Spain

DSC_0265About a month ago I was attending a romance conference in Madrid. How cool is that?

Quite, actually, as it had snowed the day before I arrived! Never mind. I didn't expect warm weather in Madrid in early February.

I was delighted to be invited to attend the conference, which was in, I believe, its fourth year and growing every year. There were nearly 200 attendees.

The weather might have been nippy but my welcome from the organizers and attendees was very warm. I knew I sold well in Spain because all my books except the traditional Regencies have been translated into Spanish, and I get fan mail, often in Spanish. Babelfish is my friend. 🙂 However, there's nothing like meeting people who have all my books and love them. Writers all need a dose of that now and then.


M6950h Tamara, Jo, Yuliss

So, if I don't speak much Spanish, how does this work? I had not one, but two, wonderful translators. Yuliss, on the right, was my main translator, but as she would also be translating for another speaker I also had Tamara, on the left. They're both MA students in translation and cultural studies (I hope I have that right.) I predict bright futures for them both.

DSCN1688Here I am doing my session, (and yes, the name cards are wrong) with Yuliss and Maria, who interviewed me. I talked about how I started my writing career, how I chose what to write, and what's coming next. There were a lot of interesting questions from the floor, and I found out that Spanish readers don't really understand the term "Georgian." To them, it's all Regency as a description of a style of book rather than a historical period.

No problem except that it made one of my anecdotes rather confusing.

DSCN1691Judging from my expression here, I'm trying to understand as Yuliss translates one of the trickier questions from the floor.

Because of my translators, I could even follow the sessions in Spanish, and they were very interesting. I learned that until recently nearly all the romance novels read in Spain were translations, but now there are a number of Spanish publishers and Spanish authors.

This is great, because they'll bring their own cultural texture to the novels.

There was an international angle, as one of the speakers was a publisher from South America. Of course many countries there are Spanish speaking and so it should be a huge market, but apparently there are still many rivalries and hostilities that mean that books often can't cross borders, so each country has it's own publishers.

So, it was a very interesting day, and a happy memory.

While I have your attention, the other day I put a new piece of writing on my web site. It's not an excerpt from A Shocking Delight because I cut it from the book. It's a rewrite of a scene from The Dragon's Bride in which David Kerslake is arm-twisted into claiming the earldom of Wyvern, and I had it as a prologue. I thought better of it, but I've put it on line for anyone interested. Andel

Click here.

There's an excerpt from A Shocking Delight here.

And only a few weeks now until it's available.

There'll be a couple of good deals on my books coming up in preparation, so if you don't get my newsletter you might want to sign up. There are sign up boxes on the bottom of nearly all my pages.

Lastly, this week only, my SF romance novella, The Trouble With Heroes is 50% off at 99c at Amazon and for other e-readers at Smashwords.

If you'd been in that Spanish audience, is there a question you'd have asked me? Now's your chance, and no translation needed.

Cheers,

Jo

 

90 thoughts on “Spain”

  1. Spain! I’m heading back there in a few months and I’ve forgotten almost all the Spanish I know! Better get those language books out again…
    I find it’s not just in Spain people use the term “Regency” to mean a lot more than that. I’ve seen late Victorian books labelled as Regencies. I’ve also seen 1930s-era books labelled “Victorian”. There’s a blog called “That’s Not Victorian” that tries to clear up the different time periods, but I don’t think there’s much help for it!

    Reply
  2. Spain! I’m heading back there in a few months and I’ve forgotten almost all the Spanish I know! Better get those language books out again…
    I find it’s not just in Spain people use the term “Regency” to mean a lot more than that. I’ve seen late Victorian books labelled as Regencies. I’ve also seen 1930s-era books labelled “Victorian”. There’s a blog called “That’s Not Victorian” that tries to clear up the different time periods, but I don’t think there’s much help for it!

    Reply
  3. Spain! I’m heading back there in a few months and I’ve forgotten almost all the Spanish I know! Better get those language books out again…
    I find it’s not just in Spain people use the term “Regency” to mean a lot more than that. I’ve seen late Victorian books labelled as Regencies. I’ve also seen 1930s-era books labelled “Victorian”. There’s a blog called “That’s Not Victorian” that tries to clear up the different time periods, but I don’t think there’s much help for it!

    Reply
  4. Spain! I’m heading back there in a few months and I’ve forgotten almost all the Spanish I know! Better get those language books out again…
    I find it’s not just in Spain people use the term “Regency” to mean a lot more than that. I’ve seen late Victorian books labelled as Regencies. I’ve also seen 1930s-era books labelled “Victorian”. There’s a blog called “That’s Not Victorian” that tries to clear up the different time periods, but I don’t think there’s much help for it!

    Reply
  5. Spain! I’m heading back there in a few months and I’ve forgotten almost all the Spanish I know! Better get those language books out again…
    I find it’s not just in Spain people use the term “Regency” to mean a lot more than that. I’ve seen late Victorian books labelled as Regencies. I’ve also seen 1930s-era books labelled “Victorian”. There’s a blog called “That’s Not Victorian” that tries to clear up the different time periods, but I don’t think there’s much help for it!

    Reply
  6. What fun, Jo! Maybe I’ll be able to attend some day. Like you, I’ve had virtually all my historicals translated into Spanish, and I do get the South American fan letters in Spanish. (Most often from Argentina, I think.) I hope that ereaders will catch on soon and make a broader array of romances available across the whole Spanish speaking territories. (Since I just returned from Peru, the subject is particularly high in my awareness now.)

    Reply
  7. What fun, Jo! Maybe I’ll be able to attend some day. Like you, I’ve had virtually all my historicals translated into Spanish, and I do get the South American fan letters in Spanish. (Most often from Argentina, I think.) I hope that ereaders will catch on soon and make a broader array of romances available across the whole Spanish speaking territories. (Since I just returned from Peru, the subject is particularly high in my awareness now.)

    Reply
  8. What fun, Jo! Maybe I’ll be able to attend some day. Like you, I’ve had virtually all my historicals translated into Spanish, and I do get the South American fan letters in Spanish. (Most often from Argentina, I think.) I hope that ereaders will catch on soon and make a broader array of romances available across the whole Spanish speaking territories. (Since I just returned from Peru, the subject is particularly high in my awareness now.)

    Reply
  9. What fun, Jo! Maybe I’ll be able to attend some day. Like you, I’ve had virtually all my historicals translated into Spanish, and I do get the South American fan letters in Spanish. (Most often from Argentina, I think.) I hope that ereaders will catch on soon and make a broader array of romances available across the whole Spanish speaking territories. (Since I just returned from Peru, the subject is particularly high in my awareness now.)

    Reply
  10. What fun, Jo! Maybe I’ll be able to attend some day. Like you, I’ve had virtually all my historicals translated into Spanish, and I do get the South American fan letters in Spanish. (Most often from Argentina, I think.) I hope that ereaders will catch on soon and make a broader array of romances available across the whole Spanish speaking territories. (Since I just returned from Peru, the subject is particularly high in my awareness now.)

    Reply
  11. This isn’t a Spanish question, but reading your post did make me wonder how Spanish readers feel about the way in which the Peninsula War (as we call it) is portrayed in many Regencies.
    Congratulations on a successful conference. I do admire you for going outside your comfort zone. And even if it wan’t warm there, you did miss a couple of the worst storms we had here, one of which was pretty devastating for Dawlish.

    Reply
  12. This isn’t a Spanish question, but reading your post did make me wonder how Spanish readers feel about the way in which the Peninsula War (as we call it) is portrayed in many Regencies.
    Congratulations on a successful conference. I do admire you for going outside your comfort zone. And even if it wan’t warm there, you did miss a couple of the worst storms we had here, one of which was pretty devastating for Dawlish.

    Reply
  13. This isn’t a Spanish question, but reading your post did make me wonder how Spanish readers feel about the way in which the Peninsula War (as we call it) is portrayed in many Regencies.
    Congratulations on a successful conference. I do admire you for going outside your comfort zone. And even if it wan’t warm there, you did miss a couple of the worst storms we had here, one of which was pretty devastating for Dawlish.

    Reply
  14. This isn’t a Spanish question, but reading your post did make me wonder how Spanish readers feel about the way in which the Peninsula War (as we call it) is portrayed in many Regencies.
    Congratulations on a successful conference. I do admire you for going outside your comfort zone. And even if it wan’t warm there, you did miss a couple of the worst storms we had here, one of which was pretty devastating for Dawlish.

    Reply
  15. This isn’t a Spanish question, but reading your post did make me wonder how Spanish readers feel about the way in which the Peninsula War (as we call it) is portrayed in many Regencies.
    Congratulations on a successful conference. I do admire you for going outside your comfort zone. And even if it wan’t warm there, you did miss a couple of the worst storms we had here, one of which was pretty devastating for Dawlish.

    Reply
  16. What a good question, HJ! I wish I’d thought to ask.It was part of my asking how Spanish written books might be different, but I didn’t ask specifically.
    Jo

    Reply
  17. What a good question, HJ! I wish I’d thought to ask.It was part of my asking how Spanish written books might be different, but I didn’t ask specifically.
    Jo

    Reply
  18. What a good question, HJ! I wish I’d thought to ask.It was part of my asking how Spanish written books might be different, but I didn’t ask specifically.
    Jo

    Reply
  19. What a good question, HJ! I wish I’d thought to ask.It was part of my asking how Spanish written books might be different, but I didn’t ask specifically.
    Jo

    Reply
  20. What a good question, HJ! I wish I’d thought to ask.It was part of my asking how Spanish written books might be different, but I didn’t ask specifically.
    Jo

    Reply
  21. What a great trip! Some things truly are universal – an appreciation of great romance writing being one of them.
    The peoples of the world disagree and squabble over so many things. It is nice to know there are some things on which we can all agree.
    Are there things readers in countries where English is not a first language prefer in romance novels? Are there things that don’t translate so to speak? And are there things they’d like to see in historical romance that they aren’t seeing?

    Reply
  22. What a great trip! Some things truly are universal – an appreciation of great romance writing being one of them.
    The peoples of the world disagree and squabble over so many things. It is nice to know there are some things on which we can all agree.
    Are there things readers in countries where English is not a first language prefer in romance novels? Are there things that don’t translate so to speak? And are there things they’d like to see in historical romance that they aren’t seeing?

    Reply
  23. What a great trip! Some things truly are universal – an appreciation of great romance writing being one of them.
    The peoples of the world disagree and squabble over so many things. It is nice to know there are some things on which we can all agree.
    Are there things readers in countries where English is not a first language prefer in romance novels? Are there things that don’t translate so to speak? And are there things they’d like to see in historical romance that they aren’t seeing?

    Reply
  24. What a great trip! Some things truly are universal – an appreciation of great romance writing being one of them.
    The peoples of the world disagree and squabble over so many things. It is nice to know there are some things on which we can all agree.
    Are there things readers in countries where English is not a first language prefer in romance novels? Are there things that don’t translate so to speak? And are there things they’d like to see in historical romance that they aren’t seeing?

    Reply
  25. What a great trip! Some things truly are universal – an appreciation of great romance writing being one of them.
    The peoples of the world disagree and squabble over so many things. It is nice to know there are some things on which we can all agree.
    Are there things readers in countries where English is not a first language prefer in romance novels? Are there things that don’t translate so to speak? And are there things they’d like to see in historical romance that they aren’t seeing?

    Reply
  26. The question I think I would ask would be for a mini-bibliography of the most interesting books you use for your Georgian books–memoirs, collected letter, reference works, biographies? I know a lot of web sites that have listings for the Regency era.
    I would love to visit Spain sometime. I’ve read so much about the cathedrals and Moorish al-Hambra over the years.

    Reply
  27. The question I think I would ask would be for a mini-bibliography of the most interesting books you use for your Georgian books–memoirs, collected letter, reference works, biographies? I know a lot of web sites that have listings for the Regency era.
    I would love to visit Spain sometime. I’ve read so much about the cathedrals and Moorish al-Hambra over the years.

    Reply
  28. The question I think I would ask would be for a mini-bibliography of the most interesting books you use for your Georgian books–memoirs, collected letter, reference works, biographies? I know a lot of web sites that have listings for the Regency era.
    I would love to visit Spain sometime. I’ve read so much about the cathedrals and Moorish al-Hambra over the years.

    Reply
  29. The question I think I would ask would be for a mini-bibliography of the most interesting books you use for your Georgian books–memoirs, collected letter, reference works, biographies? I know a lot of web sites that have listings for the Regency era.
    I would love to visit Spain sometime. I’ve read so much about the cathedrals and Moorish al-Hambra over the years.

    Reply
  30. The question I think I would ask would be for a mini-bibliography of the most interesting books you use for your Georgian books–memoirs, collected letter, reference works, biographies? I know a lot of web sites that have listings for the Regency era.
    I would love to visit Spain sometime. I’ve read so much about the cathedrals and Moorish al-Hambra over the years.

    Reply
  31. About this question, I have to tell you that, generally speaking, Spanish readers are very friendly towards Englishmen fighting in the Peninsula War.
    For instance, one of the most important -if not ‘the most’- web pages about the genre, published an article about the Duke of Wellington (http://www.rnovelaromantica.com/index.php/articulos-y-noticias/todos-los-articulos/item/sabias-que-el-duque-de-wellington) last year.
    My personal opinion is, nevertheless, not quite so good, as the British Army acted, as a matter of fact, like the majority of armies in war: inflicting unnecesary pain to the civilians with rape, pillaging and those things. It was particularly painful if you think that they were supposed to be ‘allies’.
    One of our most successful writers, Pérez-Reverte, wrote an article about it, ‘Nuestros aliados los ingleses’ (‘Our allies the English’, http://www.perezreverte.com/articulo/patentes-corso/207/nuestros-aliados-ingleses/). I mention it because of the importance of the writer, but I don’t think you would like it, because, well,… English soldiers are not always the good guys of the story. And it’s also written in such a style that I think not even a good ‘human’ translator can express what it really says -not to mention a mechanical one. And this writer, when he makes this weekly column, adopts a ‘persona’ which is very disdainful, with a lot of f-words, so it can sound very unpolite to a British, because you don’t usually use such expressions in your common life.
    So there you have two different points of view about those times. I have to reassure you that, the average romance reader is very fond of your novels and doesn’t care about the historical accuracy in this point. If they know anything, they suspend disbelief.

    Reply
  32. About this question, I have to tell you that, generally speaking, Spanish readers are very friendly towards Englishmen fighting in the Peninsula War.
    For instance, one of the most important -if not ‘the most’- web pages about the genre, published an article about the Duke of Wellington (http://www.rnovelaromantica.com/index.php/articulos-y-noticias/todos-los-articulos/item/sabias-que-el-duque-de-wellington) last year.
    My personal opinion is, nevertheless, not quite so good, as the British Army acted, as a matter of fact, like the majority of armies in war: inflicting unnecesary pain to the civilians with rape, pillaging and those things. It was particularly painful if you think that they were supposed to be ‘allies’.
    One of our most successful writers, Pérez-Reverte, wrote an article about it, ‘Nuestros aliados los ingleses’ (‘Our allies the English’, http://www.perezreverte.com/articulo/patentes-corso/207/nuestros-aliados-ingleses/). I mention it because of the importance of the writer, but I don’t think you would like it, because, well,… English soldiers are not always the good guys of the story. And it’s also written in such a style that I think not even a good ‘human’ translator can express what it really says -not to mention a mechanical one. And this writer, when he makes this weekly column, adopts a ‘persona’ which is very disdainful, with a lot of f-words, so it can sound very unpolite to a British, because you don’t usually use such expressions in your common life.
    So there you have two different points of view about those times. I have to reassure you that, the average romance reader is very fond of your novels and doesn’t care about the historical accuracy in this point. If they know anything, they suspend disbelief.

    Reply
  33. About this question, I have to tell you that, generally speaking, Spanish readers are very friendly towards Englishmen fighting in the Peninsula War.
    For instance, one of the most important -if not ‘the most’- web pages about the genre, published an article about the Duke of Wellington (http://www.rnovelaromantica.com/index.php/articulos-y-noticias/todos-los-articulos/item/sabias-que-el-duque-de-wellington) last year.
    My personal opinion is, nevertheless, not quite so good, as the British Army acted, as a matter of fact, like the majority of armies in war: inflicting unnecesary pain to the civilians with rape, pillaging and those things. It was particularly painful if you think that they were supposed to be ‘allies’.
    One of our most successful writers, Pérez-Reverte, wrote an article about it, ‘Nuestros aliados los ingleses’ (‘Our allies the English’, http://www.perezreverte.com/articulo/patentes-corso/207/nuestros-aliados-ingleses/). I mention it because of the importance of the writer, but I don’t think you would like it, because, well,… English soldiers are not always the good guys of the story. And it’s also written in such a style that I think not even a good ‘human’ translator can express what it really says -not to mention a mechanical one. And this writer, when he makes this weekly column, adopts a ‘persona’ which is very disdainful, with a lot of f-words, so it can sound very unpolite to a British, because you don’t usually use such expressions in your common life.
    So there you have two different points of view about those times. I have to reassure you that, the average romance reader is very fond of your novels and doesn’t care about the historical accuracy in this point. If they know anything, they suspend disbelief.

    Reply
  34. About this question, I have to tell you that, generally speaking, Spanish readers are very friendly towards Englishmen fighting in the Peninsula War.
    For instance, one of the most important -if not ‘the most’- web pages about the genre, published an article about the Duke of Wellington (http://www.rnovelaromantica.com/index.php/articulos-y-noticias/todos-los-articulos/item/sabias-que-el-duque-de-wellington) last year.
    My personal opinion is, nevertheless, not quite so good, as the British Army acted, as a matter of fact, like the majority of armies in war: inflicting unnecesary pain to the civilians with rape, pillaging and those things. It was particularly painful if you think that they were supposed to be ‘allies’.
    One of our most successful writers, Pérez-Reverte, wrote an article about it, ‘Nuestros aliados los ingleses’ (‘Our allies the English’, http://www.perezreverte.com/articulo/patentes-corso/207/nuestros-aliados-ingleses/). I mention it because of the importance of the writer, but I don’t think you would like it, because, well,… English soldiers are not always the good guys of the story. And it’s also written in such a style that I think not even a good ‘human’ translator can express what it really says -not to mention a mechanical one. And this writer, when he makes this weekly column, adopts a ‘persona’ which is very disdainful, with a lot of f-words, so it can sound very unpolite to a British, because you don’t usually use such expressions in your common life.
    So there you have two different points of view about those times. I have to reassure you that, the average romance reader is very fond of your novels and doesn’t care about the historical accuracy in this point. If they know anything, they suspend disbelief.

    Reply
  35. About this question, I have to tell you that, generally speaking, Spanish readers are very friendly towards Englishmen fighting in the Peninsula War.
    For instance, one of the most important -if not ‘the most’- web pages about the genre, published an article about the Duke of Wellington (http://www.rnovelaromantica.com/index.php/articulos-y-noticias/todos-los-articulos/item/sabias-que-el-duque-de-wellington) last year.
    My personal opinion is, nevertheless, not quite so good, as the British Army acted, as a matter of fact, like the majority of armies in war: inflicting unnecesary pain to the civilians with rape, pillaging and those things. It was particularly painful if you think that they were supposed to be ‘allies’.
    One of our most successful writers, Pérez-Reverte, wrote an article about it, ‘Nuestros aliados los ingleses’ (‘Our allies the English’, http://www.perezreverte.com/articulo/patentes-corso/207/nuestros-aliados-ingleses/). I mention it because of the importance of the writer, but I don’t think you would like it, because, well,… English soldiers are not always the good guys of the story. And it’s also written in such a style that I think not even a good ‘human’ translator can express what it really says -not to mention a mechanical one. And this writer, when he makes this weekly column, adopts a ‘persona’ which is very disdainful, with a lot of f-words, so it can sound very unpolite to a British, because you don’t usually use such expressions in your common life.
    So there you have two different points of view about those times. I have to reassure you that, the average romance reader is very fond of your novels and doesn’t care about the historical accuracy in this point. If they know anything, they suspend disbelief.

    Reply
  36. OMG I’d love to be in that audience! I hope you really enjoyed your time here!
    I think my questions would have been more about industry. The influence of self pub against trad pub or how can we get your backlist of ‘oldies but goldies’ translated to Spanish, for instance.
    And lately I’ve been asking myself about British writers and New World (I use this term as they do in ‘wine industry’, which includes for instance Australia) authors writing about the same – British history. What you have in common, if there’s any difference.
    Not a long time ago I read somebody saying ‘I didn’t know Julia Quinn was not English’ and then someone else said ‘I’m British and it’s very clear for me that she is certainly not British’. So it made me think about this topic.
    You are completely right about the Georgian thing. I have to recognize ‘Georgian’ is a term that means nothing to an average Spanish reader. The majority of them would hardly know who the ‘Spanish’ king was at the time!
    But I have also found references to something ‘Regency’ outside the 1811-1820 time. Look for the article ‘Regency dances’ in the wikipedia, which explains it. Many Kleypas’ novels are considered Regency even when they are set in 1830s or 1840s. And I have even seen Georgette Heyer’s ‘Devil’s cub’ classified as a Regency, when it’s the most Georgian/pre French Revolution I have ever seen! Doesn’t anybody realize… I don’t know… Just the way the characters dress?

    Reply
  37. OMG I’d love to be in that audience! I hope you really enjoyed your time here!
    I think my questions would have been more about industry. The influence of self pub against trad pub or how can we get your backlist of ‘oldies but goldies’ translated to Spanish, for instance.
    And lately I’ve been asking myself about British writers and New World (I use this term as they do in ‘wine industry’, which includes for instance Australia) authors writing about the same – British history. What you have in common, if there’s any difference.
    Not a long time ago I read somebody saying ‘I didn’t know Julia Quinn was not English’ and then someone else said ‘I’m British and it’s very clear for me that she is certainly not British’. So it made me think about this topic.
    You are completely right about the Georgian thing. I have to recognize ‘Georgian’ is a term that means nothing to an average Spanish reader. The majority of them would hardly know who the ‘Spanish’ king was at the time!
    But I have also found references to something ‘Regency’ outside the 1811-1820 time. Look for the article ‘Regency dances’ in the wikipedia, which explains it. Many Kleypas’ novels are considered Regency even when they are set in 1830s or 1840s. And I have even seen Georgette Heyer’s ‘Devil’s cub’ classified as a Regency, when it’s the most Georgian/pre French Revolution I have ever seen! Doesn’t anybody realize… I don’t know… Just the way the characters dress?

    Reply
  38. OMG I’d love to be in that audience! I hope you really enjoyed your time here!
    I think my questions would have been more about industry. The influence of self pub against trad pub or how can we get your backlist of ‘oldies but goldies’ translated to Spanish, for instance.
    And lately I’ve been asking myself about British writers and New World (I use this term as they do in ‘wine industry’, which includes for instance Australia) authors writing about the same – British history. What you have in common, if there’s any difference.
    Not a long time ago I read somebody saying ‘I didn’t know Julia Quinn was not English’ and then someone else said ‘I’m British and it’s very clear for me that she is certainly not British’. So it made me think about this topic.
    You are completely right about the Georgian thing. I have to recognize ‘Georgian’ is a term that means nothing to an average Spanish reader. The majority of them would hardly know who the ‘Spanish’ king was at the time!
    But I have also found references to something ‘Regency’ outside the 1811-1820 time. Look for the article ‘Regency dances’ in the wikipedia, which explains it. Many Kleypas’ novels are considered Regency even when they are set in 1830s or 1840s. And I have even seen Georgette Heyer’s ‘Devil’s cub’ classified as a Regency, when it’s the most Georgian/pre French Revolution I have ever seen! Doesn’t anybody realize… I don’t know… Just the way the characters dress?

    Reply
  39. OMG I’d love to be in that audience! I hope you really enjoyed your time here!
    I think my questions would have been more about industry. The influence of self pub against trad pub or how can we get your backlist of ‘oldies but goldies’ translated to Spanish, for instance.
    And lately I’ve been asking myself about British writers and New World (I use this term as they do in ‘wine industry’, which includes for instance Australia) authors writing about the same – British history. What you have in common, if there’s any difference.
    Not a long time ago I read somebody saying ‘I didn’t know Julia Quinn was not English’ and then someone else said ‘I’m British and it’s very clear for me that she is certainly not British’. So it made me think about this topic.
    You are completely right about the Georgian thing. I have to recognize ‘Georgian’ is a term that means nothing to an average Spanish reader. The majority of them would hardly know who the ‘Spanish’ king was at the time!
    But I have also found references to something ‘Regency’ outside the 1811-1820 time. Look for the article ‘Regency dances’ in the wikipedia, which explains it. Many Kleypas’ novels are considered Regency even when they are set in 1830s or 1840s. And I have even seen Georgette Heyer’s ‘Devil’s cub’ classified as a Regency, when it’s the most Georgian/pre French Revolution I have ever seen! Doesn’t anybody realize… I don’t know… Just the way the characters dress?

    Reply
  40. OMG I’d love to be in that audience! I hope you really enjoyed your time here!
    I think my questions would have been more about industry. The influence of self pub against trad pub or how can we get your backlist of ‘oldies but goldies’ translated to Spanish, for instance.
    And lately I’ve been asking myself about British writers and New World (I use this term as they do in ‘wine industry’, which includes for instance Australia) authors writing about the same – British history. What you have in common, if there’s any difference.
    Not a long time ago I read somebody saying ‘I didn’t know Julia Quinn was not English’ and then someone else said ‘I’m British and it’s very clear for me that she is certainly not British’. So it made me think about this topic.
    You are completely right about the Georgian thing. I have to recognize ‘Georgian’ is a term that means nothing to an average Spanish reader. The majority of them would hardly know who the ‘Spanish’ king was at the time!
    But I have also found references to something ‘Regency’ outside the 1811-1820 time. Look for the article ‘Regency dances’ in the wikipedia, which explains it. Many Kleypas’ novels are considered Regency even when they are set in 1830s or 1840s. And I have even seen Georgette Heyer’s ‘Devil’s cub’ classified as a Regency, when it’s the most Georgian/pre French Revolution I have ever seen! Doesn’t anybody realize… I don’t know… Just the way the characters dress?

    Reply
  41. Thanks for that, Bona. Very interesting. My Spanish isn’t good enough to understand all the page on Wellington, but I got the gist.
    Don’t worry, I never assume the armies of any country are completely “good guys.” War is a dreadful business, even if one side is nobly motivated, and most of the time both sides have at least some lower reasons for getting involved.
    However, I think in the mindset of the Napoleonic Wars we can reasonably portray British soldiers as seeing themselves as fighting the good fight against an enemy who wants to invade their country, and has already taken over a great part of Europe.
    Jo

    Reply
  42. Thanks for that, Bona. Very interesting. My Spanish isn’t good enough to understand all the page on Wellington, but I got the gist.
    Don’t worry, I never assume the armies of any country are completely “good guys.” War is a dreadful business, even if one side is nobly motivated, and most of the time both sides have at least some lower reasons for getting involved.
    However, I think in the mindset of the Napoleonic Wars we can reasonably portray British soldiers as seeing themselves as fighting the good fight against an enemy who wants to invade their country, and has already taken over a great part of Europe.
    Jo

    Reply
  43. Thanks for that, Bona. Very interesting. My Spanish isn’t good enough to understand all the page on Wellington, but I got the gist.
    Don’t worry, I never assume the armies of any country are completely “good guys.” War is a dreadful business, even if one side is nobly motivated, and most of the time both sides have at least some lower reasons for getting involved.
    However, I think in the mindset of the Napoleonic Wars we can reasonably portray British soldiers as seeing themselves as fighting the good fight against an enemy who wants to invade their country, and has already taken over a great part of Europe.
    Jo

    Reply
  44. Thanks for that, Bona. Very interesting. My Spanish isn’t good enough to understand all the page on Wellington, but I got the gist.
    Don’t worry, I never assume the armies of any country are completely “good guys.” War is a dreadful business, even if one side is nobly motivated, and most of the time both sides have at least some lower reasons for getting involved.
    However, I think in the mindset of the Napoleonic Wars we can reasonably portray British soldiers as seeing themselves as fighting the good fight against an enemy who wants to invade their country, and has already taken over a great part of Europe.
    Jo

    Reply
  45. Thanks for that, Bona. Very interesting. My Spanish isn’t good enough to understand all the page on Wellington, but I got the gist.
    Don’t worry, I never assume the armies of any country are completely “good guys.” War is a dreadful business, even if one side is nobly motivated, and most of the time both sides have at least some lower reasons for getting involved.
    However, I think in the mindset of the Napoleonic Wars we can reasonably portray British soldiers as seeing themselves as fighting the good fight against an enemy who wants to invade their country, and has already taken over a great part of Europe.
    Jo

    Reply
  46. Hi Louisa, I’m afraid I didn’t really get answers to your questions, though I tried. I have the feeling that the readers were as varied in their tastes as English-speaking ones. Of course above all, they want a good story, and I suspect all British settings have a bit of a fantasy glow for them, as they do for many American readers.
    I thought they might have different feelings about courtship patterns and such, but it didn’t seem so.
    Jo

    Reply
  47. Hi Louisa, I’m afraid I didn’t really get answers to your questions, though I tried. I have the feeling that the readers were as varied in their tastes as English-speaking ones. Of course above all, they want a good story, and I suspect all British settings have a bit of a fantasy glow for them, as they do for many American readers.
    I thought they might have different feelings about courtship patterns and such, but it didn’t seem so.
    Jo

    Reply
  48. Hi Louisa, I’m afraid I didn’t really get answers to your questions, though I tried. I have the feeling that the readers were as varied in their tastes as English-speaking ones. Of course above all, they want a good story, and I suspect all British settings have a bit of a fantasy glow for them, as they do for many American readers.
    I thought they might have different feelings about courtship patterns and such, but it didn’t seem so.
    Jo

    Reply
  49. Hi Louisa, I’m afraid I didn’t really get answers to your questions, though I tried. I have the feeling that the readers were as varied in their tastes as English-speaking ones. Of course above all, they want a good story, and I suspect all British settings have a bit of a fantasy glow for them, as they do for many American readers.
    I thought they might have different feelings about courtship patterns and such, but it didn’t seem so.
    Jo

    Reply
  50. Hi Louisa, I’m afraid I didn’t really get answers to your questions, though I tried. I have the feeling that the readers were as varied in their tastes as English-speaking ones. Of course above all, they want a good story, and I suspect all British settings have a bit of a fantasy glow for them, as they do for many American readers.
    I thought they might have different feelings about courtship patterns and such, but it didn’t seem so.
    Jo

    Reply
  51. I do have a page of sources, Shannon, but it’s very out of date. When I first created my web page it was in the early days, and way before Google search et al, so it seemed important. Now it seems less so.
    But you can check it out here.
    http://www.jobev.com/source.html
    Perhaps we can do a Wench blog soon about key research books we use.

    Reply
  52. I do have a page of sources, Shannon, but it’s very out of date. When I first created my web page it was in the early days, and way before Google search et al, so it seemed important. Now it seems less so.
    But you can check it out here.
    http://www.jobev.com/source.html
    Perhaps we can do a Wench blog soon about key research books we use.

    Reply
  53. I do have a page of sources, Shannon, but it’s very out of date. When I first created my web page it was in the early days, and way before Google search et al, so it seemed important. Now it seems less so.
    But you can check it out here.
    http://www.jobev.com/source.html
    Perhaps we can do a Wench blog soon about key research books we use.

    Reply
  54. I do have a page of sources, Shannon, but it’s very out of date. When I first created my web page it was in the early days, and way before Google search et al, so it seemed important. Now it seems less so.
    But you can check it out here.
    http://www.jobev.com/source.html
    Perhaps we can do a Wench blog soon about key research books we use.

    Reply
  55. I do have a page of sources, Shannon, but it’s very out of date. When I first created my web page it was in the early days, and way before Google search et al, so it seemed important. Now it seems less so.
    But you can check it out here.
    http://www.jobev.com/source.html
    Perhaps we can do a Wench blog soon about key research books we use.

    Reply
  56. Bona, when people confuse the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian periods I do wonder how they visualize the people in the books! Sometimes publishers use the wrong style on the covers. It’s very odd to me because it’s so different.
    From the conference I had the feeling that the Spanish authors weren’t strongly interested in self-publishing opportunities, but aware of the possibilities. I think the smaller publishers there are using the same dynamics.
    All my novels are translated into Spanish except the trad Regencies, and I’m prompting Titania to look at doing them. Perhaps they don’t think the trads will sell well in Spanish.
    Good translation is expensive,so authors are moving slowly at having their self-published work translated, but it will come.

    Reply
  57. Bona, when people confuse the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian periods I do wonder how they visualize the people in the books! Sometimes publishers use the wrong style on the covers. It’s very odd to me because it’s so different.
    From the conference I had the feeling that the Spanish authors weren’t strongly interested in self-publishing opportunities, but aware of the possibilities. I think the smaller publishers there are using the same dynamics.
    All my novels are translated into Spanish except the trad Regencies, and I’m prompting Titania to look at doing them. Perhaps they don’t think the trads will sell well in Spanish.
    Good translation is expensive,so authors are moving slowly at having their self-published work translated, but it will come.

    Reply
  58. Bona, when people confuse the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian periods I do wonder how they visualize the people in the books! Sometimes publishers use the wrong style on the covers. It’s very odd to me because it’s so different.
    From the conference I had the feeling that the Spanish authors weren’t strongly interested in self-publishing opportunities, but aware of the possibilities. I think the smaller publishers there are using the same dynamics.
    All my novels are translated into Spanish except the trad Regencies, and I’m prompting Titania to look at doing them. Perhaps they don’t think the trads will sell well in Spanish.
    Good translation is expensive,so authors are moving slowly at having their self-published work translated, but it will come.

    Reply
  59. Bona, when people confuse the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian periods I do wonder how they visualize the people in the books! Sometimes publishers use the wrong style on the covers. It’s very odd to me because it’s so different.
    From the conference I had the feeling that the Spanish authors weren’t strongly interested in self-publishing opportunities, but aware of the possibilities. I think the smaller publishers there are using the same dynamics.
    All my novels are translated into Spanish except the trad Regencies, and I’m prompting Titania to look at doing them. Perhaps they don’t think the trads will sell well in Spanish.
    Good translation is expensive,so authors are moving slowly at having their self-published work translated, but it will come.

    Reply
  60. Bona, when people confuse the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian periods I do wonder how they visualize the people in the books! Sometimes publishers use the wrong style on the covers. It’s very odd to me because it’s so different.
    From the conference I had the feeling that the Spanish authors weren’t strongly interested in self-publishing opportunities, but aware of the possibilities. I think the smaller publishers there are using the same dynamics.
    All my novels are translated into Spanish except the trad Regencies, and I’m prompting Titania to look at doing them. Perhaps they don’t think the trads will sell well in Spanish.
    Good translation is expensive,so authors are moving slowly at having their self-published work translated, but it will come.

    Reply

Leave a Comment