Slipping through time with Christina Courtenay!

TSKOD_largeNicola here! Today I’m welcoming Christina Courtenay back to the Word Wenches to talk about her latest time slip novel, The Secret Kiss of Darkness. Christina is a multi-award winning author of historical romantic fiction and as I am a huge fan of time slip novels I couldn’t wait to quiz her about her latest book!

Christina, welcome back to the Word Wenches! Please tell us a little bit about The Secret Kiss of Darkness.

The Secret Kiss of Darkness is a time slip novel set in Devon, in the south-west of the UK.  The heroine in the present has her life totally disrupted when she almost bankrupts herself to buy a portrait of a mysterious 18th century gentleman at an auction.  There’s forbidden love, smugglers and romance, as well as a gypsy’s spell!

The story was inspired by a Van Dyck painting in the National Gallery here in London, which looked so real I thought the man portrayed was going to start talking to me any minute!  I swear his eyes followed my every move.  It was very spooky but brilliant as it gave me the idea for this novel.

What brilliant inspiration for a book! What would you say is the most challenging aspect of writing a story that combines a historical and a contemporary story?

I think the most difficult thing is to keep the reader engaged in both stories without losing interest or forgetting what was happening.  I try to alternate the sections so that they are not too long, and thereby hopefully the plot strands will be fresh in the reader’s mind.  It can also be tricky to get the language right – you have to switch from a more historical ‘feel’ in descriptions and dialogue of the historical scenes to the present where you have to be careful not to sound too old-fashioned.  One way of doing that would be to write each story separately and combine them afterwards, but that doesn’t work for me so I just have to try and switch mindset for each section.

Which is your favourite scene in the book?

When the hero in the past, smuggler Jago Kerswell, unexpectedly meets the love of his life.  She bumps Devon coveinto him, quite literally, and turns his life upside down with a request he can’t refuse (even though he knows he should).

You write a variety of different genres but do you have a particular type of story you are drawn to tell?

I do love the time slip format because I’m fascinated by the idea that our souls might live on after we pass away, and although I’m terrified of ghosts, at the same time it is a comforting thought that life could go on in some form.  In this book, I’ve chosen a rather strange way for this to happen, but that’s part of the fun of this genre – you can do anything!  I also always like stories where good triumphs over evil, so I’m sure that’s part of every novel I write.

Can you tell us where your interest in history springs from and how it has influenced your writing?

I’ve been fascinated by history since I was very young and still remember my first history lesson at school learning about Stone Age people – I’ve been hooked ever since.  To a certain extent, it could be because I loved fairy tales, and they’re usually set in the past which is what made them seem so romantic.  And I love reading about ancient treasures and cultures like the Vikings, Egyptians and Romans.  When I began to read novels and found that some of them were set in the past, I naturally gravitated towards those.  My father told me to read The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas and I knew then I’d found my ideal book.  It followed, of course, that I would also choose to write in my favourite genre.

What research did you do for this particular novel?

Saltram HouseAs it’s set in Devon, I spent some time there during holidays, exploring the lovely coastline and other scenic places.  My favourite was Saltram House, a stately home near Plymouth, and I loved it so much I based the hero’s house in my story on that (with a few alterations of course).  I also had to do research about smugglers, and I read up on the life of the painter Thomas Gainsborough, whose portraits feature in the novel.  He seems to have been quite a character and some of the things he is alleged to have said made me laugh!

Who is your favourite fictional hero/heroine?

My favourite hero is probably Jamie Fraser in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series – he’s just immensely likeable, but I also love bad boy heroes like Ratty (Miles Rattenbury) in Sue Moorcroft’s Starting Over for example.  I tend to fall in love with whatever hero I’m reading about at the moment though, so I’m a bit fickle!  As for heroines, I think it has to be Winter de Ballesteros in M M Kaye’s novel Shadow of the Moon.  She is so strong and goes through so much, I’m completely in awe of her.

Interesting choices! I’m another who has to admit to being profligate with my affections when it comes to heroes! Shadow of the Moon is a wonderful book and I completely agree about Winter’s character. What are you currently reading?

Every Secret Thing by Emma Cole (aka Susanna Kearsley).  I discovered that for some reason I’d missed this one and as I love her books, I had to rectify that immediately!

We’re big fans of Susanna’s books here at the Wenches too! What do you keep beside your computer when you’re writing?

Paper and pen for jotting down random thoughts and ‘to-do’ lists, research notes, a board with photos of the hero (I usually use actors or real people I’ve seen in magazines for inspiration), a name book (or two or three…) and all kinds of miscellaneous items.  Underneath my chair is my faithful companion, the youngest of my three dogs, who always keeps me company and sometimes provides inspiration too.

If you weren’t a writer, what would you be?

I used to work as a legal secretary but wouldn’t want to do that again.  If I could start over I’d be an archaeologist or, failing that, I’d love to work as an editor in a publishing house.

What’s the best writing advice you’ve ever been given and what advice would you give to other aspiring authors?

Persevere and believe in yourself (I didn’t want to hear that at the time, because getting published seemed to take so long, but it was true!).  And I always tell aspiring authors to find themselves a writing buddy, someone who is at the same stage as yourself and who you trust to give constructive (but never malicious) criticism.  It’s so much more enjoyable to set out on the journey towards publication together with someone, rather than on your own.

Good advice! Thank you very much, Christina, for joining us today. Here is the blurb for The TSKOD_large Secret Kiss of Darkness:

Must forbidden love end in heartbreak?

Kayla Sinclair knows she’s in big trouble when she almost bankrupts herself to buy a life-size portrait of a mysterious eighteenth century man at an auction.

Jago Kerswell, inn-keeper and smuggler, knows there is danger in those stolen moments with Lady Eliza Marcombe, but he'll take any risk to be with her.

Over two centuries separate Kayla and Jago, but when Kayla’s jealous fiancé presents her with an ultimatum, and Jago and Eliza’s affair is tragically discovered, their lives become inextricably linked thanks to a gypsy’s spell. Kayla finds herself on a quest that could heal the past, but what she cannot foresee is the danger in her own future.

Will Kayla find heartache or happiness? 

ISBN:  978-1781890677

And here are the buy links:

Amazon UK: http://tinyurl.com/kz66zrd

Amazon US: http://tinyurl.com/muu5b46 (On sale March)

Kindle UK: http://tinyurl.com/lonuk6g

Kindle US: http://tinyurl.com/l4ake9u

To find out more about Christina's books, check out her website, Facebook page and Twitter! 

http://christinacourtenay.com/

https://www.facebook.com/christinacourtenayauthor?fref=ts

https://twitter.com/PiaCCourtenay

Do you enjoy time slip books? What do you like about them? Do you have any favourite books or authors in the genre? And are there any periods of history you would like particularly to see featured in a time slip novel? There is a copy of The Secret Kiss of Darkness up for grabs for one commenter between now and midnight Thursday.

110 thoughts on “Slipping through time with Christina Courtenay!”

  1. I love time slip books! Susanna Kearsley, Barbara Erskine and Christina are my favourites. I also love The House On The Strand written by Daphne Du Maurier. A period of history in a time slip novel? Charles 11’s era I think, featuring Nell Gwynn. I’m so fascinated by history, and I do believe we all have past lives. I’ve visited Saltram House, as live an hours ride away from Plymouth. I really like ‘spooky’ stories, but don’t find them frightening at all! Good luck with this title Christina, can’t wait to read it … Rosy

    Reply
  2. I love time slip books! Susanna Kearsley, Barbara Erskine and Christina are my favourites. I also love The House On The Strand written by Daphne Du Maurier. A period of history in a time slip novel? Charles 11’s era I think, featuring Nell Gwynn. I’m so fascinated by history, and I do believe we all have past lives. I’ve visited Saltram House, as live an hours ride away from Plymouth. I really like ‘spooky’ stories, but don’t find them frightening at all! Good luck with this title Christina, can’t wait to read it … Rosy

    Reply
  3. I love time slip books! Susanna Kearsley, Barbara Erskine and Christina are my favourites. I also love The House On The Strand written by Daphne Du Maurier. A period of history in a time slip novel? Charles 11’s era I think, featuring Nell Gwynn. I’m so fascinated by history, and I do believe we all have past lives. I’ve visited Saltram House, as live an hours ride away from Plymouth. I really like ‘spooky’ stories, but don’t find them frightening at all! Good luck with this title Christina, can’t wait to read it … Rosy

    Reply
  4. I love time slip books! Susanna Kearsley, Barbara Erskine and Christina are my favourites. I also love The House On The Strand written by Daphne Du Maurier. A period of history in a time slip novel? Charles 11’s era I think, featuring Nell Gwynn. I’m so fascinated by history, and I do believe we all have past lives. I’ve visited Saltram House, as live an hours ride away from Plymouth. I really like ‘spooky’ stories, but don’t find them frightening at all! Good luck with this title Christina, can’t wait to read it … Rosy

    Reply
  5. I love time slip books! Susanna Kearsley, Barbara Erskine and Christina are my favourites. I also love The House On The Strand written by Daphne Du Maurier. A period of history in a time slip novel? Charles 11’s era I think, featuring Nell Gwynn. I’m so fascinated by history, and I do believe we all have past lives. I’ve visited Saltram House, as live an hours ride away from Plymouth. I really like ‘spooky’ stories, but don’t find them frightening at all! Good luck with this title Christina, can’t wait to read it … Rosy

    Reply
  6. Hi Rosemary! Thanks so much for the comment. It’s great to meet another time slip fan. It was Barbara Erskine who first got me into reading time slip books. How lovely to be close to Saltram House. It looks well worth the visit. I must put it on my list when I am down in Devon.

    Reply
  7. Hi Rosemary! Thanks so much for the comment. It’s great to meet another time slip fan. It was Barbara Erskine who first got me into reading time slip books. How lovely to be close to Saltram House. It looks well worth the visit. I must put it on my list when I am down in Devon.

    Reply
  8. Hi Rosemary! Thanks so much for the comment. It’s great to meet another time slip fan. It was Barbara Erskine who first got me into reading time slip books. How lovely to be close to Saltram House. It looks well worth the visit. I must put it on my list when I am down in Devon.

    Reply
  9. Hi Rosemary! Thanks so much for the comment. It’s great to meet another time slip fan. It was Barbara Erskine who first got me into reading time slip books. How lovely to be close to Saltram House. It looks well worth the visit. I must put it on my list when I am down in Devon.

    Reply
  10. Hi Rosemary! Thanks so much for the comment. It’s great to meet another time slip fan. It was Barbara Erskine who first got me into reading time slip books. How lovely to be close to Saltram House. It looks well worth the visit. I must put it on my list when I am down in Devon.

    Reply
  11. Many thanks, Rosemary! I think The House on the Strand was the first time slip I read as well and I’ve loved them ever since! Susanna Kearsley and Barbara Erskine are my favourites too 🙂 You are so lucky to live close to Saltram House, it’s beautiful! I’m hoping to visit there again soon.

    Reply
  12. Many thanks, Rosemary! I think The House on the Strand was the first time slip I read as well and I’ve loved them ever since! Susanna Kearsley and Barbara Erskine are my favourites too 🙂 You are so lucky to live close to Saltram House, it’s beautiful! I’m hoping to visit there again soon.

    Reply
  13. Many thanks, Rosemary! I think The House on the Strand was the first time slip I read as well and I’ve loved them ever since! Susanna Kearsley and Barbara Erskine are my favourites too 🙂 You are so lucky to live close to Saltram House, it’s beautiful! I’m hoping to visit there again soon.

    Reply
  14. Many thanks, Rosemary! I think The House on the Strand was the first time slip I read as well and I’ve loved them ever since! Susanna Kearsley and Barbara Erskine are my favourites too 🙂 You are so lucky to live close to Saltram House, it’s beautiful! I’m hoping to visit there again soon.

    Reply
  15. Many thanks, Rosemary! I think The House on the Strand was the first time slip I read as well and I’ve loved them ever since! Susanna Kearsley and Barbara Erskine are my favourites too 🙂 You are so lucky to live close to Saltram House, it’s beautiful! I’m hoping to visit there again soon.

    Reply
  16. Welcome back to the Word Wenches, Christina! I do love me a good “become obsessed with the portrait of a hunk” book, and this one sounds delicious.
    I’m also intrigued by your YAs, and impressed by your versatility. And now it’s time for me to hare off to Amazon…

    Reply
  17. Welcome back to the Word Wenches, Christina! I do love me a good “become obsessed with the portrait of a hunk” book, and this one sounds delicious.
    I’m also intrigued by your YAs, and impressed by your versatility. And now it’s time for me to hare off to Amazon…

    Reply
  18. Welcome back to the Word Wenches, Christina! I do love me a good “become obsessed with the portrait of a hunk” book, and this one sounds delicious.
    I’m also intrigued by your YAs, and impressed by your versatility. And now it’s time for me to hare off to Amazon…

    Reply
  19. Welcome back to the Word Wenches, Christina! I do love me a good “become obsessed with the portrait of a hunk” book, and this one sounds delicious.
    I’m also intrigued by your YAs, and impressed by your versatility. And now it’s time for me to hare off to Amazon…

    Reply
  20. Welcome back to the Word Wenches, Christina! I do love me a good “become obsessed with the portrait of a hunk” book, and this one sounds delicious.
    I’m also intrigued by your YAs, and impressed by your versatility. And now it’s time for me to hare off to Amazon…

    Reply
  21. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches & Ms. Courtenay!
    Ms. Cornick we share the same passion for time slips! I am always eager to see how each writer treats the timescape in their stories! Loved learning the impetus beginning of the book! Goodness, a painting whose eyes turnt as you moved,… I’d rather say that was a jumpgate into the story! Whilst you were speaking about the balance between contemporary & historical passages, my mind frittered back fondly on behalf of “Kate & Leopold” (film) where I felt they did a grand job of eclipsing ‘time’ in the last sequences where her ‘dress’ alters as she ‘leaps through time’? The whole sequence involving the photograph was bang-on brilliant too! Which is why I can understand how you wanted to encourage the reader to be swept wholly into both realms but not lose the essence of either!
    Time slip romances and historicals cross out of the ghost realm and enter into the reincarnation realm! Which is why I think I adore them so much, as its not as ‘heart hitching’ to think of an apparition of your past love appearing before you; but rather, the soul’s flight taken out from the past and re-deposited into the future!
    I always appreciate a sociological inclusion inside of a story which barters itself a steadfast challenge between good vs evil. There is something to be said to become intuitively in-tune with the inner-workings of the mind to understand the spring-steppings of action!
    Your not the only one who is fickle for heroes & heroines! I still have an internal debate with myself if I prefer Aubrey over Maurin in Master & Commander! Of which, the only proper way I’ll definitely resolve it is to read the complete series, as I only have seen the film! 🙁 I simply get enraptured by the tale at hand, the characters right before my eyes, and afterwards I feel disconnected from placing myself a bit out of present reality!
    I crave books like those where I quite literally have to pull myself back through the vortex of reading and experiencing a story by text and re-enter the current time of my environment! I am I suppose addicted to time slips because its like being able to time travel to two distinct eras for the ticket of visiting only one!
    Outlander is on my tCC (Classics Club) list; if that tells you anything! I love the series from an outside point of view which I want to eradicate into a reader’s perspective!
    Favourites of the time slip thematic!? Hmm,… I’ve listed motion pictures, but not books! 🙁 From 2013: Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole; The House Girl by Tara Conklin; and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker — all of which I explored on my blog, and the latter launched me into this whole study of Magical Realism which I inserted into my tCC reading cycle!
    Bless you for offering a bookaway, but the conversation & the company is what lights up my heart with joy! 🙂

    Reply
  22. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches & Ms. Courtenay!
    Ms. Cornick we share the same passion for time slips! I am always eager to see how each writer treats the timescape in their stories! Loved learning the impetus beginning of the book! Goodness, a painting whose eyes turnt as you moved,… I’d rather say that was a jumpgate into the story! Whilst you were speaking about the balance between contemporary & historical passages, my mind frittered back fondly on behalf of “Kate & Leopold” (film) where I felt they did a grand job of eclipsing ‘time’ in the last sequences where her ‘dress’ alters as she ‘leaps through time’? The whole sequence involving the photograph was bang-on brilliant too! Which is why I can understand how you wanted to encourage the reader to be swept wholly into both realms but not lose the essence of either!
    Time slip romances and historicals cross out of the ghost realm and enter into the reincarnation realm! Which is why I think I adore them so much, as its not as ‘heart hitching’ to think of an apparition of your past love appearing before you; but rather, the soul’s flight taken out from the past and re-deposited into the future!
    I always appreciate a sociological inclusion inside of a story which barters itself a steadfast challenge between good vs evil. There is something to be said to become intuitively in-tune with the inner-workings of the mind to understand the spring-steppings of action!
    Your not the only one who is fickle for heroes & heroines! I still have an internal debate with myself if I prefer Aubrey over Maurin in Master & Commander! Of which, the only proper way I’ll definitely resolve it is to read the complete series, as I only have seen the film! 🙁 I simply get enraptured by the tale at hand, the characters right before my eyes, and afterwards I feel disconnected from placing myself a bit out of present reality!
    I crave books like those where I quite literally have to pull myself back through the vortex of reading and experiencing a story by text and re-enter the current time of my environment! I am I suppose addicted to time slips because its like being able to time travel to two distinct eras for the ticket of visiting only one!
    Outlander is on my tCC (Classics Club) list; if that tells you anything! I love the series from an outside point of view which I want to eradicate into a reader’s perspective!
    Favourites of the time slip thematic!? Hmm,… I’ve listed motion pictures, but not books! 🙁 From 2013: Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole; The House Girl by Tara Conklin; and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker — all of which I explored on my blog, and the latter launched me into this whole study of Magical Realism which I inserted into my tCC reading cycle!
    Bless you for offering a bookaway, but the conversation & the company is what lights up my heart with joy! 🙂

    Reply
  23. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches & Ms. Courtenay!
    Ms. Cornick we share the same passion for time slips! I am always eager to see how each writer treats the timescape in their stories! Loved learning the impetus beginning of the book! Goodness, a painting whose eyes turnt as you moved,… I’d rather say that was a jumpgate into the story! Whilst you were speaking about the balance between contemporary & historical passages, my mind frittered back fondly on behalf of “Kate & Leopold” (film) where I felt they did a grand job of eclipsing ‘time’ in the last sequences where her ‘dress’ alters as she ‘leaps through time’? The whole sequence involving the photograph was bang-on brilliant too! Which is why I can understand how you wanted to encourage the reader to be swept wholly into both realms but not lose the essence of either!
    Time slip romances and historicals cross out of the ghost realm and enter into the reincarnation realm! Which is why I think I adore them so much, as its not as ‘heart hitching’ to think of an apparition of your past love appearing before you; but rather, the soul’s flight taken out from the past and re-deposited into the future!
    I always appreciate a sociological inclusion inside of a story which barters itself a steadfast challenge between good vs evil. There is something to be said to become intuitively in-tune with the inner-workings of the mind to understand the spring-steppings of action!
    Your not the only one who is fickle for heroes & heroines! I still have an internal debate with myself if I prefer Aubrey over Maurin in Master & Commander! Of which, the only proper way I’ll definitely resolve it is to read the complete series, as I only have seen the film! 🙁 I simply get enraptured by the tale at hand, the characters right before my eyes, and afterwards I feel disconnected from placing myself a bit out of present reality!
    I crave books like those where I quite literally have to pull myself back through the vortex of reading and experiencing a story by text and re-enter the current time of my environment! I am I suppose addicted to time slips because its like being able to time travel to two distinct eras for the ticket of visiting only one!
    Outlander is on my tCC (Classics Club) list; if that tells you anything! I love the series from an outside point of view which I want to eradicate into a reader’s perspective!
    Favourites of the time slip thematic!? Hmm,… I’ve listed motion pictures, but not books! 🙁 From 2013: Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole; The House Girl by Tara Conklin; and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker — all of which I explored on my blog, and the latter launched me into this whole study of Magical Realism which I inserted into my tCC reading cycle!
    Bless you for offering a bookaway, but the conversation & the company is what lights up my heart with joy! 🙂

    Reply
  24. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches & Ms. Courtenay!
    Ms. Cornick we share the same passion for time slips! I am always eager to see how each writer treats the timescape in their stories! Loved learning the impetus beginning of the book! Goodness, a painting whose eyes turnt as you moved,… I’d rather say that was a jumpgate into the story! Whilst you were speaking about the balance between contemporary & historical passages, my mind frittered back fondly on behalf of “Kate & Leopold” (film) where I felt they did a grand job of eclipsing ‘time’ in the last sequences where her ‘dress’ alters as she ‘leaps through time’? The whole sequence involving the photograph was bang-on brilliant too! Which is why I can understand how you wanted to encourage the reader to be swept wholly into both realms but not lose the essence of either!
    Time slip romances and historicals cross out of the ghost realm and enter into the reincarnation realm! Which is why I think I adore them so much, as its not as ‘heart hitching’ to think of an apparition of your past love appearing before you; but rather, the soul’s flight taken out from the past and re-deposited into the future!
    I always appreciate a sociological inclusion inside of a story which barters itself a steadfast challenge between good vs evil. There is something to be said to become intuitively in-tune with the inner-workings of the mind to understand the spring-steppings of action!
    Your not the only one who is fickle for heroes & heroines! I still have an internal debate with myself if I prefer Aubrey over Maurin in Master & Commander! Of which, the only proper way I’ll definitely resolve it is to read the complete series, as I only have seen the film! 🙁 I simply get enraptured by the tale at hand, the characters right before my eyes, and afterwards I feel disconnected from placing myself a bit out of present reality!
    I crave books like those where I quite literally have to pull myself back through the vortex of reading and experiencing a story by text and re-enter the current time of my environment! I am I suppose addicted to time slips because its like being able to time travel to two distinct eras for the ticket of visiting only one!
    Outlander is on my tCC (Classics Club) list; if that tells you anything! I love the series from an outside point of view which I want to eradicate into a reader’s perspective!
    Favourites of the time slip thematic!? Hmm,… I’ve listed motion pictures, but not books! 🙁 From 2013: Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole; The House Girl by Tara Conklin; and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker — all of which I explored on my blog, and the latter launched me into this whole study of Magical Realism which I inserted into my tCC reading cycle!
    Bless you for offering a bookaway, but the conversation & the company is what lights up my heart with joy! 🙂

    Reply
  25. Hallo, Hallo dear Wenches & Ms. Courtenay!
    Ms. Cornick we share the same passion for time slips! I am always eager to see how each writer treats the timescape in their stories! Loved learning the impetus beginning of the book! Goodness, a painting whose eyes turnt as you moved,… I’d rather say that was a jumpgate into the story! Whilst you were speaking about the balance between contemporary & historical passages, my mind frittered back fondly on behalf of “Kate & Leopold” (film) where I felt they did a grand job of eclipsing ‘time’ in the last sequences where her ‘dress’ alters as she ‘leaps through time’? The whole sequence involving the photograph was bang-on brilliant too! Which is why I can understand how you wanted to encourage the reader to be swept wholly into both realms but not lose the essence of either!
    Time slip romances and historicals cross out of the ghost realm and enter into the reincarnation realm! Which is why I think I adore them so much, as its not as ‘heart hitching’ to think of an apparition of your past love appearing before you; but rather, the soul’s flight taken out from the past and re-deposited into the future!
    I always appreciate a sociological inclusion inside of a story which barters itself a steadfast challenge between good vs evil. There is something to be said to become intuitively in-tune with the inner-workings of the mind to understand the spring-steppings of action!
    Your not the only one who is fickle for heroes & heroines! I still have an internal debate with myself if I prefer Aubrey over Maurin in Master & Commander! Of which, the only proper way I’ll definitely resolve it is to read the complete series, as I only have seen the film! 🙁 I simply get enraptured by the tale at hand, the characters right before my eyes, and afterwards I feel disconnected from placing myself a bit out of present reality!
    I crave books like those where I quite literally have to pull myself back through the vortex of reading and experiencing a story by text and re-enter the current time of my environment! I am I suppose addicted to time slips because its like being able to time travel to two distinct eras for the ticket of visiting only one!
    Outlander is on my tCC (Classics Club) list; if that tells you anything! I love the series from an outside point of view which I want to eradicate into a reader’s perspective!
    Favourites of the time slip thematic!? Hmm,… I’ve listed motion pictures, but not books! 🙁 From 2013: Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole; The House Girl by Tara Conklin; and The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker — all of which I explored on my blog, and the latter launched me into this whole study of Magical Realism which I inserted into my tCC reading cycle!
    Bless you for offering a bookaway, but the conversation & the company is what lights up my heart with joy! 🙂

    Reply
  26. Many thanks for your comments! I have missed some of the films and books you mentioned so will definitely add those to my lists. So glad you enjoy time slips as much as I do!

    Reply
  27. Many thanks for your comments! I have missed some of the films and books you mentioned so will definitely add those to my lists. So glad you enjoy time slips as much as I do!

    Reply
  28. Many thanks for your comments! I have missed some of the films and books you mentioned so will definitely add those to my lists. So glad you enjoy time slips as much as I do!

    Reply
  29. Many thanks for your comments! I have missed some of the films and books you mentioned so will definitely add those to my lists. So glad you enjoy time slips as much as I do!

    Reply
  30. Many thanks for your comments! I have missed some of the films and books you mentioned so will definitely add those to my lists. So glad you enjoy time slips as much as I do!

    Reply
  31. Thanks so much for visiting, Christina. I love the story of the Van Dyke painting inspiring your Secret Kiss of Darkness. I, too, find museums a huge source of sudden inspiration for plot/character ideas. Really looking forward to reading it!

    Reply
  32. Thanks so much for visiting, Christina. I love the story of the Van Dyke painting inspiring your Secret Kiss of Darkness. I, too, find museums a huge source of sudden inspiration for plot/character ideas. Really looking forward to reading it!

    Reply
  33. Thanks so much for visiting, Christina. I love the story of the Van Dyke painting inspiring your Secret Kiss of Darkness. I, too, find museums a huge source of sudden inspiration for plot/character ideas. Really looking forward to reading it!

    Reply
  34. Thanks so much for visiting, Christina. I love the story of the Van Dyke painting inspiring your Secret Kiss of Darkness. I, too, find museums a huge source of sudden inspiration for plot/character ideas. Really looking forward to reading it!

    Reply
  35. Thanks so much for visiting, Christina. I love the story of the Van Dyke painting inspiring your Secret Kiss of Darkness. I, too, find museums a huge source of sudden inspiration for plot/character ideas. Really looking forward to reading it!

    Reply
  36. Many thanks, Cara! Glad I’m not the only one – I do love going to museums of all kinds, there’s so much inspiration to be found and you just never know what you’re going to come across!

    Reply
  37. Many thanks, Cara! Glad I’m not the only one – I do love going to museums of all kinds, there’s so much inspiration to be found and you just never know what you’re going to come across!

    Reply
  38. Many thanks, Cara! Glad I’m not the only one – I do love going to museums of all kinds, there’s so much inspiration to be found and you just never know what you’re going to come across!

    Reply
  39. Many thanks, Cara! Glad I’m not the only one – I do love going to museums of all kinds, there’s so much inspiration to be found and you just never know what you’re going to come across!

    Reply
  40. Many thanks, Cara! Glad I’m not the only one – I do love going to museums of all kinds, there’s so much inspiration to be found and you just never know what you’re going to come across!

    Reply
  41. I’ve missed some of these books/films too and am eagerly hurrying to catch up with them. I did love Kate and Leopold. Thank you so much for your comments, Jorie. I am very happy you like visiting the blog!

    Reply
  42. I’ve missed some of these books/films too and am eagerly hurrying to catch up with them. I did love Kate and Leopold. Thank you so much for your comments, Jorie. I am very happy you like visiting the blog!

    Reply
  43. I’ve missed some of these books/films too and am eagerly hurrying to catch up with them. I did love Kate and Leopold. Thank you so much for your comments, Jorie. I am very happy you like visiting the blog!

    Reply
  44. I’ve missed some of these books/films too and am eagerly hurrying to catch up with them. I did love Kate and Leopold. Thank you so much for your comments, Jorie. I am very happy you like visiting the blog!

    Reply
  45. I’ve missed some of these books/films too and am eagerly hurrying to catch up with them. I did love Kate and Leopold. Thank you so much for your comments, Jorie. I am very happy you like visiting the blog!

    Reply
  46. Dear all,
    Christina Courtenay’s novel sounds like a very intriguing work. However, I must confess to my ignorance. What exactly is the difference between a “time slip” book and a “time travel” book? Is the first a subset of the other? Would the Robert S. Nathan novel, “A Portrait of Jennie” (remember the movie with Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten) be an example of a “time slip” story? And would Joan Overfield’s books “Time’s Tapestry” and “A Door Ajar” exemplify time travel”? I really liked all three of these. I adore the historic aspects of the time travel (and time slip) genre. How does a person from another time adapt to the changes confronting him/her when thrust in a truly distinct culture from the one considered “home” — language differences, clothing, and roles which are acceptable for men and women can differ widely. What fun!! Also, reminds me of another favorite book, Michael Crichton’s “Timeline”.

    Reply
  47. Dear all,
    Christina Courtenay’s novel sounds like a very intriguing work. However, I must confess to my ignorance. What exactly is the difference between a “time slip” book and a “time travel” book? Is the first a subset of the other? Would the Robert S. Nathan novel, “A Portrait of Jennie” (remember the movie with Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten) be an example of a “time slip” story? And would Joan Overfield’s books “Time’s Tapestry” and “A Door Ajar” exemplify time travel”? I really liked all three of these. I adore the historic aspects of the time travel (and time slip) genre. How does a person from another time adapt to the changes confronting him/her when thrust in a truly distinct culture from the one considered “home” — language differences, clothing, and roles which are acceptable for men and women can differ widely. What fun!! Also, reminds me of another favorite book, Michael Crichton’s “Timeline”.

    Reply
  48. Dear all,
    Christina Courtenay’s novel sounds like a very intriguing work. However, I must confess to my ignorance. What exactly is the difference between a “time slip” book and a “time travel” book? Is the first a subset of the other? Would the Robert S. Nathan novel, “A Portrait of Jennie” (remember the movie with Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten) be an example of a “time slip” story? And would Joan Overfield’s books “Time’s Tapestry” and “A Door Ajar” exemplify time travel”? I really liked all three of these. I adore the historic aspects of the time travel (and time slip) genre. How does a person from another time adapt to the changes confronting him/her when thrust in a truly distinct culture from the one considered “home” — language differences, clothing, and roles which are acceptable for men and women can differ widely. What fun!! Also, reminds me of another favorite book, Michael Crichton’s “Timeline”.

    Reply
  49. Dear all,
    Christina Courtenay’s novel sounds like a very intriguing work. However, I must confess to my ignorance. What exactly is the difference between a “time slip” book and a “time travel” book? Is the first a subset of the other? Would the Robert S. Nathan novel, “A Portrait of Jennie” (remember the movie with Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten) be an example of a “time slip” story? And would Joan Overfield’s books “Time’s Tapestry” and “A Door Ajar” exemplify time travel”? I really liked all three of these. I adore the historic aspects of the time travel (and time slip) genre. How does a person from another time adapt to the changes confronting him/her when thrust in a truly distinct culture from the one considered “home” — language differences, clothing, and roles which are acceptable for men and women can differ widely. What fun!! Also, reminds me of another favorite book, Michael Crichton’s “Timeline”.

    Reply
  50. Dear all,
    Christina Courtenay’s novel sounds like a very intriguing work. However, I must confess to my ignorance. What exactly is the difference between a “time slip” book and a “time travel” book? Is the first a subset of the other? Would the Robert S. Nathan novel, “A Portrait of Jennie” (remember the movie with Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten) be an example of a “time slip” story? And would Joan Overfield’s books “Time’s Tapestry” and “A Door Ajar” exemplify time travel”? I really liked all three of these. I adore the historic aspects of the time travel (and time slip) genre. How does a person from another time adapt to the changes confronting him/her when thrust in a truly distinct culture from the one considered “home” — language differences, clothing, and roles which are acceptable for men and women can differ widely. What fun!! Also, reminds me of another favorite book, Michael Crichton’s “Timeline”.

    Reply
  51. Wonderful interview! Thank you so much Christina and Nicola.
    This is a “must read” for me – one of my dearest, oldest friends is from Devon and her mother (who is very much like a 2nd mother to me) still lives there. Also, I do enjoy time-slip novels although I’ve only read Susanna Kearsley’s. The movies Timeline with Gerard Butler (THUD!) and Kate and Leopold with Hugh Jackman (THUD again!!) are two of my favorites though.

    Reply
  52. Wonderful interview! Thank you so much Christina and Nicola.
    This is a “must read” for me – one of my dearest, oldest friends is from Devon and her mother (who is very much like a 2nd mother to me) still lives there. Also, I do enjoy time-slip novels although I’ve only read Susanna Kearsley’s. The movies Timeline with Gerard Butler (THUD!) and Kate and Leopold with Hugh Jackman (THUD again!!) are two of my favorites though.

    Reply
  53. Wonderful interview! Thank you so much Christina and Nicola.
    This is a “must read” for me – one of my dearest, oldest friends is from Devon and her mother (who is very much like a 2nd mother to me) still lives there. Also, I do enjoy time-slip novels although I’ve only read Susanna Kearsley’s. The movies Timeline with Gerard Butler (THUD!) and Kate and Leopold with Hugh Jackman (THUD again!!) are two of my favorites though.

    Reply
  54. Wonderful interview! Thank you so much Christina and Nicola.
    This is a “must read” for me – one of my dearest, oldest friends is from Devon and her mother (who is very much like a 2nd mother to me) still lives there. Also, I do enjoy time-slip novels although I’ve only read Susanna Kearsley’s. The movies Timeline with Gerard Butler (THUD!) and Kate and Leopold with Hugh Jackman (THUD again!!) are two of my favorites though.

    Reply
  55. Wonderful interview! Thank you so much Christina and Nicola.
    This is a “must read” for me – one of my dearest, oldest friends is from Devon and her mother (who is very much like a 2nd mother to me) still lives there. Also, I do enjoy time-slip novels although I’ve only read Susanna Kearsley’s. The movies Timeline with Gerard Butler (THUD!) and Kate and Leopold with Hugh Jackman (THUD again!!) are two of my favorites though.

    Reply
  56. Hi Laurel,
    Thank you for your comments! The difference between time travel and time slip is that in a time travel book, the characters from the present actually physically travel back (or forth) in time, whereas in a time slip novel, you have two stories running concurrently – one in the past and one in the present – and they are connected somehow, but the protagonists don’t visit each other’s eras. Instead it can be that they find out about each other through other means, like a diary or a ghost or something like that. I love both kinds, hope you do too!

    Reply
  57. Hi Laurel,
    Thank you for your comments! The difference between time travel and time slip is that in a time travel book, the characters from the present actually physically travel back (or forth) in time, whereas in a time slip novel, you have two stories running concurrently – one in the past and one in the present – and they are connected somehow, but the protagonists don’t visit each other’s eras. Instead it can be that they find out about each other through other means, like a diary or a ghost or something like that. I love both kinds, hope you do too!

    Reply
  58. Hi Laurel,
    Thank you for your comments! The difference between time travel and time slip is that in a time travel book, the characters from the present actually physically travel back (or forth) in time, whereas in a time slip novel, you have two stories running concurrently – one in the past and one in the present – and they are connected somehow, but the protagonists don’t visit each other’s eras. Instead it can be that they find out about each other through other means, like a diary or a ghost or something like that. I love both kinds, hope you do too!

    Reply
  59. Hi Laurel,
    Thank you for your comments! The difference between time travel and time slip is that in a time travel book, the characters from the present actually physically travel back (or forth) in time, whereas in a time slip novel, you have two stories running concurrently – one in the past and one in the present – and they are connected somehow, but the protagonists don’t visit each other’s eras. Instead it can be that they find out about each other through other means, like a diary or a ghost or something like that. I love both kinds, hope you do too!

    Reply
  60. Hi Laurel,
    Thank you for your comments! The difference between time travel and time slip is that in a time travel book, the characters from the present actually physically travel back (or forth) in time, whereas in a time slip novel, you have two stories running concurrently – one in the past and one in the present – and they are connected somehow, but the protagonists don’t visit each other’s eras. Instead it can be that they find out about each other through other means, like a diary or a ghost or something like that. I love both kinds, hope you do too!

    Reply
  61. Thank you very much Donna! I really must see those movies, don’t know how I could have missed them. And yes, Susanna’s books are fabulous, can’t wait for the next one!

    Reply
  62. Thank you very much Donna! I really must see those movies, don’t know how I could have missed them. And yes, Susanna’s books are fabulous, can’t wait for the next one!

    Reply
  63. Thank you very much Donna! I really must see those movies, don’t know how I could have missed them. And yes, Susanna’s books are fabulous, can’t wait for the next one!

    Reply
  64. Thank you very much Donna! I really must see those movies, don’t know how I could have missed them. And yes, Susanna’s books are fabulous, can’t wait for the next one!

    Reply
  65. Thank you very much Donna! I really must see those movies, don’t know how I could have missed them. And yes, Susanna’s books are fabulous, can’t wait for the next one!

    Reply
  66. I love time-slip books! I just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Firebird, and would love to read more books in the same genre.

    Reply
  67. I love time-slip books! I just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Firebird, and would love to read more books in the same genre.

    Reply
  68. I love time-slip books! I just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Firebird, and would love to read more books in the same genre.

    Reply
  69. I love time-slip books! I just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Firebird, and would love to read more books in the same genre.

    Reply
  70. I love time-slip books! I just finished reading Susanna Kearsley’s The Firebird, and would love to read more books in the same genre.

    Reply
  71. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, Donna. I’m reading Christina’s book at the moment and loving it. Timeline is also on my list of favourites, not least because of Gerard Butler!

    Reply
  72. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, Donna. I’m reading Christina’s book at the moment and loving it. Timeline is also on my list of favourites, not least because of Gerard Butler!

    Reply
  73. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, Donna. I’m reading Christina’s book at the moment and loving it. Timeline is also on my list of favourites, not least because of Gerard Butler!

    Reply
  74. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, Donna. I’m reading Christina’s book at the moment and loving it. Timeline is also on my list of favourites, not least because of Gerard Butler!

    Reply
  75. I’m so pleased you enjoyed the interview, Donna. I’m reading Christina’s book at the moment and loving it. Timeline is also on my list of favourites, not least because of Gerard Butler!

    Reply

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