Street Libraries

Anne here, and today I'm talking about a phenomenon that's caught my eye recently — Street Libraries, also called Little Free Libraries. A street library is a little collection of books set up in a public place — for instance your front yard where it is accessible from the street — for people to borrow, or swap or simply to take a book.  LittleFreeBookLibrary

There are no rules, nobody checks the books in or out — it's all on a trust system. The books come, and the books go. And with any luck, new ones will appear. To quote Street Libraries Australia: "Street Libraries are a window into the mind of a community . . . They are a symbol of trust and hope – a tiny vestibule of literary happiness."

It's a lovely idea, I think. I first noticed one at the Queen Victoria Market — a big traditional undercover marketplace in the centre of Melbourne. Tucked in behind a row of fruit and vegetable stalls was a large wooden cabinet with open doors displaying a range of books. (Unfortunately my photo turned out poorly so I can't show it to you.)

As I watched, people came up, flipped through the books, selected one and left. Were they pinching books? If they were, nobody seemed to care. And then I realized— it was a street library. 

1280px-Original-2_transparentAccording to Wikipedia, "The first Little Free Library was built in 2009 by Todd Bol in Hudson, Wisconsin. He mounted a wooden container designed to look like a one-room schoolhouse on a post on his lawn and filled it with books as a tribute to his mother, who was a book lover and school teacher." And from there, the idea went global.

Little free libraries has a FaceBook page

Some people have gone to great lengths to design and build charming little street libraries — the ones on this page are but a small collection. Google the term and see all the delightful street libraries that will appear. Holden-street-little-library

Of course a good Little Street Library needs to be weather proof, and pest proof, and hopefully attractive. There are DIY Build your own street library websites and classes. Here's another. Pinterest is awash with ideas and plans

But you don't have to have anything permanent if you don't want to. Author Julie Cohen was clearing out some books recently, and put a small bookshelf out on the footpath, with a sign saying "Please take as many books as you like—but leave me the shelf." 

JulieCohenShe said : "I filled it with books I've enjoyed but which I know I'll probably never read again. (I always need more space for books—I bought five last week.)
    All day, people walked past and took books. My neighbours took children's stories; a stranger picked up all the travel guides to places we've been. A blonde woman took five and said "I was looking for books for my holiday." So I handed her another one that I'd particularly enjoyed.
    Every time I looked out my window, someone different was in front of my house, reading. I refilled the shelves twice.
    At about 8 pm, there was a knock on the door, and when we opened it, no one was there, but the bookshelf had been placed in front of our door. Every book gone."

Isn't that a lovely story? She put it on her facebook page, and when I wrote to ask for permission to use her photo, she said, "That photo had nearly 100 shares on Facebook, but on Twitter, it went a bit viral and was seen over 330,000 times and I had people from all over the world get in touch with me about it. The power of books!"

So, what about you — had you heard about street libraries before? Do you like the idea or not? Are there any little street libraries near you? I know many of us are practically drowning in books — would you want to start a street library, or maybe use the Julie Cohen method?

 

140 thoughts on “Street Libraries”

  1. I love Little Free Libraries! Two years ago, authors Nancy Naigle and Kelsey Browning (who co-wrote The Granny Series of books) took a 2600 mile, 16 state road trip, stopping at Little Free Libraries along the way, taking photos, videos, and dropping off books. It’s documented in photo albums on their Facebook pages. Some of the street libraries they visited were AMAZING!
    About 18 months ago, my city erected a Little Free Library at the entrance to our Community Garden. It’s only a mile from my condo so I visit often, leaving books and occasionally taking one. It gives me joy to know a book I’ve enjoyed will hopefully do the same for someone else, perhaps someone who cannot afford to buy it herself.

    Reply
  2. I love Little Free Libraries! Two years ago, authors Nancy Naigle and Kelsey Browning (who co-wrote The Granny Series of books) took a 2600 mile, 16 state road trip, stopping at Little Free Libraries along the way, taking photos, videos, and dropping off books. It’s documented in photo albums on their Facebook pages. Some of the street libraries they visited were AMAZING!
    About 18 months ago, my city erected a Little Free Library at the entrance to our Community Garden. It’s only a mile from my condo so I visit often, leaving books and occasionally taking one. It gives me joy to know a book I’ve enjoyed will hopefully do the same for someone else, perhaps someone who cannot afford to buy it herself.

    Reply
  3. I love Little Free Libraries! Two years ago, authors Nancy Naigle and Kelsey Browning (who co-wrote The Granny Series of books) took a 2600 mile, 16 state road trip, stopping at Little Free Libraries along the way, taking photos, videos, and dropping off books. It’s documented in photo albums on their Facebook pages. Some of the street libraries they visited were AMAZING!
    About 18 months ago, my city erected a Little Free Library at the entrance to our Community Garden. It’s only a mile from my condo so I visit often, leaving books and occasionally taking one. It gives me joy to know a book I’ve enjoyed will hopefully do the same for someone else, perhaps someone who cannot afford to buy it herself.

    Reply
  4. I love Little Free Libraries! Two years ago, authors Nancy Naigle and Kelsey Browning (who co-wrote The Granny Series of books) took a 2600 mile, 16 state road trip, stopping at Little Free Libraries along the way, taking photos, videos, and dropping off books. It’s documented in photo albums on their Facebook pages. Some of the street libraries they visited were AMAZING!
    About 18 months ago, my city erected a Little Free Library at the entrance to our Community Garden. It’s only a mile from my condo so I visit often, leaving books and occasionally taking one. It gives me joy to know a book I’ve enjoyed will hopefully do the same for someone else, perhaps someone who cannot afford to buy it herself.

    Reply
  5. I love Little Free Libraries! Two years ago, authors Nancy Naigle and Kelsey Browning (who co-wrote The Granny Series of books) took a 2600 mile, 16 state road trip, stopping at Little Free Libraries along the way, taking photos, videos, and dropping off books. It’s documented in photo albums on their Facebook pages. Some of the street libraries they visited were AMAZING!
    About 18 months ago, my city erected a Little Free Library at the entrance to our Community Garden. It’s only a mile from my condo so I visit often, leaving books and occasionally taking one. It gives me joy to know a book I’ve enjoyed will hopefully do the same for someone else, perhaps someone who cannot afford to buy it herself.

    Reply
  6. What a wonderful blog, Anne! And what fabulous creativity for the little libraries. I love the idea—as you say, the power of books and reading! We have a “little library” at my beach club, and I love adding books, and clearly other people do too! It’s fun watching the constantly changing variety of titles!
    I hope the trend catches on. Reading is such a joy—the more people who discover that, the better!

    Reply
  7. What a wonderful blog, Anne! And what fabulous creativity for the little libraries. I love the idea—as you say, the power of books and reading! We have a “little library” at my beach club, and I love adding books, and clearly other people do too! It’s fun watching the constantly changing variety of titles!
    I hope the trend catches on. Reading is such a joy—the more people who discover that, the better!

    Reply
  8. What a wonderful blog, Anne! And what fabulous creativity for the little libraries. I love the idea—as you say, the power of books and reading! We have a “little library” at my beach club, and I love adding books, and clearly other people do too! It’s fun watching the constantly changing variety of titles!
    I hope the trend catches on. Reading is such a joy—the more people who discover that, the better!

    Reply
  9. What a wonderful blog, Anne! And what fabulous creativity for the little libraries. I love the idea—as you say, the power of books and reading! We have a “little library” at my beach club, and I love adding books, and clearly other people do too! It’s fun watching the constantly changing variety of titles!
    I hope the trend catches on. Reading is such a joy—the more people who discover that, the better!

    Reply
  10. What a wonderful blog, Anne! And what fabulous creativity for the little libraries. I love the idea—as you say, the power of books and reading! We have a “little library” at my beach club, and I love adding books, and clearly other people do too! It’s fun watching the constantly changing variety of titles!
    I hope the trend catches on. Reading is such a joy—the more people who discover that, the better!

    Reply
  11. I have seen these before and I think they are wonderful – especially in areas that don’t have access to free public libraries. I have also seen similar boxes with non-perishable food items donated for people who might need them.
    As far as I know, we don’t have any street libraries in my neighborhood. If we did, I’m sure I would have books to donate. As it is, I usually donate my extra books to my public library. If they don’t use the books, they have a bin where they sell extra books for pennies on the dollar. I always check it. I’ve found some real gems there. And the money is used to enhance the extra programs they provide.
    I think the street libraries (and the food boxes) can only enhance the sense of community. We need that in this day and age.

    Reply
  12. I have seen these before and I think they are wonderful – especially in areas that don’t have access to free public libraries. I have also seen similar boxes with non-perishable food items donated for people who might need them.
    As far as I know, we don’t have any street libraries in my neighborhood. If we did, I’m sure I would have books to donate. As it is, I usually donate my extra books to my public library. If they don’t use the books, they have a bin where they sell extra books for pennies on the dollar. I always check it. I’ve found some real gems there. And the money is used to enhance the extra programs they provide.
    I think the street libraries (and the food boxes) can only enhance the sense of community. We need that in this day and age.

    Reply
  13. I have seen these before and I think they are wonderful – especially in areas that don’t have access to free public libraries. I have also seen similar boxes with non-perishable food items donated for people who might need them.
    As far as I know, we don’t have any street libraries in my neighborhood. If we did, I’m sure I would have books to donate. As it is, I usually donate my extra books to my public library. If they don’t use the books, they have a bin where they sell extra books for pennies on the dollar. I always check it. I’ve found some real gems there. And the money is used to enhance the extra programs they provide.
    I think the street libraries (and the food boxes) can only enhance the sense of community. We need that in this day and age.

    Reply
  14. I have seen these before and I think they are wonderful – especially in areas that don’t have access to free public libraries. I have also seen similar boxes with non-perishable food items donated for people who might need them.
    As far as I know, we don’t have any street libraries in my neighborhood. If we did, I’m sure I would have books to donate. As it is, I usually donate my extra books to my public library. If they don’t use the books, they have a bin where they sell extra books for pennies on the dollar. I always check it. I’ve found some real gems there. And the money is used to enhance the extra programs they provide.
    I think the street libraries (and the food boxes) can only enhance the sense of community. We need that in this day and age.

    Reply
  15. I have seen these before and I think they are wonderful – especially in areas that don’t have access to free public libraries. I have also seen similar boxes with non-perishable food items donated for people who might need them.
    As far as I know, we don’t have any street libraries in my neighborhood. If we did, I’m sure I would have books to donate. As it is, I usually donate my extra books to my public library. If they don’t use the books, they have a bin where they sell extra books for pennies on the dollar. I always check it. I’ve found some real gems there. And the money is used to enhance the extra programs they provide.
    I think the street libraries (and the food boxes) can only enhance the sense of community. We need that in this day and age.

    Reply
  16. Wow, PJ — what a wonderful road trip that must have been. I’m sure you keep your own Little Free Library well stocked. I keep meaning to take some of my books to the Street Library at the Vic Market, but I usually forget — having fruits and vegies and cheese and things on my mind, instead of books.

    Reply
  17. Wow, PJ — what a wonderful road trip that must have been. I’m sure you keep your own Little Free Library well stocked. I keep meaning to take some of my books to the Street Library at the Vic Market, but I usually forget — having fruits and vegies and cheese and things on my mind, instead of books.

    Reply
  18. Wow, PJ — what a wonderful road trip that must have been. I’m sure you keep your own Little Free Library well stocked. I keep meaning to take some of my books to the Street Library at the Vic Market, but I usually forget — having fruits and vegies and cheese and things on my mind, instead of books.

    Reply
  19. Wow, PJ — what a wonderful road trip that must have been. I’m sure you keep your own Little Free Library well stocked. I keep meaning to take some of my books to the Street Library at the Vic Market, but I usually forget — having fruits and vegies and cheese and things on my mind, instead of books.

    Reply
  20. Wow, PJ — what a wonderful road trip that must have been. I’m sure you keep your own Little Free Library well stocked. I keep meaning to take some of my books to the Street Library at the Vic Market, but I usually forget — having fruits and vegies and cheese and things on my mind, instead of books.

    Reply
  21. My sisters and I were camping at Chattahoochee Bend State Park (Georgia) this summer and found they had a Little Free Library next to the bath house. That was quite a surprise but a very nice one. It had a nice selection of adult and children’s books.
    Luckily we had books to donate because we did Sister’s Book Swap while we were camping. There were books that had reached the end of the line and were needing new homes. One of those unplanned, serendipitous moments that are so perfect.
    One of my sister’s in Carrollton “manages” a Little Free Library which is next to the 18 mile Green Beltway that people walk/bike on. She is constantly collecting books for it.

    Reply
  22. My sisters and I were camping at Chattahoochee Bend State Park (Georgia) this summer and found they had a Little Free Library next to the bath house. That was quite a surprise but a very nice one. It had a nice selection of adult and children’s books.
    Luckily we had books to donate because we did Sister’s Book Swap while we were camping. There were books that had reached the end of the line and were needing new homes. One of those unplanned, serendipitous moments that are so perfect.
    One of my sister’s in Carrollton “manages” a Little Free Library which is next to the 18 mile Green Beltway that people walk/bike on. She is constantly collecting books for it.

    Reply
  23. My sisters and I were camping at Chattahoochee Bend State Park (Georgia) this summer and found they had a Little Free Library next to the bath house. That was quite a surprise but a very nice one. It had a nice selection of adult and children’s books.
    Luckily we had books to donate because we did Sister’s Book Swap while we were camping. There were books that had reached the end of the line and were needing new homes. One of those unplanned, serendipitous moments that are so perfect.
    One of my sister’s in Carrollton “manages” a Little Free Library which is next to the 18 mile Green Beltway that people walk/bike on. She is constantly collecting books for it.

    Reply
  24. My sisters and I were camping at Chattahoochee Bend State Park (Georgia) this summer and found they had a Little Free Library next to the bath house. That was quite a surprise but a very nice one. It had a nice selection of adult and children’s books.
    Luckily we had books to donate because we did Sister’s Book Swap while we were camping. There were books that had reached the end of the line and were needing new homes. One of those unplanned, serendipitous moments that are so perfect.
    One of my sister’s in Carrollton “manages” a Little Free Library which is next to the 18 mile Green Beltway that people walk/bike on. She is constantly collecting books for it.

    Reply
  25. My sisters and I were camping at Chattahoochee Bend State Park (Georgia) this summer and found they had a Little Free Library next to the bath house. That was quite a surprise but a very nice one. It had a nice selection of adult and children’s books.
    Luckily we had books to donate because we did Sister’s Book Swap while we were camping. There were books that had reached the end of the line and were needing new homes. One of those unplanned, serendipitous moments that are so perfect.
    One of my sister’s in Carrollton “manages” a Little Free Library which is next to the 18 mile Green Beltway that people walk/bike on. She is constantly collecting books for it.

    Reply
  26. There are quite a few of these within walking distance of my office – so I can enjoy browsing on my lunch hour stroll. Love the idea of the temporary set-up to share books though – as I might more practically be able to do that in my neighborhood, than to set up a permanent one.

    Reply
  27. There are quite a few of these within walking distance of my office – so I can enjoy browsing on my lunch hour stroll. Love the idea of the temporary set-up to share books though – as I might more practically be able to do that in my neighborhood, than to set up a permanent one.

    Reply
  28. There are quite a few of these within walking distance of my office – so I can enjoy browsing on my lunch hour stroll. Love the idea of the temporary set-up to share books though – as I might more practically be able to do that in my neighborhood, than to set up a permanent one.

    Reply
  29. There are quite a few of these within walking distance of my office – so I can enjoy browsing on my lunch hour stroll. Love the idea of the temporary set-up to share books though – as I might more practically be able to do that in my neighborhood, than to set up a permanent one.

    Reply
  30. There are quite a few of these within walking distance of my office – so I can enjoy browsing on my lunch hour stroll. Love the idea of the temporary set-up to share books though – as I might more practically be able to do that in my neighborhood, than to set up a permanent one.

    Reply
  31. Author Jamie Ford mentioned these little free libraries on his Facebook page–I think he left ARCs of his next book in a few of them. They’re so cute! We don’t have any in my neighborhood, but our library system has put together a really cool thing for the summer called the Subway Library, where you can download short stories or longer books by connecting to the wi-fi on the subway.

    Reply
  32. Author Jamie Ford mentioned these little free libraries on his Facebook page–I think he left ARCs of his next book in a few of them. They’re so cute! We don’t have any in my neighborhood, but our library system has put together a really cool thing for the summer called the Subway Library, where you can download short stories or longer books by connecting to the wi-fi on the subway.

    Reply
  33. Author Jamie Ford mentioned these little free libraries on his Facebook page–I think he left ARCs of his next book in a few of them. They’re so cute! We don’t have any in my neighborhood, but our library system has put together a really cool thing for the summer called the Subway Library, where you can download short stories or longer books by connecting to the wi-fi on the subway.

    Reply
  34. Author Jamie Ford mentioned these little free libraries on his Facebook page–I think he left ARCs of his next book in a few of them. They’re so cute! We don’t have any in my neighborhood, but our library system has put together a really cool thing for the summer called the Subway Library, where you can download short stories or longer books by connecting to the wi-fi on the subway.

    Reply
  35. Author Jamie Ford mentioned these little free libraries on his Facebook page–I think he left ARCs of his next book in a few of them. They’re so cute! We don’t have any in my neighborhood, but our library system has put together a really cool thing for the summer called the Subway Library, where you can download short stories or longer books by connecting to the wi-fi on the subway.

    Reply
  36. Anne, I love Julie Cohen’s story of having three bookcases worth of books taken–and the little bookcase itself politely put back on her front step. *G* I exercise at a Curves and there’ a tall bookcase there for swapping books back and forth. So nice. We get enough rain in this part of the world that being undercover makes sense.

    Reply
  37. Anne, I love Julie Cohen’s story of having three bookcases worth of books taken–and the little bookcase itself politely put back on her front step. *G* I exercise at a Curves and there’ a tall bookcase there for swapping books back and forth. So nice. We get enough rain in this part of the world that being undercover makes sense.

    Reply
  38. Anne, I love Julie Cohen’s story of having three bookcases worth of books taken–and the little bookcase itself politely put back on her front step. *G* I exercise at a Curves and there’ a tall bookcase there for swapping books back and forth. So nice. We get enough rain in this part of the world that being undercover makes sense.

    Reply
  39. Anne, I love Julie Cohen’s story of having three bookcases worth of books taken–and the little bookcase itself politely put back on her front step. *G* I exercise at a Curves and there’ a tall bookcase there for swapping books back and forth. So nice. We get enough rain in this part of the world that being undercover makes sense.

    Reply
  40. Anne, I love Julie Cohen’s story of having three bookcases worth of books taken–and the little bookcase itself politely put back on her front step. *G* I exercise at a Curves and there’ a tall bookcase there for swapping books back and forth. So nice. We get enough rain in this part of the world that being undercover makes sense.

    Reply
  41. I know that they exist theoretically, but I’ve never really looked for one. I often take the books that I don’t want to keep and give them to the library but I love this idea even more. I went to littlefreelibrary.org and found the nearest one on the map. It’s about 2 miles from my house so I’ll take my contributions and leave them for someone else to enjoy. Thanks for highlighting this, it absolutely didn’t occur to me.

    Reply
  42. I know that they exist theoretically, but I’ve never really looked for one. I often take the books that I don’t want to keep and give them to the library but I love this idea even more. I went to littlefreelibrary.org and found the nearest one on the map. It’s about 2 miles from my house so I’ll take my contributions and leave them for someone else to enjoy. Thanks for highlighting this, it absolutely didn’t occur to me.

    Reply
  43. I know that they exist theoretically, but I’ve never really looked for one. I often take the books that I don’t want to keep and give them to the library but I love this idea even more. I went to littlefreelibrary.org and found the nearest one on the map. It’s about 2 miles from my house so I’ll take my contributions and leave them for someone else to enjoy. Thanks for highlighting this, it absolutely didn’t occur to me.

    Reply
  44. I know that they exist theoretically, but I’ve never really looked for one. I often take the books that I don’t want to keep and give them to the library but I love this idea even more. I went to littlefreelibrary.org and found the nearest one on the map. It’s about 2 miles from my house so I’ll take my contributions and leave them for someone else to enjoy. Thanks for highlighting this, it absolutely didn’t occur to me.

    Reply
  45. I know that they exist theoretically, but I’ve never really looked for one. I often take the books that I don’t want to keep and give them to the library but I love this idea even more. I went to littlefreelibrary.org and found the nearest one on the map. It’s about 2 miles from my house so I’ll take my contributions and leave them for someone else to enjoy. Thanks for highlighting this, it absolutely didn’t occur to me.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for a fun post, Anne! I enjoyed hearing about the LFL road trip as well as Julie Cohen’s returned bookshelf. I’ve seen a few Little Free Libraries locally; it’s probably good that one isn’t close to home as my curiosity would have me stop by on a daily basis.

    Reply
  47. Thanks for a fun post, Anne! I enjoyed hearing about the LFL road trip as well as Julie Cohen’s returned bookshelf. I’ve seen a few Little Free Libraries locally; it’s probably good that one isn’t close to home as my curiosity would have me stop by on a daily basis.

    Reply
  48. Thanks for a fun post, Anne! I enjoyed hearing about the LFL road trip as well as Julie Cohen’s returned bookshelf. I’ve seen a few Little Free Libraries locally; it’s probably good that one isn’t close to home as my curiosity would have me stop by on a daily basis.

    Reply
  49. Thanks for a fun post, Anne! I enjoyed hearing about the LFL road trip as well as Julie Cohen’s returned bookshelf. I’ve seen a few Little Free Libraries locally; it’s probably good that one isn’t close to home as my curiosity would have me stop by on a daily basis.

    Reply
  50. Thanks for a fun post, Anne! I enjoyed hearing about the LFL road trip as well as Julie Cohen’s returned bookshelf. I’ve seen a few Little Free Libraries locally; it’s probably good that one isn’t close to home as my curiosity would have me stop by on a daily basis.

    Reply
  51. A camping area would be the perfect spot for a Little Free Library, Vicki. We camped a lot when I was a kid and I was always running out of books to read. And how nice of your sister to “manage” one — I should think that each one would need a bit of managing, simply to keep the books tidy and make sure everything’s okay.

    Reply
  52. A camping area would be the perfect spot for a Little Free Library, Vicki. We camped a lot when I was a kid and I was always running out of books to read. And how nice of your sister to “manage” one — I should think that each one would need a bit of managing, simply to keep the books tidy and make sure everything’s okay.

    Reply
  53. A camping area would be the perfect spot for a Little Free Library, Vicki. We camped a lot when I was a kid and I was always running out of books to read. And how nice of your sister to “manage” one — I should think that each one would need a bit of managing, simply to keep the books tidy and make sure everything’s okay.

    Reply
  54. A camping area would be the perfect spot for a Little Free Library, Vicki. We camped a lot when I was a kid and I was always running out of books to read. And how nice of your sister to “manage” one — I should think that each one would need a bit of managing, simply to keep the books tidy and make sure everything’s okay.

    Reply
  55. A camping area would be the perfect spot for a Little Free Library, Vicki. We camped a lot when I was a kid and I was always running out of books to read. And how nice of your sister to “manage” one — I should think that each one would need a bit of managing, simply to keep the books tidy and make sure everything’s okay.

    Reply
  56. Great idea to have one at Curves, too Mary Jo. I think all the little free ones try to be weather proof, but undercover makes it so much easier. And yes, that was a lovely ending to Julie Cohen’s story, the bookcase put back on her step so nicely.

    Reply
  57. Great idea to have one at Curves, too Mary Jo. I think all the little free ones try to be weather proof, but undercover makes it so much easier. And yes, that was a lovely ending to Julie Cohen’s story, the bookcase put back on her step so nicely.

    Reply
  58. Great idea to have one at Curves, too Mary Jo. I think all the little free ones try to be weather proof, but undercover makes it so much easier. And yes, that was a lovely ending to Julie Cohen’s story, the bookcase put back on her step so nicely.

    Reply
  59. Great idea to have one at Curves, too Mary Jo. I think all the little free ones try to be weather proof, but undercover makes it so much easier. And yes, that was a lovely ending to Julie Cohen’s story, the bookcase put back on her step so nicely.

    Reply
  60. Great idea to have one at Curves, too Mary Jo. I think all the little free ones try to be weather proof, but undercover makes it so much easier. And yes, that was a lovely ending to Julie Cohen’s story, the bookcase put back on her step so nicely.

    Reply
  61. Kareni, I was just talking to a friend f mine about these and she told me there are three in my neighborhood, one in her street, and I’d never seen or noticed them. She uses them a lot. So I’ll be checking them out next time I visit her. I foresee a small addiction in the future.

    Reply
  62. Kareni, I was just talking to a friend f mine about these and she told me there are three in my neighborhood, one in her street, and I’d never seen or noticed them. She uses them a lot. So I’ll be checking them out next time I visit her. I foresee a small addiction in the future.

    Reply
  63. Kareni, I was just talking to a friend f mine about these and she told me there are three in my neighborhood, one in her street, and I’d never seen or noticed them. She uses them a lot. So I’ll be checking them out next time I visit her. I foresee a small addiction in the future.

    Reply
  64. Kareni, I was just talking to a friend f mine about these and she told me there are three in my neighborhood, one in her street, and I’d never seen or noticed them. She uses them a lot. So I’ll be checking them out next time I visit her. I foresee a small addiction in the future.

    Reply
  65. Kareni, I was just talking to a friend f mine about these and she told me there are three in my neighborhood, one in her street, and I’d never seen or noticed them. She uses them a lot. So I’ll be checking them out next time I visit her. I foresee a small addiction in the future.

    Reply
  66. I am a basket maker at the Oxford Community Arts Center in Oxford, Ohio. There are two Little Free Libraries there. One is in the building near the back door where many people enter and the other on the front porch of the building. Every so often I fill a bag and take books to donate and sometimes I find one I want to read.

    Reply
  67. I am a basket maker at the Oxford Community Arts Center in Oxford, Ohio. There are two Little Free Libraries there. One is in the building near the back door where many people enter and the other on the front porch of the building. Every so often I fill a bag and take books to donate and sometimes I find one I want to read.

    Reply
  68. I am a basket maker at the Oxford Community Arts Center in Oxford, Ohio. There are two Little Free Libraries there. One is in the building near the back door where many people enter and the other on the front porch of the building. Every so often I fill a bag and take books to donate and sometimes I find one I want to read.

    Reply
  69. I am a basket maker at the Oxford Community Arts Center in Oxford, Ohio. There are two Little Free Libraries there. One is in the building near the back door where many people enter and the other on the front porch of the building. Every so often I fill a bag and take books to donate and sometimes I find one I want to read.

    Reply
  70. I am a basket maker at the Oxford Community Arts Center in Oxford, Ohio. There are two Little Free Libraries there. One is in the building near the back door where many people enter and the other on the front porch of the building. Every so often I fill a bag and take books to donate and sometimes I find one I want to read.

    Reply
  71. There is a Little Free Library in my neighborhood. I think this idea is one of the best “good news” stories ever. And, good news is always a blessing.

    Reply
  72. There is a Little Free Library in my neighborhood. I think this idea is one of the best “good news” stories ever. And, good news is always a blessing.

    Reply
  73. There is a Little Free Library in my neighborhood. I think this idea is one of the best “good news” stories ever. And, good news is always a blessing.

    Reply
  74. There is a Little Free Library in my neighborhood. I think this idea is one of the best “good news” stories ever. And, good news is always a blessing.

    Reply
  75. There is a Little Free Library in my neighborhood. I think this idea is one of the best “good news” stories ever. And, good news is always a blessing.

    Reply
  76. I though that I had posted yesterday, but the post seems to have gotten lost.
    Anyway, I’m glad I waited, because today I found the map. There are 11 little libraries here in Columbia. My husband and I need to check them out!

    Reply
  77. I though that I had posted yesterday, but the post seems to have gotten lost.
    Anyway, I’m glad I waited, because today I found the map. There are 11 little libraries here in Columbia. My husband and I need to check them out!

    Reply
  78. I though that I had posted yesterday, but the post seems to have gotten lost.
    Anyway, I’m glad I waited, because today I found the map. There are 11 little libraries here in Columbia. My husband and I need to check them out!

    Reply
  79. I though that I had posted yesterday, but the post seems to have gotten lost.
    Anyway, I’m glad I waited, because today I found the map. There are 11 little libraries here in Columbia. My husband and I need to check them out!

    Reply
  80. I though that I had posted yesterday, but the post seems to have gotten lost.
    Anyway, I’m glad I waited, because today I found the map. There are 11 little libraries here in Columbia. My husband and I need to check them out!

    Reply
  81. I’d never heard of this but what a wonderful idea! It’s a pity we don’t have them here. I live out in the countryside. If I put books out they’d probably leave them and take the shelves!!

    Reply
  82. I’d never heard of this but what a wonderful idea! It’s a pity we don’t have them here. I live out in the countryside. If I put books out they’d probably leave them and take the shelves!!

    Reply
  83. I’d never heard of this but what a wonderful idea! It’s a pity we don’t have them here. I live out in the countryside. If I put books out they’d probably leave them and take the shelves!!

    Reply
  84. I’d never heard of this but what a wonderful idea! It’s a pity we don’t have them here. I live out in the countryside. If I put books out they’d probably leave them and take the shelves!!

    Reply
  85. I’d never heard of this but what a wonderful idea! It’s a pity we don’t have them here. I live out in the countryside. If I put books out they’d probably leave them and take the shelves!!

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Jeanne –what a nice community.
    I love that you make baskets, too. I used to make them when I was a little girl — but alas, they must have been tossed out when we shifted. My favorites were my first basket which had a wooden base and no handles — I used it for sewing stuff, and a set of little pine needle baskets that I made.

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Jeanne –what a nice community.
    I love that you make baskets, too. I used to make them when I was a little girl — but alas, they must have been tossed out when we shifted. My favorites were my first basket which had a wooden base and no handles — I used it for sewing stuff, and a set of little pine needle baskets that I made.

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Jeanne –what a nice community.
    I love that you make baskets, too. I used to make them when I was a little girl — but alas, they must have been tossed out when we shifted. My favorites were my first basket which had a wooden base and no handles — I used it for sewing stuff, and a set of little pine needle baskets that I made.

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Jeanne –what a nice community.
    I love that you make baskets, too. I used to make them when I was a little girl — but alas, they must have been tossed out when we shifted. My favorites were my first basket which had a wooden base and no handles — I used it for sewing stuff, and a set of little pine needle baskets that I made.

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Jeanne –what a nice community.
    I love that you make baskets, too. I used to make them when I was a little girl — but alas, they must have been tossed out when we shifted. My favorites were my first basket which had a wooden base and no handles — I used it for sewing stuff, and a set of little pine needle baskets that I made.

    Reply
  91. In our rural community here in Oxfordshire UK we have a free library. When British Telecom decommissioned all the public phone boxes people started to use them for all kinds of purposes from tourist information to greenhouses. The one in our village is a library and people literally do travel from miles around to visit. It helps that we are in an area that gets lots of cyclists passing through. But everyone from the guys who collect the refuse to visitors wanting to see the historic sites, pop in. I think it also helps that we have a lot of eclectic readers around here so the contents are always interesting too. The council is cutting the mobile library service to rural communities here and also the town libraries so little free libraries are a huge help.

    Reply
  92. In our rural community here in Oxfordshire UK we have a free library. When British Telecom decommissioned all the public phone boxes people started to use them for all kinds of purposes from tourist information to greenhouses. The one in our village is a library and people literally do travel from miles around to visit. It helps that we are in an area that gets lots of cyclists passing through. But everyone from the guys who collect the refuse to visitors wanting to see the historic sites, pop in. I think it also helps that we have a lot of eclectic readers around here so the contents are always interesting too. The council is cutting the mobile library service to rural communities here and also the town libraries so little free libraries are a huge help.

    Reply
  93. In our rural community here in Oxfordshire UK we have a free library. When British Telecom decommissioned all the public phone boxes people started to use them for all kinds of purposes from tourist information to greenhouses. The one in our village is a library and people literally do travel from miles around to visit. It helps that we are in an area that gets lots of cyclists passing through. But everyone from the guys who collect the refuse to visitors wanting to see the historic sites, pop in. I think it also helps that we have a lot of eclectic readers around here so the contents are always interesting too. The council is cutting the mobile library service to rural communities here and also the town libraries so little free libraries are a huge help.

    Reply
  94. In our rural community here in Oxfordshire UK we have a free library. When British Telecom decommissioned all the public phone boxes people started to use them for all kinds of purposes from tourist information to greenhouses. The one in our village is a library and people literally do travel from miles around to visit. It helps that we are in an area that gets lots of cyclists passing through. But everyone from the guys who collect the refuse to visitors wanting to see the historic sites, pop in. I think it also helps that we have a lot of eclectic readers around here so the contents are always interesting too. The council is cutting the mobile library service to rural communities here and also the town libraries so little free libraries are a huge help.

    Reply
  95. In our rural community here in Oxfordshire UK we have a free library. When British Telecom decommissioned all the public phone boxes people started to use them for all kinds of purposes from tourist information to greenhouses. The one in our village is a library and people literally do travel from miles around to visit. It helps that we are in an area that gets lots of cyclists passing through. But everyone from the guys who collect the refuse to visitors wanting to see the historic sites, pop in. I think it also helps that we have a lot of eclectic readers around here so the contents are always interesting too. The council is cutting the mobile library service to rural communities here and also the town libraries so little free libraries are a huge help.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Nicola — wonderful uses for old phone boxes — that or turning them into see-through tardises 😉 And lovely that people are keeping them stocked and alive.

    Reply
  97. Thanks, Nicola — wonderful uses for old phone boxes — that or turning them into see-through tardises 😉 And lovely that people are keeping them stocked and alive.

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Nicola — wonderful uses for old phone boxes — that or turning them into see-through tardises 😉 And lovely that people are keeping them stocked and alive.

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Nicola — wonderful uses for old phone boxes — that or turning them into see-through tardises 😉 And lovely that people are keeping them stocked and alive.

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Nicola — wonderful uses for old phone boxes — that or turning them into see-through tardises 😉 And lovely that people are keeping them stocked and alive.

    Reply

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