Slanguage

W-DeskLady5 Pat here:

Since so many of us enjoy playing with words, I’ve been keeping track of the words I’ve thrown out of the current WIP. For those of you who think a writer pours a story from her fingers directly onto the page—this might be a spoiler. My first outpouring of story is in draft mode, rather like an artist sketching on canvas before adding paint. Anything and everything may be erased as I go back and color in the details. Language is particularly susceptible for culling since I dash out the first word that remotely says what I need to move the story forward, then have to go back and craft real sentences with better word choices.

Aside from the fact that my crazed typing will frequently substitute homonyms ( two words pronounced 
Homonym or spelled the same way but with different meanings) for the words I  really mean, I’m likely to toss in slanguage all my own. These words are frequently archaic to today’s vocabularies but anachronistic for the Regency, like bejeebers and hightail. They sound old, so my addled mind accepts them and moves on. If a word just sounds particularly English, like gobsmacked, my characters are quite apt to emit it, unless I smack them down and correct their…ahem, English.

Unfortunately, phrases like “making love” or “having sex” or even something so innocent as “a tad” or “not to worry” don’t leap out and smack the modern reader as anachronistic, even though they are.  So they’re a tad hard to spot.

Love sign Maybe we all ought to talk with our hands. (Sign to left means love or I love you)  Slang might be particular to its time period, but words like pretty, cute, handsome, and sophisticated are hard to juggle.  I’m not likely to call a Regency heroine cute, because it would more likely be an insult—as in too clever for her own good.  The modern reader isn't likely to grasp that .  Handsome, however, might mean appropriate or large, as in a handsome fortune. That it also could mean a large and/or graceful form, as in a handsome man, just confuses the issue, but I think the modern reader can work that one out based on the sentence. Sophisticated, on the other hand, (hear me sigh) was not generally a compliment. The original meaning was to adulterate, to deceptively modify. I assume it must have gone on to mean a person who could speak circles around an innocent and confuse their thinking, then progressed on to mean that person was more culturally adept. So whether or not one is considered a sophisticate in the Regency era might or might not be a good thing. I don’t care. I want my heroes to be worldly, sophisticated men. Take that any way you like it. I just won't introduce a character into a sophisticated room unless my brain is turned off. Which it could be.

Anyone interested in a great Regency thesaurus needs to see Emily Hendrickson’s compilation (http://www.emilyhendrickson.com/referencebook.html). I have it, but that doesn’t mean the word I want is there, because of the bad habit mentioned above. It’s a bit hard to find bejeebers in any thesaurus, much less one that translates to the Regency era.                 
Roget

Besides Rogets and Emily’s compilations, I use several online references, including http://onlineslangdictionary.com/ in my attempts to add crutches to my feeble memory and track dates of origin. Eric Partridge has some excellent dictionaries from the time period, my favorite is the Dictionary of Catch Phrases, but again, if I don’t know the word I want, it’s pretty hard to find it. 

And just because he’s so much fun to read, John Dierdorf’s site  http://www.io.com/~dierdorf/words.html  is bookmarked in my reference file (scroll down for index that leads to words discussed). Hats off to one of his blogs for adding the cute, pretty, sophisticated conundrum to my knowledge.

Now that I've totally crossed your eyes and dotted your tees, are you going to go back and re-read all your Regencies for all the no-no's? Or just laugh when you discover them because you know better than the author?

50 thoughts on “Slanguage”

  1. I like words. I also like them to sound appropriate. There will always be some anachronisms and that’s OK.
    But period speech is more than just words. There’s also sentence structure. Part of the attraction of the Regency is the language. I don’t want a Regency person to sound like a 21st century person. The Regency is close enough so that most of their language sounds modern. Some Regency slang adds to the flavor, and you can pick up the meaning from the context. Earlier periods are more difficult. No one speaks Latin anymore, so you have to use standard modern English if you’re writing about ancient Rome.
    And in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, which I’m rereading, there are very few contractions. Another can of worms, but sometimes historical authors overdo the contractions (shouldn’t’ve). I’ve also found that in many cases you can reword a sentence to remove the contraction.

    Reply
  2. I like words. I also like them to sound appropriate. There will always be some anachronisms and that’s OK.
    But period speech is more than just words. There’s also sentence structure. Part of the attraction of the Regency is the language. I don’t want a Regency person to sound like a 21st century person. The Regency is close enough so that most of their language sounds modern. Some Regency slang adds to the flavor, and you can pick up the meaning from the context. Earlier periods are more difficult. No one speaks Latin anymore, so you have to use standard modern English if you’re writing about ancient Rome.
    And in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, which I’m rereading, there are very few contractions. Another can of worms, but sometimes historical authors overdo the contractions (shouldn’t’ve). I’ve also found that in many cases you can reword a sentence to remove the contraction.

    Reply
  3. I like words. I also like them to sound appropriate. There will always be some anachronisms and that’s OK.
    But period speech is more than just words. There’s also sentence structure. Part of the attraction of the Regency is the language. I don’t want a Regency person to sound like a 21st century person. The Regency is close enough so that most of their language sounds modern. Some Regency slang adds to the flavor, and you can pick up the meaning from the context. Earlier periods are more difficult. No one speaks Latin anymore, so you have to use standard modern English if you’re writing about ancient Rome.
    And in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, which I’m rereading, there are very few contractions. Another can of worms, but sometimes historical authors overdo the contractions (shouldn’t’ve). I’ve also found that in many cases you can reword a sentence to remove the contraction.

    Reply
  4. I like words. I also like them to sound appropriate. There will always be some anachronisms and that’s OK.
    But period speech is more than just words. There’s also sentence structure. Part of the attraction of the Regency is the language. I don’t want a Regency person to sound like a 21st century person. The Regency is close enough so that most of their language sounds modern. Some Regency slang adds to the flavor, and you can pick up the meaning from the context. Earlier periods are more difficult. No one speaks Latin anymore, so you have to use standard modern English if you’re writing about ancient Rome.
    And in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, which I’m rereading, there are very few contractions. Another can of worms, but sometimes historical authors overdo the contractions (shouldn’t’ve). I’ve also found that in many cases you can reword a sentence to remove the contraction.

    Reply
  5. I like words. I also like them to sound appropriate. There will always be some anachronisms and that’s OK.
    But period speech is more than just words. There’s also sentence structure. Part of the attraction of the Regency is the language. I don’t want a Regency person to sound like a 21st century person. The Regency is close enough so that most of their language sounds modern. Some Regency slang adds to the flavor, and you can pick up the meaning from the context. Earlier periods are more difficult. No one speaks Latin anymore, so you have to use standard modern English if you’re writing about ancient Rome.
    And in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, which I’m rereading, there are very few contractions. Another can of worms, but sometimes historical authors overdo the contractions (shouldn’t’ve). I’ve also found that in many cases you can reword a sentence to remove the contraction.

    Reply
  6. True about sentence structure, although I’m not qualified to try to explain how that’s done. And I’m certainly not going to get into the contraction argument. Part of the problem lies in creating a little piece of reality and not a literary production. Austen would have been very aware of correctness of speech when she wrote. But if I’m writing a character talking in the heat of passion, I’m not going to use the same stilted phrasing as she does. The modern reader simply won’t be sucked into the reality if I did. We walk a very fine line in attempting to reproduce Regency speech!

    Reply
  7. True about sentence structure, although I’m not qualified to try to explain how that’s done. And I’m certainly not going to get into the contraction argument. Part of the problem lies in creating a little piece of reality and not a literary production. Austen would have been very aware of correctness of speech when she wrote. But if I’m writing a character talking in the heat of passion, I’m not going to use the same stilted phrasing as she does. The modern reader simply won’t be sucked into the reality if I did. We walk a very fine line in attempting to reproduce Regency speech!

    Reply
  8. True about sentence structure, although I’m not qualified to try to explain how that’s done. And I’m certainly not going to get into the contraction argument. Part of the problem lies in creating a little piece of reality and not a literary production. Austen would have been very aware of correctness of speech when she wrote. But if I’m writing a character talking in the heat of passion, I’m not going to use the same stilted phrasing as she does. The modern reader simply won’t be sucked into the reality if I did. We walk a very fine line in attempting to reproduce Regency speech!

    Reply
  9. True about sentence structure, although I’m not qualified to try to explain how that’s done. And I’m certainly not going to get into the contraction argument. Part of the problem lies in creating a little piece of reality and not a literary production. Austen would have been very aware of correctness of speech when she wrote. But if I’m writing a character talking in the heat of passion, I’m not going to use the same stilted phrasing as she does. The modern reader simply won’t be sucked into the reality if I did. We walk a very fine line in attempting to reproduce Regency speech!

    Reply
  10. True about sentence structure, although I’m not qualified to try to explain how that’s done. And I’m certainly not going to get into the contraction argument. Part of the problem lies in creating a little piece of reality and not a literary production. Austen would have been very aware of correctness of speech when she wrote. But if I’m writing a character talking in the heat of passion, I’m not going to use the same stilted phrasing as she does. The modern reader simply won’t be sucked into the reality if I did. We walk a very fine line in attempting to reproduce Regency speech!

    Reply
  11. Thank you so much for posting this. I’ve only recently started writing and have stalled a bit because I was worried about getting everything right first time. The other day I gave myself a good talking too, something I remember to do after stressing about things for a while, and decided to just write it as I thought it and go back later to correct everything that needs it. And what do you know, things are slowly starting to flow again.
    Reading your post above leads me to believe I’m hopefully on the right track. Thanks also for the online word and phrase references. I used to flick through the dictionary to find new and interesting words so I’ll enjoy having a look through these.

    Reply
  12. Thank you so much for posting this. I’ve only recently started writing and have stalled a bit because I was worried about getting everything right first time. The other day I gave myself a good talking too, something I remember to do after stressing about things for a while, and decided to just write it as I thought it and go back later to correct everything that needs it. And what do you know, things are slowly starting to flow again.
    Reading your post above leads me to believe I’m hopefully on the right track. Thanks also for the online word and phrase references. I used to flick through the dictionary to find new and interesting words so I’ll enjoy having a look through these.

    Reply
  13. Thank you so much for posting this. I’ve only recently started writing and have stalled a bit because I was worried about getting everything right first time. The other day I gave myself a good talking too, something I remember to do after stressing about things for a while, and decided to just write it as I thought it and go back later to correct everything that needs it. And what do you know, things are slowly starting to flow again.
    Reading your post above leads me to believe I’m hopefully on the right track. Thanks also for the online word and phrase references. I used to flick through the dictionary to find new and interesting words so I’ll enjoy having a look through these.

    Reply
  14. Thank you so much for posting this. I’ve only recently started writing and have stalled a bit because I was worried about getting everything right first time. The other day I gave myself a good talking too, something I remember to do after stressing about things for a while, and decided to just write it as I thought it and go back later to correct everything that needs it. And what do you know, things are slowly starting to flow again.
    Reading your post above leads me to believe I’m hopefully on the right track. Thanks also for the online word and phrase references. I used to flick through the dictionary to find new and interesting words so I’ll enjoy having a look through these.

    Reply
  15. Thank you so much for posting this. I’ve only recently started writing and have stalled a bit because I was worried about getting everything right first time. The other day I gave myself a good talking too, something I remember to do after stressing about things for a while, and decided to just write it as I thought it and go back later to correct everything that needs it. And what do you know, things are slowly starting to flow again.
    Reading your post above leads me to believe I’m hopefully on the right track. Thanks also for the online word and phrase references. I used to flick through the dictionary to find new and interesting words so I’ll enjoy having a look through these.

    Reply
  16. Glad I could help, Kim! We all have to find our own processes. Perfection was never mine. “G” Creativity gets weighed down by that heavy editor looking over your shoulder, so it’s sometimes easier to lock up the editor and let the Muse does what she does best…create. Have fun with the references!

    Reply
  17. Glad I could help, Kim! We all have to find our own processes. Perfection was never mine. “G” Creativity gets weighed down by that heavy editor looking over your shoulder, so it’s sometimes easier to lock up the editor and let the Muse does what she does best…create. Have fun with the references!

    Reply
  18. Glad I could help, Kim! We all have to find our own processes. Perfection was never mine. “G” Creativity gets weighed down by that heavy editor looking over your shoulder, so it’s sometimes easier to lock up the editor and let the Muse does what she does best…create. Have fun with the references!

    Reply
  19. Glad I could help, Kim! We all have to find our own processes. Perfection was never mine. “G” Creativity gets weighed down by that heavy editor looking over your shoulder, so it’s sometimes easier to lock up the editor and let the Muse does what she does best…create. Have fun with the references!

    Reply
  20. Glad I could help, Kim! We all have to find our own processes. Perfection was never mine. “G” Creativity gets weighed down by that heavy editor looking over your shoulder, so it’s sometimes easier to lock up the editor and let the Muse does what she does best…create. Have fun with the references!

    Reply
  21. Great post! And very helpful. I try to make myself get it down on the page and then weed out the anachronisms and just plain clumsy syntax on the second pass through the manuscript. I am not always successful. There are times I sit and mull over a bit of dialogue because it just doesn’t sound or feel right.
    I love words. The written word has a rhythm and flow all its own and the English spoken in nineteenth century England has a lovely timbre and music to it. As a musician I have a real appreciation for a well-turned phrase and a well-timed musical set of dialogue.

    Reply
  22. Great post! And very helpful. I try to make myself get it down on the page and then weed out the anachronisms and just plain clumsy syntax on the second pass through the manuscript. I am not always successful. There are times I sit and mull over a bit of dialogue because it just doesn’t sound or feel right.
    I love words. The written word has a rhythm and flow all its own and the English spoken in nineteenth century England has a lovely timbre and music to it. As a musician I have a real appreciation for a well-turned phrase and a well-timed musical set of dialogue.

    Reply
  23. Great post! And very helpful. I try to make myself get it down on the page and then weed out the anachronisms and just plain clumsy syntax on the second pass through the manuscript. I am not always successful. There are times I sit and mull over a bit of dialogue because it just doesn’t sound or feel right.
    I love words. The written word has a rhythm and flow all its own and the English spoken in nineteenth century England has a lovely timbre and music to it. As a musician I have a real appreciation for a well-turned phrase and a well-timed musical set of dialogue.

    Reply
  24. Great post! And very helpful. I try to make myself get it down on the page and then weed out the anachronisms and just plain clumsy syntax on the second pass through the manuscript. I am not always successful. There are times I sit and mull over a bit of dialogue because it just doesn’t sound or feel right.
    I love words. The written word has a rhythm and flow all its own and the English spoken in nineteenth century England has a lovely timbre and music to it. As a musician I have a real appreciation for a well-turned phrase and a well-timed musical set of dialogue.

    Reply
  25. Great post! And very helpful. I try to make myself get it down on the page and then weed out the anachronisms and just plain clumsy syntax on the second pass through the manuscript. I am not always successful. There are times I sit and mull over a bit of dialogue because it just doesn’t sound or feel right.
    I love words. The written word has a rhythm and flow all its own and the English spoken in nineteenth century England has a lovely timbre and music to it. As a musician I have a real appreciation for a well-turned phrase and a well-timed musical set of dialogue.

    Reply
  26. I’m a wordie and I love elegant dialogue. I’m not too critical of anachronistic words in my historicals unless they are blatant. Honestly, writing historicals is like walking a minefield. There are so many words that sound perfectly historical but are actually anachronistic. John Dierdorf’s site depresses me. *g* Seriously, though, I’ve referred to it many times, and have been shocked that words I thought were acceptable to use in my Regencies are, in fact, anachronistic.

    Reply
  27. I’m a wordie and I love elegant dialogue. I’m not too critical of anachronistic words in my historicals unless they are blatant. Honestly, writing historicals is like walking a minefield. There are so many words that sound perfectly historical but are actually anachronistic. John Dierdorf’s site depresses me. *g* Seriously, though, I’ve referred to it many times, and have been shocked that words I thought were acceptable to use in my Regencies are, in fact, anachronistic.

    Reply
  28. I’m a wordie and I love elegant dialogue. I’m not too critical of anachronistic words in my historicals unless they are blatant. Honestly, writing historicals is like walking a minefield. There are so many words that sound perfectly historical but are actually anachronistic. John Dierdorf’s site depresses me. *g* Seriously, though, I’ve referred to it many times, and have been shocked that words I thought were acceptable to use in my Regencies are, in fact, anachronistic.

    Reply
  29. I’m a wordie and I love elegant dialogue. I’m not too critical of anachronistic words in my historicals unless they are blatant. Honestly, writing historicals is like walking a minefield. There are so many words that sound perfectly historical but are actually anachronistic. John Dierdorf’s site depresses me. *g* Seriously, though, I’ve referred to it many times, and have been shocked that words I thought were acceptable to use in my Regencies are, in fact, anachronistic.

    Reply
  30. I’m a wordie and I love elegant dialogue. I’m not too critical of anachronistic words in my historicals unless they are blatant. Honestly, writing historicals is like walking a minefield. There are so many words that sound perfectly historical but are actually anachronistic. John Dierdorf’s site depresses me. *g* Seriously, though, I’ve referred to it many times, and have been shocked that words I thought were acceptable to use in my Regencies are, in fact, anachronistic.

    Reply
  31. One of the best authors I’ve found for incorporating Regency words and phrases is Barbara Metzger. After I’ve laughed my head off reading her books, I go back and reread. She uses tons of Regencyese. All those words sound Regency and everything sounds modern, too. I love Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  32. One of the best authors I’ve found for incorporating Regency words and phrases is Barbara Metzger. After I’ve laughed my head off reading her books, I go back and reread. She uses tons of Regencyese. All those words sound Regency and everything sounds modern, too. I love Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  33. One of the best authors I’ve found for incorporating Regency words and phrases is Barbara Metzger. After I’ve laughed my head off reading her books, I go back and reread. She uses tons of Regencyese. All those words sound Regency and everything sounds modern, too. I love Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  34. One of the best authors I’ve found for incorporating Regency words and phrases is Barbara Metzger. After I’ve laughed my head off reading her books, I go back and reread. She uses tons of Regencyese. All those words sound Regency and everything sounds modern, too. I love Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  35. One of the best authors I’ve found for incorporating Regency words and phrases is Barbara Metzger. After I’ve laughed my head off reading her books, I go back and reread. She uses tons of Regencyese. All those words sound Regency and everything sounds modern, too. I love Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  36. John’s site is fun to read, but he isn’t always precise. You have to trace the words in question back to an OED or other source to verify first date of usage. In talking about cute, handsome, etc, he was simply talking about how words develop over time, no dates involved. The OED had to clarify that for me.
    Barbara is fantastic, isn’t she?

    Reply
  37. John’s site is fun to read, but he isn’t always precise. You have to trace the words in question back to an OED or other source to verify first date of usage. In talking about cute, handsome, etc, he was simply talking about how words develop over time, no dates involved. The OED had to clarify that for me.
    Barbara is fantastic, isn’t she?

    Reply
  38. John’s site is fun to read, but he isn’t always precise. You have to trace the words in question back to an OED or other source to verify first date of usage. In talking about cute, handsome, etc, he was simply talking about how words develop over time, no dates involved. The OED had to clarify that for me.
    Barbara is fantastic, isn’t she?

    Reply
  39. John’s site is fun to read, but he isn’t always precise. You have to trace the words in question back to an OED or other source to verify first date of usage. In talking about cute, handsome, etc, he was simply talking about how words develop over time, no dates involved. The OED had to clarify that for me.
    Barbara is fantastic, isn’t she?

    Reply
  40. John’s site is fun to read, but he isn’t always precise. You have to trace the words in question back to an OED or other source to verify first date of usage. In talking about cute, handsome, etc, he was simply talking about how words develop over time, no dates involved. The OED had to clarify that for me.
    Barbara is fantastic, isn’t she?

    Reply
  41. Expressions that don’t “belong” really STOP me in mid reading (as in one book set in the 1800’s and the heroine said to her brother–“YOU THINK?” in a way that we’d do today!!!)
    BUT the things that really make my hair stand up is TAKE and BRING being used backwards or incorrectly and someone who says or writes–TRY AND do this or that!!
    As I tell our daughters—It’s take out not take in and bring has IN inside it so bring is for someone to bring something IN to you and TAKE is for you to take something OUT to some other place!
    IT’S TRY TO not TRY AND!!!
    Maybe I need a life but these things really just set my teeth on edge!

    Reply
  42. Expressions that don’t “belong” really STOP me in mid reading (as in one book set in the 1800’s and the heroine said to her brother–“YOU THINK?” in a way that we’d do today!!!)
    BUT the things that really make my hair stand up is TAKE and BRING being used backwards or incorrectly and someone who says or writes–TRY AND do this or that!!
    As I tell our daughters—It’s take out not take in and bring has IN inside it so bring is for someone to bring something IN to you and TAKE is for you to take something OUT to some other place!
    IT’S TRY TO not TRY AND!!!
    Maybe I need a life but these things really just set my teeth on edge!

    Reply
  43. Expressions that don’t “belong” really STOP me in mid reading (as in one book set in the 1800’s and the heroine said to her brother–“YOU THINK?” in a way that we’d do today!!!)
    BUT the things that really make my hair stand up is TAKE and BRING being used backwards or incorrectly and someone who says or writes–TRY AND do this or that!!
    As I tell our daughters—It’s take out not take in and bring has IN inside it so bring is for someone to bring something IN to you and TAKE is for you to take something OUT to some other place!
    IT’S TRY TO not TRY AND!!!
    Maybe I need a life but these things really just set my teeth on edge!

    Reply
  44. Expressions that don’t “belong” really STOP me in mid reading (as in one book set in the 1800’s and the heroine said to her brother–“YOU THINK?” in a way that we’d do today!!!)
    BUT the things that really make my hair stand up is TAKE and BRING being used backwards or incorrectly and someone who says or writes–TRY AND do this or that!!
    As I tell our daughters—It’s take out not take in and bring has IN inside it so bring is for someone to bring something IN to you and TAKE is for you to take something OUT to some other place!
    IT’S TRY TO not TRY AND!!!
    Maybe I need a life but these things really just set my teeth on edge!

    Reply
  45. Expressions that don’t “belong” really STOP me in mid reading (as in one book set in the 1800’s and the heroine said to her brother–“YOU THINK?” in a way that we’d do today!!!)
    BUT the things that really make my hair stand up is TAKE and BRING being used backwards or incorrectly and someone who says or writes–TRY AND do this or that!!
    As I tell our daughters—It’s take out not take in and bring has IN inside it so bring is for someone to bring something IN to you and TAKE is for you to take something OUT to some other place!
    IT’S TRY TO not TRY AND!!!
    Maybe I need a life but these things really just set my teeth on edge!

    Reply
  46. I am reading a Regency-era novel right now that used the word “mesmerized.” Tsk, tsk, tsk! 🙂 I’m not usually too picky as long as the anachronism isn’t blatant (like someone stubbing his toe and saying “Doh!” :)). As for purely authentic narration or dialogue, first of all, we just don’t know for sure, and second of all it sometimes interferes with the story rather than helping it along. And, of course, what works for one writer/reader will not work for another.
    Thanks for those links. I’m going to add those to my “Writing” favorites!

    Reply
  47. I am reading a Regency-era novel right now that used the word “mesmerized.” Tsk, tsk, tsk! 🙂 I’m not usually too picky as long as the anachronism isn’t blatant (like someone stubbing his toe and saying “Doh!” :)). As for purely authentic narration or dialogue, first of all, we just don’t know for sure, and second of all it sometimes interferes with the story rather than helping it along. And, of course, what works for one writer/reader will not work for another.
    Thanks for those links. I’m going to add those to my “Writing” favorites!

    Reply
  48. I am reading a Regency-era novel right now that used the word “mesmerized.” Tsk, tsk, tsk! 🙂 I’m not usually too picky as long as the anachronism isn’t blatant (like someone stubbing his toe and saying “Doh!” :)). As for purely authentic narration or dialogue, first of all, we just don’t know for sure, and second of all it sometimes interferes with the story rather than helping it along. And, of course, what works for one writer/reader will not work for another.
    Thanks for those links. I’m going to add those to my “Writing” favorites!

    Reply
  49. I am reading a Regency-era novel right now that used the word “mesmerized.” Tsk, tsk, tsk! 🙂 I’m not usually too picky as long as the anachronism isn’t blatant (like someone stubbing his toe and saying “Doh!” :)). As for purely authentic narration or dialogue, first of all, we just don’t know for sure, and second of all it sometimes interferes with the story rather than helping it along. And, of course, what works for one writer/reader will not work for another.
    Thanks for those links. I’m going to add those to my “Writing” favorites!

    Reply
  50. I am reading a Regency-era novel right now that used the word “mesmerized.” Tsk, tsk, tsk! 🙂 I’m not usually too picky as long as the anachronism isn’t blatant (like someone stubbing his toe and saying “Doh!” :)). As for purely authentic narration or dialogue, first of all, we just don’t know for sure, and second of all it sometimes interferes with the story rather than helping it along. And, of course, what works for one writer/reader will not work for another.
    Thanks for those links. I’m going to add those to my “Writing” favorites!

    Reply

Leave a Comment