Starting our Celebrations Early

  WW 10th anniversary logo

Hi! I'm Melissa, the Wench blog mistress.  As part of our gala 10th Anniversary celebration, which officially kicks off on May 23, we all would like to share some of our favorite posts from the last ten years.  To start us off, here is a post on Mothers from Jo Beverley talking a bit about mothers in books.

 Mother's day has always been quite enjoyable for me, I have a wonderful mom, an amazing mother-in-law, and in the last few years I have had the joy of celebrating as a mother myself.  Jo asks such thoughtful questions in her post, so I will leave you with them. 

Do you feel that the role of mothers has changed in the last few years, or is the post still on point?  Please remember that the copy of the Secret Wedding was for 2013, but there is still a book prize for a lucky commenter!

 

From Jo Beverley, May 2013

Mumcol2We celebrate Mother's Day in March in Britain, but having lived in Canada for a long time the May date feels more traditional to me, and it's made me think about mothers in our novels. The picture is of my mother, Mildred, as a teenager, on her wedding day, and her 40th wedding anniversary.

I have to say that my work is short on great mothers. No reflection on my own mum, but for some reason my heroine's good mothers are usually dead before the book starts. Mind you, most of the bad ones are, too.

If I consider my recent books I have a cold mother for Georgia is A Scandalous Countess, and a dead, unappreciative one for Prudence in An Unlikely Countess. In my upcoming book, Seduction in Silk, the heroine's dead mother is a stinker, and the hero's is the same as in Scandalous C as Perry is Georgia's brother.

To look on the bright side, both Christian's parents in A Secret Wedding were loving, though also such an embarrassment to him at times with their seemingly endless production of healthy children and unashamed enjoyment of the getting of them. Sometimes parents in novels can make life difficult, as in Perry's case in Seduction in Silk.Sedinsilksm

There's an excerpt here, but no mothers present.

I have some questions for you.

What great mothers for heroes and heroines have you found in historical romance? What makes them particularly great?

In general, if the protagonists have a mother, does that help or hinder? Does being motherless lead to a stronger plot? Does a loving mother weaken the drama? Examples?

Thesw

If you have a great story about your mother, share it here. My mother, a devout Catholic, used to invite Jehova's Witnesses in for tea and try to convert them. I think she got put on their blacklist in the end as they stopped coming by.

I'll give a copy of The Secret Wedding to the writer of one of the interesting comments, randomly picked.

Cheers,

Jo

 

80 thoughts on “Starting our Celebrations Early”

  1. I remember a post asking about mothers, but I really thought it was more recently than 2013. Have I really gotten to the point where 3 years ago is “just the other day”? Please, if I have, do not tell me.
    I remember any number of people mentioning Violet Bridgerton as a great mom. She always seems to know when to hold back and when to step in with her children. She loves them, but can be exasperated with them as well.
    I think the role of the mother really depends on the writer. The mother-less child trope can become a crutch in the hands of a lazy writer. Loss doesn’t automatically make someone interesting. Honestly, sometimes it’s nice to see a good mother-daughter relationship (or any strong female relationships) in books. There can still be conflict with a loving parent — there’s still the drive to not disappoint someone who’s been so supportive.

    Reply
  2. I remember a post asking about mothers, but I really thought it was more recently than 2013. Have I really gotten to the point where 3 years ago is “just the other day”? Please, if I have, do not tell me.
    I remember any number of people mentioning Violet Bridgerton as a great mom. She always seems to know when to hold back and when to step in with her children. She loves them, but can be exasperated with them as well.
    I think the role of the mother really depends on the writer. The mother-less child trope can become a crutch in the hands of a lazy writer. Loss doesn’t automatically make someone interesting. Honestly, sometimes it’s nice to see a good mother-daughter relationship (or any strong female relationships) in books. There can still be conflict with a loving parent — there’s still the drive to not disappoint someone who’s been so supportive.

    Reply
  3. I remember a post asking about mothers, but I really thought it was more recently than 2013. Have I really gotten to the point where 3 years ago is “just the other day”? Please, if I have, do not tell me.
    I remember any number of people mentioning Violet Bridgerton as a great mom. She always seems to know when to hold back and when to step in with her children. She loves them, but can be exasperated with them as well.
    I think the role of the mother really depends on the writer. The mother-less child trope can become a crutch in the hands of a lazy writer. Loss doesn’t automatically make someone interesting. Honestly, sometimes it’s nice to see a good mother-daughter relationship (or any strong female relationships) in books. There can still be conflict with a loving parent — there’s still the drive to not disappoint someone who’s been so supportive.

    Reply
  4. I remember a post asking about mothers, but I really thought it was more recently than 2013. Have I really gotten to the point where 3 years ago is “just the other day”? Please, if I have, do not tell me.
    I remember any number of people mentioning Violet Bridgerton as a great mom. She always seems to know when to hold back and when to step in with her children. She loves them, but can be exasperated with them as well.
    I think the role of the mother really depends on the writer. The mother-less child trope can become a crutch in the hands of a lazy writer. Loss doesn’t automatically make someone interesting. Honestly, sometimes it’s nice to see a good mother-daughter relationship (or any strong female relationships) in books. There can still be conflict with a loving parent — there’s still the drive to not disappoint someone who’s been so supportive.

    Reply
  5. I remember a post asking about mothers, but I really thought it was more recently than 2013. Have I really gotten to the point where 3 years ago is “just the other day”? Please, if I have, do not tell me.
    I remember any number of people mentioning Violet Bridgerton as a great mom. She always seems to know when to hold back and when to step in with her children. She loves them, but can be exasperated with them as well.
    I think the role of the mother really depends on the writer. The mother-less child trope can become a crutch in the hands of a lazy writer. Loss doesn’t automatically make someone interesting. Honestly, sometimes it’s nice to see a good mother-daughter relationship (or any strong female relationships) in books. There can still be conflict with a loving parent — there’s still the drive to not disappoint someone who’s been so supportive.

    Reply
  6. oooh yes, Violet Bridgerton is a great mother. So is the Duchess of Moreland in Grace Burrowes’ books.

    Reply
  7. oooh yes, Violet Bridgerton is a great mother. So is the Duchess of Moreland in Grace Burrowes’ books.

    Reply
  8. oooh yes, Violet Bridgerton is a great mother. So is the Duchess of Moreland in Grace Burrowes’ books.

    Reply
  9. oooh yes, Violet Bridgerton is a great mother. So is the Duchess of Moreland in Grace Burrowes’ books.

    Reply
  10. oooh yes, Violet Bridgerton is a great mother. So is the Duchess of Moreland in Grace Burrowes’ books.

    Reply
  11. I just double-checked, and it was indeed May 2013, but Jo Beverley also did a post on Mothers and Sons in 2015, so perhaps that is the one you are thinking of?
    I have not had the pleasure of reading the Bridgertons yet, but as I do like strong moms, I will add it to my “to read” list! Thanks!

    Reply
  12. I just double-checked, and it was indeed May 2013, but Jo Beverley also did a post on Mothers and Sons in 2015, so perhaps that is the one you are thinking of?
    I have not had the pleasure of reading the Bridgertons yet, but as I do like strong moms, I will add it to my “to read” list! Thanks!

    Reply
  13. I just double-checked, and it was indeed May 2013, but Jo Beverley also did a post on Mothers and Sons in 2015, so perhaps that is the one you are thinking of?
    I have not had the pleasure of reading the Bridgertons yet, but as I do like strong moms, I will add it to my “to read” list! Thanks!

    Reply
  14. I just double-checked, and it was indeed May 2013, but Jo Beverley also did a post on Mothers and Sons in 2015, so perhaps that is the one you are thinking of?
    I have not had the pleasure of reading the Bridgertons yet, but as I do like strong moms, I will add it to my “to read” list! Thanks!

    Reply
  15. I just double-checked, and it was indeed May 2013, but Jo Beverley also did a post on Mothers and Sons in 2015, so perhaps that is the one you are thinking of?
    I have not had the pleasure of reading the Bridgertons yet, but as I do like strong moms, I will add it to my “to read” list! Thanks!

    Reply
  16. I think that in some cases having a mother in the story can humanize a rascally hero. Make the hero more likeable especially if it’s a good relationship and she gives him fits over his rascally behavior.

    Reply
  17. I think that in some cases having a mother in the story can humanize a rascally hero. Make the hero more likeable especially if it’s a good relationship and she gives him fits over his rascally behavior.

    Reply
  18. I think that in some cases having a mother in the story can humanize a rascally hero. Make the hero more likeable especially if it’s a good relationship and she gives him fits over his rascally behavior.

    Reply
  19. I think that in some cases having a mother in the story can humanize a rascally hero. Make the hero more likeable especially if it’s a good relationship and she gives him fits over his rascally behavior.

    Reply
  20. I think that in some cases having a mother in the story can humanize a rascally hero. Make the hero more likeable especially if it’s a good relationship and she gives him fits over his rascally behavior.

    Reply
  21. I will admit to usually killing off the mothers of heroes, particularly in my Magic books. It gives them the excuse to misbehave like little boys and to be amazed when they encounter an all-female environment. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  22. I will admit to usually killing off the mothers of heroes, particularly in my Magic books. It gives them the excuse to misbehave like little boys and to be amazed when they encounter an all-female environment. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  23. I will admit to usually killing off the mothers of heroes, particularly in my Magic books. It gives them the excuse to misbehave like little boys and to be amazed when they encounter an all-female environment. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  24. I will admit to usually killing off the mothers of heroes, particularly in my Magic books. It gives them the excuse to misbehave like little boys and to be amazed when they encounter an all-female environment. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  25. I will admit to usually killing off the mothers of heroes, particularly in my Magic books. It gives them the excuse to misbehave like little boys and to be amazed when they encounter an all-female environment. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  26. The Bridgertons had a great mom. The Symthe-Smith girls had loving mothers,but….
    Just finished reading Sometimes a Rogue (Putney) and Bree had a great mom, just died 2 years earlier. Sarah had a great relationship with her mom.
    It’s nice to see mom’s working hard to get their children set up in life – it’s just not what they want (Mrs. Bennet).

    Reply
  27. The Bridgertons had a great mom. The Symthe-Smith girls had loving mothers,but….
    Just finished reading Sometimes a Rogue (Putney) and Bree had a great mom, just died 2 years earlier. Sarah had a great relationship with her mom.
    It’s nice to see mom’s working hard to get their children set up in life – it’s just not what they want (Mrs. Bennet).

    Reply
  28. The Bridgertons had a great mom. The Symthe-Smith girls had loving mothers,but….
    Just finished reading Sometimes a Rogue (Putney) and Bree had a great mom, just died 2 years earlier. Sarah had a great relationship with her mom.
    It’s nice to see mom’s working hard to get their children set up in life – it’s just not what they want (Mrs. Bennet).

    Reply
  29. The Bridgertons had a great mom. The Symthe-Smith girls had loving mothers,but….
    Just finished reading Sometimes a Rogue (Putney) and Bree had a great mom, just died 2 years earlier. Sarah had a great relationship with her mom.
    It’s nice to see mom’s working hard to get their children set up in life – it’s just not what they want (Mrs. Bennet).

    Reply
  30. The Bridgertons had a great mom. The Symthe-Smith girls had loving mothers,but….
    Just finished reading Sometimes a Rogue (Putney) and Bree had a great mom, just died 2 years earlier. Sarah had a great relationship with her mom.
    It’s nice to see mom’s working hard to get their children set up in life – it’s just not what they want (Mrs. Bennet).

    Reply
  31. I guess Violet Bridgerton is the First Mother of historical romance. And with eight children why wouldn’t she be! I do like a hero who is perhaps a scoundrel but has respect and love for his mother.

    Reply
  32. I guess Violet Bridgerton is the First Mother of historical romance. And with eight children why wouldn’t she be! I do like a hero who is perhaps a scoundrel but has respect and love for his mother.

    Reply
  33. I guess Violet Bridgerton is the First Mother of historical romance. And with eight children why wouldn’t she be! I do like a hero who is perhaps a scoundrel but has respect and love for his mother.

    Reply
  34. I guess Violet Bridgerton is the First Mother of historical romance. And with eight children why wouldn’t she be! I do like a hero who is perhaps a scoundrel but has respect and love for his mother.

    Reply
  35. I guess Violet Bridgerton is the First Mother of historical romance. And with eight children why wouldn’t she be! I do like a hero who is perhaps a scoundrel but has respect and love for his mother.

    Reply
  36. I tend to remember the difficult mothers more than I do the great ones.
    I have to agree with the nomination for Violet Bridgerton. But I would like to add the Cynster matrons (Stephanie Laurens) , the “previous” generation PUS the married ins. We see them more as matrons (and society matrons, at that), but look again. They are the “go to” women for information and advice. The allow the children and grandchildren to develop their own personalities. The are a bloc of strong shelter when needed. Pretty much my definition of a good mother.

    Reply
  37. I tend to remember the difficult mothers more than I do the great ones.
    I have to agree with the nomination for Violet Bridgerton. But I would like to add the Cynster matrons (Stephanie Laurens) , the “previous” generation PUS the married ins. We see them more as matrons (and society matrons, at that), but look again. They are the “go to” women for information and advice. The allow the children and grandchildren to develop their own personalities. The are a bloc of strong shelter when needed. Pretty much my definition of a good mother.

    Reply
  38. I tend to remember the difficult mothers more than I do the great ones.
    I have to agree with the nomination for Violet Bridgerton. But I would like to add the Cynster matrons (Stephanie Laurens) , the “previous” generation PUS the married ins. We see them more as matrons (and society matrons, at that), but look again. They are the “go to” women for information and advice. The allow the children and grandchildren to develop their own personalities. The are a bloc of strong shelter when needed. Pretty much my definition of a good mother.

    Reply
  39. I tend to remember the difficult mothers more than I do the great ones.
    I have to agree with the nomination for Violet Bridgerton. But I would like to add the Cynster matrons (Stephanie Laurens) , the “previous” generation PUS the married ins. We see them more as matrons (and society matrons, at that), but look again. They are the “go to” women for information and advice. The allow the children and grandchildren to develop their own personalities. The are a bloc of strong shelter when needed. Pretty much my definition of a good mother.

    Reply
  40. I tend to remember the difficult mothers more than I do the great ones.
    I have to agree with the nomination for Violet Bridgerton. But I would like to add the Cynster matrons (Stephanie Laurens) , the “previous” generation PUS the married ins. We see them more as matrons (and society matrons, at that), but look again. They are the “go to” women for information and advice. The allow the children and grandchildren to develop their own personalities. The are a bloc of strong shelter when needed. Pretty much my definition of a good mother.

    Reply
  41. It is to late in the evening (umm, guess I should say to early in the morning) to think about which mother I would add to the list. I just saw the post on Facebook about this being the 10 year anniversary and had to stop in and say congratulations. I’ve been lurking for years, used to make more comments but don’t do that as much as I should now.
    Congratulations!

    Reply
  42. It is to late in the evening (umm, guess I should say to early in the morning) to think about which mother I would add to the list. I just saw the post on Facebook about this being the 10 year anniversary and had to stop in and say congratulations. I’ve been lurking for years, used to make more comments but don’t do that as much as I should now.
    Congratulations!

    Reply
  43. It is to late in the evening (umm, guess I should say to early in the morning) to think about which mother I would add to the list. I just saw the post on Facebook about this being the 10 year anniversary and had to stop in and say congratulations. I’ve been lurking for years, used to make more comments but don’t do that as much as I should now.
    Congratulations!

    Reply
  44. It is to late in the evening (umm, guess I should say to early in the morning) to think about which mother I would add to the list. I just saw the post on Facebook about this being the 10 year anniversary and had to stop in and say congratulations. I’ve been lurking for years, used to make more comments but don’t do that as much as I should now.
    Congratulations!

    Reply
  45. It is to late in the evening (umm, guess I should say to early in the morning) to think about which mother I would add to the list. I just saw the post on Facebook about this being the 10 year anniversary and had to stop in and say congratulations. I’ve been lurking for years, used to make more comments but don’t do that as much as I should now.
    Congratulations!

    Reply
  46. I, too, want to congratulate you ladies on the 10th anniversary of your blog. I’m a fairly newcomer to this website, but I have enjoyed some really interesting posts here.
    Again, congratulations – and many more!

    Reply
  47. I, too, want to congratulate you ladies on the 10th anniversary of your blog. I’m a fairly newcomer to this website, but I have enjoyed some really interesting posts here.
    Again, congratulations – and many more!

    Reply
  48. I, too, want to congratulate you ladies on the 10th anniversary of your blog. I’m a fairly newcomer to this website, but I have enjoyed some really interesting posts here.
    Again, congratulations – and many more!

    Reply
  49. I, too, want to congratulate you ladies on the 10th anniversary of your blog. I’m a fairly newcomer to this website, but I have enjoyed some really interesting posts here.
    Again, congratulations – and many more!

    Reply
  50. I, too, want to congratulate you ladies on the 10th anniversary of your blog. I’m a fairly newcomer to this website, but I have enjoyed some really interesting posts here.
    Again, congratulations – and many more!

    Reply
  51. My mother never met a stranger. She signed us up for an early version of Air B&B where travellers could stay at our house for free. We had Buddist Monks for a week as well as a French family. The son was 4 years younger than me and considered himself a Casanova. I ended up staying at a friend’s house for the duration of their stay.

    Reply
  52. My mother never met a stranger. She signed us up for an early version of Air B&B where travellers could stay at our house for free. We had Buddist Monks for a week as well as a French family. The son was 4 years younger than me and considered himself a Casanova. I ended up staying at a friend’s house for the duration of their stay.

    Reply
  53. My mother never met a stranger. She signed us up for an early version of Air B&B where travellers could stay at our house for free. We had Buddist Monks for a week as well as a French family. The son was 4 years younger than me and considered himself a Casanova. I ended up staying at a friend’s house for the duration of their stay.

    Reply
  54. My mother never met a stranger. She signed us up for an early version of Air B&B where travellers could stay at our house for free. We had Buddist Monks for a week as well as a French family. The son was 4 years younger than me and considered himself a Casanova. I ended up staying at a friend’s house for the duration of their stay.

    Reply
  55. My mother never met a stranger. She signed us up for an early version of Air B&B where travellers could stay at our house for free. We had Buddist Monks for a week as well as a French family. The son was 4 years younger than me and considered himself a Casanova. I ended up staying at a friend’s house for the duration of their stay.

    Reply
  56. I completely agree with your mention of the Duchess of Moreland. Fiercely devoted to her children, natural and ‘on the other side of the blanket.’ Her own personal history had to have something to do with it before her marriage to the Duke, but his support and devotion made such a wonderful marriage and therefore parents to their huge brood.

    Reply
  57. I completely agree with your mention of the Duchess of Moreland. Fiercely devoted to her children, natural and ‘on the other side of the blanket.’ Her own personal history had to have something to do with it before her marriage to the Duke, but his support and devotion made such a wonderful marriage and therefore parents to their huge brood.

    Reply
  58. I completely agree with your mention of the Duchess of Moreland. Fiercely devoted to her children, natural and ‘on the other side of the blanket.’ Her own personal history had to have something to do with it before her marriage to the Duke, but his support and devotion made such a wonderful marriage and therefore parents to their huge brood.

    Reply
  59. I completely agree with your mention of the Duchess of Moreland. Fiercely devoted to her children, natural and ‘on the other side of the blanket.’ Her own personal history had to have something to do with it before her marriage to the Duke, but his support and devotion made such a wonderful marriage and therefore parents to their huge brood.

    Reply
  60. I completely agree with your mention of the Duchess of Moreland. Fiercely devoted to her children, natural and ‘on the other side of the blanket.’ Her own personal history had to have something to do with it before her marriage to the Duke, but his support and devotion made such a wonderful marriage and therefore parents to their huge brood.

    Reply
  61. First, congratulations on the Tenth Anniversary for this amazingly educational, thought provoking and entertaining blog.
    Given that historical romance is fiction, whether or not it is accurate in every category, (accurate WOULD be my choice, of course) the idea of a novel is drama, conflict, and resolution. No news there. It therefore seems very common that the character of a difficult mother or other parental figure is a big part of a H/h’s conflict or pressure. A more sympathetic Mama seems to work best if she is portrayed over the course of a series, giving more time to understanding her motivations. Otherwise a sweet loving mother comes close to being just filler. I cannot think any, and I’ll kick myself later I’m sure, because they just aren’t memorable.
    I’ve GOT to read the Bridgertons!

    Reply
  62. First, congratulations on the Tenth Anniversary for this amazingly educational, thought provoking and entertaining blog.
    Given that historical romance is fiction, whether or not it is accurate in every category, (accurate WOULD be my choice, of course) the idea of a novel is drama, conflict, and resolution. No news there. It therefore seems very common that the character of a difficult mother or other parental figure is a big part of a H/h’s conflict or pressure. A more sympathetic Mama seems to work best if she is portrayed over the course of a series, giving more time to understanding her motivations. Otherwise a sweet loving mother comes close to being just filler. I cannot think any, and I’ll kick myself later I’m sure, because they just aren’t memorable.
    I’ve GOT to read the Bridgertons!

    Reply
  63. First, congratulations on the Tenth Anniversary for this amazingly educational, thought provoking and entertaining blog.
    Given that historical romance is fiction, whether or not it is accurate in every category, (accurate WOULD be my choice, of course) the idea of a novel is drama, conflict, and resolution. No news there. It therefore seems very common that the character of a difficult mother or other parental figure is a big part of a H/h’s conflict or pressure. A more sympathetic Mama seems to work best if she is portrayed over the course of a series, giving more time to understanding her motivations. Otherwise a sweet loving mother comes close to being just filler. I cannot think any, and I’ll kick myself later I’m sure, because they just aren’t memorable.
    I’ve GOT to read the Bridgertons!

    Reply
  64. First, congratulations on the Tenth Anniversary for this amazingly educational, thought provoking and entertaining blog.
    Given that historical romance is fiction, whether or not it is accurate in every category, (accurate WOULD be my choice, of course) the idea of a novel is drama, conflict, and resolution. No news there. It therefore seems very common that the character of a difficult mother or other parental figure is a big part of a H/h’s conflict or pressure. A more sympathetic Mama seems to work best if she is portrayed over the course of a series, giving more time to understanding her motivations. Otherwise a sweet loving mother comes close to being just filler. I cannot think any, and I’ll kick myself later I’m sure, because they just aren’t memorable.
    I’ve GOT to read the Bridgertons!

    Reply
  65. First, congratulations on the Tenth Anniversary for this amazingly educational, thought provoking and entertaining blog.
    Given that historical romance is fiction, whether or not it is accurate in every category, (accurate WOULD be my choice, of course) the idea of a novel is drama, conflict, and resolution. No news there. It therefore seems very common that the character of a difficult mother or other parental figure is a big part of a H/h’s conflict or pressure. A more sympathetic Mama seems to work best if she is portrayed over the course of a series, giving more time to understanding her motivations. Otherwise a sweet loving mother comes close to being just filler. I cannot think any, and I’ll kick myself later I’m sure, because they just aren’t memorable.
    I’ve GOT to read the Bridgertons!

    Reply
  66. Congratulations on your tenth anniversary!
    When my sister-in-law moved far away from family to a new town and was at home all day with four small children, she was so desperate for adult conversation that she would invited missionaries in for refreshments. She didn’t attempt to convert them though!
    I’ve often thought that my parents’ story would make a good novel. My parents both emigrated from Europe to New Zealand in the 1950s. New Zealand at that time was so unpeopled that the government was paying young people to come and settle there. My mother and her sister then saved to bring out their mother who was beyond the age limit for free transportation. My parents met on the ship my mother traveled on. My father was a purser on board. My father subsequently met my grandmother when he was on his last trip. On encountering my mother and her mother on a city street, he was invited to my mother’s wedding. She did not marry her fiance whom she’d also met on board. She and my father met again some months later and married three months after that.

    Reply
  67. Congratulations on your tenth anniversary!
    When my sister-in-law moved far away from family to a new town and was at home all day with four small children, she was so desperate for adult conversation that she would invited missionaries in for refreshments. She didn’t attempt to convert them though!
    I’ve often thought that my parents’ story would make a good novel. My parents both emigrated from Europe to New Zealand in the 1950s. New Zealand at that time was so unpeopled that the government was paying young people to come and settle there. My mother and her sister then saved to bring out their mother who was beyond the age limit for free transportation. My parents met on the ship my mother traveled on. My father was a purser on board. My father subsequently met my grandmother when he was on his last trip. On encountering my mother and her mother on a city street, he was invited to my mother’s wedding. She did not marry her fiance whom she’d also met on board. She and my father met again some months later and married three months after that.

    Reply
  68. Congratulations on your tenth anniversary!
    When my sister-in-law moved far away from family to a new town and was at home all day with four small children, she was so desperate for adult conversation that she would invited missionaries in for refreshments. She didn’t attempt to convert them though!
    I’ve often thought that my parents’ story would make a good novel. My parents both emigrated from Europe to New Zealand in the 1950s. New Zealand at that time was so unpeopled that the government was paying young people to come and settle there. My mother and her sister then saved to bring out their mother who was beyond the age limit for free transportation. My parents met on the ship my mother traveled on. My father was a purser on board. My father subsequently met my grandmother when he was on his last trip. On encountering my mother and her mother on a city street, he was invited to my mother’s wedding. She did not marry her fiance whom she’d also met on board. She and my father met again some months later and married three months after that.

    Reply
  69. Congratulations on your tenth anniversary!
    When my sister-in-law moved far away from family to a new town and was at home all day with four small children, she was so desperate for adult conversation that she would invited missionaries in for refreshments. She didn’t attempt to convert them though!
    I’ve often thought that my parents’ story would make a good novel. My parents both emigrated from Europe to New Zealand in the 1950s. New Zealand at that time was so unpeopled that the government was paying young people to come and settle there. My mother and her sister then saved to bring out their mother who was beyond the age limit for free transportation. My parents met on the ship my mother traveled on. My father was a purser on board. My father subsequently met my grandmother when he was on his last trip. On encountering my mother and her mother on a city street, he was invited to my mother’s wedding. She did not marry her fiance whom she’d also met on board. She and my father met again some months later and married three months after that.

    Reply
  70. Congratulations on your tenth anniversary!
    When my sister-in-law moved far away from family to a new town and was at home all day with four small children, she was so desperate for adult conversation that she would invited missionaries in for refreshments. She didn’t attempt to convert them though!
    I’ve often thought that my parents’ story would make a good novel. My parents both emigrated from Europe to New Zealand in the 1950s. New Zealand at that time was so unpeopled that the government was paying young people to come and settle there. My mother and her sister then saved to bring out their mother who was beyond the age limit for free transportation. My parents met on the ship my mother traveled on. My father was a purser on board. My father subsequently met my grandmother when he was on his last trip. On encountering my mother and her mother on a city street, he was invited to my mother’s wedding. She did not marry her fiance whom she’d also met on board. She and my father met again some months later and married three months after that.

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