Some Some Summertime

Joanna here, 

The thermometer tells us it's 100 degrees today, (thank you, Mercury, god of thermometers). Another ikea bookcases
The cat is conked out on her back in the shade, too tired to harass the birds.  I'm listening to my heatstroke playlist. That's the one that starts with the Beachboy's Kokomo, ("Aruba, Jamaica ooo I wanna take ya to …") and shimmies on to the Lovin' Spoonful's Summer in the City, ("Doesn't seem to be a shadow  in the City").

Summer is upon us.

So let me ask, "What books would you take to the beach this summer?  Old friends?  New discoveries?"

There is a temperate zone in the mind, between luxurious indolence and exacting work; and it is to this region, just between laziness and labor, that summer reading belongs. 
                                 Henry Ward Beecher

HammockonBeach wiki

Here in the South we know all about the heat index creeping stealthily up toward the triple digits.  We've raised 'doing nothing' to a graceful art form.  It's an art practiced by the swimming pool or a big 'ole lake,  or at least in company with a hose spraying around the backyard.  Bonus points for the lifestyle include barbecued ribs and cold Mountain Dew.  And beer.    Backyardhose attribclapstar

For me, any day of the simmering summer is incomplete without a book in the bag.  Or a couple books, since you never know exactly how the spirit will move you.  Summer reading needs the background noise of kids running around barefoot and yelling about nothing at all.  It needs a shady porch or umbrella and maybe a dragonfly hovering just off the port side of the hammock.    

Kai lungI'll tuck an old friend in the straw bag — Kai-Lung's Golden Hours by Ernest Bramah.  There's a funny, clever, dreamy, irrationality to it that suits hot weather and lying by the pool.  I own it in paperback, but it's free on e-readers, being out of copyright an' all. 

(Go ahead and click on any of these book names for more information 'bout the book.)

Jennifer Crusie always picks me up.  Funny, funny woman.  I haven't had a chance to read, Tell Me Lies yet, and I'm looking forward to it.  Susan Elizabeth Phillips has a new book out in July The Great Escape: A Novel.  I might top those two off with rum and coke and Grace Burrowes' most recent book, Lady Maggie's Secret Scandal

In one of those fortunate happenstances, the ARCs for Mischief and Mistletoe are wending their way Wenchward, so I have that to look forward to.  A cool read in so many ways.

Mary Jo Putney says:

I am a Reader for All Seasons, and certainly can’t evoke languid summer reading times as well as Joanna can. (The dragonfly is a nice touch. <G>)

But a favorite I just reread fits the summer reading theme: White Lies by Jayne Ann Krentz.  The  book is one of her Arcane Society romantic suspense novels, and it’s set in blazing summer heat in Arizona as the heroine, Clare Painteddesert wikiLancaster, becomes involved with murder, mayhem, and a hot alpha hunter named Jake.  I like  the characters and the plot—Clare is a human lie detector, which gives her an unusual philosophy of life.  And I like the JAK banter. 

I also like the way the book makes a reader feel the Arizona heat.  The burning steering wheels and the blasts of air conditioning when entering a building.  The deliciousness of a desert night, with softly slinking coyotes and giant stars on a dark velvet sky.  The crunch of bruschetta and the cool wine that follows.  Perfect summer reading if one is lounging on a shaded patio.  

But in general, any good story will do, summer or winter!

(Teacup attrib merdeglace, girl with hose attrib clapstar, bookshelves charliebrewer)

Nicola Cornick, who is not suffering the Virginia swelter or even Arizona's At-Least-It's-A-Dry-Heat desert, says: Teacup attrib merdeglace

There is a saying that summer in the UK consists of three hot days and then a thunderstorm, but this year it’s been so cool and damp we’ve barely had three hot days in a row and not much in the way of humidity.  So when my thoughts turn to summer reads they tend provoke ideas of pale sandy beaches and cool breezes off the sea and me sitting behind a wind break as I try to read, cradling a cup of tea from the flask to warm me up!

5 Paul Cesar Helleu (French artist, 1859-1927) ReaderMaybe that’s one of the reasons I’m looking forward to reading The Cornish House by Liz Fenwick. It sounds wonderfully evocative of the county, its coastline, its history and its atmosphere. I love holidays in Cornwall and one of my all time favourite books is Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne Du Maurier, which evokes the spirit of time and place in Cornwall so beautifully. I was even lucky enough to stay in Daphne Du Maurier's house at Frenchman's Creek one year and I could feel the ghosts all around me.

Which brings me neatly to my other hotly anticipated summer read. This is The Silent Touch of Shadows by HWW Christina Courtenay, a time slip book set in the present and the 15th century. I love time travel books and can never find enough of them to read. There's a pdf file with an extract from the here.  It's out in a couple of weeks and I can't wait to pick it up! 

Susan King brings us three recommendations and a garden:

I'm a dedicated year-round reader, though I tend to read a little more during the summer, with the pace of the household quieter, the Guys being busy and not around as much — I'll find an air-conditioned corner, curl up with the dog, and make a dent in the TBR pile. If it's not too hot 'n buggy, I love sitting out Morton_distanthoursto read on the shady side of the deck. But summer or winter, the reading situation depends on the deadline situation, but with my deadline a ways off yet (I'm time-dyslexic, ahem), this summer I have serious Reading Intentions.  

I've just started The Distant Hours by Kate Morton, and then I've got my eye on A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness. At the same time (because who reads just one book), I'm catchingDeck_summer up with some Wench novels (Mary Jo's delicious No Longer A Gentleman is toppling the stack). I've also loaded up the Kindle with lots of books and good intentions — mysteries, romance, a couple of YAs.
In a few weeks, when we'll be at Lake George for a bit, I'll find time to sit out on the breezy porch and read for hours. There's always the bottomless stack of research books, notes, and pages to read/revise — that sort of reading never stops!
It's a lovely thing, reading. I couldn't get through a summer (fall, winter, spring) or a lifetime without it!
 
The library in summer is the most wonderful thing because there you get books on any subject and read them each for only as long as they hold your interest, abandoning any that don't, halfway or a quarter of the way through if you like, and store up all that knowledge in the happy corners of your mind for your own self and not to show off how much you know or spit it back at your teacher on a test paper.
                    Polly Horvath

Andrea Pickens
brings us a couple few interesting suggestions, including our only hit on nonfiction:
It’s been a little hard to think of summer reads because here in the northeast where I live, it’s been unseasonably cool. But the vernal equinox seems to be bringing in a wave of sun and heat, so am looking forward to stretching out under a beach umbrella and diving into some of the books on my TBR pile.

 
I can highly recommend one that I just finished. Anatomy of Murder, by Imogen Robertson, is the second in her Georgian-set mystery series and it features fascinating characters, a compelling plot and wonderfully gritty description of life in London. It’s a compelling read that’s very hard to put down.  I’ve also got Past Wench Loretta Chase’s new release, Scandal Wears Satin, in my beach bag, for her pithy humor is perfect for making me laugh on a lazy summer day.

 
Now,  I know it’s the season for light reads, but I thought you all might get a laugh at what else I’m currently reading. A  dear friend of mine is fascinated by physics—about which I know less than nothing. However, he finds the subject so interesting that I recently read The Clockwork Universe, which was about Isaac Newton,  the Royal Society and the making of the modern world of science, so I could talk to him about it. To my surprise, I found it fascinating. However, I’ve now opened Pandora’s Box, because he just gave me Quantum, a book on quantuBanished bridem physics. I have started it—and feel like I’m back in school because I’ve started taking notes so I can try to understand some of the concepts. To my utter shock, I am enjoying learning about something that is utterly alien to me. And given that we want young people to get excited about science as well as reading, I feel I’m doing my bit. (If I don’t surface for the rest of the summer, you will know why!)

And (Shameless plug!) for those of you in the mood for a traditional Regency read, I've just posted three more of my old Signet books in e-book format at Amazon.  The Banished Bride, Second Chances, and A Stroke of Luck.

Jo Beverley points out:

I've never understood the concept of summer reads. To many it seems to mean a Marie_Danforth_Page Young Girl Reading 1914time when they're allowed to goof off and read the books they actually enjoy instead of the ought-to tomes. Come on now, break free and read for pleasure all year long!

Next, I'm not sure people have the most reading time in summer. Why should that be? Surely many people spend their summer holidays places they enjoy, not escaping to somewhere else in fiction. Now a long winter evening — that sounds like good reading time!

Anyway, I've never liked reading in the sun. However, that might not be a problem, given the weather summer's starting with here in England!
Irving Ramsay Wiles (American artist, 1861–1948) Reading in the Garden
Do you read more in summer?

And we round it off with suggestions from Anne Gracie:

It's a lovely idea — summer reads — but it's a bit hard to wrap my head around at the moment, because where I am (downunder) it's cold and wet and wintry, so I'm thinking more of reading curled up in front of the fire, or snuggling down under the bedclothes with a good book. In any case, I'm like Jo — I don't much like reading on the beach. Too bright and glarey to read, and I always end up with sand in the pages.  Give me a shady garden with a hammock and a long, cool glass standing by, any time.

R Curt Herrmann (1854-1929) Sophie Herrmann. (2)I'm actually not reading a lot at the moment because I'm on deadline, and at such times I reread, more than read,  but I have a lovely pile of new books ready on my TBR pile, and a few more on order.

I have Eloisa James's Paris book waiting, and Loretta Chase's Scandal Wears Satin on order, and I did try to leave Nalini Singh's Tangle of Need until after I'd finished my book, but I gave in. I've been hooked this series since Slave to Sensation. Julia Quinn's latest is singing its siren song to me, too. I've also got a pile of P.G. Wodehouses standing by — a lot of my old copies have gone walkabout, so I treated myself to a pile of new ones recently.

But summer heat or winter chills, as far as I'm concerned it's always time for a good book.

So, there you are — round about two dozen books for your delectation and enjoyment.  Have you read any of these?  Would you second the recommendations?

Is summer your time for light reading and a lot of it?  Are you expecting to get much reading done over the next few weeks?

155 thoughts on “Some Some Summertime”

  1. How delicious, Joanna! It makes me want to be reading instead of writing. But like Anne, I’ve a deadline hammering toward me, which focuses the mind wonderfully.
    I’m another who doesn’t like reading in the sun–way too much glare. But give me a lounger on a patio with a view of the sea, and I am THERE!

    Reply
  2. How delicious, Joanna! It makes me want to be reading instead of writing. But like Anne, I’ve a deadline hammering toward me, which focuses the mind wonderfully.
    I’m another who doesn’t like reading in the sun–way too much glare. But give me a lounger on a patio with a view of the sea, and I am THERE!

    Reply
  3. How delicious, Joanna! It makes me want to be reading instead of writing. But like Anne, I’ve a deadline hammering toward me, which focuses the mind wonderfully.
    I’m another who doesn’t like reading in the sun–way too much glare. But give me a lounger on a patio with a view of the sea, and I am THERE!

    Reply
  4. How delicious, Joanna! It makes me want to be reading instead of writing. But like Anne, I’ve a deadline hammering toward me, which focuses the mind wonderfully.
    I’m another who doesn’t like reading in the sun–way too much glare. But give me a lounger on a patio with a view of the sea, and I am THERE!

    Reply
  5. How delicious, Joanna! It makes me want to be reading instead of writing. But like Anne, I’ve a deadline hammering toward me, which focuses the mind wonderfully.
    I’m another who doesn’t like reading in the sun–way too much glare. But give me a lounger on a patio with a view of the sea, and I am THERE!

    Reply
  6. One could argue that mankind’s march toward technological civilization has been motivated by a desire to create insect-free, glare-free reading places. And books, of course.

    Reply
  7. One could argue that mankind’s march toward technological civilization has been motivated by a desire to create insect-free, glare-free reading places. And books, of course.

    Reply
  8. One could argue that mankind’s march toward technological civilization has been motivated by a desire to create insect-free, glare-free reading places. And books, of course.

    Reply
  9. One could argue that mankind’s march toward technological civilization has been motivated by a desire to create insect-free, glare-free reading places. And books, of course.

    Reply
  10. One could argue that mankind’s march toward technological civilization has been motivated by a desire to create insect-free, glare-free reading places. And books, of course.

    Reply
  11. I read a lot, no matter the season, but I have always read more in the summer, probably because most of my life has moved to the academic calendar with more free time in summer. I’m not a beach reader though. I prefer the porch or a bench overlooking the river or, most often, my favorite chair inside in air conditioned comfort.
    Among the Wench readings mentioned, I’ve read Tell Me Lies, Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal, White Lies, Frenchman’s Creek, No Longer a Gentleman, Scandal Wears Satin, Paris in Love, and A Night Like This (the Julia Quinn). As for books I’d recommend, I gave a rave review today to Susan Mallery’s All Summer Long, a great summer read. I’ve loved both the Sherry Thomas books I’ve read–Beguiling the Beauty and Ravishing the Heiress, particularly the latter. I’ve read ARCS of wonderful books by my friends Manda Collins (How to Romance a Rake) and Maggie Robinson (Lord Gray’s List). I’ve also read and loved soon-to-be-released books by Elizabeth Hoyt, Pamela Morsi, Molly O’Keefe, and Emilie Richards.
    And Summer 2012 is ending with an abundance of great books being released on August 28. I’ve already read A Lady by Midnight, Tessa Dare; The Ugly Duchess, Eloisa James; The Way to a Duke’s Heart,Caroline Linden; Nightingale Way, Emily March; When Lightning Strikes, Brenda Novak; Return to Willow Lake, Susan Wiggs. Today I’m reading The Book of Madness and Cures by Regina O’Melveny, a road book about a 16th-century Venetian woman who is a medical practioner. Fascinating. See–I do read a great deal in the summer. 🙂

    Reply
  12. I read a lot, no matter the season, but I have always read more in the summer, probably because most of my life has moved to the academic calendar with more free time in summer. I’m not a beach reader though. I prefer the porch or a bench overlooking the river or, most often, my favorite chair inside in air conditioned comfort.
    Among the Wench readings mentioned, I’ve read Tell Me Lies, Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal, White Lies, Frenchman’s Creek, No Longer a Gentleman, Scandal Wears Satin, Paris in Love, and A Night Like This (the Julia Quinn). As for books I’d recommend, I gave a rave review today to Susan Mallery’s All Summer Long, a great summer read. I’ve loved both the Sherry Thomas books I’ve read–Beguiling the Beauty and Ravishing the Heiress, particularly the latter. I’ve read ARCS of wonderful books by my friends Manda Collins (How to Romance a Rake) and Maggie Robinson (Lord Gray’s List). I’ve also read and loved soon-to-be-released books by Elizabeth Hoyt, Pamela Morsi, Molly O’Keefe, and Emilie Richards.
    And Summer 2012 is ending with an abundance of great books being released on August 28. I’ve already read A Lady by Midnight, Tessa Dare; The Ugly Duchess, Eloisa James; The Way to a Duke’s Heart,Caroline Linden; Nightingale Way, Emily March; When Lightning Strikes, Brenda Novak; Return to Willow Lake, Susan Wiggs. Today I’m reading The Book of Madness and Cures by Regina O’Melveny, a road book about a 16th-century Venetian woman who is a medical practioner. Fascinating. See–I do read a great deal in the summer. 🙂

    Reply
  13. I read a lot, no matter the season, but I have always read more in the summer, probably because most of my life has moved to the academic calendar with more free time in summer. I’m not a beach reader though. I prefer the porch or a bench overlooking the river or, most often, my favorite chair inside in air conditioned comfort.
    Among the Wench readings mentioned, I’ve read Tell Me Lies, Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal, White Lies, Frenchman’s Creek, No Longer a Gentleman, Scandal Wears Satin, Paris in Love, and A Night Like This (the Julia Quinn). As for books I’d recommend, I gave a rave review today to Susan Mallery’s All Summer Long, a great summer read. I’ve loved both the Sherry Thomas books I’ve read–Beguiling the Beauty and Ravishing the Heiress, particularly the latter. I’ve read ARCS of wonderful books by my friends Manda Collins (How to Romance a Rake) and Maggie Robinson (Lord Gray’s List). I’ve also read and loved soon-to-be-released books by Elizabeth Hoyt, Pamela Morsi, Molly O’Keefe, and Emilie Richards.
    And Summer 2012 is ending with an abundance of great books being released on August 28. I’ve already read A Lady by Midnight, Tessa Dare; The Ugly Duchess, Eloisa James; The Way to a Duke’s Heart,Caroline Linden; Nightingale Way, Emily March; When Lightning Strikes, Brenda Novak; Return to Willow Lake, Susan Wiggs. Today I’m reading The Book of Madness and Cures by Regina O’Melveny, a road book about a 16th-century Venetian woman who is a medical practioner. Fascinating. See–I do read a great deal in the summer. 🙂

    Reply
  14. I read a lot, no matter the season, but I have always read more in the summer, probably because most of my life has moved to the academic calendar with more free time in summer. I’m not a beach reader though. I prefer the porch or a bench overlooking the river or, most often, my favorite chair inside in air conditioned comfort.
    Among the Wench readings mentioned, I’ve read Tell Me Lies, Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal, White Lies, Frenchman’s Creek, No Longer a Gentleman, Scandal Wears Satin, Paris in Love, and A Night Like This (the Julia Quinn). As for books I’d recommend, I gave a rave review today to Susan Mallery’s All Summer Long, a great summer read. I’ve loved both the Sherry Thomas books I’ve read–Beguiling the Beauty and Ravishing the Heiress, particularly the latter. I’ve read ARCS of wonderful books by my friends Manda Collins (How to Romance a Rake) and Maggie Robinson (Lord Gray’s List). I’ve also read and loved soon-to-be-released books by Elizabeth Hoyt, Pamela Morsi, Molly O’Keefe, and Emilie Richards.
    And Summer 2012 is ending with an abundance of great books being released on August 28. I’ve already read A Lady by Midnight, Tessa Dare; The Ugly Duchess, Eloisa James; The Way to a Duke’s Heart,Caroline Linden; Nightingale Way, Emily March; When Lightning Strikes, Brenda Novak; Return to Willow Lake, Susan Wiggs. Today I’m reading The Book of Madness and Cures by Regina O’Melveny, a road book about a 16th-century Venetian woman who is a medical practioner. Fascinating. See–I do read a great deal in the summer. 🙂

    Reply
  15. I read a lot, no matter the season, but I have always read more in the summer, probably because most of my life has moved to the academic calendar with more free time in summer. I’m not a beach reader though. I prefer the porch or a bench overlooking the river or, most often, my favorite chair inside in air conditioned comfort.
    Among the Wench readings mentioned, I’ve read Tell Me Lies, Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal, White Lies, Frenchman’s Creek, No Longer a Gentleman, Scandal Wears Satin, Paris in Love, and A Night Like This (the Julia Quinn). As for books I’d recommend, I gave a rave review today to Susan Mallery’s All Summer Long, a great summer read. I’ve loved both the Sherry Thomas books I’ve read–Beguiling the Beauty and Ravishing the Heiress, particularly the latter. I’ve read ARCS of wonderful books by my friends Manda Collins (How to Romance a Rake) and Maggie Robinson (Lord Gray’s List). I’ve also read and loved soon-to-be-released books by Elizabeth Hoyt, Pamela Morsi, Molly O’Keefe, and Emilie Richards.
    And Summer 2012 is ending with an abundance of great books being released on August 28. I’ve already read A Lady by Midnight, Tessa Dare; The Ugly Duchess, Eloisa James; The Way to a Duke’s Heart,Caroline Linden; Nightingale Way, Emily March; When Lightning Strikes, Brenda Novak; Return to Willow Lake, Susan Wiggs. Today I’m reading The Book of Madness and Cures by Regina O’Melveny, a road book about a 16th-century Venetian woman who is a medical practioner. Fascinating. See–I do read a great deal in the summer. 🙂

    Reply
  16. Maggie and I thank you for the mention, Jo. I’m finding the heat wave particularly inconvenient because the current WIP is yet another Christmas story. To soothe my frazzled mind, I’m on a Loretta Chase binge, taking Lord Perfect to hang out with me by the bed-fan. Where are those cabana boys when we need them?

    Reply
  17. Maggie and I thank you for the mention, Jo. I’m finding the heat wave particularly inconvenient because the current WIP is yet another Christmas story. To soothe my frazzled mind, I’m on a Loretta Chase binge, taking Lord Perfect to hang out with me by the bed-fan. Where are those cabana boys when we need them?

    Reply
  18. Maggie and I thank you for the mention, Jo. I’m finding the heat wave particularly inconvenient because the current WIP is yet another Christmas story. To soothe my frazzled mind, I’m on a Loretta Chase binge, taking Lord Perfect to hang out with me by the bed-fan. Where are those cabana boys when we need them?

    Reply
  19. Maggie and I thank you for the mention, Jo. I’m finding the heat wave particularly inconvenient because the current WIP is yet another Christmas story. To soothe my frazzled mind, I’m on a Loretta Chase binge, taking Lord Perfect to hang out with me by the bed-fan. Where are those cabana boys when we need them?

    Reply
  20. Maggie and I thank you for the mention, Jo. I’m finding the heat wave particularly inconvenient because the current WIP is yet another Christmas story. To soothe my frazzled mind, I’m on a Loretta Chase binge, taking Lord Perfect to hang out with me by the bed-fan. Where are those cabana boys when we need them?

    Reply
  21. Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”. (Yes, I know it sounds dry and not Winchester’s best, but lovely descriptions of Bath, the English countryside, and English society–particularly the quaint aristocratic hobby of collecting fossils–in the late 1700s and early 1800s.)

    Reply
  22. Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”. (Yes, I know it sounds dry and not Winchester’s best, but lovely descriptions of Bath, the English countryside, and English society–particularly the quaint aristocratic hobby of collecting fossils–in the late 1700s and early 1800s.)

    Reply
  23. Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”. (Yes, I know it sounds dry and not Winchester’s best, but lovely descriptions of Bath, the English countryside, and English society–particularly the quaint aristocratic hobby of collecting fossils–in the late 1700s and early 1800s.)

    Reply
  24. Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”. (Yes, I know it sounds dry and not Winchester’s best, but lovely descriptions of Bath, the English countryside, and English society–particularly the quaint aristocratic hobby of collecting fossils–in the late 1700s and early 1800s.)

    Reply
  25. Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”. (Yes, I know it sounds dry and not Winchester’s best, but lovely descriptions of Bath, the English countryside, and English society–particularly the quaint aristocratic hobby of collecting fossils–in the late 1700s and early 1800s.)

    Reply
  26. Summer here in the Deep South is not conducive to outdoor reading unless you have a screened-in porch or a place on the beach! As I work all year round my reading habits don’t change much. One of these days when I quit the day job, maybe they will!
    Just finished Grace Burrowes’ Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal and LOVED it. I’ve so enjoyed the entire series.
    Before that was Olivia Drake’s If the Slipper Fits – a good old fashioned governess story with a cute premise. I look forward to the rest of the series.
    I have Preston and Child’s Cold Vengeance on my TBR stack. If you haven’t read their Agent Pendergast series you are missing a treat!
    The Haunted – A Social History of Ghosts by Owen Davies is my current non-fiction read. Fascinating!

    Reply
  27. Summer here in the Deep South is not conducive to outdoor reading unless you have a screened-in porch or a place on the beach! As I work all year round my reading habits don’t change much. One of these days when I quit the day job, maybe they will!
    Just finished Grace Burrowes’ Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal and LOVED it. I’ve so enjoyed the entire series.
    Before that was Olivia Drake’s If the Slipper Fits – a good old fashioned governess story with a cute premise. I look forward to the rest of the series.
    I have Preston and Child’s Cold Vengeance on my TBR stack. If you haven’t read their Agent Pendergast series you are missing a treat!
    The Haunted – A Social History of Ghosts by Owen Davies is my current non-fiction read. Fascinating!

    Reply
  28. Summer here in the Deep South is not conducive to outdoor reading unless you have a screened-in porch or a place on the beach! As I work all year round my reading habits don’t change much. One of these days when I quit the day job, maybe they will!
    Just finished Grace Burrowes’ Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal and LOVED it. I’ve so enjoyed the entire series.
    Before that was Olivia Drake’s If the Slipper Fits – a good old fashioned governess story with a cute premise. I look forward to the rest of the series.
    I have Preston and Child’s Cold Vengeance on my TBR stack. If you haven’t read their Agent Pendergast series you are missing a treat!
    The Haunted – A Social History of Ghosts by Owen Davies is my current non-fiction read. Fascinating!

    Reply
  29. Summer here in the Deep South is not conducive to outdoor reading unless you have a screened-in porch or a place on the beach! As I work all year round my reading habits don’t change much. One of these days when I quit the day job, maybe they will!
    Just finished Grace Burrowes’ Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal and LOVED it. I’ve so enjoyed the entire series.
    Before that was Olivia Drake’s If the Slipper Fits – a good old fashioned governess story with a cute premise. I look forward to the rest of the series.
    I have Preston and Child’s Cold Vengeance on my TBR stack. If you haven’t read their Agent Pendergast series you are missing a treat!
    The Haunted – A Social History of Ghosts by Owen Davies is my current non-fiction read. Fascinating!

    Reply
  30. Summer here in the Deep South is not conducive to outdoor reading unless you have a screened-in porch or a place on the beach! As I work all year round my reading habits don’t change much. One of these days when I quit the day job, maybe they will!
    Just finished Grace Burrowes’ Lady Maggie’s Secret Scandal and LOVED it. I’ve so enjoyed the entire series.
    Before that was Olivia Drake’s If the Slipper Fits – a good old fashioned governess story with a cute premise. I look forward to the rest of the series.
    I have Preston and Child’s Cold Vengeance on my TBR stack. If you haven’t read their Agent Pendergast series you are missing a treat!
    The Haunted – A Social History of Ghosts by Owen Davies is my current non-fiction read. Fascinating!

    Reply
  31. Thank you, Wenches, for the many wonderful recommendations! I can see now that my e-reader “wish list” (my new-age TBR pile)is going to get quite a bit longer this summer.
    I’ve recently loved “Master of Crows” by Grace Draven and “Castaway Dreams” by Darlene Marshall. I’m waiting anxiously for Loretta Chase’s “Scandal Wears Satin” and Elizabeth Hoyt’s “Thief of Shadows.” And I can’t seem to stop myself from re-reading the Liaden Universe novels by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller–a good place to start with those would be “Local Custom” (you can find a multi-chapter sample on the Baen Books website, which also offers the e-books more cheaply than other sites).
    I have to mention, too, that two books you all have recommended–“Cornish House” and “Discovery of Witches”–were written by friends and fellow graduates of my alma mater Mount Holyoke College. Liz Fenwick was in my class and Deborah Harkness in the next year’s class.
    And speaking of my college class, if you like mysteries that feature strong, intelligent women detectives, you should try “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello (another classmate) which evokes an amazing sense of place (Richmond, Virginia) and won a Christy award for best first novel.
    Blessings to all of you!

    Reply
  32. Thank you, Wenches, for the many wonderful recommendations! I can see now that my e-reader “wish list” (my new-age TBR pile)is going to get quite a bit longer this summer.
    I’ve recently loved “Master of Crows” by Grace Draven and “Castaway Dreams” by Darlene Marshall. I’m waiting anxiously for Loretta Chase’s “Scandal Wears Satin” and Elizabeth Hoyt’s “Thief of Shadows.” And I can’t seem to stop myself from re-reading the Liaden Universe novels by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller–a good place to start with those would be “Local Custom” (you can find a multi-chapter sample on the Baen Books website, which also offers the e-books more cheaply than other sites).
    I have to mention, too, that two books you all have recommended–“Cornish House” and “Discovery of Witches”–were written by friends and fellow graduates of my alma mater Mount Holyoke College. Liz Fenwick was in my class and Deborah Harkness in the next year’s class.
    And speaking of my college class, if you like mysteries that feature strong, intelligent women detectives, you should try “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello (another classmate) which evokes an amazing sense of place (Richmond, Virginia) and won a Christy award for best first novel.
    Blessings to all of you!

    Reply
  33. Thank you, Wenches, for the many wonderful recommendations! I can see now that my e-reader “wish list” (my new-age TBR pile)is going to get quite a bit longer this summer.
    I’ve recently loved “Master of Crows” by Grace Draven and “Castaway Dreams” by Darlene Marshall. I’m waiting anxiously for Loretta Chase’s “Scandal Wears Satin” and Elizabeth Hoyt’s “Thief of Shadows.” And I can’t seem to stop myself from re-reading the Liaden Universe novels by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller–a good place to start with those would be “Local Custom” (you can find a multi-chapter sample on the Baen Books website, which also offers the e-books more cheaply than other sites).
    I have to mention, too, that two books you all have recommended–“Cornish House” and “Discovery of Witches”–were written by friends and fellow graduates of my alma mater Mount Holyoke College. Liz Fenwick was in my class and Deborah Harkness in the next year’s class.
    And speaking of my college class, if you like mysteries that feature strong, intelligent women detectives, you should try “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello (another classmate) which evokes an amazing sense of place (Richmond, Virginia) and won a Christy award for best first novel.
    Blessings to all of you!

    Reply
  34. Thank you, Wenches, for the many wonderful recommendations! I can see now that my e-reader “wish list” (my new-age TBR pile)is going to get quite a bit longer this summer.
    I’ve recently loved “Master of Crows” by Grace Draven and “Castaway Dreams” by Darlene Marshall. I’m waiting anxiously for Loretta Chase’s “Scandal Wears Satin” and Elizabeth Hoyt’s “Thief of Shadows.” And I can’t seem to stop myself from re-reading the Liaden Universe novels by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller–a good place to start with those would be “Local Custom” (you can find a multi-chapter sample on the Baen Books website, which also offers the e-books more cheaply than other sites).
    I have to mention, too, that two books you all have recommended–“Cornish House” and “Discovery of Witches”–were written by friends and fellow graduates of my alma mater Mount Holyoke College. Liz Fenwick was in my class and Deborah Harkness in the next year’s class.
    And speaking of my college class, if you like mysteries that feature strong, intelligent women detectives, you should try “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello (another classmate) which evokes an amazing sense of place (Richmond, Virginia) and won a Christy award for best first novel.
    Blessings to all of you!

    Reply
  35. Thank you, Wenches, for the many wonderful recommendations! I can see now that my e-reader “wish list” (my new-age TBR pile)is going to get quite a bit longer this summer.
    I’ve recently loved “Master of Crows” by Grace Draven and “Castaway Dreams” by Darlene Marshall. I’m waiting anxiously for Loretta Chase’s “Scandal Wears Satin” and Elizabeth Hoyt’s “Thief of Shadows.” And I can’t seem to stop myself from re-reading the Liaden Universe novels by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller–a good place to start with those would be “Local Custom” (you can find a multi-chapter sample on the Baen Books website, which also offers the e-books more cheaply than other sites).
    I have to mention, too, that two books you all have recommended–“Cornish House” and “Discovery of Witches”–were written by friends and fellow graduates of my alma mater Mount Holyoke College. Liz Fenwick was in my class and Deborah Harkness in the next year’s class.
    And speaking of my college class, if you like mysteries that feature strong, intelligent women detectives, you should try “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello (another classmate) which evokes an amazing sense of place (Richmond, Virginia) and won a Christy award for best first novel.
    Blessings to all of you!

    Reply
  36. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous list of reads (just what I need, LOL!) But really, I love getting recommendations, and see a lot of things here that are definitely going to be added to my teetering TBR pile. Thanks, everyone. And keep the suggestions coming!

    Reply
  37. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous list of reads (just what I need, LOL!) But really, I love getting recommendations, and see a lot of things here that are definitely going to be added to my teetering TBR pile. Thanks, everyone. And keep the suggestions coming!

    Reply
  38. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous list of reads (just what I need, LOL!) But really, I love getting recommendations, and see a lot of things here that are definitely going to be added to my teetering TBR pile. Thanks, everyone. And keep the suggestions coming!

    Reply
  39. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous list of reads (just what I need, LOL!) But really, I love getting recommendations, and see a lot of things here that are definitely going to be added to my teetering TBR pile. Thanks, everyone. And keep the suggestions coming!

    Reply
  40. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous list of reads (just what I need, LOL!) But really, I love getting recommendations, and see a lot of things here that are definitely going to be added to my teetering TBR pile. Thanks, everyone. And keep the suggestions coming!

    Reply
  41. Along about now I am usually feeling that I need a little Christmas, so I read Christmas stories – not the glurgy kind, usually some old Signet or Fawcett regencies and Janet Evanovich’s Visions of Sugar Plums.
    Right now I’m reading all the Agatha Raisin stories in order and marvelling again at how Marion Chesney can nail characters in just a line or two. Also saluting her courage in having a middle aged heroine with flaky men in her life and no brains at all about relationships. Reminds me of women I have known at work, who were consummate professionals at work and complete train wrecks in their personal lives.
    Summer is a godo time for skimmable thrillers, so I have a stack of John Birmingham on hand as well. And one good book I’ve been saving, Elegy for Eddie by Jacqueline Winspear, a writer who rewards full concentration.

    Reply
  42. Along about now I am usually feeling that I need a little Christmas, so I read Christmas stories – not the glurgy kind, usually some old Signet or Fawcett regencies and Janet Evanovich’s Visions of Sugar Plums.
    Right now I’m reading all the Agatha Raisin stories in order and marvelling again at how Marion Chesney can nail characters in just a line or two. Also saluting her courage in having a middle aged heroine with flaky men in her life and no brains at all about relationships. Reminds me of women I have known at work, who were consummate professionals at work and complete train wrecks in their personal lives.
    Summer is a godo time for skimmable thrillers, so I have a stack of John Birmingham on hand as well. And one good book I’ve been saving, Elegy for Eddie by Jacqueline Winspear, a writer who rewards full concentration.

    Reply
  43. Along about now I am usually feeling that I need a little Christmas, so I read Christmas stories – not the glurgy kind, usually some old Signet or Fawcett regencies and Janet Evanovich’s Visions of Sugar Plums.
    Right now I’m reading all the Agatha Raisin stories in order and marvelling again at how Marion Chesney can nail characters in just a line or two. Also saluting her courage in having a middle aged heroine with flaky men in her life and no brains at all about relationships. Reminds me of women I have known at work, who were consummate professionals at work and complete train wrecks in their personal lives.
    Summer is a godo time for skimmable thrillers, so I have a stack of John Birmingham on hand as well. And one good book I’ve been saving, Elegy for Eddie by Jacqueline Winspear, a writer who rewards full concentration.

    Reply
  44. Along about now I am usually feeling that I need a little Christmas, so I read Christmas stories – not the glurgy kind, usually some old Signet or Fawcett regencies and Janet Evanovich’s Visions of Sugar Plums.
    Right now I’m reading all the Agatha Raisin stories in order and marvelling again at how Marion Chesney can nail characters in just a line or two. Also saluting her courage in having a middle aged heroine with flaky men in her life and no brains at all about relationships. Reminds me of women I have known at work, who were consummate professionals at work and complete train wrecks in their personal lives.
    Summer is a godo time for skimmable thrillers, so I have a stack of John Birmingham on hand as well. And one good book I’ve been saving, Elegy for Eddie by Jacqueline Winspear, a writer who rewards full concentration.

    Reply
  45. Along about now I am usually feeling that I need a little Christmas, so I read Christmas stories – not the glurgy kind, usually some old Signet or Fawcett regencies and Janet Evanovich’s Visions of Sugar Plums.
    Right now I’m reading all the Agatha Raisin stories in order and marvelling again at how Marion Chesney can nail characters in just a line or two. Also saluting her courage in having a middle aged heroine with flaky men in her life and no brains at all about relationships. Reminds me of women I have known at work, who were consummate professionals at work and complete train wrecks in their personal lives.
    Summer is a godo time for skimmable thrillers, so I have a stack of John Birmingham on hand as well. And one good book I’ve been saving, Elegy for Eddie by Jacqueline Winspear, a writer who rewards full concentration.

    Reply
  46. Hi Janice —
    I will just remind the home gamers that Marion Chesney is also M. C. Beaton who wrote not only Agatha Raisin, but also Hamish MacBeth.

    Reply
  47. Hi Janice —
    I will just remind the home gamers that Marion Chesney is also M. C. Beaton who wrote not only Agatha Raisin, but also Hamish MacBeth.

    Reply
  48. Hi Janice —
    I will just remind the home gamers that Marion Chesney is also M. C. Beaton who wrote not only Agatha Raisin, but also Hamish MacBeth.

    Reply
  49. Hi Janice —
    I will just remind the home gamers that Marion Chesney is also M. C. Beaton who wrote not only Agatha Raisin, but also Hamish MacBeth.

    Reply
  50. Hi Janice —
    I will just remind the home gamers that Marion Chesney is also M. C. Beaton who wrote not only Agatha Raisin, but also Hamish MacBeth.

    Reply
  51. Hi Cara —
    That’s exactly what I’m thinking — how am I ever going to find time to fit even one more book on the TBR pile. I’m getting to be a book hoarder.

    Reply
  52. Hi Cara —
    That’s exactly what I’m thinking — how am I ever going to find time to fit even one more book on the TBR pile. I’m getting to be a book hoarder.

    Reply
  53. Hi Cara —
    That’s exactly what I’m thinking — how am I ever going to find time to fit even one more book on the TBR pile. I’m getting to be a book hoarder.

    Reply
  54. Hi Cara —
    That’s exactly what I’m thinking — how am I ever going to find time to fit even one more book on the TBR pile. I’m getting to be a book hoarder.

    Reply
  55. Hi Cara —
    That’s exactly what I’m thinking — how am I ever going to find time to fit even one more book on the TBR pile. I’m getting to be a book hoarder.

    Reply
  56. Hi Rev Melinda —
    I’m going to pass along the suggestion for “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello. I have a friend who’s writing an evocative ghost story set in Richmond. She’ll be interested.

    Reply
  57. Hi Rev Melinda —
    I’m going to pass along the suggestion for “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello. I have a friend who’s writing an evocative ghost story set in Richmond. She’ll be interested.

    Reply
  58. Hi Rev Melinda —
    I’m going to pass along the suggestion for “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello. I have a friend who’s writing an evocative ghost story set in Richmond. She’ll be interested.

    Reply
  59. Hi Rev Melinda —
    I’m going to pass along the suggestion for “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello. I have a friend who’s writing an evocative ghost story set in Richmond. She’ll be interested.

    Reply
  60. Hi Rev Melinda —
    I’m going to pass along the suggestion for “The Stones Cry Out” by Sibella Giorello. I have a friend who’s writing an evocative ghost story set in Richmond. She’ll be interested.

    Reply
  61. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I may just track down your social history of ghosts. I like social history, but I’ve never thought of ghost stories that way. Sounds interesting.

    Reply
  62. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I may just track down your social history of ghosts. I like social history, but I’ve never thought of ghost stories that way. Sounds interesting.

    Reply
  63. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I may just track down your social history of ghosts. I like social history, but I’ve never thought of ghost stories that way. Sounds interesting.

    Reply
  64. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I may just track down your social history of ghosts. I like social history, but I’ve never thought of ghost stories that way. Sounds interesting.

    Reply
  65. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I may just track down your social history of ghosts. I like social history, but I’ve never thought of ghost stories that way. Sounds interesting.

    Reply
  66. Hi Joanna —
    I read and enjoyed “The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time” by Dava Sobel. (Wrote Galileo’s Daughters)
    The William Smith books sounds fascinating.

    Reply
  67. Hi Joanna —
    I read and enjoyed “The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time” by Dava Sobel. (Wrote Galileo’s Daughters)
    The William Smith books sounds fascinating.

    Reply
  68. Hi Joanna —
    I read and enjoyed “The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time” by Dava Sobel. (Wrote Galileo’s Daughters)
    The William Smith books sounds fascinating.

    Reply
  69. Hi Joanna —
    I read and enjoyed “The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time” by Dava Sobel. (Wrote Galileo’s Daughters)
    The William Smith books sounds fascinating.

    Reply
  70. Hi Joanna —
    I read and enjoyed “The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time” by Dava Sobel. (Wrote Galileo’s Daughters)
    The William Smith books sounds fascinating.

    Reply
  71. Hi Janga —
    I was asking myself whether my own ‘summer reading’ thing is part of the academic calendar. I still have kids in school, so it might be.
    But it’s also the childhood memory. Every year they’d unlock the gate and turn us lose in June. For me that meant being turned lose to read. Summer books have never lost that faint aroma of freedom.
    I’m going down your list, book by book, making out my ‘to buy’ list. I will not get to read them till next winter, me having no time at all, but I can buy them now and go to the book shelf and run my fingers across the spines every once in a while. Anticipating.

    Reply
  72. Hi Janga —
    I was asking myself whether my own ‘summer reading’ thing is part of the academic calendar. I still have kids in school, so it might be.
    But it’s also the childhood memory. Every year they’d unlock the gate and turn us lose in June. For me that meant being turned lose to read. Summer books have never lost that faint aroma of freedom.
    I’m going down your list, book by book, making out my ‘to buy’ list. I will not get to read them till next winter, me having no time at all, but I can buy them now and go to the book shelf and run my fingers across the spines every once in a while. Anticipating.

    Reply
  73. Hi Janga —
    I was asking myself whether my own ‘summer reading’ thing is part of the academic calendar. I still have kids in school, so it might be.
    But it’s also the childhood memory. Every year they’d unlock the gate and turn us lose in June. For me that meant being turned lose to read. Summer books have never lost that faint aroma of freedom.
    I’m going down your list, book by book, making out my ‘to buy’ list. I will not get to read them till next winter, me having no time at all, but I can buy them now and go to the book shelf and run my fingers across the spines every once in a while. Anticipating.

    Reply
  74. Hi Janga —
    I was asking myself whether my own ‘summer reading’ thing is part of the academic calendar. I still have kids in school, so it might be.
    But it’s also the childhood memory. Every year they’d unlock the gate and turn us lose in June. For me that meant being turned lose to read. Summer books have never lost that faint aroma of freedom.
    I’m going down your list, book by book, making out my ‘to buy’ list. I will not get to read them till next winter, me having no time at all, but I can buy them now and go to the book shelf and run my fingers across the spines every once in a while. Anticipating.

    Reply
  75. Hi Janga —
    I was asking myself whether my own ‘summer reading’ thing is part of the academic calendar. I still have kids in school, so it might be.
    But it’s also the childhood memory. Every year they’d unlock the gate and turn us lose in June. For me that meant being turned lose to read. Summer books have never lost that faint aroma of freedom.
    I’m going down your list, book by book, making out my ‘to buy’ list. I will not get to read them till next winter, me having no time at all, but I can buy them now and go to the book shelf and run my fingers across the spines every once in a while. Anticipating.

    Reply
  76. Oh I’d take Lord Perfect over a cabana boy any day. Or a ride up the Nile with Mr. Impossible…
    Summer reads don’t change for me. I have no kids to keep me to a school calendar, so I continue on as I always do.
    I’m reading Victoria Houston’s mystery series set in the lake region of Wisconsin. It has me Googling muskie, brown trout, and brook trout. I found a wonderful B&B up north of Milwaukie. This might lead to a vacation, even though I haven’t fished in years.

    Reply
  77. Oh I’d take Lord Perfect over a cabana boy any day. Or a ride up the Nile with Mr. Impossible…
    Summer reads don’t change for me. I have no kids to keep me to a school calendar, so I continue on as I always do.
    I’m reading Victoria Houston’s mystery series set in the lake region of Wisconsin. It has me Googling muskie, brown trout, and brook trout. I found a wonderful B&B up north of Milwaukie. This might lead to a vacation, even though I haven’t fished in years.

    Reply
  78. Oh I’d take Lord Perfect over a cabana boy any day. Or a ride up the Nile with Mr. Impossible…
    Summer reads don’t change for me. I have no kids to keep me to a school calendar, so I continue on as I always do.
    I’m reading Victoria Houston’s mystery series set in the lake region of Wisconsin. It has me Googling muskie, brown trout, and brook trout. I found a wonderful B&B up north of Milwaukie. This might lead to a vacation, even though I haven’t fished in years.

    Reply
  79. Oh I’d take Lord Perfect over a cabana boy any day. Or a ride up the Nile with Mr. Impossible…
    Summer reads don’t change for me. I have no kids to keep me to a school calendar, so I continue on as I always do.
    I’m reading Victoria Houston’s mystery series set in the lake region of Wisconsin. It has me Googling muskie, brown trout, and brook trout. I found a wonderful B&B up north of Milwaukie. This might lead to a vacation, even though I haven’t fished in years.

    Reply
  80. Oh I’d take Lord Perfect over a cabana boy any day. Or a ride up the Nile with Mr. Impossible…
    Summer reads don’t change for me. I have no kids to keep me to a school calendar, so I continue on as I always do.
    I’m reading Victoria Houston’s mystery series set in the lake region of Wisconsin. It has me Googling muskie, brown trout, and brook trout. I found a wonderful B&B up north of Milwaukie. This might lead to a vacation, even though I haven’t fished in years.

    Reply
  81. I have to agree with Jo- I just keep reading what I would be reading anyway (except with fewer school books and more romance novels 😀 )
    I am moving to Hawaii, so my years will now be eternally 75-80 F and sunny with occasional rain, which is certainly an improvement over Michigan weather. (I will miss fall a bit, but certainly not winter.) At the moment I am working on what little of Anne Stuart’s back list I’ve been able to get my hands on, and next will be whatever I can find at my new library.

    Reply
  82. I have to agree with Jo- I just keep reading what I would be reading anyway (except with fewer school books and more romance novels 😀 )
    I am moving to Hawaii, so my years will now be eternally 75-80 F and sunny with occasional rain, which is certainly an improvement over Michigan weather. (I will miss fall a bit, but certainly not winter.) At the moment I am working on what little of Anne Stuart’s back list I’ve been able to get my hands on, and next will be whatever I can find at my new library.

    Reply
  83. I have to agree with Jo- I just keep reading what I would be reading anyway (except with fewer school books and more romance novels 😀 )
    I am moving to Hawaii, so my years will now be eternally 75-80 F and sunny with occasional rain, which is certainly an improvement over Michigan weather. (I will miss fall a bit, but certainly not winter.) At the moment I am working on what little of Anne Stuart’s back list I’ve been able to get my hands on, and next will be whatever I can find at my new library.

    Reply
  84. I have to agree with Jo- I just keep reading what I would be reading anyway (except with fewer school books and more romance novels 😀 )
    I am moving to Hawaii, so my years will now be eternally 75-80 F and sunny with occasional rain, which is certainly an improvement over Michigan weather. (I will miss fall a bit, but certainly not winter.) At the moment I am working on what little of Anne Stuart’s back list I’ve been able to get my hands on, and next will be whatever I can find at my new library.

    Reply
  85. I have to agree with Jo- I just keep reading what I would be reading anyway (except with fewer school books and more romance novels 😀 )
    I am moving to Hawaii, so my years will now be eternally 75-80 F and sunny with occasional rain, which is certainly an improvement over Michigan weather. (I will miss fall a bit, but certainly not winter.) At the moment I am working on what little of Anne Stuart’s back list I’ve been able to get my hands on, and next will be whatever I can find at my new library.

    Reply
  86. Hi Susan —
    That sounds like the fishing I used to do in Maine. Bass fishing, mostly, but also trout and land-locked salmon.

    Reply
  87. Hi Susan —
    That sounds like the fishing I used to do in Maine. Bass fishing, mostly, but also trout and land-locked salmon.

    Reply
  88. Hi Susan —
    That sounds like the fishing I used to do in Maine. Bass fishing, mostly, but also trout and land-locked salmon.

    Reply
  89. Hi Susan —
    That sounds like the fishing I used to do in Maine. Bass fishing, mostly, but also trout and land-locked salmon.

    Reply
  90. Hi Susan —
    That sounds like the fishing I used to do in Maine. Bass fishing, mostly, but also trout and land-locked salmon.

    Reply
  91. Hi Margot —
    I cannot begin to express how much I love libraries. And interlibrary loan. Thank you, Ben Franklin.

    Reply
  92. Hi Margot —
    I cannot begin to express how much I love libraries. And interlibrary loan. Thank you, Ben Franklin.

    Reply
  93. Hi Margot —
    I cannot begin to express how much I love libraries. And interlibrary loan. Thank you, Ben Franklin.

    Reply
  94. Hi Margot —
    I cannot begin to express how much I love libraries. And interlibrary loan. Thank you, Ben Franklin.

    Reply
  95. Hi Margot —
    I cannot begin to express how much I love libraries. And interlibrary loan. Thank you, Ben Franklin.

    Reply
  96. Joanna Novins wrote: “Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”.”
    That is a great audio book. Fascinating subject, period detail, and great reading.
    That reminds me that summer is a good time for me to enjoy audio books, because I like to listen to them when gardening!
    Jo

    Reply
  97. Joanna Novins wrote: “Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”.”
    That is a great audio book. Fascinating subject, period detail, and great reading.
    That reminds me that summer is a good time for me to enjoy audio books, because I like to listen to them when gardening!
    Jo

    Reply
  98. Joanna Novins wrote: “Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”.”
    That is a great audio book. Fascinating subject, period detail, and great reading.
    That reminds me that summer is a good time for me to enjoy audio books, because I like to listen to them when gardening!
    Jo

    Reply
  99. Joanna Novins wrote: “Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”.”
    That is a great audio book. Fascinating subject, period detail, and great reading.
    That reminds me that summer is a good time for me to enjoy audio books, because I like to listen to them when gardening!
    Jo

    Reply
  100. Joanna Novins wrote: “Have been thinking of you guys, listening to Simon Winchester reading, “The Map that Changed the World; William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology”.”
    That is a great audio book. Fascinating subject, period detail, and great reading.
    That reminds me that summer is a good time for me to enjoy audio books, because I like to listen to them when gardening!
    Jo

    Reply
  101. I’m going to look out for the social history of ghosts as well. Sounds fascinating and right up my street. What a great list of recommendations I now have. Love this topic! Now all I need is time to sit down and read on a chilly beach!

    Reply
  102. I’m going to look out for the social history of ghosts as well. Sounds fascinating and right up my street. What a great list of recommendations I now have. Love this topic! Now all I need is time to sit down and read on a chilly beach!

    Reply
  103. I’m going to look out for the social history of ghosts as well. Sounds fascinating and right up my street. What a great list of recommendations I now have. Love this topic! Now all I need is time to sit down and read on a chilly beach!

    Reply
  104. I’m going to look out for the social history of ghosts as well. Sounds fascinating and right up my street. What a great list of recommendations I now have. Love this topic! Now all I need is time to sit down and read on a chilly beach!

    Reply
  105. I’m going to look out for the social history of ghosts as well. Sounds fascinating and right up my street. What a great list of recommendations I now have. Love this topic! Now all I need is time to sit down and read on a chilly beach!

    Reply
  106. Hi Nicola —
    There is pleasure in the pathless woods;
    There is rapture on the lonely shore;
    … if, of course, you don’t freeze to death.

    Reply
  107. Hi Nicola —
    There is pleasure in the pathless woods;
    There is rapture on the lonely shore;
    … if, of course, you don’t freeze to death.

    Reply
  108. Hi Nicola —
    There is pleasure in the pathless woods;
    There is rapture on the lonely shore;
    … if, of course, you don’t freeze to death.

    Reply
  109. Hi Nicola —
    There is pleasure in the pathless woods;
    There is rapture on the lonely shore;
    … if, of course, you don’t freeze to death.

    Reply
  110. Hi Nicola —
    There is pleasure in the pathless woods;
    There is rapture on the lonely shore;
    … if, of course, you don’t freeze to death.

    Reply
  111. Hi Jo —
    I don’t ‘do’ audio books myself. A lot of it has been because folks talk of them in terms of using the downtime of commuting as audiobook time.
    Since I don’t commute, this doesn’t strike into the gold of my own particular needs.
    But listening while I garden … now that I hadn’t considered.

    Reply
  112. Hi Jo —
    I don’t ‘do’ audio books myself. A lot of it has been because folks talk of them in terms of using the downtime of commuting as audiobook time.
    Since I don’t commute, this doesn’t strike into the gold of my own particular needs.
    But listening while I garden … now that I hadn’t considered.

    Reply
  113. Hi Jo —
    I don’t ‘do’ audio books myself. A lot of it has been because folks talk of them in terms of using the downtime of commuting as audiobook time.
    Since I don’t commute, this doesn’t strike into the gold of my own particular needs.
    But listening while I garden … now that I hadn’t considered.

    Reply
  114. Hi Jo —
    I don’t ‘do’ audio books myself. A lot of it has been because folks talk of them in terms of using the downtime of commuting as audiobook time.
    Since I don’t commute, this doesn’t strike into the gold of my own particular needs.
    But listening while I garden … now that I hadn’t considered.

    Reply
  115. Hi Jo —
    I don’t ‘do’ audio books myself. A lot of it has been because folks talk of them in terms of using the downtime of commuting as audiobook time.
    Since I don’t commute, this doesn’t strike into the gold of my own particular needs.
    But listening while I garden … now that I hadn’t considered.

    Reply
  116. I’ve read a few of those books, and now have noted some more. I am a reader of all seasons, but more so with the extremes of the weather – like when it’s very cold or snowy, or if there is a heavy rainstorm, or if it is very hot outside & I’m not moving around a lot.

    Reply
  117. I’ve read a few of those books, and now have noted some more. I am a reader of all seasons, but more so with the extremes of the weather – like when it’s very cold or snowy, or if there is a heavy rainstorm, or if it is very hot outside & I’m not moving around a lot.

    Reply
  118. I’ve read a few of those books, and now have noted some more. I am a reader of all seasons, but more so with the extremes of the weather – like when it’s very cold or snowy, or if there is a heavy rainstorm, or if it is very hot outside & I’m not moving around a lot.

    Reply
  119. I’ve read a few of those books, and now have noted some more. I am a reader of all seasons, but more so with the extremes of the weather – like when it’s very cold or snowy, or if there is a heavy rainstorm, or if it is very hot outside & I’m not moving around a lot.

    Reply
  120. I’ve read a few of those books, and now have noted some more. I am a reader of all seasons, but more so with the extremes of the weather – like when it’s very cold or snowy, or if there is a heavy rainstorm, or if it is very hot outside & I’m not moving around a lot.

    Reply
  121. Hi Diane,
    Nothing better than reading all cozy inside when it’s stormy outside. Makes the book twice as good.

    Reply
  122. Hi Diane,
    Nothing better than reading all cozy inside when it’s stormy outside. Makes the book twice as good.

    Reply
  123. Hi Diane,
    Nothing better than reading all cozy inside when it’s stormy outside. Makes the book twice as good.

    Reply
  124. Hi Diane,
    Nothing better than reading all cozy inside when it’s stormy outside. Makes the book twice as good.

    Reply
  125. Hi Diane,
    Nothing better than reading all cozy inside when it’s stormy outside. Makes the book twice as good.

    Reply
  126. I am among those who read all year round. At the moment, I am trying to tame the storage for the over 5000 books that my husband and I own. We are planning to set up new “stacks” in an unused finished basement room, but need to be able to find the books before hand.
    This means that MOST of my reading is in the re-read section at present. (Re-reads don’t interfere with my work as much as new reads do.)
    But I am catching up on new and new-to-my collection books: The 3 most recent China Bayles mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert (Holly Blues, Mourning Gloria, and Cat’s Clay), Mary Jo’s No Longer Respectible, Maggie Seftons The Skein of the Crime and Unraveled, and Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This among others.

    Reply
  127. I am among those who read all year round. At the moment, I am trying to tame the storage for the over 5000 books that my husband and I own. We are planning to set up new “stacks” in an unused finished basement room, but need to be able to find the books before hand.
    This means that MOST of my reading is in the re-read section at present. (Re-reads don’t interfere with my work as much as new reads do.)
    But I am catching up on new and new-to-my collection books: The 3 most recent China Bayles mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert (Holly Blues, Mourning Gloria, and Cat’s Clay), Mary Jo’s No Longer Respectible, Maggie Seftons The Skein of the Crime and Unraveled, and Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This among others.

    Reply
  128. I am among those who read all year round. At the moment, I am trying to tame the storage for the over 5000 books that my husband and I own. We are planning to set up new “stacks” in an unused finished basement room, but need to be able to find the books before hand.
    This means that MOST of my reading is in the re-read section at present. (Re-reads don’t interfere with my work as much as new reads do.)
    But I am catching up on new and new-to-my collection books: The 3 most recent China Bayles mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert (Holly Blues, Mourning Gloria, and Cat’s Clay), Mary Jo’s No Longer Respectible, Maggie Seftons The Skein of the Crime and Unraveled, and Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This among others.

    Reply
  129. I am among those who read all year round. At the moment, I am trying to tame the storage for the over 5000 books that my husband and I own. We are planning to set up new “stacks” in an unused finished basement room, but need to be able to find the books before hand.
    This means that MOST of my reading is in the re-read section at present. (Re-reads don’t interfere with my work as much as new reads do.)
    But I am catching up on new and new-to-my collection books: The 3 most recent China Bayles mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert (Holly Blues, Mourning Gloria, and Cat’s Clay), Mary Jo’s No Longer Respectible, Maggie Seftons The Skein of the Crime and Unraveled, and Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This among others.

    Reply
  130. I am among those who read all year round. At the moment, I am trying to tame the storage for the over 5000 books that my husband and I own. We are planning to set up new “stacks” in an unused finished basement room, but need to be able to find the books before hand.
    This means that MOST of my reading is in the re-read section at present. (Re-reads don’t interfere with my work as much as new reads do.)
    But I am catching up on new and new-to-my collection books: The 3 most recent China Bayles mysteries by Susan Wittig Albert (Holly Blues, Mourning Gloria, and Cat’s Clay), Mary Jo’s No Longer Respectible, Maggie Seftons The Skein of the Crime and Unraveled, and Julia Quinn’s A Night Like This among others.

    Reply
  131. Hi Sue —
    That is a wonderful collection of reads.
    I am a person of many books, myself, though I seem to be always weeding out the collection. My walls are all book storage. They fall into what my friend calls, “They’re not just books. They’re insulation,” category.

    Reply
  132. Hi Sue —
    That is a wonderful collection of reads.
    I am a person of many books, myself, though I seem to be always weeding out the collection. My walls are all book storage. They fall into what my friend calls, “They’re not just books. They’re insulation,” category.

    Reply
  133. Hi Sue —
    That is a wonderful collection of reads.
    I am a person of many books, myself, though I seem to be always weeding out the collection. My walls are all book storage. They fall into what my friend calls, “They’re not just books. They’re insulation,” category.

    Reply
  134. Hi Sue —
    That is a wonderful collection of reads.
    I am a person of many books, myself, though I seem to be always weeding out the collection. My walls are all book storage. They fall into what my friend calls, “They’re not just books. They’re insulation,” category.

    Reply
  135. Hi Sue —
    That is a wonderful collection of reads.
    I am a person of many books, myself, though I seem to be always weeding out the collection. My walls are all book storage. They fall into what my friend calls, “They’re not just books. They’re insulation,” category.

    Reply
  136. I read year round to the detriment of housework. But I think the idea of summer reading comes about because as mothers we are at the pool, park or beach and have guilt-free time to read — I have no sense of guilt when it comes to reading. During the rest of the year we are at home and all the chores nag at us to be done and so while the children play we dust — actually I don’t but then I don’t have the proper sense of guilt when it comes to housework. Enjoy reading whenever and wherever you can.

    Reply
  137. I read year round to the detriment of housework. But I think the idea of summer reading comes about because as mothers we are at the pool, park or beach and have guilt-free time to read — I have no sense of guilt when it comes to reading. During the rest of the year we are at home and all the chores nag at us to be done and so while the children play we dust — actually I don’t but then I don’t have the proper sense of guilt when it comes to housework. Enjoy reading whenever and wherever you can.

    Reply
  138. I read year round to the detriment of housework. But I think the idea of summer reading comes about because as mothers we are at the pool, park or beach and have guilt-free time to read — I have no sense of guilt when it comes to reading. During the rest of the year we are at home and all the chores nag at us to be done and so while the children play we dust — actually I don’t but then I don’t have the proper sense of guilt when it comes to housework. Enjoy reading whenever and wherever you can.

    Reply
  139. I read year round to the detriment of housework. But I think the idea of summer reading comes about because as mothers we are at the pool, park or beach and have guilt-free time to read — I have no sense of guilt when it comes to reading. During the rest of the year we are at home and all the chores nag at us to be done and so while the children play we dust — actually I don’t but then I don’t have the proper sense of guilt when it comes to housework. Enjoy reading whenever and wherever you can.

    Reply
  140. I read year round to the detriment of housework. But I think the idea of summer reading comes about because as mothers we are at the pool, park or beach and have guilt-free time to read — I have no sense of guilt when it comes to reading. During the rest of the year we are at home and all the chores nag at us to be done and so while the children play we dust — actually I don’t but then I don’t have the proper sense of guilt when it comes to housework. Enjoy reading whenever and wherever you can.

    Reply
  141. Hi Lyn —
    I had forgotten the ‘taking the kids somewhere and waiting’ part of summer. Yes. Many happy hours of reading while the kids cavorted in the lake or ran about madly in groups.
    “Yes, dear. Of course you may have another orange crush and chillidog.”
    And it’s back to Dickens.

    Reply
  142. Hi Lyn —
    I had forgotten the ‘taking the kids somewhere and waiting’ part of summer. Yes. Many happy hours of reading while the kids cavorted in the lake or ran about madly in groups.
    “Yes, dear. Of course you may have another orange crush and chillidog.”
    And it’s back to Dickens.

    Reply
  143. Hi Lyn —
    I had forgotten the ‘taking the kids somewhere and waiting’ part of summer. Yes. Many happy hours of reading while the kids cavorted in the lake or ran about madly in groups.
    “Yes, dear. Of course you may have another orange crush and chillidog.”
    And it’s back to Dickens.

    Reply
  144. Hi Lyn —
    I had forgotten the ‘taking the kids somewhere and waiting’ part of summer. Yes. Many happy hours of reading while the kids cavorted in the lake or ran about madly in groups.
    “Yes, dear. Of course you may have another orange crush and chillidog.”
    And it’s back to Dickens.

    Reply
  145. Hi Lyn —
    I had forgotten the ‘taking the kids somewhere and waiting’ part of summer. Yes. Many happy hours of reading while the kids cavorted in the lake or ran about madly in groups.
    “Yes, dear. Of course you may have another orange crush and chillidog.”
    And it’s back to Dickens.

    Reply

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