handful of rinsed seedless raisins, a handful of almonds which have been first scalded, peeled and then finely sliced, and a few cloves. Stir together and add the sliced tongue. Cook slowly for 1/2 hour, then serve with lemon sauce.
    Lemon Sauce:
    6 egg yolks
    1-1/8 Tbs flour
    4 lemons
    sugar
    1-1/2 Tbs butter
    4 to 6 Tbs white wine
    In a mixing casserole, beat 6 egg yolks a little, add the flour and mix. Add one full large cup of water, the juice of 4 lemons, enough sugar to be sweet to your taste, the grated peel of one lemon, 1-1/2 Tbs of sweet butter and 4-6 Tbs VERY good wine. As you put in each of the ingredients, mix in a little, then when the last one is added, mix all together well, but gently. Now place the casserole on the flame and with constant stirring, bring to a boil, but do not let it boil. Remove from the fire and press through a sieve. Serve immediately with any kind of roast or boiled meats.
    As you can see, France has not cornered the market on cooking with wine πŸ˜† and also, almost everything contains either wine or vinegar or sour cream. (Even the desserts) and talk about a cardiologist’s delight!!
    OH! Loretta!! I got the book, thank you so very much!!
    I have lots of Ciorba recipes, (sour soups), chicken liver stew, brains balls, stuffed carp…side dishes that aren’t sauerkraut…they probably didn’t eat a lot of these kinds of things in Regency England, did they? πŸ˜€

    Reply
  70. Okay, here goes…
    Limba Afumata
    Wash a smoked tongue (beef) in a few changes of hot water and put in a casserole with water to which have been added 2 cloves, a piece of laurel leaf, a few peppercorns, one onion and 1/2 C vinegar. Boil slowly for 2 hours or until cooked. (please don’t ask me how you’d tell if it’s cooked, you just can) Peel, cut into slices, arrange on a heated plate and garnish with hard boiled eggs sliced into quarters, olives and horseradish sauce. If you wish, you may boil the smoked tongue in plain water and serve with a well seasoned sauce.
    Now, for Limba De Porc Proaspata (Fresh Pork Tongue) you need:
    Pork tongues
    2tbs. Lard
    2tbs. Flour
    chives, thyme
    1tbs. Pulverized sugar
    1pt. Wine (my kind of sauce!)
    seedless raisins
    almonds and cloves
    Prepare the pork tongues exactly like the beef tongue. While they are boiling, prepare a brown sauce as follows:
    Heat in a deep iron pan 2 Tbs of lard or bacon drippings. When very hot add 2 heaping Tbs flour, stirring constantly. When light brown, add a little finely chopped chives and a little thyme, stir, then add one Tbs of pulverized sugar while stirring. When browned, thin slowly with one pint of GOOD wine and enough liquid in which the tongues have been cooked to make a sauce, neither too thick nor too thin. Taste and if needed, add more salt and sugar. Add a handful of rinsed seedless raisins, a handful of almonds which have been first scalded, peeled and then finely sliced, and a few cloves. Stir together and add the sliced tongue. Cook slowly for 1/2 hour, then serve with lemon sauce.
    Lemon Sauce:
    6 egg yolks
    1-1/8 Tbs flour
    4 lemons
    sugar
    1-1/2 Tbs butter
    4 to 6 Tbs white wine
    In a mixing casserole, beat 6 egg yolks a little, add the flour and mix. Add one full large cup of water, the juice of 4 lemons, enough sugar to be sweet to your taste, the grated peel of one lemon, 1-1/2 Tbs of sweet butter and 4-6 Tbs VERY good wine. As you put in each of the ingredients, mix in a little, then when the last one is added, mix all together well, but gently. Now place the casserole on the flame and with constant stirring, bring to a boil, but do not let it boil. Remove from the fire and press through a sieve. Serve immediately with any kind of roast or boiled meats.
    As you can see, France has not cornered the market on cooking with wine πŸ˜† and also, almost everything contains either wine or vinegar or sour cream. (Even the desserts) and talk about a cardiologist’s delight!!
    OH! Loretta!! I got the book, thank you so very much!!
    I have lots of Ciorba recipes, (sour soups), chicken liver stew, brains balls, stuffed carp…side dishes that aren’t sauerkraut…they probably didn’t eat a lot of these kinds of things in Regency England, did they? πŸ˜€

    Reply
  71. Theo, one (at least THIS one!) would need VAST QUANTITIES of wine to wash down the likes of this! Brains? Tongue? There’s probably a recipe for mole in there somewhere, too…

    Reply
  72. Theo, one (at least THIS one!) would need VAST QUANTITIES of wine to wash down the likes of this! Brains? Tongue? There’s probably a recipe for mole in there somewhere, too…

    Reply
  73. Theo, one (at least THIS one!) would need VAST QUANTITIES of wine to wash down the likes of this! Brains? Tongue? There’s probably a recipe for mole in there somewhere, too…

    Reply
  74. Theo, one (at least THIS one!) would need VAST QUANTITIES of wine to wash down the likes of this! Brains? Tongue? There’s probably a recipe for mole in there somewhere, too…

    Reply
  75. Theo, one (at least THIS one!) would need VAST QUANTITIES of wine to wash down the likes of this! Brains? Tongue? There’s probably a recipe for mole in there somewhere, too…

    Reply
  76. LOL Tal!!
    I do have a recipe for Ciuperci Umplute Cu Creeri…Mushrooms Stuffed with Brains but alas, that takes 1/4 cup of sherry, which I’m not fond of…
    Oh, and the Creeri De Vitel Fripi (Fried Veal Brains) and they have a very nice Wine Sauce (Creeri Cu Sos De Smantana Sau Vin) that they’re simmered in!
    Of course, if you’re going to prepare this stuff, I would think you’d need an extra bottle of wine to wash down your gag reflex as your cooking this stuff….
    But that’s the way they ate.
    And like I said, almost everything is soured, either with the wine, sauerkraut, sour cream, lemon and whipping cream…
    But then, you have cabbage and noodles…food of the gods!
    Did they eat brains during Regency and Victorian times? I never fully explored that. Just found a few recipes that fit my story and didn’t delve any deeper.

    Reply
  77. LOL Tal!!
    I do have a recipe for Ciuperci Umplute Cu Creeri…Mushrooms Stuffed with Brains but alas, that takes 1/4 cup of sherry, which I’m not fond of…
    Oh, and the Creeri De Vitel Fripi (Fried Veal Brains) and they have a very nice Wine Sauce (Creeri Cu Sos De Smantana Sau Vin) that they’re simmered in!
    Of course, if you’re going to prepare this stuff, I would think you’d need an extra bottle of wine to wash down your gag reflex as your cooking this stuff….
    But that’s the way they ate.
    And like I said, almost everything is soured, either with the wine, sauerkraut, sour cream, lemon and whipping cream…
    But then, you have cabbage and noodles…food of the gods!
    Did they eat brains during Regency and Victorian times? I never fully explored that. Just found a few recipes that fit my story and didn’t delve any deeper.

    Reply
  78. LOL Tal!!
    I do have a recipe for Ciuperci Umplute Cu Creeri…Mushrooms Stuffed with Brains but alas, that takes 1/4 cup of sherry, which I’m not fond of…
    Oh, and the Creeri De Vitel Fripi (Fried Veal Brains) and they have a very nice Wine Sauce (Creeri Cu Sos De Smantana Sau Vin) that they’re simmered in!
    Of course, if you’re going to prepare this stuff, I would think you’d need an extra bottle of wine to wash down your gag reflex as your cooking this stuff….
    But that’s the way they ate.
    And like I said, almost everything is soured, either with the wine, sauerkraut, sour cream, lemon and whipping cream…
    But then, you have cabbage and noodles…food of the gods!
    Did they eat brains during Regency and Victorian times? I never fully explored that. Just found a few recipes that fit my story and didn’t delve any deeper.

    Reply
  79. LOL Tal!!
    I do have a recipe for Ciuperci Umplute Cu Creeri…Mushrooms Stuffed with Brains but alas, that takes 1/4 cup of sherry, which I’m not fond of…
    Oh, and the Creeri De Vitel Fripi (Fried Veal Brains) and they have a very nice Wine Sauce (Creeri Cu Sos De Smantana Sau Vin) that they’re simmered in!
    Of course, if you’re going to prepare this stuff, I would think you’d need an extra bottle of wine to wash down your gag reflex as your cooking this stuff….
    But that’s the way they ate.
    And like I said, almost everything is soured, either with the wine, sauerkraut, sour cream, lemon and whipping cream…
    But then, you have cabbage and noodles…food of the gods!
    Did they eat brains during Regency and Victorian times? I never fully explored that. Just found a few recipes that fit my story and didn’t delve any deeper.

    Reply
  80. LOL Tal!!
    I do have a recipe for Ciuperci Umplute Cu Creeri…Mushrooms Stuffed with Brains but alas, that takes 1/4 cup of sherry, which I’m not fond of…
    Oh, and the Creeri De Vitel Fripi (Fried Veal Brains) and they have a very nice Wine Sauce (Creeri Cu Sos De Smantana Sau Vin) that they’re simmered in!
    Of course, if you’re going to prepare this stuff, I would think you’d need an extra bottle of wine to wash down your gag reflex as your cooking this stuff….
    But that’s the way they ate.
    And like I said, almost everything is soured, either with the wine, sauerkraut, sour cream, lemon and whipping cream…
    But then, you have cabbage and noodles…food of the gods!
    Did they eat brains during Regency and Victorian times? I never fully explored that. Just found a few recipes that fit my story and didn’t delve any deeper.

    Reply
  81. Theo, I’ll have to find my Jane Austen cookbook to answer that; but I think that historically organ meats have been the food of the lower classes. Wouldn’t want to swear to it, though. The only ones I am fond of are sauteed chicken livers with mushrooms and onions.
    The Tigress has returned from Wales and will post her summer pudding recipe (simplicity itself) tomorrow, she said.
    Oh, and speaking of ethnic delicacies, there’s a chapter in Steven Brust’s BROKEDOWN PALACE in which the characters indulge in a traditional (it’s another planet but the food is Hungarian) meal; it should not be read by anyone more than a block from a Hungarian restaurant on pain of intense suffering. After each course, another button on the waistband gets undone…

    Reply
  82. Theo, I’ll have to find my Jane Austen cookbook to answer that; but I think that historically organ meats have been the food of the lower classes. Wouldn’t want to swear to it, though. The only ones I am fond of are sauteed chicken livers with mushrooms and onions.
    The Tigress has returned from Wales and will post her summer pudding recipe (simplicity itself) tomorrow, she said.
    Oh, and speaking of ethnic delicacies, there’s a chapter in Steven Brust’s BROKEDOWN PALACE in which the characters indulge in a traditional (it’s another planet but the food is Hungarian) meal; it should not be read by anyone more than a block from a Hungarian restaurant on pain of intense suffering. After each course, another button on the waistband gets undone…

    Reply
  83. Theo, I’ll have to find my Jane Austen cookbook to answer that; but I think that historically organ meats have been the food of the lower classes. Wouldn’t want to swear to it, though. The only ones I am fond of are sauteed chicken livers with mushrooms and onions.
    The Tigress has returned from Wales and will post her summer pudding recipe (simplicity itself) tomorrow, she said.
    Oh, and speaking of ethnic delicacies, there’s a chapter in Steven Brust’s BROKEDOWN PALACE in which the characters indulge in a traditional (it’s another planet but the food is Hungarian) meal; it should not be read by anyone more than a block from a Hungarian restaurant on pain of intense suffering. After each course, another button on the waistband gets undone…

    Reply
  84. Theo, I’ll have to find my Jane Austen cookbook to answer that; but I think that historically organ meats have been the food of the lower classes. Wouldn’t want to swear to it, though. The only ones I am fond of are sauteed chicken livers with mushrooms and onions.
    The Tigress has returned from Wales and will post her summer pudding recipe (simplicity itself) tomorrow, she said.
    Oh, and speaking of ethnic delicacies, there’s a chapter in Steven Brust’s BROKEDOWN PALACE in which the characters indulge in a traditional (it’s another planet but the food is Hungarian) meal; it should not be read by anyone more than a block from a Hungarian restaurant on pain of intense suffering. After each course, another button on the waistband gets undone…

    Reply
  85. Theo, I’ll have to find my Jane Austen cookbook to answer that; but I think that historically organ meats have been the food of the lower classes. Wouldn’t want to swear to it, though. The only ones I am fond of are sauteed chicken livers with mushrooms and onions.
    The Tigress has returned from Wales and will post her summer pudding recipe (simplicity itself) tomorrow, she said.
    Oh, and speaking of ethnic delicacies, there’s a chapter in Steven Brust’s BROKEDOWN PALACE in which the characters indulge in a traditional (it’s another planet but the food is Hungarian) meal; it should not be read by anyone more than a block from a Hungarian restaurant on pain of intense suffering. After each course, another button on the waistband gets undone…

    Reply
  86. JO! I found a recipe for Stewed Cucumbers and though they all seemed the same, regardless of country, this one rather stood out for the comments at the end, and no, I don’t think they look all that tasty either…
    STEWED CUCUMBERS II
    Several cucumbers, sliced thick
    chopped onion (optional)
    Salt
    1/2 c. vinegar
    Pepper
    2 tbs. butter
    1 tbs. flour
    Cut your cucumbers into thick slices, add some chopped onions, if liked, and some salt; let them simmer over a slow fire, till done enough; then pour off a large portion of the liquor [water in which vegetables cooked], and add a little vinegar, pepper, butter and flour; let them stew a few minutes longer, and serve them up with the sauce.
    Comment: Rare indeed today is the notion of cooking a cucumber. The vast majority, of course, are made into pickles, and the remainder doomed to decorate restaurant salads from which they are quietly picked off and ignored or pushed down to drown under the dressing.
    Boiled or stewed cucumbers were recommended to those who suffered digestive upset upon eating the vegetable in its raw state. Considering what else people ate in those days we doubt that cucumbers were the main culprit in the epidemic of “dyspepsia” which ravaged the populace, but it couldn’t have helped either.
    From The Carolina Housewife by Sarah Rutledge, 1847 featured on Civil War Interactive.
    Tal,
    Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, Romanian, they’re all fairly close in their ingredients and recipes. And yes, this would be why my in-laws kept throwing food at me on vacation. They’re always throwing food at me and hate taking no for an answer. Of course, my maternal family was pure Scots and I love Haggis but I understand that must be an acquired taste. I grew up on it so don’t give it another thought. That and black pudding but you can’t make that here anymore unless you slaughter the cow yourself because I can’t find anywhere that I can find beef blood. At least not around me.

    Reply
  87. JO! I found a recipe for Stewed Cucumbers and though they all seemed the same, regardless of country, this one rather stood out for the comments at the end, and no, I don’t think they look all that tasty either…
    STEWED CUCUMBERS II
    Several cucumbers, sliced thick
    chopped onion (optional)
    Salt
    1/2 c. vinegar
    Pepper
    2 tbs. butter
    1 tbs. flour
    Cut your cucumbers into thick slices, add some chopped onions, if liked, and some salt; let them simmer over a slow fire, till done enough; then pour off a large portion of the liquor [water in which vegetables cooked], and add a little vinegar, pepper, butter and flour; let them stew a few minutes longer, and serve them up with the sauce.
    Comment: Rare indeed today is the notion of cooking a cucumber. The vast majority, of course, are made into pickles, and the remainder doomed to decorate restaurant salads from which they are quietly picked off and ignored or pushed down to drown under the dressing.
    Boiled or stewed cucumbers were recommended to those who suffered digestive upset upon eating the vegetable in its raw state. Considering what else people ate in those days we doubt that cucumbers were the main culprit in the epidemic of “dyspepsia” which ravaged the populace, but it couldn’t have helped either.
    From The Carolina Housewife by Sarah Rutledge, 1847 featured on Civil War Interactive.
    Tal,
    Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, Romanian, they’re all fairly close in their ingredients and recipes. And yes, this would be why my in-laws kept throwing food at me on vacation. They’re always throwing food at me and hate taking no for an answer. Of course, my maternal family was pure Scots and I love Haggis but I understand that must be an acquired taste. I grew up on it so don’t give it another thought. That and black pudding but you can’t make that here anymore unless you slaughter the cow yourself because I can’t find anywhere that I can find beef blood. At least not around me.

    Reply
  88. JO! I found a recipe for Stewed Cucumbers and though they all seemed the same, regardless of country, this one rather stood out for the comments at the end, and no, I don’t think they look all that tasty either…
    STEWED CUCUMBERS II
    Several cucumbers, sliced thick
    chopped onion (optional)
    Salt
    1/2 c. vinegar
    Pepper
    2 tbs. butter
    1 tbs. flour
    Cut your cucumbers into thick slices, add some chopped onions, if liked, and some salt; let them simmer over a slow fire, till done enough; then pour off a large portion of the liquor [water in which vegetables cooked], and add a little vinegar, pepper, butter and flour; let them stew a few minutes longer, and serve them up with the sauce.
    Comment: Rare indeed today is the notion of cooking a cucumber. The vast majority, of course, are made into pickles, and the remainder doomed to decorate restaurant salads from which they are quietly picked off and ignored or pushed down to drown under the dressing.
    Boiled or stewed cucumbers were recommended to those who suffered digestive upset upon eating the vegetable in its raw state. Considering what else people ate in those days we doubt that cucumbers were the main culprit in the epidemic of “dyspepsia” which ravaged the populace, but it couldn’t have helped either.
    From The Carolina Housewife by Sarah Rutledge, 1847 featured on Civil War Interactive.
    Tal,
    Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, Romanian, they’re all fairly close in their ingredients and recipes. And yes, this would be why my in-laws kept throwing food at me on vacation. They’re always throwing food at me and hate taking no for an answer. Of course, my maternal family was pure Scots and I love Haggis but I understand that must be an acquired taste. I grew up on it so don’t give it another thought. That and black pudding but you can’t make that here anymore unless you slaughter the cow yourself because I can’t find anywhere that I can find beef blood. At least not around me.

    Reply
  89. JO! I found a recipe for Stewed Cucumbers and though they all seemed the same, regardless of country, this one rather stood out for the comments at the end, and no, I don’t think they look all that tasty either…
    STEWED CUCUMBERS II
    Several cucumbers, sliced thick
    chopped onion (optional)
    Salt
    1/2 c. vinegar
    Pepper
    2 tbs. butter
    1 tbs. flour
    Cut your cucumbers into thick slices, add some chopped onions, if liked, and some salt; let them simmer over a slow fire, till done enough; then pour off a large portion of the liquor [water in which vegetables cooked], and add a little vinegar, pepper, butter and flour; let them stew a few minutes longer, and serve them up with the sauce.
    Comment: Rare indeed today is the notion of cooking a cucumber. The vast majority, of course, are made into pickles, and the remainder doomed to decorate restaurant salads from which they are quietly picked off and ignored or pushed down to drown under the dressing.
    Boiled or stewed cucumbers were recommended to those who suffered digestive upset upon eating the vegetable in its raw state. Considering what else people ate in those days we doubt that cucumbers were the main culprit in the epidemic of “dyspepsia” which ravaged the populace, but it couldn’t have helped either.
    From The Carolina Housewife by Sarah Rutledge, 1847 featured on Civil War Interactive.
    Tal,
    Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, Romanian, they’re all fairly close in their ingredients and recipes. And yes, this would be why my in-laws kept throwing food at me on vacation. They’re always throwing food at me and hate taking no for an answer. Of course, my maternal family was pure Scots and I love Haggis but I understand that must be an acquired taste. I grew up on it so don’t give it another thought. That and black pudding but you can’t make that here anymore unless you slaughter the cow yourself because I can’t find anywhere that I can find beef blood. At least not around me.

    Reply
  90. JO! I found a recipe for Stewed Cucumbers and though they all seemed the same, regardless of country, this one rather stood out for the comments at the end, and no, I don’t think they look all that tasty either…
    STEWED CUCUMBERS II
    Several cucumbers, sliced thick
    chopped onion (optional)
    Salt
    1/2 c. vinegar
    Pepper
    2 tbs. butter
    1 tbs. flour
    Cut your cucumbers into thick slices, add some chopped onions, if liked, and some salt; let them simmer over a slow fire, till done enough; then pour off a large portion of the liquor [water in which vegetables cooked], and add a little vinegar, pepper, butter and flour; let them stew a few minutes longer, and serve them up with the sauce.
    Comment: Rare indeed today is the notion of cooking a cucumber. The vast majority, of course, are made into pickles, and the remainder doomed to decorate restaurant salads from which they are quietly picked off and ignored or pushed down to drown under the dressing.
    Boiled or stewed cucumbers were recommended to those who suffered digestive upset upon eating the vegetable in its raw state. Considering what else people ate in those days we doubt that cucumbers were the main culprit in the epidemic of “dyspepsia” which ravaged the populace, but it couldn’t have helped either.
    From The Carolina Housewife by Sarah Rutledge, 1847 featured on Civil War Interactive.
    Tal,
    Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, Romanian, they’re all fairly close in their ingredients and recipes. And yes, this would be why my in-laws kept throwing food at me on vacation. They’re always throwing food at me and hate taking no for an answer. Of course, my maternal family was pure Scots and I love Haggis but I understand that must be an acquired taste. I grew up on it so don’t give it another thought. That and black pudding but you can’t make that here anymore unless you slaughter the cow yourself because I can’t find anywhere that I can find beef blood. At least not around me.

    Reply
  91. Theo, the dishes described in BROKEDOWN PALACE (and other books by Brust) sound a lot more delectable than the ones you listed. I can’t stand vinegar, and organ meats aren’t my thing either; your recipes lack only okra to make me declare war on Romania…
    As for cucumbers, I like them raw. Alternated slices of cucumber and tomato in dressing make a nice alternative to a green salad.
    Also, I keep a bottle of cucumber eau de cologne in the fridge. Great spritz for when you come in out of a 110-degree day!

    Reply
  92. Theo, the dishes described in BROKEDOWN PALACE (and other books by Brust) sound a lot more delectable than the ones you listed. I can’t stand vinegar, and organ meats aren’t my thing either; your recipes lack only okra to make me declare war on Romania…
    As for cucumbers, I like them raw. Alternated slices of cucumber and tomato in dressing make a nice alternative to a green salad.
    Also, I keep a bottle of cucumber eau de cologne in the fridge. Great spritz for when you come in out of a 110-degree day!

    Reply
  93. Theo, the dishes described in BROKEDOWN PALACE (and other books by Brust) sound a lot more delectable than the ones you listed. I can’t stand vinegar, and organ meats aren’t my thing either; your recipes lack only okra to make me declare war on Romania…
    As for cucumbers, I like them raw. Alternated slices of cucumber and tomato in dressing make a nice alternative to a green salad.
    Also, I keep a bottle of cucumber eau de cologne in the fridge. Great spritz for when you come in out of a 110-degree day!

    Reply
  94. Theo, the dishes described in BROKEDOWN PALACE (and other books by Brust) sound a lot more delectable than the ones you listed. I can’t stand vinegar, and organ meats aren’t my thing either; your recipes lack only okra to make me declare war on Romania…
    As for cucumbers, I like them raw. Alternated slices of cucumber and tomato in dressing make a nice alternative to a green salad.
    Also, I keep a bottle of cucumber eau de cologne in the fridge. Great spritz for when you come in out of a 110-degree day!

    Reply
  95. Theo, the dishes described in BROKEDOWN PALACE (and other books by Brust) sound a lot more delectable than the ones you listed. I can’t stand vinegar, and organ meats aren’t my thing either; your recipes lack only okra to make me declare war on Romania…
    As for cucumbers, I like them raw. Alternated slices of cucumber and tomato in dressing make a nice alternative to a green salad.
    Also, I keep a bottle of cucumber eau de cologne in the fridge. Great spritz for when you come in out of a 110-degree day!

    Reply
  96. Tal, there must be 20 recipes for okra in that recipe book. I just didn’t have the heart to gross everyone out because okra to me is God’s joke on the vegetable world…thankfully, that’s one dish my in-laws can’t stand. My FIL is Romanian and my MIL is Czech. I probably should clarify that. But that’s why I have so many recipes for that too.
    Now, if you want a really excellent soup, and you like Green Beans, Green Bean Soup is awesome!!
    Simmer a ham bone that has some meat attached, in just enough water to cover it. Add one huge sweet onion, two large toes of garlic, minced, pepper to taste and let it simmer for three hours or so, or until liquid is halved.
    Remove bone and clean meat away. Put meat and cleaned bone back into broth, season with more pepper or a bit of salt to taste and add one ‘family size’ bag frozen green beans. Bring to boil and simmer for half an hour.
    In the meantime, beat a dozen eggs in a large bowl and sprinkle with paprika. When the half hour has passed, remove the ham bone, bring back to a slow boil and whisk in the eggs, stirring constantly to break them up. Simmer for a few minutes until eggs are firm. Turn off heat and add 8-12 ounces sour cream, blending through broth.
    Serve with a huge loaf of round bread slathered with lots of butter.
    This is better the next day but don’t boil it to reheat or the sour cream will curdle. We have this once every week or two in the winter. It’s probably one of the best soup recipes I’ve ever eaten.
    If you like cabbage, let me know, I’ll give you the cabbage and noodle recipe.
    I need to read Brokedown Palace (don’t hit me! I just never read it!) to see the recipes in there.
    My father’s parents came from England so we ate a lot of pasties (they emigrated from Cornwall), Steak and Kidney Pie, lots of traditional English dishes when we ate there. However, my Scots mother and my English grandmother never got along so my mother refused to cook anything English on principle…go figure πŸ˜‰
    Life was never boring at family gatherings though πŸ˜†

    Reply
  97. Tal, there must be 20 recipes for okra in that recipe book. I just didn’t have the heart to gross everyone out because okra to me is God’s joke on the vegetable world…thankfully, that’s one dish my in-laws can’t stand. My FIL is Romanian and my MIL is Czech. I probably should clarify that. But that’s why I have so many recipes for that too.
    Now, if you want a really excellent soup, and you like Green Beans, Green Bean Soup is awesome!!
    Simmer a ham bone that has some meat attached, in just enough water to cover it. Add one huge sweet onion, two large toes of garlic, minced, pepper to taste and let it simmer for three hours or so, or until liquid is halved.
    Remove bone and clean meat away. Put meat and cleaned bone back into broth, season with more pepper or a bit of salt to taste and add one ‘family size’ bag frozen green beans. Bring to boil and simmer for half an hour.
    In the meantime, beat a dozen eggs in a large bowl and sprinkle with paprika. When the half hour has passed, remove the ham bone, bring back to a slow boil and whisk in the eggs, stirring constantly to break them up. Simmer for a few minutes until eggs are firm. Turn off heat and add 8-12 ounces sour cream, blending through broth.
    Serve with a huge loaf of round bread slathered with lots of butter.
    This is better the next day but don’t boil it to reheat or the sour cream will curdle. We have this once every week or two in the winter. It’s probably one of the best soup recipes I’ve ever eaten.
    If you like cabbage, let me know, I’ll give you the cabbage and noodle recipe.
    I need to read Brokedown Palace (don’t hit me! I just never read it!) to see the recipes in there.
    My father’s parents came from England so we ate a lot of pasties (they emigrated from Cornwall), Steak and Kidney Pie, lots of traditional English dishes when we ate there. However, my Scots mother and my English grandmother never got along so my mother refused to cook anything English on principle…go figure πŸ˜‰
    Life was never boring at family gatherings though πŸ˜†

    Reply
  98. Tal, there must be 20 recipes for okra in that recipe book. I just didn’t have the heart to gross everyone out because okra to me is God’s joke on the vegetable world…thankfully, that’s one dish my in-laws can’t stand. My FIL is Romanian and my MIL is Czech. I probably should clarify that. But that’s why I have so many recipes for that too.
    Now, if you want a really excellent soup, and you like Green Beans, Green Bean Soup is awesome!!
    Simmer a ham bone that has some meat attached, in just enough water to cover it. Add one huge sweet onion, two large toes of garlic, minced, pepper to taste and let it simmer for three hours or so, or until liquid is halved.
    Remove bone and clean meat away. Put meat and cleaned bone back into broth, season with more pepper or a bit of salt to taste and add one ‘family size’ bag frozen green beans. Bring to boil and simmer for half an hour.
    In the meantime, beat a dozen eggs in a large bowl and sprinkle with paprika. When the half hour has passed, remove the ham bone, bring back to a slow boil and whisk in the eggs, stirring constantly to break them up. Simmer for a few minutes until eggs are firm. Turn off heat and add 8-12 ounces sour cream, blending through broth.
    Serve with a huge loaf of round bread slathered with lots of butter.
    This is better the next day but don’t boil it to reheat or the sour cream will curdle. We have this once every week or two in the winter. It’s probably one of the best soup recipes I’ve ever eaten.
    If you like cabbage, let me know, I’ll give you the cabbage and noodle recipe.
    I need to read Brokedown Palace (don’t hit me! I just never read it!) to see the recipes in there.
    My father’s parents came from England so we ate a lot of pasties (they emigrated from Cornwall), Steak and Kidney Pie, lots of traditional English dishes when we ate there. However, my Scots mother and my English grandmother never got along so my mother refused to cook anything English on principle…go figure πŸ˜‰
    Life was never boring at family gatherings though πŸ˜†

    Reply
  99. Tal, there must be 20 recipes for okra in that recipe book. I just didn’t have the heart to gross everyone out because okra to me is God’s joke on the vegetable world…thankfully, that’s one dish my in-laws can’t stand. My FIL is Romanian and my MIL is Czech. I probably should clarify that. But that’s why I have so many recipes for that too.
    Now, if you want a really excellent soup, and you like Green Beans, Green Bean Soup is awesome!!
    Simmer a ham bone that has some meat attached, in just enough water to cover it. Add one huge sweet onion, two large toes of garlic, minced, pepper to taste and let it simmer for three hours or so, or until liquid is halved.
    Remove bone and clean meat away. Put meat and cleaned bone back into broth, season with more pepper or a bit of salt to taste and add one ‘family size’ bag frozen green beans. Bring to boil and simmer for half an hour.
    In the meantime, beat a dozen eggs in a large bowl and sprinkle with paprika. When the half hour has passed, remove the ham bone, bring back to a slow boil and whisk in the eggs, stirring constantly to break them up. Simmer for a few minutes until eggs are firm. Turn off heat and add 8-12 ounces sour cream, blending through broth.
    Serve with a huge loaf of round bread slathered with lots of butter.
    This is better the next day but don’t boil it to reheat or the sour cream will curdle. We have this once every week or two in the winter. It’s probably one of the best soup recipes I’ve ever eaten.
    If you like cabbage, let me know, I’ll give you the cabbage and noodle recipe.
    I need to read Brokedown Palace (don’t hit me! I just never read it!) to see the recipes in there.
    My father’s parents came from England so we ate a lot of pasties (they emigrated from Cornwall), Steak and Kidney Pie, lots of traditional English dishes when we ate there. However, my Scots mother and my English grandmother never got along so my mother refused to cook anything English on principle…go figure πŸ˜‰
    Life was never boring at family gatherings though πŸ˜†

    Reply
  100. Tal, there must be 20 recipes for okra in that recipe book. I just didn’t have the heart to gross everyone out because okra to me is God’s joke on the vegetable world…thankfully, that’s one dish my in-laws can’t stand. My FIL is Romanian and my MIL is Czech. I probably should clarify that. But that’s why I have so many recipes for that too.
    Now, if you want a really excellent soup, and you like Green Beans, Green Bean Soup is awesome!!
    Simmer a ham bone that has some meat attached, in just enough water to cover it. Add one huge sweet onion, two large toes of garlic, minced, pepper to taste and let it simmer for three hours or so, or until liquid is halved.
    Remove bone and clean meat away. Put meat and cleaned bone back into broth, season with more pepper or a bit of salt to taste and add one ‘family size’ bag frozen green beans. Bring to boil and simmer for half an hour.
    In the meantime, beat a dozen eggs in a large bowl and sprinkle with paprika. When the half hour has passed, remove the ham bone, bring back to a slow boil and whisk in the eggs, stirring constantly to break them up. Simmer for a few minutes until eggs are firm. Turn off heat and add 8-12 ounces sour cream, blending through broth.
    Serve with a huge loaf of round bread slathered with lots of butter.
    This is better the next day but don’t boil it to reheat or the sour cream will curdle. We have this once every week or two in the winter. It’s probably one of the best soup recipes I’ve ever eaten.
    If you like cabbage, let me know, I’ll give you the cabbage and noodle recipe.
    I need to read Brokedown Palace (don’t hit me! I just never read it!) to see the recipes in there.
    My father’s parents came from England so we ate a lot of pasties (they emigrated from Cornwall), Steak and Kidney Pie, lots of traditional English dishes when we ate there. However, my Scots mother and my English grandmother never got along so my mother refused to cook anything English on principle…go figure πŸ˜‰
    Life was never boring at family gatherings though πŸ˜†

    Reply
  101. Tongue? I like tongue. If you haven’t tried it, do. It’s quite common as a cold meat in Britain. I must say it was disconcerting when my mother brought one home to cook. Beef tongues are enormous, and there’s that tongue skin….
    Theo, re boiled cucumbers, amazing what people will eat if ill. As for dyspepsia, cukes are know to give people gas. They do it to me — very nasty swelling upper intestine gas — but only the north American type. The long English type are fine, which is why they’re called “burpless.” But if people over here have a prejudice against cucumbers, that could be why. In my experience people in England don’t usually avoid the cukes in their salads. In fact, there are the famous cucumber sandwiches, which are very nice. Salmond and cucumber sandwiches are lovely, too.
    I like black pudding, made properly and it is hard to find. A butcher up in Victoria has some, and he doesn’t make it himself, so it must be commercially available somewhere.
    As for “variety meats” in the past, the upper classes certainly ate kidney, and I think brain was considered a delicacy, as were sweetbreads. Then there’s ox-tail soup. I don’t have time to dig through my old cookery sources (off to Oz tomorrow, and in the way of life this weekend is turning out to be busy) but I don’t think they had the same mindset about it. For example, oysters were common food.
    Thanks for some great chat about food. We’ll have to blog about it again.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  102. Tongue? I like tongue. If you haven’t tried it, do. It’s quite common as a cold meat in Britain. I must say it was disconcerting when my mother brought one home to cook. Beef tongues are enormous, and there’s that tongue skin….
    Theo, re boiled cucumbers, amazing what people will eat if ill. As for dyspepsia, cukes are know to give people gas. They do it to me — very nasty swelling upper intestine gas — but only the north American type. The long English type are fine, which is why they’re called “burpless.” But if people over here have a prejudice against cucumbers, that could be why. In my experience people in England don’t usually avoid the cukes in their salads. In fact, there are the famous cucumber sandwiches, which are very nice. Salmond and cucumber sandwiches are lovely, too.
    I like black pudding, made properly and it is hard to find. A butcher up in Victoria has some, and he doesn’t make it himself, so it must be commercially available somewhere.
    As for “variety meats” in the past, the upper classes certainly ate kidney, and I think brain was considered a delicacy, as were sweetbreads. Then there’s ox-tail soup. I don’t have time to dig through my old cookery sources (off to Oz tomorrow, and in the way of life this weekend is turning out to be busy) but I don’t think they had the same mindset about it. For example, oysters were common food.
    Thanks for some great chat about food. We’ll have to blog about it again.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  103. Tongue? I like tongue. If you haven’t tried it, do. It’s quite common as a cold meat in Britain. I must say it was disconcerting when my mother brought one home to cook. Beef tongues are enormous, and there’s that tongue skin….
    Theo, re boiled cucumbers, amazing what people will eat if ill. As for dyspepsia, cukes are know to give people gas. They do it to me — very nasty swelling upper intestine gas — but only the north American type. The long English type are fine, which is why they’re called “burpless.” But if people over here have a prejudice against cucumbers, that could be why. In my experience people in England don’t usually avoid the cukes in their salads. In fact, there are the famous cucumber sandwiches, which are very nice. Salmond and cucumber sandwiches are lovely, too.
    I like black pudding, made properly and it is hard to find. A butcher up in Victoria has some, and he doesn’t make it himself, so it must be commercially available somewhere.
    As for “variety meats” in the past, the upper classes certainly ate kidney, and I think brain was considered a delicacy, as were sweetbreads. Then there’s ox-tail soup. I don’t have time to dig through my old cookery sources (off to Oz tomorrow, and in the way of life this weekend is turning out to be busy) but I don’t think they had the same mindset about it. For example, oysters were common food.
    Thanks for some great chat about food. We’ll have to blog about it again.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  104. Tongue? I like tongue. If you haven’t tried it, do. It’s quite common as a cold meat in Britain. I must say it was disconcerting when my mother brought one home to cook. Beef tongues are enormous, and there’s that tongue skin….
    Theo, re boiled cucumbers, amazing what people will eat if ill. As for dyspepsia, cukes are know to give people gas. They do it to me — very nasty swelling upper intestine gas — but only the north American type. The long English type are fine, which is why they’re called “burpless.” But if people over here have a prejudice against cucumbers, that could be why. In my experience people in England don’t usually avoid the cukes in their salads. In fact, there are the famous cucumber sandwiches, which are very nice. Salmond and cucumber sandwiches are lovely, too.
    I like black pudding, made properly and it is hard to find. A butcher up in Victoria has some, and he doesn’t make it himself, so it must be commercially available somewhere.
    As for “variety meats” in the past, the upper classes certainly ate kidney, and I think brain was considered a delicacy, as were sweetbreads. Then there’s ox-tail soup. I don’t have time to dig through my old cookery sources (off to Oz tomorrow, and in the way of life this weekend is turning out to be busy) but I don’t think they had the same mindset about it. For example, oysters were common food.
    Thanks for some great chat about food. We’ll have to blog about it again.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  105. Tongue? I like tongue. If you haven’t tried it, do. It’s quite common as a cold meat in Britain. I must say it was disconcerting when my mother brought one home to cook. Beef tongues are enormous, and there’s that tongue skin….
    Theo, re boiled cucumbers, amazing what people will eat if ill. As for dyspepsia, cukes are know to give people gas. They do it to me — very nasty swelling upper intestine gas — but only the north American type. The long English type are fine, which is why they’re called “burpless.” But if people over here have a prejudice against cucumbers, that could be why. In my experience people in England don’t usually avoid the cukes in their salads. In fact, there are the famous cucumber sandwiches, which are very nice. Salmond and cucumber sandwiches are lovely, too.
    I like black pudding, made properly and it is hard to find. A butcher up in Victoria has some, and he doesn’t make it himself, so it must be commercially available somewhere.
    As for “variety meats” in the past, the upper classes certainly ate kidney, and I think brain was considered a delicacy, as were sweetbreads. Then there’s ox-tail soup. I don’t have time to dig through my old cookery sources (off to Oz tomorrow, and in the way of life this weekend is turning out to be busy) but I don’t think they had the same mindset about it. For example, oysters were common food.
    Thanks for some great chat about food. We’ll have to blog about it again.
    Jo πŸ™‚

    Reply
  106. Oh, of course! I forgot about steak-and-kidney pie!
    Theo, I’m afraid BROKEDOWN PALACE doesn’t have recipes, just names of dishes. It’s a really good read. I hope you can find it–it’s an OOP paperback original from many years ago.

    Reply
  107. Oh, of course! I forgot about steak-and-kidney pie!
    Theo, I’m afraid BROKEDOWN PALACE doesn’t have recipes, just names of dishes. It’s a really good read. I hope you can find it–it’s an OOP paperback original from many years ago.

    Reply
  108. Oh, of course! I forgot about steak-and-kidney pie!
    Theo, I’m afraid BROKEDOWN PALACE doesn’t have recipes, just names of dishes. It’s a really good read. I hope you can find it–it’s an OOP paperback original from many years ago.

    Reply
  109. Oh, of course! I forgot about steak-and-kidney pie!
    Theo, I’m afraid BROKEDOWN PALACE doesn’t have recipes, just names of dishes. It’s a really good read. I hope you can find it–it’s an OOP paperback original from many years ago.

    Reply
  110. Oh, of course! I forgot about steak-and-kidney pie!
    Theo, I’m afraid BROKEDOWN PALACE doesn’t have recipes, just names of dishes. It’s a really good read. I hope you can find it–it’s an OOP paperback original from many years ago.

    Reply
  111. Summer Pudding: so ridiculously simple it hardly seems worth mentioning. Surely everyone already knows how to make it?
    One basin and a saucer that will fit neatly just inside the top of said basin.
    Some good white bread, and a quantity of lightly-cooked summer soft fruit that will fill the basin: the fruit can be any combination of blackberries, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants, whitecurrants, bilberries (i.e. blueberries), strawberries, gooseberries etc.
    Lightly butter the inside of the basin. Line it carefully with slices of white bread – leave no gaps. The bread will stick nicely to the butter. Fill the lined basin with the cooled stewed fruit (it may be necessary to keep back some of the juice, which can be poured over portions of the completed pudding). Put a lid of bread slices on top, and then put the saucer on top of that, and a weight (about 2 lbs.) on top to compress the whole thing. Chill in the fridge for at least 12 hours.
    It should be possible to turn it out when it is well soaked and chilled. Serve with cream.

    Reply
  112. Summer Pudding: so ridiculously simple it hardly seems worth mentioning. Surely everyone already knows how to make it?
    One basin and a saucer that will fit neatly just inside the top of said basin.
    Some good white bread, and a quantity of lightly-cooked summer soft fruit that will fill the basin: the fruit can be any combination of blackberries, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants, whitecurrants, bilberries (i.e. blueberries), strawberries, gooseberries etc.
    Lightly butter the inside of the basin. Line it carefully with slices of white bread – leave no gaps. The bread will stick nicely to the butter. Fill the lined basin with the cooled stewed fruit (it may be necessary to keep back some of the juice, which can be poured over portions of the completed pudding). Put a lid of bread slices on top, and then put the saucer on top of that, and a weight (about 2 lbs.) on top to compress the whole thing. Chill in the fridge for at least 12 hours.
    It should be possible to turn it out when it is well soaked and chilled. Serve with cream.

    Reply
  113. Summer Pudding: so ridiculously simple it hardly seems worth mentioning. Surely everyone already knows how to make it?
    One basin and a saucer that will fit neatly just inside the top of said basin.
    Some good white bread, and a quantity of lightly-cooked summer soft fruit that will fill the basin: the fruit can be any combination of blackberries, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants, whitecurrants, bilberries (i.e. blueberries), strawberries, gooseberries etc.
    Lightly butter the inside of the basin. Line it carefully with slices of white bread – leave no gaps. The bread will stick nicely to the butter. Fill the lined basin with the cooled stewed fruit (it may be necessary to keep back some of the juice, which can be poured over portions of the completed pudding). Put a lid of bread slices on top, and then put the saucer on top of that, and a weight (about 2 lbs.) on top to compress the whole thing. Chill in the fridge for at least 12 hours.
    It should be possible to turn it out when it is well soaked and chilled. Serve with cream.

    Reply
  114. Summer Pudding: so ridiculously simple it hardly seems worth mentioning. Surely everyone already knows how to make it?
    One basin and a saucer that will fit neatly just inside the top of said basin.
    Some good white bread, and a quantity of lightly-cooked summer soft fruit that will fill the basin: the fruit can be any combination of blackberries, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants, whitecurrants, bilberries (i.e. blueberries), strawberries, gooseberries etc.
    Lightly butter the inside of the basin. Line it carefully with slices of white bread – leave no gaps. The bread will stick nicely to the butter. Fill the lined basin with the cooled stewed fruit (it may be necessary to keep back some of the juice, which can be poured over portions of the completed pudding). Put a lid of bread slices on top, and then put the saucer on top of that, and a weight (about 2 lbs.) on top to compress the whole thing. Chill in the fridge for at least 12 hours.
    It should be possible to turn it out when it is well soaked and chilled. Serve with cream.

    Reply
  115. Summer Pudding: so ridiculously simple it hardly seems worth mentioning. Surely everyone already knows how to make it?
    One basin and a saucer that will fit neatly just inside the top of said basin.
    Some good white bread, and a quantity of lightly-cooked summer soft fruit that will fill the basin: the fruit can be any combination of blackberries, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants, whitecurrants, bilberries (i.e. blueberries), strawberries, gooseberries etc.
    Lightly butter the inside of the basin. Line it carefully with slices of white bread – leave no gaps. The bread will stick nicely to the butter. Fill the lined basin with the cooled stewed fruit (it may be necessary to keep back some of the juice, which can be poured over portions of the completed pudding). Put a lid of bread slices on top, and then put the saucer on top of that, and a weight (about 2 lbs.) on top to compress the whole thing. Chill in the fridge for at least 12 hours.
    It should be possible to turn it out when it is well soaked and chilled. Serve with cream.

    Reply
  116. Oh I’ll have to try out that recipe. I love food, and I LOVE books. So this summer has consisted of enjoying the best of both. This week I am enjoying a new book on women’s self-discovery, titled “The Pink Forest” by Dana Dorfman and homemade pasta dishes. It has been a great week so far!
    http://www.danadorfman.com/

    Reply
  117. Oh I’ll have to try out that recipe. I love food, and I LOVE books. So this summer has consisted of enjoying the best of both. This week I am enjoying a new book on women’s self-discovery, titled “The Pink Forest” by Dana Dorfman and homemade pasta dishes. It has been a great week so far!
    http://www.danadorfman.com/

    Reply
  118. Oh I’ll have to try out that recipe. I love food, and I LOVE books. So this summer has consisted of enjoying the best of both. This week I am enjoying a new book on women’s self-discovery, titled “The Pink Forest” by Dana Dorfman and homemade pasta dishes. It has been a great week so far!
    http://www.danadorfman.com/

    Reply
  119. Oh I’ll have to try out that recipe. I love food, and I LOVE books. So this summer has consisted of enjoying the best of both. This week I am enjoying a new book on women’s self-discovery, titled “The Pink Forest” by Dana Dorfman and homemade pasta dishes. It has been a great week so far!
    http://www.danadorfman.com/

    Reply
  120. Oh I’ll have to try out that recipe. I love food, and I LOVE books. So this summer has consisted of enjoying the best of both. This week I am enjoying a new book on women’s self-discovery, titled “The Pink Forest” by Dana Dorfman and homemade pasta dishes. It has been a great week so far!
    http://www.danadorfman.com/

    Reply

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