Slow cooking. . .

Anne here. I bought a slow cooker recently, and it made me think about slow cooking in the past. Duchess

I remember an episode of The Duchess of Duke Street (anyone remember that show?) where Louisa Trotter (the heroine of the show) was cooking for some bigwig but had to travel to the site of the dinner party and do much of the cooking there, in some inadequate kitchen. One of the dishes was a slow-cooked one — a signature dish that had been requested, I think — and so, not having much time, and much of that being on the road, she had to improvise.

DutchOvenWhat she did was to begin the cooking process in a cast iron pot like a Dutch oven (Dutch ovens have been around for several hundred years.) She wrapped the merrily bubbling pot in a cloth, then placed it in a box and packed it tightly with hay on all sides. The hay acted as an insulator and by the time she reached her destination, hours later, and opened up the Dutch oven, the meat was perfectly cooked and fall-apart tender. Just like the meat I cooked yesterday in my electric slow cooker.


ImrpovisedHaybox

Later this "haybox" method was developed into something called "the fireless cooker", and was much the same, except that the haybox was pre-prepared. They became increasingly sophisticated looking, with nary the sight of hay. The outside might be made of steel and lined with porcelain, better insulating materials were used and pots made to fit the container exactly. Some had stone disks that you heated in the oven or fire, then put in the "fireless oven, " popped your dish of stew on top and after five or six hours, your dinner was ready. Or if you were cooking porridge overnight, a hot breakfast was ready without having to light a fire in the morning.

Cooker-fireless-toledoThese "fireless cookers" were in use and still being sold in the UK and America right up to WW2, and, according to my research, are coming back into fashion with those interested in conserving energy. They're still in use in many other countries today.

In the Regency era, the use and management of fire in the kitchen was still fairly rudimentary. The design of ordinary fireplaces were more a matter of custom than efficiency; fires didn't heat rooms efficiently and chimneys could smoke up a room most inconveniently when the wind was in the wrong direction. RumfordFireplace

This changed when American born physicist, Sir Benjamin Thompson, (later Count Rumford — he was a loyalist who left America after the War of Independence) designed what came to be known as the "Rumford fireplace" (see photo at left.) It restricted the chimney opening to create a stronger updraft, angled the side walls to throw out heat better and introduced a choke to control the updraft of the chimney. It was efficient and attractive and quickly became the rage among wealthy aristocrats, who had their London houses modified to his design. Rumford became a celebrity.

KitchenSpitI have a cookbook from 1758 (Eliza Smith's The Compleat Housewife) in which the descriptions of how to roast various cuts of meat, all refer to its relationship with the fire — "move closer to the fire," "stir up the fire to make a brisk fire," "move away from the fire."

You might think that a joint of meat cooked by sitting close to a fire would be a very dried-out piece of meat, but last year I had the pleasure of eating some home-grown pork cooked on an asado, an Argentine-style barbecue where meat is cooked by placing it vertically beside the fire, not over it — you can see it here in the photo on the right. Asado

And I can testify that the pork, which sat next to the fire for five hours or more, was tender and delicious and not the slightest bit dry. This has therefore colored my view of roasting meat in an open Georgian-era fireplace, though I'm sure a lot of roasting was done in Dutch ovens, rather than in the air.

Cookery in pots or joints on spits were common. Over time, all kinds of ingenious devices were developed to make the turning of the spit less of a chore — clockwork devices that had to be reset after a short period, as you can see in the illustration on the left, some with a pendulum-like affair that powered the clockwork by gravity, but had to be reset the instant the weight hit the ground. And dogs. Rowlandson1

Yes, dogs, poor little things. These unfortunate little creatures were specially bred and trained to run on a treadmill that powered a spit. Look at the Rowlandson picture on your right — the circular window above the woman in front contains a small caged dog running madly. From his cage runs a connection to the spit. (Click for a bigger image.)  I suppose these dogs were well fed and probably petted by the servants, but still, I can't help but recoil from the idea. I believe there is still a dog spit cage at No.1 Royal Brescent in Bath.

The cast iron kitchen ranges we often think of were mainly in kitchens of wealthy households, and even then, not always because they were fairly new. One one side was a cast iron oven, and water was heated on the other. With the advent of domestic ovens, baking became more popular and there was a flowering of amazingly ornate pies and cakes and so on.

1KitchenRangePrior to that most baking was done in local bakeries and special bakehouses. But of course there were no thermostats so, as people still do today with outdoor clay ovens, they had to guess the right temperature, and it became a matter of experience, or vague description, like "toss in some flour and when it turns a biscuit color the oven is ready."

So, from those early Dutch ovens in a haybox, to my electric slow cooker with its easy-clean cast iron-like lining dish, there isn't a lot of difference but my, how cooking has been revolutionized in between. And yet the cast iron stove‚ the modern Aga, is still beloved of the English. I confess to having a sneaking desire for one myself, except that my climate is a bit too warm to justify it.

What about you? Do you remember the Duchess of Duke Street? Do you have an Aga or some other kind of cast iron stove? Do you use a slow cooker at all? Have you cooked over an open fire, or on an asado — or in a clay pit perhaps. What kind of unconventional or traditional cooking have you experienced?  Or don't you cook at all?

140 thoughts on “Slow cooking. . .”

  1. Anne, I LOVED the Duchess of Duke Street! I can’t remember that episode but I can remember the music and am off search for that wonderful show now and love it all over again.
    I had *no* idea about all the above (poor dogs) but it is fascinating. I am guilty of very quick meals and one of the reasons I love a slow cooker/ croc pot is that it really does taste better for those extra hours and I feel that I have made a nice meal and all the lovely herbs have time to do their work. cxxx

    Reply
  2. Anne, I LOVED the Duchess of Duke Street! I can’t remember that episode but I can remember the music and am off search for that wonderful show now and love it all over again.
    I had *no* idea about all the above (poor dogs) but it is fascinating. I am guilty of very quick meals and one of the reasons I love a slow cooker/ croc pot is that it really does taste better for those extra hours and I feel that I have made a nice meal and all the lovely herbs have time to do their work. cxxx

    Reply
  3. Anne, I LOVED the Duchess of Duke Street! I can’t remember that episode but I can remember the music and am off search for that wonderful show now and love it all over again.
    I had *no* idea about all the above (poor dogs) but it is fascinating. I am guilty of very quick meals and one of the reasons I love a slow cooker/ croc pot is that it really does taste better for those extra hours and I feel that I have made a nice meal and all the lovely herbs have time to do their work. cxxx

    Reply
  4. Anne, I LOVED the Duchess of Duke Street! I can’t remember that episode but I can remember the music and am off search for that wonderful show now and love it all over again.
    I had *no* idea about all the above (poor dogs) but it is fascinating. I am guilty of very quick meals and one of the reasons I love a slow cooker/ croc pot is that it really does taste better for those extra hours and I feel that I have made a nice meal and all the lovely herbs have time to do their work. cxxx

    Reply
  5. Anne, I LOVED the Duchess of Duke Street! I can’t remember that episode but I can remember the music and am off search for that wonderful show now and love it all over again.
    I had *no* idea about all the above (poor dogs) but it is fascinating. I am guilty of very quick meals and one of the reasons I love a slow cooker/ croc pot is that it really does taste better for those extra hours and I feel that I have made a nice meal and all the lovely herbs have time to do their work. cxxx

    Reply
  6. Carol, that’s what I thought when I was remembering the Duchess of Duke St — it was so long ago, I’d love to see it again. I’m going to try to chase it up as well.
    Another benefit of a slow cooker — makes you recall fave TV shows. 😉

    Reply
  7. Carol, that’s what I thought when I was remembering the Duchess of Duke St — it was so long ago, I’d love to see it again. I’m going to try to chase it up as well.
    Another benefit of a slow cooker — makes you recall fave TV shows. 😉

    Reply
  8. Carol, that’s what I thought when I was remembering the Duchess of Duke St — it was so long ago, I’d love to see it again. I’m going to try to chase it up as well.
    Another benefit of a slow cooker — makes you recall fave TV shows. 😉

    Reply
  9. Carol, that’s what I thought when I was remembering the Duchess of Duke St — it was so long ago, I’d love to see it again. I’m going to try to chase it up as well.
    Another benefit of a slow cooker — makes you recall fave TV shows. 😉

    Reply
  10. Carol, that’s what I thought when I was remembering the Duchess of Duke St — it was so long ago, I’d love to see it again. I’m going to try to chase it up as well.
    Another benefit of a slow cooker — makes you recall fave TV shows. 😉

    Reply
  11. Hallo, Ms. Gracie!!
    I only have a half second to write this, but I wanted to tell you before I swing back lateron that I positively *loved!* The Duchess of Duke Street! I found it whilst browsing through BBC Adaptations & serials — borrowed it through my library’s ILL services a few years back! Sadly, there is an emotionally gutting sequence in Series 2 which we haven’t yet had the courage to go through,.. alas, my journey with Louisa is on hold! The whole of the first series was smashingly brilliant! Wow. And, to think I knew one of the actors from his career after personal tragedy and then, prior as he had a key role in the series!
    I am still aching to know if two characters were able to wed and if Louisa finally found happiness both in work & love! Pulls at your heart this one! What staid with me the most was her gumpshun and willingness to do something unconventional to realise her dreams!
    I’ll drop back and read this lovely post in full!
    Always happy to share memories of the BBC!

    Reply
  12. Hallo, Ms. Gracie!!
    I only have a half second to write this, but I wanted to tell you before I swing back lateron that I positively *loved!* The Duchess of Duke Street! I found it whilst browsing through BBC Adaptations & serials — borrowed it through my library’s ILL services a few years back! Sadly, there is an emotionally gutting sequence in Series 2 which we haven’t yet had the courage to go through,.. alas, my journey with Louisa is on hold! The whole of the first series was smashingly brilliant! Wow. And, to think I knew one of the actors from his career after personal tragedy and then, prior as he had a key role in the series!
    I am still aching to know if two characters were able to wed and if Louisa finally found happiness both in work & love! Pulls at your heart this one! What staid with me the most was her gumpshun and willingness to do something unconventional to realise her dreams!
    I’ll drop back and read this lovely post in full!
    Always happy to share memories of the BBC!

    Reply
  13. Hallo, Ms. Gracie!!
    I only have a half second to write this, but I wanted to tell you before I swing back lateron that I positively *loved!* The Duchess of Duke Street! I found it whilst browsing through BBC Adaptations & serials — borrowed it through my library’s ILL services a few years back! Sadly, there is an emotionally gutting sequence in Series 2 which we haven’t yet had the courage to go through,.. alas, my journey with Louisa is on hold! The whole of the first series was smashingly brilliant! Wow. And, to think I knew one of the actors from his career after personal tragedy and then, prior as he had a key role in the series!
    I am still aching to know if two characters were able to wed and if Louisa finally found happiness both in work & love! Pulls at your heart this one! What staid with me the most was her gumpshun and willingness to do something unconventional to realise her dreams!
    I’ll drop back and read this lovely post in full!
    Always happy to share memories of the BBC!

    Reply
  14. Hallo, Ms. Gracie!!
    I only have a half second to write this, but I wanted to tell you before I swing back lateron that I positively *loved!* The Duchess of Duke Street! I found it whilst browsing through BBC Adaptations & serials — borrowed it through my library’s ILL services a few years back! Sadly, there is an emotionally gutting sequence in Series 2 which we haven’t yet had the courage to go through,.. alas, my journey with Louisa is on hold! The whole of the first series was smashingly brilliant! Wow. And, to think I knew one of the actors from his career after personal tragedy and then, prior as he had a key role in the series!
    I am still aching to know if two characters were able to wed and if Louisa finally found happiness both in work & love! Pulls at your heart this one! What staid with me the most was her gumpshun and willingness to do something unconventional to realise her dreams!
    I’ll drop back and read this lovely post in full!
    Always happy to share memories of the BBC!

    Reply
  15. Hallo, Ms. Gracie!!
    I only have a half second to write this, but I wanted to tell you before I swing back lateron that I positively *loved!* The Duchess of Duke Street! I found it whilst browsing through BBC Adaptations & serials — borrowed it through my library’s ILL services a few years back! Sadly, there is an emotionally gutting sequence in Series 2 which we haven’t yet had the courage to go through,.. alas, my journey with Louisa is on hold! The whole of the first series was smashingly brilliant! Wow. And, to think I knew one of the actors from his career after personal tragedy and then, prior as he had a key role in the series!
    I am still aching to know if two characters were able to wed and if Louisa finally found happiness both in work & love! Pulls at your heart this one! What staid with me the most was her gumpshun and willingness to do something unconventional to realise her dreams!
    I’ll drop back and read this lovely post in full!
    Always happy to share memories of the BBC!

    Reply
  16. I grew up on wonderful pot roasts and stews made in my grandmother’s cast iron Dutch oven, but unfortunately I did not inherit her cookware.
    I do love my slow cooker and use it often for stews, chili, and other recipes. My kitchen is all electric, so the “outdoor kitchen” with a large gas grill comes in handy in the summer when I don’t want to heat up the kitchen – or when a storm hits and there’s no electricity.
    We were without power for over a week the last time we had a direct hit from a hurricane …
    I love meat slow grilled/smoked over indirect heat, too, especially beef brisket and pork.
    Now I have to figure out how to get my mind off food!

    Reply
  17. I grew up on wonderful pot roasts and stews made in my grandmother’s cast iron Dutch oven, but unfortunately I did not inherit her cookware.
    I do love my slow cooker and use it often for stews, chili, and other recipes. My kitchen is all electric, so the “outdoor kitchen” with a large gas grill comes in handy in the summer when I don’t want to heat up the kitchen – or when a storm hits and there’s no electricity.
    We were without power for over a week the last time we had a direct hit from a hurricane …
    I love meat slow grilled/smoked over indirect heat, too, especially beef brisket and pork.
    Now I have to figure out how to get my mind off food!

    Reply
  18. I grew up on wonderful pot roasts and stews made in my grandmother’s cast iron Dutch oven, but unfortunately I did not inherit her cookware.
    I do love my slow cooker and use it often for stews, chili, and other recipes. My kitchen is all electric, so the “outdoor kitchen” with a large gas grill comes in handy in the summer when I don’t want to heat up the kitchen – or when a storm hits and there’s no electricity.
    We were without power for over a week the last time we had a direct hit from a hurricane …
    I love meat slow grilled/smoked over indirect heat, too, especially beef brisket and pork.
    Now I have to figure out how to get my mind off food!

    Reply
  19. I grew up on wonderful pot roasts and stews made in my grandmother’s cast iron Dutch oven, but unfortunately I did not inherit her cookware.
    I do love my slow cooker and use it often for stews, chili, and other recipes. My kitchen is all electric, so the “outdoor kitchen” with a large gas grill comes in handy in the summer when I don’t want to heat up the kitchen – or when a storm hits and there’s no electricity.
    We were without power for over a week the last time we had a direct hit from a hurricane …
    I love meat slow grilled/smoked over indirect heat, too, especially beef brisket and pork.
    Now I have to figure out how to get my mind off food!

    Reply
  20. I grew up on wonderful pot roasts and stews made in my grandmother’s cast iron Dutch oven, but unfortunately I did not inherit her cookware.
    I do love my slow cooker and use it often for stews, chili, and other recipes. My kitchen is all electric, so the “outdoor kitchen” with a large gas grill comes in handy in the summer when I don’t want to heat up the kitchen – or when a storm hits and there’s no electricity.
    We were without power for over a week the last time we had a direct hit from a hurricane …
    I love meat slow grilled/smoked over indirect heat, too, especially beef brisket and pork.
    Now I have to figure out how to get my mind off food!

    Reply
  21. Oh, Jorie, these comments about Duchess of Duke Street have me seriously wanting to find a DVD and watch those episodes again.
    It was a wonderful series, wasn't it?
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  22. Oh, Jorie, these comments about Duchess of Duke Street have me seriously wanting to find a DVD and watch those episodes again.
    It was a wonderful series, wasn't it?
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  23. Oh, Jorie, these comments about Duchess of Duke Street have me seriously wanting to find a DVD and watch those episodes again.
    It was a wonderful series, wasn't it?
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  24. Oh, Jorie, these comments about Duchess of Duke Street have me seriously wanting to find a DVD and watch those episodes again.
    It was a wonderful series, wasn't it?
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  25. Oh, Jorie, these comments about Duchess of Duke Street have me seriously wanting to find a DVD and watch those episodes again.
    It was a wonderful series, wasn't it?
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  26. Sharon, so useful to have a secondary kitchen. Some years back we had a gas problem and the whole city had to do without gas for over a week. I have gas heating, gas hot water and gas cooking, so it was quite an inconvenience, especially since it was in winter (though our winters are not freezing and we rarely have snow)
    I learned to have cold showers and cooked outside on a small Japanese hibachi barbecue. I wish I’d thought of a slow cooker then, but of course, I didn’t. It would have been perfect to come home from work to a hot meal, instead of having to light a fire and cook outside. Still, it was a bit of an adventure. 🙂

    Reply
  27. Sharon, so useful to have a secondary kitchen. Some years back we had a gas problem and the whole city had to do without gas for over a week. I have gas heating, gas hot water and gas cooking, so it was quite an inconvenience, especially since it was in winter (though our winters are not freezing and we rarely have snow)
    I learned to have cold showers and cooked outside on a small Japanese hibachi barbecue. I wish I’d thought of a slow cooker then, but of course, I didn’t. It would have been perfect to come home from work to a hot meal, instead of having to light a fire and cook outside. Still, it was a bit of an adventure. 🙂

    Reply
  28. Sharon, so useful to have a secondary kitchen. Some years back we had a gas problem and the whole city had to do without gas for over a week. I have gas heating, gas hot water and gas cooking, so it was quite an inconvenience, especially since it was in winter (though our winters are not freezing and we rarely have snow)
    I learned to have cold showers and cooked outside on a small Japanese hibachi barbecue. I wish I’d thought of a slow cooker then, but of course, I didn’t. It would have been perfect to come home from work to a hot meal, instead of having to light a fire and cook outside. Still, it was a bit of an adventure. 🙂

    Reply
  29. Sharon, so useful to have a secondary kitchen. Some years back we had a gas problem and the whole city had to do without gas for over a week. I have gas heating, gas hot water and gas cooking, so it was quite an inconvenience, especially since it was in winter (though our winters are not freezing and we rarely have snow)
    I learned to have cold showers and cooked outside on a small Japanese hibachi barbecue. I wish I’d thought of a slow cooker then, but of course, I didn’t. It would have been perfect to come home from work to a hot meal, instead of having to light a fire and cook outside. Still, it was a bit of an adventure. 🙂

    Reply
  30. Sharon, so useful to have a secondary kitchen. Some years back we had a gas problem and the whole city had to do without gas for over a week. I have gas heating, gas hot water and gas cooking, so it was quite an inconvenience, especially since it was in winter (though our winters are not freezing and we rarely have snow)
    I learned to have cold showers and cooked outside on a small Japanese hibachi barbecue. I wish I’d thought of a slow cooker then, but of course, I didn’t. It would have been perfect to come home from work to a hot meal, instead of having to light a fire and cook outside. Still, it was a bit of an adventure. 🙂

    Reply
  31. I must admit I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street – didn’t have TV at the time. But I do have a slow cooker and it is brilliant. Having said that I also have a slow combustion stove, or Aga which is wood fired, and as I hate cooking, I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. Hate the thing. Can’t cook, can’t get it hot enough, have to get the right wood to fire it. Its a pest. I think in Regency times, if I had to cook on such a thing everyone would have starved, or at least been very skinny and malnourished. Having said that, during power failures it at least means we have a source of heating so I suppose I can tolerate it for that alone.

    Reply
  32. I must admit I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street – didn’t have TV at the time. But I do have a slow cooker and it is brilliant. Having said that I also have a slow combustion stove, or Aga which is wood fired, and as I hate cooking, I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. Hate the thing. Can’t cook, can’t get it hot enough, have to get the right wood to fire it. Its a pest. I think in Regency times, if I had to cook on such a thing everyone would have starved, or at least been very skinny and malnourished. Having said that, during power failures it at least means we have a source of heating so I suppose I can tolerate it for that alone.

    Reply
  33. I must admit I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street – didn’t have TV at the time. But I do have a slow cooker and it is brilliant. Having said that I also have a slow combustion stove, or Aga which is wood fired, and as I hate cooking, I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. Hate the thing. Can’t cook, can’t get it hot enough, have to get the right wood to fire it. Its a pest. I think in Regency times, if I had to cook on such a thing everyone would have starved, or at least been very skinny and malnourished. Having said that, during power failures it at least means we have a source of heating so I suppose I can tolerate it for that alone.

    Reply
  34. I must admit I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street – didn’t have TV at the time. But I do have a slow cooker and it is brilliant. Having said that I also have a slow combustion stove, or Aga which is wood fired, and as I hate cooking, I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. Hate the thing. Can’t cook, can’t get it hot enough, have to get the right wood to fire it. Its a pest. I think in Regency times, if I had to cook on such a thing everyone would have starved, or at least been very skinny and malnourished. Having said that, during power failures it at least means we have a source of heating so I suppose I can tolerate it for that alone.

    Reply
  35. I must admit I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street – didn’t have TV at the time. But I do have a slow cooker and it is brilliant. Having said that I also have a slow combustion stove, or Aga which is wood fired, and as I hate cooking, I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. Hate the thing. Can’t cook, can’t get it hot enough, have to get the right wood to fire it. Its a pest. I think in Regency times, if I had to cook on such a thing everyone would have starved, or at least been very skinny and malnourished. Having said that, during power failures it at least means we have a source of heating so I suppose I can tolerate it for that alone.

    Reply
  36. I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street but I do love my slow cooker! Someone has reinvented the powerless slow cooker type thing…I saw this via FB not long ago http://nb-wonderbag.com/ Intriguing!
    I also have a pressure cooker which I am a newbie at using and am kind of daunted by but will keep experimenting.

    Reply
  37. I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street but I do love my slow cooker! Someone has reinvented the powerless slow cooker type thing…I saw this via FB not long ago http://nb-wonderbag.com/ Intriguing!
    I also have a pressure cooker which I am a newbie at using and am kind of daunted by but will keep experimenting.

    Reply
  38. I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street but I do love my slow cooker! Someone has reinvented the powerless slow cooker type thing…I saw this via FB not long ago http://nb-wonderbag.com/ Intriguing!
    I also have a pressure cooker which I am a newbie at using and am kind of daunted by but will keep experimenting.

    Reply
  39. I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street but I do love my slow cooker! Someone has reinvented the powerless slow cooker type thing…I saw this via FB not long ago http://nb-wonderbag.com/ Intriguing!
    I also have a pressure cooker which I am a newbie at using and am kind of daunted by but will keep experimenting.

    Reply
  40. I never saw the Duchess of Duke Street but I do love my slow cooker! Someone has reinvented the powerless slow cooker type thing…I saw this via FB not long ago http://nb-wonderbag.com/ Intriguing!
    I also have a pressure cooker which I am a newbie at using and am kind of daunted by but will keep experimenting.

    Reply
  41. Anne, thanks for that fascinating history of slow cooking! Very interesting, especially to learn that slow cooking was practiced long ago.
    I have two slow cookers–one medium sized and one large. I love them! I use mine mostly for stews, for fixing a pot roast with potatoes, onions, and carrots, for beef stroganoff, for chicken dishes, for pepper steak . . . I could go on.
    Unlike your cast-iron type inner tub, over here in the US our slow cookers have a clay/pottery tub. I’ve recently discovered that you can buy these plastic bags to line the pot before you add your ingredients, and once the meal is cooked, you scoop out the cooked ingredients, then toss the plastic liner. Very nifty, and it means you don’t have to remove the inner tub to clean it!

    Reply
  42. Anne, thanks for that fascinating history of slow cooking! Very interesting, especially to learn that slow cooking was practiced long ago.
    I have two slow cookers–one medium sized and one large. I love them! I use mine mostly for stews, for fixing a pot roast with potatoes, onions, and carrots, for beef stroganoff, for chicken dishes, for pepper steak . . . I could go on.
    Unlike your cast-iron type inner tub, over here in the US our slow cookers have a clay/pottery tub. I’ve recently discovered that you can buy these plastic bags to line the pot before you add your ingredients, and once the meal is cooked, you scoop out the cooked ingredients, then toss the plastic liner. Very nifty, and it means you don’t have to remove the inner tub to clean it!

    Reply
  43. Anne, thanks for that fascinating history of slow cooking! Very interesting, especially to learn that slow cooking was practiced long ago.
    I have two slow cookers–one medium sized and one large. I love them! I use mine mostly for stews, for fixing a pot roast with potatoes, onions, and carrots, for beef stroganoff, for chicken dishes, for pepper steak . . . I could go on.
    Unlike your cast-iron type inner tub, over here in the US our slow cookers have a clay/pottery tub. I’ve recently discovered that you can buy these plastic bags to line the pot before you add your ingredients, and once the meal is cooked, you scoop out the cooked ingredients, then toss the plastic liner. Very nifty, and it means you don’t have to remove the inner tub to clean it!

    Reply
  44. Anne, thanks for that fascinating history of slow cooking! Very interesting, especially to learn that slow cooking was practiced long ago.
    I have two slow cookers–one medium sized and one large. I love them! I use mine mostly for stews, for fixing a pot roast with potatoes, onions, and carrots, for beef stroganoff, for chicken dishes, for pepper steak . . . I could go on.
    Unlike your cast-iron type inner tub, over here in the US our slow cookers have a clay/pottery tub. I’ve recently discovered that you can buy these plastic bags to line the pot before you add your ingredients, and once the meal is cooked, you scoop out the cooked ingredients, then toss the plastic liner. Very nifty, and it means you don’t have to remove the inner tub to clean it!

    Reply
  45. Anne, thanks for that fascinating history of slow cooking! Very interesting, especially to learn that slow cooking was practiced long ago.
    I have two slow cookers–one medium sized and one large. I love them! I use mine mostly for stews, for fixing a pot roast with potatoes, onions, and carrots, for beef stroganoff, for chicken dishes, for pepper steak . . . I could go on.
    Unlike your cast-iron type inner tub, over here in the US our slow cookers have a clay/pottery tub. I’ve recently discovered that you can buy these plastic bags to line the pot before you add your ingredients, and once the meal is cooked, you scoop out the cooked ingredients, then toss the plastic liner. Very nifty, and it means you don’t have to remove the inner tub to clean it!

    Reply
  46. Sherrie, the slow cooker my mother owned had a ceramic inside. This one I have allows you to brown the meat (or whatever) in the heavy liner pan and then place it in the cooker, without any extra washing up, and I'm all for that. But your plastic bag approach has helped me to understand a hint someone on facebook gave me about lining the inside container first to save on washing up.
    I have used the "haybox" method for making yoghurt, only it wasn't a haybox it was a small cupboard and we wrapped the glass jug of warm, yoghurty milk in an old-fashioned sleeping bag and left it there overnight. The yoghurt turned out beautiful, too. I think often we turn to gadgets when a little old fashioned ingenuity will do just as well.

    Reply
  47. Jenny, I'm chuckling here or your dislike of your stove and your conviction that had you been born in the Regency everyone would have been skinny. Let's hope you would have had servants who'd cook you lovely things. Isn't it funny how some of us romanticize wood-burning stoves. We had one when I was young, and later on my brother had one in his house and I loved feeding it and chopping the wood for it and cooking on it. But it was only in the school holidays I stayed there, so it never got to be anything than a leisure activity for me.

    Reply
  48. Sherrie, the slow cooker my mother owned had a ceramic inside. This one I have allows you to brown the meat (or whatever) in the heavy liner pan and then place it in the cooker, without any extra washing up, and I'm all for that. But your plastic bag approach has helped me to understand a hint someone on facebook gave me about lining the inside container first to save on washing up.
    I have used the "haybox" method for making yoghurt, only it wasn't a haybox it was a small cupboard and we wrapped the glass jug of warm, yoghurty milk in an old-fashioned sleeping bag and left it there overnight. The yoghurt turned out beautiful, too. I think often we turn to gadgets when a little old fashioned ingenuity will do just as well.

    Reply
  49. Jenny, I'm chuckling here or your dislike of your stove and your conviction that had you been born in the Regency everyone would have been skinny. Let's hope you would have had servants who'd cook you lovely things. Isn't it funny how some of us romanticize wood-burning stoves. We had one when I was young, and later on my brother had one in his house and I loved feeding it and chopping the wood for it and cooking on it. But it was only in the school holidays I stayed there, so it never got to be anything than a leisure activity for me.

    Reply
  50. Sherrie, the slow cooker my mother owned had a ceramic inside. This one I have allows you to brown the meat (or whatever) in the heavy liner pan and then place it in the cooker, without any extra washing up, and I'm all for that. But your plastic bag approach has helped me to understand a hint someone on facebook gave me about lining the inside container first to save on washing up.
    I have used the "haybox" method for making yoghurt, only it wasn't a haybox it was a small cupboard and we wrapped the glass jug of warm, yoghurty milk in an old-fashioned sleeping bag and left it there overnight. The yoghurt turned out beautiful, too. I think often we turn to gadgets when a little old fashioned ingenuity will do just as well.

    Reply
  51. Jenny, I'm chuckling here or your dislike of your stove and your conviction that had you been born in the Regency everyone would have been skinny. Let's hope you would have had servants who'd cook you lovely things. Isn't it funny how some of us romanticize wood-burning stoves. We had one when I was young, and later on my brother had one in his house and I loved feeding it and chopping the wood for it and cooking on it. But it was only in the school holidays I stayed there, so it never got to be anything than a leisure activity for me.

    Reply
  52. Sherrie, the slow cooker my mother owned had a ceramic inside. This one I have allows you to brown the meat (or whatever) in the heavy liner pan and then place it in the cooker, without any extra washing up, and I'm all for that. But your plastic bag approach has helped me to understand a hint someone on facebook gave me about lining the inside container first to save on washing up.
    I have used the "haybox" method for making yoghurt, only it wasn't a haybox it was a small cupboard and we wrapped the glass jug of warm, yoghurty milk in an old-fashioned sleeping bag and left it there overnight. The yoghurt turned out beautiful, too. I think often we turn to gadgets when a little old fashioned ingenuity will do just as well.

    Reply
  53. Jenny, I'm chuckling here or your dislike of your stove and your conviction that had you been born in the Regency everyone would have been skinny. Let's hope you would have had servants who'd cook you lovely things. Isn't it funny how some of us romanticize wood-burning stoves. We had one when I was young, and later on my brother had one in his house and I loved feeding it and chopping the wood for it and cooking on it. But it was only in the school holidays I stayed there, so it never got to be anything than a leisure activity for me.

    Reply
  54. Sherrie, the slow cooker my mother owned had a ceramic inside. This one I have allows you to brown the meat (or whatever) in the heavy liner pan and then place it in the cooker, without any extra washing up, and I'm all for that. But your plastic bag approach has helped me to understand a hint someone on facebook gave me about lining the inside container first to save on washing up.
    I have used the "haybox" method for making yoghurt, only it wasn't a haybox it was a small cupboard and we wrapped the glass jug of warm, yoghurty milk in an old-fashioned sleeping bag and left it there overnight. The yoghurt turned out beautiful, too. I think often we turn to gadgets when a little old fashioned ingenuity will do just as well.

    Reply
  55. Jenny, I'm chuckling here or your dislike of your stove and your conviction that had you been born in the Regency everyone would have been skinny. Let's hope you would have had servants who'd cook you lovely things. Isn't it funny how some of us romanticize wood-burning stoves. We had one when I was young, and later on my brother had one in his house and I loved feeding it and chopping the wood for it and cooking on it. But it was only in the school holidays I stayed there, so it never got to be anything than a leisure activity for me.

    Reply
  56. Mel, thanks for sharing that link — how interesting. I'm told the old haybox thing still works perfectly, though, so nothing would need to be bought.
    I suppose these ones are lighter and more efficient. As for pressure cookers, my mother had one when I was a child and they seemed fearsome things to me. But I am enjoying my slow cooker. At the moment, with our hot weather here, it makes it easier to slow cook things in that than turn the oven on, and I'm sure in winter it will be a boon also. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  57. Mel, thanks for sharing that link — how interesting. I'm told the old haybox thing still works perfectly, though, so nothing would need to be bought.
    I suppose these ones are lighter and more efficient. As for pressure cookers, my mother had one when I was a child and they seemed fearsome things to me. But I am enjoying my slow cooker. At the moment, with our hot weather here, it makes it easier to slow cook things in that than turn the oven on, and I'm sure in winter it will be a boon also. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  58. Mel, thanks for sharing that link — how interesting. I'm told the old haybox thing still works perfectly, though, so nothing would need to be bought.
    I suppose these ones are lighter and more efficient. As for pressure cookers, my mother had one when I was a child and they seemed fearsome things to me. But I am enjoying my slow cooker. At the moment, with our hot weather here, it makes it easier to slow cook things in that than turn the oven on, and I'm sure in winter it will be a boon also. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  59. Mel, thanks for sharing that link — how interesting. I'm told the old haybox thing still works perfectly, though, so nothing would need to be bought.
    I suppose these ones are lighter and more efficient. As for pressure cookers, my mother had one when I was a child and they seemed fearsome things to me. But I am enjoying my slow cooker. At the moment, with our hot weather here, it makes it easier to slow cook things in that than turn the oven on, and I'm sure in winter it will be a boon also. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  60. Mel, thanks for sharing that link — how interesting. I'm told the old haybox thing still works perfectly, though, so nothing would need to be bought.
    I suppose these ones are lighter and more efficient. As for pressure cookers, my mother had one when I was a child and they seemed fearsome things to me. But I am enjoying my slow cooker. At the moment, with our hot weather here, it makes it easier to slow cook things in that than turn the oven on, and I'm sure in winter it will be a boon also. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  61. Fascinating article! I’ve seen several references to a “Rumford stove” in Regencies and always thought it was just that, a stove. (I pictured my great-aunt’s wood-burning range with baking compartment, actually.) So it’s really a type of fireplace . . . bummer for the cooks. And the spit-dogs! Bless my modern mess. I just replaced a 35-year-old microwave and 10-year-old toaster oven with new, variable-energy ones, looking forward to some interesting new cooking. Still happy with my 25-year-old crock pot, though. Best shredded pork ever, for all kinds of ethnic and comfort recipes.

    Reply
  62. Fascinating article! I’ve seen several references to a “Rumford stove” in Regencies and always thought it was just that, a stove. (I pictured my great-aunt’s wood-burning range with baking compartment, actually.) So it’s really a type of fireplace . . . bummer for the cooks. And the spit-dogs! Bless my modern mess. I just replaced a 35-year-old microwave and 10-year-old toaster oven with new, variable-energy ones, looking forward to some interesting new cooking. Still happy with my 25-year-old crock pot, though. Best shredded pork ever, for all kinds of ethnic and comfort recipes.

    Reply
  63. Fascinating article! I’ve seen several references to a “Rumford stove” in Regencies and always thought it was just that, a stove. (I pictured my great-aunt’s wood-burning range with baking compartment, actually.) So it’s really a type of fireplace . . . bummer for the cooks. And the spit-dogs! Bless my modern mess. I just replaced a 35-year-old microwave and 10-year-old toaster oven with new, variable-energy ones, looking forward to some interesting new cooking. Still happy with my 25-year-old crock pot, though. Best shredded pork ever, for all kinds of ethnic and comfort recipes.

    Reply
  64. Fascinating article! I’ve seen several references to a “Rumford stove” in Regencies and always thought it was just that, a stove. (I pictured my great-aunt’s wood-burning range with baking compartment, actually.) So it’s really a type of fireplace . . . bummer for the cooks. And the spit-dogs! Bless my modern mess. I just replaced a 35-year-old microwave and 10-year-old toaster oven with new, variable-energy ones, looking forward to some interesting new cooking. Still happy with my 25-year-old crock pot, though. Best shredded pork ever, for all kinds of ethnic and comfort recipes.

    Reply
  65. Fascinating article! I’ve seen several references to a “Rumford stove” in Regencies and always thought it was just that, a stove. (I pictured my great-aunt’s wood-burning range with baking compartment, actually.) So it’s really a type of fireplace . . . bummer for the cooks. And the spit-dogs! Bless my modern mess. I just replaced a 35-year-old microwave and 10-year-old toaster oven with new, variable-energy ones, looking forward to some interesting new cooking. Still happy with my 25-year-old crock pot, though. Best shredded pork ever, for all kinds of ethnic and comfort recipes.

    Reply
  66. I’ve only recently returned the DVD of the first Duchess of Duke Street series to the library – SNAP! Something that struck me watching it (after years of not watching it) is how much more sophisticated direction/cinematography has become for period dramas.
    About slow cooking – 20 plus years after giving up meat, the only meat meals I remember with real fondness are the ones my mum cooked in her 1970s crock pot (it looked like this http://frugalmaterialist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/screenshot_17.jpg ) Mum’s crock pot specials were coq au vin, lamb shank stew, and corned beef & veg with creamy-boozy mustard sauce!

    Reply
  67. I’ve only recently returned the DVD of the first Duchess of Duke Street series to the library – SNAP! Something that struck me watching it (after years of not watching it) is how much more sophisticated direction/cinematography has become for period dramas.
    About slow cooking – 20 plus years after giving up meat, the only meat meals I remember with real fondness are the ones my mum cooked in her 1970s crock pot (it looked like this http://frugalmaterialist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/screenshot_17.jpg ) Mum’s crock pot specials were coq au vin, lamb shank stew, and corned beef & veg with creamy-boozy mustard sauce!

    Reply
  68. I’ve only recently returned the DVD of the first Duchess of Duke Street series to the library – SNAP! Something that struck me watching it (after years of not watching it) is how much more sophisticated direction/cinematography has become for period dramas.
    About slow cooking – 20 plus years after giving up meat, the only meat meals I remember with real fondness are the ones my mum cooked in her 1970s crock pot (it looked like this http://frugalmaterialist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/screenshot_17.jpg ) Mum’s crock pot specials were coq au vin, lamb shank stew, and corned beef & veg with creamy-boozy mustard sauce!

    Reply
  69. I’ve only recently returned the DVD of the first Duchess of Duke Street series to the library – SNAP! Something that struck me watching it (after years of not watching it) is how much more sophisticated direction/cinematography has become for period dramas.
    About slow cooking – 20 plus years after giving up meat, the only meat meals I remember with real fondness are the ones my mum cooked in her 1970s crock pot (it looked like this http://frugalmaterialist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/screenshot_17.jpg ) Mum’s crock pot specials were coq au vin, lamb shank stew, and corned beef & veg with creamy-boozy mustard sauce!

    Reply
  70. I’ve only recently returned the DVD of the first Duchess of Duke Street series to the library – SNAP! Something that struck me watching it (after years of not watching it) is how much more sophisticated direction/cinematography has become for period dramas.
    About slow cooking – 20 plus years after giving up meat, the only meat meals I remember with real fondness are the ones my mum cooked in her 1970s crock pot (it looked like this http://frugalmaterialist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/screenshot_17.jpg ) Mum’s crock pot specials were coq au vin, lamb shank stew, and corned beef & veg with creamy-boozy mustard sauce!

    Reply
  71. I do indeed remember the Duchess of Duke Street with Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility) and the late Christopher Cazenove. I remember admiring the heroine for facing her situation head on, accepting her society pretty much as it was, and making the best of it — but I loathed the King and I really loathed the equerry who pimped for him. Thought Charlie was just another such until of course (spoilers).
    It was shot on videotape like most Brit series at the time, with that jarring mix of filmed bits and videotaped bits that was used then. Taping was much cheaper and faster than filming and was used for indoors scenes. I am happy to say that watching dvds of these old series on a good player makes them look much better, and I can see that some work was done on the ones I have to bring them a bit closer to current day resolution standards. None of that matters a bit if the show doesn’t have a good story, of course.
    I just finished Enemy at the Door, a really engrossing late 1970s serial about life in the Channel Islands during the Nazi occupation, and it was done in the same way. It looks pretty good on my bluray player – and it’s got that one necessity, a good story about characters you come to care about.

    Reply
  72. I do indeed remember the Duchess of Duke Street with Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility) and the late Christopher Cazenove. I remember admiring the heroine for facing her situation head on, accepting her society pretty much as it was, and making the best of it — but I loathed the King and I really loathed the equerry who pimped for him. Thought Charlie was just another such until of course (spoilers).
    It was shot on videotape like most Brit series at the time, with that jarring mix of filmed bits and videotaped bits that was used then. Taping was much cheaper and faster than filming and was used for indoors scenes. I am happy to say that watching dvds of these old series on a good player makes them look much better, and I can see that some work was done on the ones I have to bring them a bit closer to current day resolution standards. None of that matters a bit if the show doesn’t have a good story, of course.
    I just finished Enemy at the Door, a really engrossing late 1970s serial about life in the Channel Islands during the Nazi occupation, and it was done in the same way. It looks pretty good on my bluray player – and it’s got that one necessity, a good story about characters you come to care about.

    Reply
  73. I do indeed remember the Duchess of Duke Street with Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility) and the late Christopher Cazenove. I remember admiring the heroine for facing her situation head on, accepting her society pretty much as it was, and making the best of it — but I loathed the King and I really loathed the equerry who pimped for him. Thought Charlie was just another such until of course (spoilers).
    It was shot on videotape like most Brit series at the time, with that jarring mix of filmed bits and videotaped bits that was used then. Taping was much cheaper and faster than filming and was used for indoors scenes. I am happy to say that watching dvds of these old series on a good player makes them look much better, and I can see that some work was done on the ones I have to bring them a bit closer to current day resolution standards. None of that matters a bit if the show doesn’t have a good story, of course.
    I just finished Enemy at the Door, a really engrossing late 1970s serial about life in the Channel Islands during the Nazi occupation, and it was done in the same way. It looks pretty good on my bluray player – and it’s got that one necessity, a good story about characters you come to care about.

    Reply
  74. I do indeed remember the Duchess of Duke Street with Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility) and the late Christopher Cazenove. I remember admiring the heroine for facing her situation head on, accepting her society pretty much as it was, and making the best of it — but I loathed the King and I really loathed the equerry who pimped for him. Thought Charlie was just another such until of course (spoilers).
    It was shot on videotape like most Brit series at the time, with that jarring mix of filmed bits and videotaped bits that was used then. Taping was much cheaper and faster than filming and was used for indoors scenes. I am happy to say that watching dvds of these old series on a good player makes them look much better, and I can see that some work was done on the ones I have to bring them a bit closer to current day resolution standards. None of that matters a bit if the show doesn’t have a good story, of course.
    I just finished Enemy at the Door, a really engrossing late 1970s serial about life in the Channel Islands during the Nazi occupation, and it was done in the same way. It looks pretty good on my bluray player – and it’s got that one necessity, a good story about characters you come to care about.

    Reply
  75. I do indeed remember the Duchess of Duke Street with Gemma Jones (Mrs. Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility) and the late Christopher Cazenove. I remember admiring the heroine for facing her situation head on, accepting her society pretty much as it was, and making the best of it — but I loathed the King and I really loathed the equerry who pimped for him. Thought Charlie was just another such until of course (spoilers).
    It was shot on videotape like most Brit series at the time, with that jarring mix of filmed bits and videotaped bits that was used then. Taping was much cheaper and faster than filming and was used for indoors scenes. I am happy to say that watching dvds of these old series on a good player makes them look much better, and I can see that some work was done on the ones I have to bring them a bit closer to current day resolution standards. None of that matters a bit if the show doesn’t have a good story, of course.
    I just finished Enemy at the Door, a really engrossing late 1970s serial about life in the Channel Islands during the Nazi occupation, and it was done in the same way. It looks pretty good on my bluray player – and it’s got that one necessity, a good story about characters you come to care about.

    Reply
  76. I never did watch the Duchess of Duke Street don’t know why it would have been my kind of thing – it probably clashed with football(soccer) and that always has priority in this house!I shall have to see if I can get hold of a dvd.
    I grew up with an aga and if I could have got it out of the house and moved it into mine when the parents passed on I would have ! It started off life coal fired and when it was turned off for its annual service it used to take up to 24 hours to get back to cooking heat!It had to be lit with charcoal and I can still see my mum lying on the floor with a taper of rolled up newspaper trying to get it to light ! It was the only time I remember my mum nearly swearing !Dad of course would always be on duty !Funnily enough when he retired the aga was quite quickly converted to oil and later to gas.It might have been a tad hot in the kitchen in summer but it came into its own in winter my friends still recall coming in our back door and converging straight to the aga to lean against it and warm up !And I still get my leg pulled for trying to make coffee when I was first at college without turning the hob under the kettle on! I was about two chapters into my book before someone came to see what was holding the coffee up!!

    Reply
  77. I never did watch the Duchess of Duke Street don’t know why it would have been my kind of thing – it probably clashed with football(soccer) and that always has priority in this house!I shall have to see if I can get hold of a dvd.
    I grew up with an aga and if I could have got it out of the house and moved it into mine when the parents passed on I would have ! It started off life coal fired and when it was turned off for its annual service it used to take up to 24 hours to get back to cooking heat!It had to be lit with charcoal and I can still see my mum lying on the floor with a taper of rolled up newspaper trying to get it to light ! It was the only time I remember my mum nearly swearing !Dad of course would always be on duty !Funnily enough when he retired the aga was quite quickly converted to oil and later to gas.It might have been a tad hot in the kitchen in summer but it came into its own in winter my friends still recall coming in our back door and converging straight to the aga to lean against it and warm up !And I still get my leg pulled for trying to make coffee when I was first at college without turning the hob under the kettle on! I was about two chapters into my book before someone came to see what was holding the coffee up!!

    Reply
  78. I never did watch the Duchess of Duke Street don’t know why it would have been my kind of thing – it probably clashed with football(soccer) and that always has priority in this house!I shall have to see if I can get hold of a dvd.
    I grew up with an aga and if I could have got it out of the house and moved it into mine when the parents passed on I would have ! It started off life coal fired and when it was turned off for its annual service it used to take up to 24 hours to get back to cooking heat!It had to be lit with charcoal and I can still see my mum lying on the floor with a taper of rolled up newspaper trying to get it to light ! It was the only time I remember my mum nearly swearing !Dad of course would always be on duty !Funnily enough when he retired the aga was quite quickly converted to oil and later to gas.It might have been a tad hot in the kitchen in summer but it came into its own in winter my friends still recall coming in our back door and converging straight to the aga to lean against it and warm up !And I still get my leg pulled for trying to make coffee when I was first at college without turning the hob under the kettle on! I was about two chapters into my book before someone came to see what was holding the coffee up!!

    Reply
  79. I never did watch the Duchess of Duke Street don’t know why it would have been my kind of thing – it probably clashed with football(soccer) and that always has priority in this house!I shall have to see if I can get hold of a dvd.
    I grew up with an aga and if I could have got it out of the house and moved it into mine when the parents passed on I would have ! It started off life coal fired and when it was turned off for its annual service it used to take up to 24 hours to get back to cooking heat!It had to be lit with charcoal and I can still see my mum lying on the floor with a taper of rolled up newspaper trying to get it to light ! It was the only time I remember my mum nearly swearing !Dad of course would always be on duty !Funnily enough when he retired the aga was quite quickly converted to oil and later to gas.It might have been a tad hot in the kitchen in summer but it came into its own in winter my friends still recall coming in our back door and converging straight to the aga to lean against it and warm up !And I still get my leg pulled for trying to make coffee when I was first at college without turning the hob under the kettle on! I was about two chapters into my book before someone came to see what was holding the coffee up!!

    Reply
  80. I never did watch the Duchess of Duke Street don’t know why it would have been my kind of thing – it probably clashed with football(soccer) and that always has priority in this house!I shall have to see if I can get hold of a dvd.
    I grew up with an aga and if I could have got it out of the house and moved it into mine when the parents passed on I would have ! It started off life coal fired and when it was turned off for its annual service it used to take up to 24 hours to get back to cooking heat!It had to be lit with charcoal and I can still see my mum lying on the floor with a taper of rolled up newspaper trying to get it to light ! It was the only time I remember my mum nearly swearing !Dad of course would always be on duty !Funnily enough when he retired the aga was quite quickly converted to oil and later to gas.It might have been a tad hot in the kitchen in summer but it came into its own in winter my friends still recall coming in our back door and converging straight to the aga to lean against it and warm up !And I still get my leg pulled for trying to make coffee when I was first at college without turning the hob under the kettle on! I was about two chapters into my book before someone came to see what was holding the coffee up!!

    Reply
  81. I never did watch The Duchess of Duke Street, although I remember when it was on TV. I have a copy of “The Settlement Cookbook” which was given to my mother as a wedding present in 1949. It’s got instructions for making a homemade fireless cooker. They advise newspaper, crumpled into tight balls, instead of hay. It’s also got instructions for making soap, and cooking over a wood or coal or oil stove. My family used to visit a country getaway that was equipped with a wood cookstove, so I remember cooking on one. It’s not really difficult, but I think keeping an even temperature for baking would be. I’ve also done quite a bit of campfire cooking. I love my slow cooker, a/k/a crockpot. although I don’t remember to use it as often as I should. I don’t think they ever went completely out of style. I use it mainly for a family recipe of Hungarian goulash, which is killer, melts in your mouth!

    Reply
  82. I never did watch The Duchess of Duke Street, although I remember when it was on TV. I have a copy of “The Settlement Cookbook” which was given to my mother as a wedding present in 1949. It’s got instructions for making a homemade fireless cooker. They advise newspaper, crumpled into tight balls, instead of hay. It’s also got instructions for making soap, and cooking over a wood or coal or oil stove. My family used to visit a country getaway that was equipped with a wood cookstove, so I remember cooking on one. It’s not really difficult, but I think keeping an even temperature for baking would be. I’ve also done quite a bit of campfire cooking. I love my slow cooker, a/k/a crockpot. although I don’t remember to use it as often as I should. I don’t think they ever went completely out of style. I use it mainly for a family recipe of Hungarian goulash, which is killer, melts in your mouth!

    Reply
  83. I never did watch The Duchess of Duke Street, although I remember when it was on TV. I have a copy of “The Settlement Cookbook” which was given to my mother as a wedding present in 1949. It’s got instructions for making a homemade fireless cooker. They advise newspaper, crumpled into tight balls, instead of hay. It’s also got instructions for making soap, and cooking over a wood or coal or oil stove. My family used to visit a country getaway that was equipped with a wood cookstove, so I remember cooking on one. It’s not really difficult, but I think keeping an even temperature for baking would be. I’ve also done quite a bit of campfire cooking. I love my slow cooker, a/k/a crockpot. although I don’t remember to use it as often as I should. I don’t think they ever went completely out of style. I use it mainly for a family recipe of Hungarian goulash, which is killer, melts in your mouth!

    Reply
  84. I never did watch The Duchess of Duke Street, although I remember when it was on TV. I have a copy of “The Settlement Cookbook” which was given to my mother as a wedding present in 1949. It’s got instructions for making a homemade fireless cooker. They advise newspaper, crumpled into tight balls, instead of hay. It’s also got instructions for making soap, and cooking over a wood or coal or oil stove. My family used to visit a country getaway that was equipped with a wood cookstove, so I remember cooking on one. It’s not really difficult, but I think keeping an even temperature for baking would be. I’ve also done quite a bit of campfire cooking. I love my slow cooker, a/k/a crockpot. although I don’t remember to use it as often as I should. I don’t think they ever went completely out of style. I use it mainly for a family recipe of Hungarian goulash, which is killer, melts in your mouth!

    Reply
  85. I never did watch The Duchess of Duke Street, although I remember when it was on TV. I have a copy of “The Settlement Cookbook” which was given to my mother as a wedding present in 1949. It’s got instructions for making a homemade fireless cooker. They advise newspaper, crumpled into tight balls, instead of hay. It’s also got instructions for making soap, and cooking over a wood or coal or oil stove. My family used to visit a country getaway that was equipped with a wood cookstove, so I remember cooking on one. It’s not really difficult, but I think keeping an even temperature for baking would be. I’ve also done quite a bit of campfire cooking. I love my slow cooker, a/k/a crockpot. although I don’t remember to use it as often as I should. I don’t think they ever went completely out of style. I use it mainly for a family recipe of Hungarian goulash, which is killer, melts in your mouth!

    Reply
  86. I did watch the Duchess of Duke Street – very interesting times. I have a recipe for Beef Burgundy that cooks long & low in the oven – I use an old heavy pot of my mothers. I just got a Crock pot for Christmas and bought the fixin’s to make a few things.

    Reply
  87. I did watch the Duchess of Duke Street – very interesting times. I have a recipe for Beef Burgundy that cooks long & low in the oven – I use an old heavy pot of my mothers. I just got a Crock pot for Christmas and bought the fixin’s to make a few things.

    Reply
  88. I did watch the Duchess of Duke Street – very interesting times. I have a recipe for Beef Burgundy that cooks long & low in the oven – I use an old heavy pot of my mothers. I just got a Crock pot for Christmas and bought the fixin’s to make a few things.

    Reply
  89. I did watch the Duchess of Duke Street – very interesting times. I have a recipe for Beef Burgundy that cooks long & low in the oven – I use an old heavy pot of my mothers. I just got a Crock pot for Christmas and bought the fixin’s to make a few things.

    Reply
  90. I did watch the Duchess of Duke Street – very interesting times. I have a recipe for Beef Burgundy that cooks long & low in the oven – I use an old heavy pot of my mothers. I just got a Crock pot for Christmas and bought the fixin’s to make a few things.

    Reply
  91. What a fun post, Anne! I’ve heard of fireless cookers, but never seen one. (Ditto The Duchess of Duke Street and a picture of spit-dogs at work. *G*)
    When crockpots first came out in the US, many, MANY years ago, I requested one for Christmas. I got it, too, and it still works. It’s wonderful for tender, stew-y sorts of things.

    Reply
  92. What a fun post, Anne! I’ve heard of fireless cookers, but never seen one. (Ditto The Duchess of Duke Street and a picture of spit-dogs at work. *G*)
    When crockpots first came out in the US, many, MANY years ago, I requested one for Christmas. I got it, too, and it still works. It’s wonderful for tender, stew-y sorts of things.

    Reply
  93. What a fun post, Anne! I’ve heard of fireless cookers, but never seen one. (Ditto The Duchess of Duke Street and a picture of spit-dogs at work. *G*)
    When crockpots first came out in the US, many, MANY years ago, I requested one for Christmas. I got it, too, and it still works. It’s wonderful for tender, stew-y sorts of things.

    Reply
  94. What a fun post, Anne! I’ve heard of fireless cookers, but never seen one. (Ditto The Duchess of Duke Street and a picture of spit-dogs at work. *G*)
    When crockpots first came out in the US, many, MANY years ago, I requested one for Christmas. I got it, too, and it still works. It’s wonderful for tender, stew-y sorts of things.

    Reply
  95. What a fun post, Anne! I’ve heard of fireless cookers, but never seen one. (Ditto The Duchess of Duke Street and a picture of spit-dogs at work. *G*)
    When crockpots first came out in the US, many, MANY years ago, I requested one for Christmas. I got it, too, and it still works. It’s wonderful for tender, stew-y sorts of things.

    Reply
  96. I’ve never seen the Duchess of Duke Street, but there are some episodes on YouTube that one can watch. I’ll have to do that.
    I love my slow-cooker. I use it often as well as a pressure cooker I use often too. Both can take a really tough cut of meat and cook it until it’s nice and tender.
    I’ve also used a Webber grill to cook a stuffed turkey with diffused heat, much like your hanging pork. It still is the best turkey we ever ate.
    Now, I have a convection oven, but the jury is still out on that one. Sometimes it bakes beautifully, sometimes…not so much.

    Reply
  97. I’ve never seen the Duchess of Duke Street, but there are some episodes on YouTube that one can watch. I’ll have to do that.
    I love my slow-cooker. I use it often as well as a pressure cooker I use often too. Both can take a really tough cut of meat and cook it until it’s nice and tender.
    I’ve also used a Webber grill to cook a stuffed turkey with diffused heat, much like your hanging pork. It still is the best turkey we ever ate.
    Now, I have a convection oven, but the jury is still out on that one. Sometimes it bakes beautifully, sometimes…not so much.

    Reply
  98. I’ve never seen the Duchess of Duke Street, but there are some episodes on YouTube that one can watch. I’ll have to do that.
    I love my slow-cooker. I use it often as well as a pressure cooker I use often too. Both can take a really tough cut of meat and cook it until it’s nice and tender.
    I’ve also used a Webber grill to cook a stuffed turkey with diffused heat, much like your hanging pork. It still is the best turkey we ever ate.
    Now, I have a convection oven, but the jury is still out on that one. Sometimes it bakes beautifully, sometimes…not so much.

    Reply
  99. I’ve never seen the Duchess of Duke Street, but there are some episodes on YouTube that one can watch. I’ll have to do that.
    I love my slow-cooker. I use it often as well as a pressure cooker I use often too. Both can take a really tough cut of meat and cook it until it’s nice and tender.
    I’ve also used a Webber grill to cook a stuffed turkey with diffused heat, much like your hanging pork. It still is the best turkey we ever ate.
    Now, I have a convection oven, but the jury is still out on that one. Sometimes it bakes beautifully, sometimes…not so much.

    Reply
  100. I’ve never seen the Duchess of Duke Street, but there are some episodes on YouTube that one can watch. I’ll have to do that.
    I love my slow-cooker. I use it often as well as a pressure cooker I use often too. Both can take a really tough cut of meat and cook it until it’s nice and tender.
    I’ve also used a Webber grill to cook a stuffed turkey with diffused heat, much like your hanging pork. It still is the best turkey we ever ate.
    Now, I have a convection oven, but the jury is still out on that one. Sometimes it bakes beautifully, sometimes…not so much.

    Reply
  101. Shannon, how interesting — I didn't know those dvds would still be around. She's fun, isn't she, Louise Trotter? I've also been watching some dvds of shows made in the 80's and though well made etc, I have to agree with you about the increasing sophistication of the directing/scriptwriting — everything, really. Even the music. That crockpot you showed in that link looked a lot like my mother's one, too — the one I never used and gave away. I'm wondering whether the new one I've bought will get just as neglected eventually, but maybe not — on FB people directed me to a really wide range of dishes that could be cooked in it — not just stewy things. Some great vegetarian ones, too

    Reply
  102. Shannon, how interesting — I didn't know those dvds would still be around. She's fun, isn't she, Louise Trotter? I've also been watching some dvds of shows made in the 80's and though well made etc, I have to agree with you about the increasing sophistication of the directing/scriptwriting — everything, really. Even the music. That crockpot you showed in that link looked a lot like my mother's one, too — the one I never used and gave away. I'm wondering whether the new one I've bought will get just as neglected eventually, but maybe not — on FB people directed me to a really wide range of dishes that could be cooked in it — not just stewy things. Some great vegetarian ones, too

    Reply
  103. Shannon, how interesting — I didn't know those dvds would still be around. She's fun, isn't she, Louise Trotter? I've also been watching some dvds of shows made in the 80's and though well made etc, I have to agree with you about the increasing sophistication of the directing/scriptwriting — everything, really. Even the music. That crockpot you showed in that link looked a lot like my mother's one, too — the one I never used and gave away. I'm wondering whether the new one I've bought will get just as neglected eventually, but maybe not — on FB people directed me to a really wide range of dishes that could be cooked in it — not just stewy things. Some great vegetarian ones, too

    Reply
  104. Shannon, how interesting — I didn't know those dvds would still be around. She's fun, isn't she, Louise Trotter? I've also been watching some dvds of shows made in the 80's and though well made etc, I have to agree with you about the increasing sophistication of the directing/scriptwriting — everything, really. Even the music. That crockpot you showed in that link looked a lot like my mother's one, too — the one I never used and gave away. I'm wondering whether the new one I've bought will get just as neglected eventually, but maybe not — on FB people directed me to a really wide range of dishes that could be cooked in it — not just stewy things. Some great vegetarian ones, too

    Reply
  105. Shannon, how interesting — I didn't know those dvds would still be around. She's fun, isn't she, Louise Trotter? I've also been watching some dvds of shows made in the 80's and though well made etc, I have to agree with you about the increasing sophistication of the directing/scriptwriting — everything, really. Even the music. That crockpot you showed in that link looked a lot like my mother's one, too — the one I never used and gave away. I'm wondering whether the new one I've bought will get just as neglected eventually, but maybe not — on FB people directed me to a really wide range of dishes that could be cooked in it — not just stewy things. Some great vegetarian ones, too

    Reply
  106. Yes, Janice, it was a bit of an eye-opener to me when I first saw that show, how the king could pretty much say "I want that one" and just have it all arranged. And yes, she was terrific in that she just faced it head on — and though she hadn't really wanted to be his mistress in the first place, she still made the best of it. And I loved her outspokenness and how she didn't mince words or cow-tow to anyone, aristocrat or pleb. And I was just thinking of the doorman and his dog fred. I really will have to get the DVDs and watch it again.
    Thanks also for the recommendation of Enemy at the Door — I'm very interested in channel islands history.

    Reply
  107. Yes, Janice, it was a bit of an eye-opener to me when I first saw that show, how the king could pretty much say "I want that one" and just have it all arranged. And yes, she was terrific in that she just faced it head on — and though she hadn't really wanted to be his mistress in the first place, she still made the best of it. And I loved her outspokenness and how she didn't mince words or cow-tow to anyone, aristocrat or pleb. And I was just thinking of the doorman and his dog fred. I really will have to get the DVDs and watch it again.
    Thanks also for the recommendation of Enemy at the Door — I'm very interested in channel islands history.

    Reply
  108. Yes, Janice, it was a bit of an eye-opener to me when I first saw that show, how the king could pretty much say "I want that one" and just have it all arranged. And yes, she was terrific in that she just faced it head on — and though she hadn't really wanted to be his mistress in the first place, she still made the best of it. And I loved her outspokenness and how she didn't mince words or cow-tow to anyone, aristocrat or pleb. And I was just thinking of the doorman and his dog fred. I really will have to get the DVDs and watch it again.
    Thanks also for the recommendation of Enemy at the Door — I'm very interested in channel islands history.

    Reply
  109. Yes, Janice, it was a bit of an eye-opener to me when I first saw that show, how the king could pretty much say "I want that one" and just have it all arranged. And yes, she was terrific in that she just faced it head on — and though she hadn't really wanted to be his mistress in the first place, she still made the best of it. And I loved her outspokenness and how she didn't mince words or cow-tow to anyone, aristocrat or pleb. And I was just thinking of the doorman and his dog fred. I really will have to get the DVDs and watch it again.
    Thanks also for the recommendation of Enemy at the Door — I'm very interested in channel islands history.

    Reply
  110. Yes, Janice, it was a bit of an eye-opener to me when I first saw that show, how the king could pretty much say "I want that one" and just have it all arranged. And yes, she was terrific in that she just faced it head on — and though she hadn't really wanted to be his mistress in the first place, she still made the best of it. And I loved her outspokenness and how she didn't mince words or cow-tow to anyone, aristocrat or pleb. And I was just thinking of the doorman and his dog fred. I really will have to get the DVDs and watch it again.
    Thanks also for the recommendation of Enemy at the Door — I'm very interested in channel islands history.

    Reply
  111. Jo I hear you on wanting that lovely old Aga. And I'm chuckling how the lighting mechanism needed to be updated when your dad retired. Isn't it so often the way? We lived in a cooler part of Australia when we had our old cast iron wood-burning kitchen stove — it was in a very old historic house — and it was so cosy all through winter. The kitchen was large and it really was the heart of the home.
    So funny when you went away to college that you forgot to light the hob — well, growing up with an Aga, why would you?
    Interestingly, in the research I did for my second novel, set partly in France and on the grand tour, the sources all commented on the warmth of French houses — they didn't seem to have fireplaces where most of the heat went up the chimney with the smoke, but instead they had small enameled stoves in each room, that were both clean and efficient.

    Reply
  112. Jo I hear you on wanting that lovely old Aga. And I'm chuckling how the lighting mechanism needed to be updated when your dad retired. Isn't it so often the way? We lived in a cooler part of Australia when we had our old cast iron wood-burning kitchen stove — it was in a very old historic house — and it was so cosy all through winter. The kitchen was large and it really was the heart of the home.
    So funny when you went away to college that you forgot to light the hob — well, growing up with an Aga, why would you?
    Interestingly, in the research I did for my second novel, set partly in France and on the grand tour, the sources all commented on the warmth of French houses — they didn't seem to have fireplaces where most of the heat went up the chimney with the smoke, but instead they had small enameled stoves in each room, that were both clean and efficient.

    Reply
  113. Jo I hear you on wanting that lovely old Aga. And I'm chuckling how the lighting mechanism needed to be updated when your dad retired. Isn't it so often the way? We lived in a cooler part of Australia when we had our old cast iron wood-burning kitchen stove — it was in a very old historic house — and it was so cosy all through winter. The kitchen was large and it really was the heart of the home.
    So funny when you went away to college that you forgot to light the hob — well, growing up with an Aga, why would you?
    Interestingly, in the research I did for my second novel, set partly in France and on the grand tour, the sources all commented on the warmth of French houses — they didn't seem to have fireplaces where most of the heat went up the chimney with the smoke, but instead they had small enameled stoves in each room, that were both clean and efficient.

    Reply
  114. Jo I hear you on wanting that lovely old Aga. And I'm chuckling how the lighting mechanism needed to be updated when your dad retired. Isn't it so often the way? We lived in a cooler part of Australia when we had our old cast iron wood-burning kitchen stove — it was in a very old historic house — and it was so cosy all through winter. The kitchen was large and it really was the heart of the home.
    So funny when you went away to college that you forgot to light the hob — well, growing up with an Aga, why would you?
    Interestingly, in the research I did for my second novel, set partly in France and on the grand tour, the sources all commented on the warmth of French houses — they didn't seem to have fireplaces where most of the heat went up the chimney with the smoke, but instead they had small enameled stoves in each room, that were both clean and efficient.

    Reply
  115. Jo I hear you on wanting that lovely old Aga. And I'm chuckling how the lighting mechanism needed to be updated when your dad retired. Isn't it so often the way? We lived in a cooler part of Australia when we had our old cast iron wood-burning kitchen stove — it was in a very old historic house — and it was so cosy all through winter. The kitchen was large and it really was the heart of the home.
    So funny when you went away to college that you forgot to light the hob — well, growing up with an Aga, why would you?
    Interestingly, in the research I did for my second novel, set partly in France and on the grand tour, the sources all commented on the warmth of French houses — they didn't seem to have fireplaces where most of the heat went up the chimney with the smoke, but instead they had small enameled stoves in each room, that were both clean and efficient.

    Reply
  116. Karin, how interesting. I LOVE old books like that, with handy hints and recipes for things like soap etc. And yes, of course newspapers would make excellent insulation and be much more easily available to city dwellers than hay.
    I think getting the baking temperature right would be very much part of the skill in those days of "a good cook" — it wasn't just mixing the right ingredients in the right way in those days. My maternal grandmother was an excellent cook, and she knew her way around a wood stove. She could tell if the temperature was right by the look of the fire (and coals) and by putting her hand into the oven. But after Pop retired they moved closer to the city and it was all gas then. What a boon that must have been.
    And yes, I think slow cookers are the kind of thing that are always around, but come into vogue at different times.

    Reply
  117. Karin, how interesting. I LOVE old books like that, with handy hints and recipes for things like soap etc. And yes, of course newspapers would make excellent insulation and be much more easily available to city dwellers than hay.
    I think getting the baking temperature right would be very much part of the skill in those days of "a good cook" — it wasn't just mixing the right ingredients in the right way in those days. My maternal grandmother was an excellent cook, and she knew her way around a wood stove. She could tell if the temperature was right by the look of the fire (and coals) and by putting her hand into the oven. But after Pop retired they moved closer to the city and it was all gas then. What a boon that must have been.
    And yes, I think slow cookers are the kind of thing that are always around, but come into vogue at different times.

    Reply
  118. Karin, how interesting. I LOVE old books like that, with handy hints and recipes for things like soap etc. And yes, of course newspapers would make excellent insulation and be much more easily available to city dwellers than hay.
    I think getting the baking temperature right would be very much part of the skill in those days of "a good cook" — it wasn't just mixing the right ingredients in the right way in those days. My maternal grandmother was an excellent cook, and she knew her way around a wood stove. She could tell if the temperature was right by the look of the fire (and coals) and by putting her hand into the oven. But after Pop retired they moved closer to the city and it was all gas then. What a boon that must have been.
    And yes, I think slow cookers are the kind of thing that are always around, but come into vogue at different times.

    Reply
  119. Karin, how interesting. I LOVE old books like that, with handy hints and recipes for things like soap etc. And yes, of course newspapers would make excellent insulation and be much more easily available to city dwellers than hay.
    I think getting the baking temperature right would be very much part of the skill in those days of "a good cook" — it wasn't just mixing the right ingredients in the right way in those days. My maternal grandmother was an excellent cook, and she knew her way around a wood stove. She could tell if the temperature was right by the look of the fire (and coals) and by putting her hand into the oven. But after Pop retired they moved closer to the city and it was all gas then. What a boon that must have been.
    And yes, I think slow cookers are the kind of thing that are always around, but come into vogue at different times.

    Reply
  120. Karin, how interesting. I LOVE old books like that, with handy hints and recipes for things like soap etc. And yes, of course newspapers would make excellent insulation and be much more easily available to city dwellers than hay.
    I think getting the baking temperature right would be very much part of the skill in those days of "a good cook" — it wasn't just mixing the right ingredients in the right way in those days. My maternal grandmother was an excellent cook, and she knew her way around a wood stove. She could tell if the temperature was right by the look of the fire (and coals) and by putting her hand into the oven. But after Pop retired they moved closer to the city and it was all gas then. What a boon that must have been.
    And yes, I think slow cookers are the kind of thing that are always around, but come into vogue at different times.

    Reply
  121. Thanks Diane
    For me the impetus to buy a slow cooker (having completely neglected the previous one) was the desire for pulled pork. I had never heard of it until some years ago when I was introduced to it in Maryland by Mary Jo's Mayhem Consultant — he was shocked I'd never even heard of pulled pork, let alone tasted it — and we soon fixed that!
    Currently it's all the rage in Melbourne — you see it in pubs and restaurants everywhere, and my tastebuds have been tingling, so ….

    Reply
  122. Thanks Diane
    For me the impetus to buy a slow cooker (having completely neglected the previous one) was the desire for pulled pork. I had never heard of it until some years ago when I was introduced to it in Maryland by Mary Jo's Mayhem Consultant — he was shocked I'd never even heard of pulled pork, let alone tasted it — and we soon fixed that!
    Currently it's all the rage in Melbourne — you see it in pubs and restaurants everywhere, and my tastebuds have been tingling, so ….

    Reply
  123. Thanks Diane
    For me the impetus to buy a slow cooker (having completely neglected the previous one) was the desire for pulled pork. I had never heard of it until some years ago when I was introduced to it in Maryland by Mary Jo's Mayhem Consultant — he was shocked I'd never even heard of pulled pork, let alone tasted it — and we soon fixed that!
    Currently it's all the rage in Melbourne — you see it in pubs and restaurants everywhere, and my tastebuds have been tingling, so ….

    Reply
  124. Thanks Diane
    For me the impetus to buy a slow cooker (having completely neglected the previous one) was the desire for pulled pork. I had never heard of it until some years ago when I was introduced to it in Maryland by Mary Jo's Mayhem Consultant — he was shocked I'd never even heard of pulled pork, let alone tasted it — and we soon fixed that!
    Currently it's all the rage in Melbourne — you see it in pubs and restaurants everywhere, and my tastebuds have been tingling, so ….

    Reply
  125. Thanks Diane
    For me the impetus to buy a slow cooker (having completely neglected the previous one) was the desire for pulled pork. I had never heard of it until some years ago when I was introduced to it in Maryland by Mary Jo's Mayhem Consultant — he was shocked I'd never even heard of pulled pork, let alone tasted it — and we soon fixed that!
    Currently it's all the rage in Melbourne — you see it in pubs and restaurants everywhere, and my tastebuds have been tingling, so ….

    Reply
  126. Mary Jo, as I said in the previous comment, it's your–well, not quite *your* fault that I bought a slow cooker. I blame the Mayhem Consultant for introducing me to pulled pork. *g*
    And I think you would love the Duchess of Duke St.

    Reply
  127. Mary Jo, as I said in the previous comment, it's your–well, not quite *your* fault that I bought a slow cooker. I blame the Mayhem Consultant for introducing me to pulled pork. *g*
    And I think you would love the Duchess of Duke St.

    Reply
  128. Mary Jo, as I said in the previous comment, it's your–well, not quite *your* fault that I bought a slow cooker. I blame the Mayhem Consultant for introducing me to pulled pork. *g*
    And I think you would love the Duchess of Duke St.

    Reply
  129. Mary Jo, as I said in the previous comment, it's your–well, not quite *your* fault that I bought a slow cooker. I blame the Mayhem Consultant for introducing me to pulled pork. *g*
    And I think you would love the Duchess of Duke St.

    Reply
  130. Mary Jo, as I said in the previous comment, it's your–well, not quite *your* fault that I bought a slow cooker. I blame the Mayhem Consultant for introducing me to pulled pork. *g*
    And I think you would love the Duchess of Duke St.

    Reply
  131. Theo, you need to watch the early episodes first — how Louise came to be in the position she is.
    That stuffed turkey sounds delicious. I can see I'm going to be starting on a whole new cooking direction with this slow cooker thing. I make stews and casseroles all the time on the stovetop and in the oven, and I enjoy the process of getting up to stir them etc. so we'll see if my enthusiasm for it stays. Right now it's convenient because I can put it on in the laundry, which is at the back of the house, kind of separate from the main part of the house. So the smells and the heat don't come into where I'm living and working, which in this current hot weather is a blessing.

    Reply
  132. Theo, you need to watch the early episodes first — how Louise came to be in the position she is.
    That stuffed turkey sounds delicious. I can see I'm going to be starting on a whole new cooking direction with this slow cooker thing. I make stews and casseroles all the time on the stovetop and in the oven, and I enjoy the process of getting up to stir them etc. so we'll see if my enthusiasm for it stays. Right now it's convenient because I can put it on in the laundry, which is at the back of the house, kind of separate from the main part of the house. So the smells and the heat don't come into where I'm living and working, which in this current hot weather is a blessing.

    Reply
  133. Theo, you need to watch the early episodes first — how Louise came to be in the position she is.
    That stuffed turkey sounds delicious. I can see I'm going to be starting on a whole new cooking direction with this slow cooker thing. I make stews and casseroles all the time on the stovetop and in the oven, and I enjoy the process of getting up to stir them etc. so we'll see if my enthusiasm for it stays. Right now it's convenient because I can put it on in the laundry, which is at the back of the house, kind of separate from the main part of the house. So the smells and the heat don't come into where I'm living and working, which in this current hot weather is a blessing.

    Reply
  134. Theo, you need to watch the early episodes first — how Louise came to be in the position she is.
    That stuffed turkey sounds delicious. I can see I'm going to be starting on a whole new cooking direction with this slow cooker thing. I make stews and casseroles all the time on the stovetop and in the oven, and I enjoy the process of getting up to stir them etc. so we'll see if my enthusiasm for it stays. Right now it's convenient because I can put it on in the laundry, which is at the back of the house, kind of separate from the main part of the house. So the smells and the heat don't come into where I'm living and working, which in this current hot weather is a blessing.

    Reply
  135. Theo, you need to watch the early episodes first — how Louise came to be in the position she is.
    That stuffed turkey sounds delicious. I can see I'm going to be starting on a whole new cooking direction with this slow cooker thing. I make stews and casseroles all the time on the stovetop and in the oven, and I enjoy the process of getting up to stir them etc. so we'll see if my enthusiasm for it stays. Right now it's convenient because I can put it on in the laundry, which is at the back of the house, kind of separate from the main part of the house. So the smells and the heat don't come into where I'm living and working, which in this current hot weather is a blessing.

    Reply

Leave a Comment