Stream of Consciousness

B5f8
Pat here:

I’m still working through the first draft of my next historical, and all my creativity has been sucked into the whirling vortex that is my Work In Progress (or POS, however you want to look at it) , which doesn’t leave a great deal of brainpower for blogging.  I could manage a political rant at the drop of the hat, (really, anyone in Congress who couldn’t see the housing bubble popping had to be either a willful idiot or lying thief) but politics are scarcely the kind of escape the wenches provide.

So for your amusement and delectation, I have let my mind slip into the stream of consciousness that is my writing process.  Which means you’re likely to see almost anything here until I get that first draft finished.

Pride_and_prejudice
I know a number of our readers are interested in the writing process, but I trust you don’t think anything we say here has any relevance to anyone besides ourselves. My process changes constantly, and because I’ve been in love with the Regency period since I read PRIDE AND PREJUDICE in fourth grade, my process for Regencies is entirely different from other eras.

I have no idea why I fixated on Austen. I read Bronte at the same time, and while JANE EYRE impressed Bronte
me, it didn’t make me want to read more about the early Victorians. Quite the opposite. I also read Cherry Ames and Nancy Drew and had no desire to research nurses or roadsters.  But I’ve been more or less reading about the Regency era since Roadster
elementary school.

So I have vast quantities of knowledge stored in the recesses of my often inaccessible brain, books completely covering my office floor as I reach for pictures of carriages or gowns or underwear, and still, I need more.  And the internet has been a complete blessing for those tiny details I’ve forgotten or must hunt through three texts to find.

Today, while my hapless hero chased four runaway rapscallions, I had need to call up information on the Surrey Iron Railway, which wasn’t a railroad as we know it, but iron lines for pulling horse-drawn Surrey
wagons.  My texts didn’t mention this nine-mile track, but a quick Google provided pictures and more information than I could possibly use. 

While I was there, I decided I needed to know what kind of wagon my runaways might have hidden on. I come from a dairy background, so that was my first thought—cans of milk.  Bad thought. During the Regency, the corn laws made feed exceedingly expensive and the number of dairy animals was reduced, thus raising the price of milk to the extent that London kitchens tended to Milk_wagon
buy it a spoonful at a time. No milk can wagons.  But I discovered several lovely Regency sites on this pursuit which took me from one blog to the next learning the various agrarian industries in the area where my runaways would end up. So I wrapped them up in sheep wool, which I now need to investigate to see how badly it would smell.

And while I play with these lovely scenes and the fascinating research, at the back of my mind is always that niggling doubt about the whole effort surviving the cutting room floor. I seriously suspect if I could compile everything I’ve ever cut from my drafts, I’d have another forty books.

I know some authors post these deleted snippets on their websites. How many of you take time to read them?  Are they really worth saving?  And if you like these snippets, are you the type who likes the DVDs containing the cut portions of films, too?  What do you get out of reading/viewing scenes the writer/filmmaker didn’t think worthy of the finished product?

85 thoughts on “Stream of Consciousness”

  1. Yes, I like to see what got cut from books as well as films. I sometimes wonder, if an author did not have to stick to a certain word count, what he or she would leave in to add depth and layers. With films, I often like the Director’s Cut better than what is originally released, so I find it interesting to see what an author found interesting, even if she later decided it was not crucial for advancing the story.

    Reply
  2. Yes, I like to see what got cut from books as well as films. I sometimes wonder, if an author did not have to stick to a certain word count, what he or she would leave in to add depth and layers. With films, I often like the Director’s Cut better than what is originally released, so I find it interesting to see what an author found interesting, even if she later decided it was not crucial for advancing the story.

    Reply
  3. Yes, I like to see what got cut from books as well as films. I sometimes wonder, if an author did not have to stick to a certain word count, what he or she would leave in to add depth and layers. With films, I often like the Director’s Cut better than what is originally released, so I find it interesting to see what an author found interesting, even if she later decided it was not crucial for advancing the story.

    Reply
  4. Yes, I like to see what got cut from books as well as films. I sometimes wonder, if an author did not have to stick to a certain word count, what he or she would leave in to add depth and layers. With films, I often like the Director’s Cut better than what is originally released, so I find it interesting to see what an author found interesting, even if she later decided it was not crucial for advancing the story.

    Reply
  5. Yes, I like to see what got cut from books as well as films. I sometimes wonder, if an author did not have to stick to a certain word count, what he or she would leave in to add depth and layers. With films, I often like the Director’s Cut better than what is originally released, so I find it interesting to see what an author found interesting, even if she later decided it was not crucial for advancing the story.

    Reply
  6. I love reading all those little snippets and such. Sometimes, something the author might have cut, either because they didn’t think it fit or, out of necessity, gives me more insight into what they were trying to convey at a certain point.
    Besides that, I’m with Linda. I’ll read any and everything I can get my ‘hands’ on from authors I love.

    Reply
  7. I love reading all those little snippets and such. Sometimes, something the author might have cut, either because they didn’t think it fit or, out of necessity, gives me more insight into what they were trying to convey at a certain point.
    Besides that, I’m with Linda. I’ll read any and everything I can get my ‘hands’ on from authors I love.

    Reply
  8. I love reading all those little snippets and such. Sometimes, something the author might have cut, either because they didn’t think it fit or, out of necessity, gives me more insight into what they were trying to convey at a certain point.
    Besides that, I’m with Linda. I’ll read any and everything I can get my ‘hands’ on from authors I love.

    Reply
  9. I love reading all those little snippets and such. Sometimes, something the author might have cut, either because they didn’t think it fit or, out of necessity, gives me more insight into what they were trying to convey at a certain point.
    Besides that, I’m with Linda. I’ll read any and everything I can get my ‘hands’ on from authors I love.

    Reply
  10. I love reading all those little snippets and such. Sometimes, something the author might have cut, either because they didn’t think it fit or, out of necessity, gives me more insight into what they were trying to convey at a certain point.
    Besides that, I’m with Linda. I’ll read any and everything I can get my ‘hands’ on from authors I love.

    Reply
  11. Sometimes I watch the deleted scenes on DVDs, but in the end I’ve always felt that the scene was cut for good reason.
    On the other hand, I’ve enjoyed online writing that gives an interesting backstory or expands minor viewpoints from a book.
    So… it depends.

    Reply
  12. Sometimes I watch the deleted scenes on DVDs, but in the end I’ve always felt that the scene was cut for good reason.
    On the other hand, I’ve enjoyed online writing that gives an interesting backstory or expands minor viewpoints from a book.
    So… it depends.

    Reply
  13. Sometimes I watch the deleted scenes on DVDs, but in the end I’ve always felt that the scene was cut for good reason.
    On the other hand, I’ve enjoyed online writing that gives an interesting backstory or expands minor viewpoints from a book.
    So… it depends.

    Reply
  14. Sometimes I watch the deleted scenes on DVDs, but in the end I’ve always felt that the scene was cut for good reason.
    On the other hand, I’ve enjoyed online writing that gives an interesting backstory or expands minor viewpoints from a book.
    So… it depends.

    Reply
  15. Sometimes I watch the deleted scenes on DVDs, but in the end I’ve always felt that the scene was cut for good reason.
    On the other hand, I’ve enjoyed online writing that gives an interesting backstory or expands minor viewpoints from a book.
    So… it depends.

    Reply
  16. Interesting. Now I’m going to have to rethink my wholesale slaughter of entire paragraphs and pages when I decide I don’t need them. Sometimes the originals stay in another file, but that’s usually an unedited version entirely, not just the snippet.
    And yes, often we cut layers and trim back secondary characters, not just because of word count, but because today’s mass market demands a fast pace with lots of dialogue and little introspection. And I have a dreadful tendency to have my characters ponder every conceivable repercussion of their actions. Messy business. “G”
    I’ve never watched the deleted DVD scenes. I’m fortunate to find a couple of hours just to watch the finished movie. Of course, in the interest of complete disclosure, I’m pretty sure I don’t know HOW to get at those scenes!

    Reply
  17. Interesting. Now I’m going to have to rethink my wholesale slaughter of entire paragraphs and pages when I decide I don’t need them. Sometimes the originals stay in another file, but that’s usually an unedited version entirely, not just the snippet.
    And yes, often we cut layers and trim back secondary characters, not just because of word count, but because today’s mass market demands a fast pace with lots of dialogue and little introspection. And I have a dreadful tendency to have my characters ponder every conceivable repercussion of their actions. Messy business. “G”
    I’ve never watched the deleted DVD scenes. I’m fortunate to find a couple of hours just to watch the finished movie. Of course, in the interest of complete disclosure, I’m pretty sure I don’t know HOW to get at those scenes!

    Reply
  18. Interesting. Now I’m going to have to rethink my wholesale slaughter of entire paragraphs and pages when I decide I don’t need them. Sometimes the originals stay in another file, but that’s usually an unedited version entirely, not just the snippet.
    And yes, often we cut layers and trim back secondary characters, not just because of word count, but because today’s mass market demands a fast pace with lots of dialogue and little introspection. And I have a dreadful tendency to have my characters ponder every conceivable repercussion of their actions. Messy business. “G”
    I’ve never watched the deleted DVD scenes. I’m fortunate to find a couple of hours just to watch the finished movie. Of course, in the interest of complete disclosure, I’m pretty sure I don’t know HOW to get at those scenes!

    Reply
  19. Interesting. Now I’m going to have to rethink my wholesale slaughter of entire paragraphs and pages when I decide I don’t need them. Sometimes the originals stay in another file, but that’s usually an unedited version entirely, not just the snippet.
    And yes, often we cut layers and trim back secondary characters, not just because of word count, but because today’s mass market demands a fast pace with lots of dialogue and little introspection. And I have a dreadful tendency to have my characters ponder every conceivable repercussion of their actions. Messy business. “G”
    I’ve never watched the deleted DVD scenes. I’m fortunate to find a couple of hours just to watch the finished movie. Of course, in the interest of complete disclosure, I’m pretty sure I don’t know HOW to get at those scenes!

    Reply
  20. Interesting. Now I’m going to have to rethink my wholesale slaughter of entire paragraphs and pages when I decide I don’t need them. Sometimes the originals stay in another file, but that’s usually an unedited version entirely, not just the snippet.
    And yes, often we cut layers and trim back secondary characters, not just because of word count, but because today’s mass market demands a fast pace with lots of dialogue and little introspection. And I have a dreadful tendency to have my characters ponder every conceivable repercussion of their actions. Messy business. “G”
    I’ve never watched the deleted DVD scenes. I’m fortunate to find a couple of hours just to watch the finished movie. Of course, in the interest of complete disclosure, I’m pretty sure I don’t know HOW to get at those scenes!

    Reply
  21. Patricia! You don’t keep everything?? 😯 That’s one thing someone told me long ago. Never destroy your words. You never know when they can be used somewhere else. And she was right. 😀
    And some of the deleted scenes on DVDs are worth the struggle to get to. 😉

    Reply
  22. Patricia! You don’t keep everything?? 😯 That’s one thing someone told me long ago. Never destroy your words. You never know when they can be used somewhere else. And she was right. 😀
    And some of the deleted scenes on DVDs are worth the struggle to get to. 😉

    Reply
  23. Patricia! You don’t keep everything?? 😯 That’s one thing someone told me long ago. Never destroy your words. You never know when they can be used somewhere else. And she was right. 😀
    And some of the deleted scenes on DVDs are worth the struggle to get to. 😉

    Reply
  24. Patricia! You don’t keep everything?? 😯 That’s one thing someone told me long ago. Never destroy your words. You never know when they can be used somewhere else. And she was right. 😀
    And some of the deleted scenes on DVDs are worth the struggle to get to. 😉

    Reply
  25. Patricia! You don’t keep everything?? 😯 That’s one thing someone told me long ago. Never destroy your words. You never know when they can be used somewhere else. And she was right. 😀
    And some of the deleted scenes on DVDs are worth the struggle to get to. 😉

    Reply
  26. I used to religiously save my words, even when they were all hard copy. I had stacks of boxes of my handwritten originals, all the various typewritten, copyedited, and revised drafts. All that crap got archived at the University of KY with our move to NC. And when we no longer had two attics to store it in, I learned to throw out everything. And after going through umpteen computers, trying to figure out how to save all those words from disk to disk, and then having the disks become obsolete… bah humbug on saving! I wouldn’t remember the words were there anyway. “G”
    And Theo, you do know Stephenie Meyers is essentially writing a bodysnatcher series, don’t you? First one is THE HOST. I enjoyed it a lot, even though it’s not my usual kind of thing.

    Reply
  27. I used to religiously save my words, even when they were all hard copy. I had stacks of boxes of my handwritten originals, all the various typewritten, copyedited, and revised drafts. All that crap got archived at the University of KY with our move to NC. And when we no longer had two attics to store it in, I learned to throw out everything. And after going through umpteen computers, trying to figure out how to save all those words from disk to disk, and then having the disks become obsolete… bah humbug on saving! I wouldn’t remember the words were there anyway. “G”
    And Theo, you do know Stephenie Meyers is essentially writing a bodysnatcher series, don’t you? First one is THE HOST. I enjoyed it a lot, even though it’s not my usual kind of thing.

    Reply
  28. I used to religiously save my words, even when they were all hard copy. I had stacks of boxes of my handwritten originals, all the various typewritten, copyedited, and revised drafts. All that crap got archived at the University of KY with our move to NC. And when we no longer had two attics to store it in, I learned to throw out everything. And after going through umpteen computers, trying to figure out how to save all those words from disk to disk, and then having the disks become obsolete… bah humbug on saving! I wouldn’t remember the words were there anyway. “G”
    And Theo, you do know Stephenie Meyers is essentially writing a bodysnatcher series, don’t you? First one is THE HOST. I enjoyed it a lot, even though it’s not my usual kind of thing.

    Reply
  29. I used to religiously save my words, even when they were all hard copy. I had stacks of boxes of my handwritten originals, all the various typewritten, copyedited, and revised drafts. All that crap got archived at the University of KY with our move to NC. And when we no longer had two attics to store it in, I learned to throw out everything. And after going through umpteen computers, trying to figure out how to save all those words from disk to disk, and then having the disks become obsolete… bah humbug on saving! I wouldn’t remember the words were there anyway. “G”
    And Theo, you do know Stephenie Meyers is essentially writing a bodysnatcher series, don’t you? First one is THE HOST. I enjoyed it a lot, even though it’s not my usual kind of thing.

    Reply
  30. I used to religiously save my words, even when they were all hard copy. I had stacks of boxes of my handwritten originals, all the various typewritten, copyedited, and revised drafts. All that crap got archived at the University of KY with our move to NC. And when we no longer had two attics to store it in, I learned to throw out everything. And after going through umpteen computers, trying to figure out how to save all those words from disk to disk, and then having the disks become obsolete… bah humbug on saving! I wouldn’t remember the words were there anyway. “G”
    And Theo, you do know Stephenie Meyers is essentially writing a bodysnatcher series, don’t you? First one is THE HOST. I enjoyed it a lot, even though it’s not my usual kind of thing.

    Reply
  31. Pat, no, I didn’t know that. Really, the bodysnatchers thing is more a backstory for mine. The doc decided after he found a werewolf that THAT would be the thing to bring him glory if he could dissect him and figure out what makes him tick.
    Is that giving too much away? Historical Paranormal.
    OH! Wait! I think I did hear that. This is her adult entry, yes? I might have to look that up.
    So far, I have my leftovers on CDs so I’m good. Now, when I have enough of those to take up the attic, it might be time for me to rethink things 🙂

    Reply
  32. Pat, no, I didn’t know that. Really, the bodysnatchers thing is more a backstory for mine. The doc decided after he found a werewolf that THAT would be the thing to bring him glory if he could dissect him and figure out what makes him tick.
    Is that giving too much away? Historical Paranormal.
    OH! Wait! I think I did hear that. This is her adult entry, yes? I might have to look that up.
    So far, I have my leftovers on CDs so I’m good. Now, when I have enough of those to take up the attic, it might be time for me to rethink things 🙂

    Reply
  33. Pat, no, I didn’t know that. Really, the bodysnatchers thing is more a backstory for mine. The doc decided after he found a werewolf that THAT would be the thing to bring him glory if he could dissect him and figure out what makes him tick.
    Is that giving too much away? Historical Paranormal.
    OH! Wait! I think I did hear that. This is her adult entry, yes? I might have to look that up.
    So far, I have my leftovers on CDs so I’m good. Now, when I have enough of those to take up the attic, it might be time for me to rethink things 🙂

    Reply
  34. Pat, no, I didn’t know that. Really, the bodysnatchers thing is more a backstory for mine. The doc decided after he found a werewolf that THAT would be the thing to bring him glory if he could dissect him and figure out what makes him tick.
    Is that giving too much away? Historical Paranormal.
    OH! Wait! I think I did hear that. This is her adult entry, yes? I might have to look that up.
    So far, I have my leftovers on CDs so I’m good. Now, when I have enough of those to take up the attic, it might be time for me to rethink things 🙂

    Reply
  35. Pat, no, I didn’t know that. Really, the bodysnatchers thing is more a backstory for mine. The doc decided after he found a werewolf that THAT would be the thing to bring him glory if he could dissect him and figure out what makes him tick.
    Is that giving too much away? Historical Paranormal.
    OH! Wait! I think I did hear that. This is her adult entry, yes? I might have to look that up.
    So far, I have my leftovers on CDs so I’m good. Now, when I have enough of those to take up the attic, it might be time for me to rethink things 🙂

    Reply
  36. I’ve always been a fan of deleted scenes on DVDs and in books. I also enjoy the little tidbits authors share of what they discovered while researching elements in their books.
    I can see how researching one element leads to the discover of some really interesting tidbits of information. None that can be used, mind you. Maybe that’s why I don’t write historicals. I’m afraid that I’ll just drill down from point to point and never get back to the story itself.

    Reply
  37. I’ve always been a fan of deleted scenes on DVDs and in books. I also enjoy the little tidbits authors share of what they discovered while researching elements in their books.
    I can see how researching one element leads to the discover of some really interesting tidbits of information. None that can be used, mind you. Maybe that’s why I don’t write historicals. I’m afraid that I’ll just drill down from point to point and never get back to the story itself.

    Reply
  38. I’ve always been a fan of deleted scenes on DVDs and in books. I also enjoy the little tidbits authors share of what they discovered while researching elements in their books.
    I can see how researching one element leads to the discover of some really interesting tidbits of information. None that can be used, mind you. Maybe that’s why I don’t write historicals. I’m afraid that I’ll just drill down from point to point and never get back to the story itself.

    Reply
  39. I’ve always been a fan of deleted scenes on DVDs and in books. I also enjoy the little tidbits authors share of what they discovered while researching elements in their books.
    I can see how researching one element leads to the discover of some really interesting tidbits of information. None that can be used, mind you. Maybe that’s why I don’t write historicals. I’m afraid that I’ll just drill down from point to point and never get back to the story itself.

    Reply
  40. I’ve always been a fan of deleted scenes on DVDs and in books. I also enjoy the little tidbits authors share of what they discovered while researching elements in their books.
    I can see how researching one element leads to the discover of some really interesting tidbits of information. None that can be used, mind you. Maybe that’s why I don’t write historicals. I’m afraid that I’ll just drill down from point to point and never get back to the story itself.

    Reply
  41. “I save about twenty drafts — that’s ten meg of disc space — and the last one contains all the final alterations. Once it has been printed out and received by the publishers, there’s a cry here of ‘Tough s**t, literary researchers of the future, try getting a proper job!’ and the rest are wiped.”
    — (Terry Pratchett, alt.fan.pratchett)

    Reply
  42. “I save about twenty drafts — that’s ten meg of disc space — and the last one contains all the final alterations. Once it has been printed out and received by the publishers, there’s a cry here of ‘Tough s**t, literary researchers of the future, try getting a proper job!’ and the rest are wiped.”
    — (Terry Pratchett, alt.fan.pratchett)

    Reply
  43. “I save about twenty drafts — that’s ten meg of disc space — and the last one contains all the final alterations. Once it has been printed out and received by the publishers, there’s a cry here of ‘Tough s**t, literary researchers of the future, try getting a proper job!’ and the rest are wiped.”
    — (Terry Pratchett, alt.fan.pratchett)

    Reply
  44. “I save about twenty drafts — that’s ten meg of disc space — and the last one contains all the final alterations. Once it has been printed out and received by the publishers, there’s a cry here of ‘Tough s**t, literary researchers of the future, try getting a proper job!’ and the rest are wiped.”
    — (Terry Pratchett, alt.fan.pratchett)

    Reply
  45. “I save about twenty drafts — that’s ten meg of disc space — and the last one contains all the final alterations. Once it has been printed out and received by the publishers, there’s a cry here of ‘Tough s**t, literary researchers of the future, try getting a proper job!’ and the rest are wiped.”
    — (Terry Pratchett, alt.fan.pratchett)

    Reply
  46. If I loved the movie, I’ll want to see all the extras and listen to the commentary soundtrack, even if it’s dopey. Good stuff that adds to my understanding of the characters often gets cut for time or because it doesn’t seem to flow right or whatever, but it’s nonetheless good stuff. So I would read snippets or unused epilogues or whatever, as long as I liked the writing.

    Reply
  47. If I loved the movie, I’ll want to see all the extras and listen to the commentary soundtrack, even if it’s dopey. Good stuff that adds to my understanding of the characters often gets cut for time or because it doesn’t seem to flow right or whatever, but it’s nonetheless good stuff. So I would read snippets or unused epilogues or whatever, as long as I liked the writing.

    Reply
  48. If I loved the movie, I’ll want to see all the extras and listen to the commentary soundtrack, even if it’s dopey. Good stuff that adds to my understanding of the characters often gets cut for time or because it doesn’t seem to flow right or whatever, but it’s nonetheless good stuff. So I would read snippets or unused epilogues or whatever, as long as I liked the writing.

    Reply
  49. If I loved the movie, I’ll want to see all the extras and listen to the commentary soundtrack, even if it’s dopey. Good stuff that adds to my understanding of the characters often gets cut for time or because it doesn’t seem to flow right or whatever, but it’s nonetheless good stuff. So I would read snippets or unused epilogues or whatever, as long as I liked the writing.

    Reply
  50. If I loved the movie, I’ll want to see all the extras and listen to the commentary soundtrack, even if it’s dopey. Good stuff that adds to my understanding of the characters often gets cut for time or because it doesn’t seem to flow right or whatever, but it’s nonetheless good stuff. So I would read snippets or unused epilogues or whatever, as long as I liked the writing.

    Reply
  51. Pat – really really enjoying your “Mystic” series! Looking forward to the next one.
    That said – I love the extra scenes, snipped materials, secondary characters who have to be cut for word count, etc. etc. I think it is fun to see ‘behind the scenes’ even if the material doesn’t make the final polished product. Most of the time, there’s some kind of remnant left that it ties into, and it can give some depth and additional understanding of where the story might have gone in another direction. On the other hand, if cereal boxes were written by my favorite authors, I’d read those too….

    Reply
  52. Pat – really really enjoying your “Mystic” series! Looking forward to the next one.
    That said – I love the extra scenes, snipped materials, secondary characters who have to be cut for word count, etc. etc. I think it is fun to see ‘behind the scenes’ even if the material doesn’t make the final polished product. Most of the time, there’s some kind of remnant left that it ties into, and it can give some depth and additional understanding of where the story might have gone in another direction. On the other hand, if cereal boxes were written by my favorite authors, I’d read those too….

    Reply
  53. Pat – really really enjoying your “Mystic” series! Looking forward to the next one.
    That said – I love the extra scenes, snipped materials, secondary characters who have to be cut for word count, etc. etc. I think it is fun to see ‘behind the scenes’ even if the material doesn’t make the final polished product. Most of the time, there’s some kind of remnant left that it ties into, and it can give some depth and additional understanding of where the story might have gone in another direction. On the other hand, if cereal boxes were written by my favorite authors, I’d read those too….

    Reply
  54. Pat – really really enjoying your “Mystic” series! Looking forward to the next one.
    That said – I love the extra scenes, snipped materials, secondary characters who have to be cut for word count, etc. etc. I think it is fun to see ‘behind the scenes’ even if the material doesn’t make the final polished product. Most of the time, there’s some kind of remnant left that it ties into, and it can give some depth and additional understanding of where the story might have gone in another direction. On the other hand, if cereal boxes were written by my favorite authors, I’d read those too….

    Reply
  55. Pat – really really enjoying your “Mystic” series! Looking forward to the next one.
    That said – I love the extra scenes, snipped materials, secondary characters who have to be cut for word count, etc. etc. I think it is fun to see ‘behind the scenes’ even if the material doesn’t make the final polished product. Most of the time, there’s some kind of remnant left that it ties into, and it can give some depth and additional understanding of where the story might have gone in another direction. On the other hand, if cereal boxes were written by my favorite authors, I’d read those too….

    Reply
  56. I just fininshed “Mystic Rider” and I loved it, just like “Mystic Guardian.” Whatever else you have about the “Mystic” series, I’ll read, and even pay for it if I have to.

    Reply
  57. I just fininshed “Mystic Rider” and I loved it, just like “Mystic Guardian.” Whatever else you have about the “Mystic” series, I’ll read, and even pay for it if I have to.

    Reply
  58. I just fininshed “Mystic Rider” and I loved it, just like “Mystic Guardian.” Whatever else you have about the “Mystic” series, I’ll read, and even pay for it if I have to.

    Reply
  59. I just fininshed “Mystic Rider” and I loved it, just like “Mystic Guardian.” Whatever else you have about the “Mystic” series, I’ll read, and even pay for it if I have to.

    Reply
  60. I just fininshed “Mystic Rider” and I loved it, just like “Mystic Guardian.” Whatever else you have about the “Mystic” series, I’ll read, and even pay for it if I have to.

    Reply
  61. I guess I need to rethink and try to put together some snippets for my website sometime. I know I rescued a couple and actually added them to the third MYSTIC book, so I’m not sure there are any big chunks left. That doesn’t happen often, though. usually, it’s just paragraphs of info dump and I whack them into cyberspace.
    And thank you for reading the MYSTIC books! The next one will be MYSTIC WARRIOR out in July. I’ll pull together all the final elements on the chalice in that book, and take a break to play with a more traditional story after that.

    Reply
  62. I guess I need to rethink and try to put together some snippets for my website sometime. I know I rescued a couple and actually added them to the third MYSTIC book, so I’m not sure there are any big chunks left. That doesn’t happen often, though. usually, it’s just paragraphs of info dump and I whack them into cyberspace.
    And thank you for reading the MYSTIC books! The next one will be MYSTIC WARRIOR out in July. I’ll pull together all the final elements on the chalice in that book, and take a break to play with a more traditional story after that.

    Reply
  63. I guess I need to rethink and try to put together some snippets for my website sometime. I know I rescued a couple and actually added them to the third MYSTIC book, so I’m not sure there are any big chunks left. That doesn’t happen often, though. usually, it’s just paragraphs of info dump and I whack them into cyberspace.
    And thank you for reading the MYSTIC books! The next one will be MYSTIC WARRIOR out in July. I’ll pull together all the final elements on the chalice in that book, and take a break to play with a more traditional story after that.

    Reply
  64. I guess I need to rethink and try to put together some snippets for my website sometime. I know I rescued a couple and actually added them to the third MYSTIC book, so I’m not sure there are any big chunks left. That doesn’t happen often, though. usually, it’s just paragraphs of info dump and I whack them into cyberspace.
    And thank you for reading the MYSTIC books! The next one will be MYSTIC WARRIOR out in July. I’ll pull together all the final elements on the chalice in that book, and take a break to play with a more traditional story after that.

    Reply
  65. I guess I need to rethink and try to put together some snippets for my website sometime. I know I rescued a couple and actually added them to the third MYSTIC book, so I’m not sure there are any big chunks left. That doesn’t happen often, though. usually, it’s just paragraphs of info dump and I whack them into cyberspace.
    And thank you for reading the MYSTIC books! The next one will be MYSTIC WARRIOR out in July. I’ll pull together all the final elements on the chalice in that book, and take a break to play with a more traditional story after that.

    Reply

Leave a Comment