Sister Scribes

Download (4)Nicola here. Today I’m musing on sisters, real, literary and fictional. I’ve always been fascinated by the relationships between siblings. Perhaps it’s because I don’t have any full siblings that I’ve always wondered what it would be like to have a sister. Would we be very close, or different and distant? Would there be sibling rivalry between us or the sort of secrets you come across in books? What would it have been like growing up with brothers and sisters?

Today is the anniversary of the birth in 1817 of Branwell Bronte, the only boy amongst literary WYR_BPM_B37-001siblings Charlotte, Emily and Anne. Originally there were six Bronte children, five of whom were girls, so Branwell’s unique status as the only son of the family promised him more freedom and perhaps led to his being more indulged. Whilst the girls were sent away to school, in some cases most unhappily, Branwell was educated by his father at home (pictured above). The two older Bronte sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, died in childhood and their deaths made a big impression on all their siblings. Maria in particular showed all the signs of developing the same literary talents as her younger sisters. One wonders what might have happened had she survived and also whether Elizabeth, who was said to most resemble Anne, would also have grown up to be an author. Branwell, meanwhile, was a writer and an artist – one of his pictures is on the right – but he never achieved the literary success his sisters did, nor was he particularly successful with his paintings.

220px-Painting_of_Brontë_sistersThe feelings that the three younger Bronte sisters had for each other must, I imagine, have been as complicated as all sisters’ relationships. Whilst there is evidence to suggest that Anne and Emily were very close, Charlotte’s friend Ellen Nussey recalling them as being: “like twins – inseparable companions, and in the very closest sympathy…” Charlotte and Anne had a less straightforward relationship with Charlotte’s periodic bouts of depression putting further strain on her interactions with her sisters. With the three of them working in a similar field, would it have been possible for them to avoid comparing their work and experience a sense of professional rivalry?

Life was probably easier for Jane Austen and her sister Cassandra. A little while ago I wrote about Jane_Austen_by_Cassandra_Austen _groß the two of them in a blog piece called Excellent Women. It is Cassandra we owe for the likeness of Jane Austen that has become famous. Cassandra and Jane were very close and it was Cassandra who enabled Jane’s career as a novelist by running the household to give her sister the time and opportunity to write. It was also Cassandra who destroyed a lot of Jane’s correspondence after her sister died, another intriguing aspect of their relationship. Had Cassandra married and had a household of her own, what would have been the effect on Jane’s writing career? It’s another fascinating question.

Jane Austen’s books are full of sisterly relationships that may or may not have been influenced by her own with Cassandra – Lizzie and Jane Bennet in Pride and Prejudice might be the closest, perhaps, although of course that book also features three other wildly differing sisters! Eleanor and Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility are also very different in temperament and outlook, whilst their younger sister Margaret barely gets a look in.  It’s tempting to think of Emma Woodhouse as an only child but in fact she too has a sister, who is married to Mr Knightley’s younger brother. With large families the norm, a family without sisters would have been unusual.

180px-Icapturethecastle (1)One of my all-time favourite books, and favourite sisterly relationships, is Rose and Cassandra Mortmain in I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith. There’s something very Sense and Sensibility about these two though in reverse; the beautiful older sister is far less practical than the younger one. They are chalk and cheese, infuriate each other but are also so very fond of each other. In Her Shoes by Jennifer Wiener is another book/movie that I think explores a sisterly relationship with real depth and poignancy.

When my editor suggested the title The Forgotten Sister for my latest book I was surprised because I The Forgotten sister NA cover hadn’t considered that it was about a sisterly relationship and yet that is a very strong element at the heart of the story. No spoilers, but sisters are crucial! Even though I never lived with a sister of my own, I have had ample opportunity to study other people’s and I do often write sibling relationships in my books. In fact one of the biggest complements a reader paid me was about my Scandalous Women series when she asked if I had sisters of my own because I had captured the complexity of sisterly relationships so well. That made me very happy, as does the fact that I have a step-sister who is great; it would have been nice to have grown up together but we have the benefits of a grown-up friendship now we are both adults.

There are some very thought-provoking quotations about sisters that reflect the many facets of the sisterly bond. "Help one another, is part of the religion of sisterhood." Was Louisa May Alcott’s advice. “Never let and angry sister brush your hair,” is a favourite of mine!

Do you have favourite sisters, real, literary or fictional? Are there any books or movies you particularly enjoy that feature sibling relationships?

105 thoughts on “Sister Scribes”

  1. Great topic, Nicola! I love sibling relationships in books, and in real life, I have a most excellent big sister who was sort of a little mother to me.
    I’ve written more brotherly relationship in my books, but sisters also. My favorite pair are Mariah and Sara Townsend, identical twins separated very young when they’re too-young parents split up and her father went to the nursery and grabbed the twin that toddled up to him, Mariah, figuring that since there were two of them, each parent could have one. *G* Mariah didn’t realize she had a twin when she grew up, yet she imagined having a perfect, always well behaved sister she thought of as Mariah. When they met as adults, Sarah assured Mariah that she wasn’t perfect. *G* (Their books are LOVING AN LOST LORD and SOMETIMES A ROGUE.)
    I can think of other fictional sisters, but I need to get to work! But as I said, a fun topic.

    Reply
  2. Great topic, Nicola! I love sibling relationships in books, and in real life, I have a most excellent big sister who was sort of a little mother to me.
    I’ve written more brotherly relationship in my books, but sisters also. My favorite pair are Mariah and Sara Townsend, identical twins separated very young when they’re too-young parents split up and her father went to the nursery and grabbed the twin that toddled up to him, Mariah, figuring that since there were two of them, each parent could have one. *G* Mariah didn’t realize she had a twin when she grew up, yet she imagined having a perfect, always well behaved sister she thought of as Mariah. When they met as adults, Sarah assured Mariah that she wasn’t perfect. *G* (Their books are LOVING AN LOST LORD and SOMETIMES A ROGUE.)
    I can think of other fictional sisters, but I need to get to work! But as I said, a fun topic.

    Reply
  3. Great topic, Nicola! I love sibling relationships in books, and in real life, I have a most excellent big sister who was sort of a little mother to me.
    I’ve written more brotherly relationship in my books, but sisters also. My favorite pair are Mariah and Sara Townsend, identical twins separated very young when they’re too-young parents split up and her father went to the nursery and grabbed the twin that toddled up to him, Mariah, figuring that since there were two of them, each parent could have one. *G* Mariah didn’t realize she had a twin when she grew up, yet she imagined having a perfect, always well behaved sister she thought of as Mariah. When they met as adults, Sarah assured Mariah that she wasn’t perfect. *G* (Their books are LOVING AN LOST LORD and SOMETIMES A ROGUE.)
    I can think of other fictional sisters, but I need to get to work! But as I said, a fun topic.

    Reply
  4. Great topic, Nicola! I love sibling relationships in books, and in real life, I have a most excellent big sister who was sort of a little mother to me.
    I’ve written more brotherly relationship in my books, but sisters also. My favorite pair are Mariah and Sara Townsend, identical twins separated very young when they’re too-young parents split up and her father went to the nursery and grabbed the twin that toddled up to him, Mariah, figuring that since there were two of them, each parent could have one. *G* Mariah didn’t realize she had a twin when she grew up, yet she imagined having a perfect, always well behaved sister she thought of as Mariah. When they met as adults, Sarah assured Mariah that she wasn’t perfect. *G* (Their books are LOVING AN LOST LORD and SOMETIMES A ROGUE.)
    I can think of other fictional sisters, but I need to get to work! But as I said, a fun topic.

    Reply
  5. Great topic, Nicola! I love sibling relationships in books, and in real life, I have a most excellent big sister who was sort of a little mother to me.
    I’ve written more brotherly relationship in my books, but sisters also. My favorite pair are Mariah and Sara Townsend, identical twins separated very young when they’re too-young parents split up and her father went to the nursery and grabbed the twin that toddled up to him, Mariah, figuring that since there were two of them, each parent could have one. *G* Mariah didn’t realize she had a twin when she grew up, yet she imagined having a perfect, always well behaved sister she thought of as Mariah. When they met as adults, Sarah assured Mariah that she wasn’t perfect. *G* (Their books are LOVING AN LOST LORD and SOMETIMES A ROGUE.)
    I can think of other fictional sisters, but I need to get to work! But as I said, a fun topic.

    Reply
  6. I am the “big” sister of two. We have a very close, but not particularly articulate, relationship. We can alway count on each other. We phone at need. My younger daughter has differences of opion with me – when those disturb her and my sister steps in for me and helps my daughter with her difficulties. You cannot have better report than that!

    Reply
  7. I am the “big” sister of two. We have a very close, but not particularly articulate, relationship. We can alway count on each other. We phone at need. My younger daughter has differences of opion with me – when those disturb her and my sister steps in for me and helps my daughter with her difficulties. You cannot have better report than that!

    Reply
  8. I am the “big” sister of two. We have a very close, but not particularly articulate, relationship. We can alway count on each other. We phone at need. My younger daughter has differences of opion with me – when those disturb her and my sister steps in for me and helps my daughter with her difficulties. You cannot have better report than that!

    Reply
  9. I am the “big” sister of two. We have a very close, but not particularly articulate, relationship. We can alway count on each other. We phone at need. My younger daughter has differences of opion with me – when those disturb her and my sister steps in for me and helps my daughter with her difficulties. You cannot have better report than that!

    Reply
  10. I am the “big” sister of two. We have a very close, but not particularly articulate, relationship. We can alway count on each other. We phone at need. My younger daughter has differences of opion with me – when those disturb her and my sister steps in for me and helps my daughter with her difficulties. You cannot have better report than that!

    Reply
  11. Like you, I don’t have any sisters, but a younger brother. I do, however, have a lovely sister-in-law and several cousins who are very close to me in age and it always feels more like we’re sisters. I dreamed of having a twin sister when I was a child, although an older brother to look out for me at school might have been more useful 🙂 As regards sisters in literature, I like the ones in Georgette Heyer’s books – there’s often one very sensible one who looks after the other(s), but the hero always falls in love with her in the end. Perfect!

    Reply
  12. Like you, I don’t have any sisters, but a younger brother. I do, however, have a lovely sister-in-law and several cousins who are very close to me in age and it always feels more like we’re sisters. I dreamed of having a twin sister when I was a child, although an older brother to look out for me at school might have been more useful 🙂 As regards sisters in literature, I like the ones in Georgette Heyer’s books – there’s often one very sensible one who looks after the other(s), but the hero always falls in love with her in the end. Perfect!

    Reply
  13. Like you, I don’t have any sisters, but a younger brother. I do, however, have a lovely sister-in-law and several cousins who are very close to me in age and it always feels more like we’re sisters. I dreamed of having a twin sister when I was a child, although an older brother to look out for me at school might have been more useful 🙂 As regards sisters in literature, I like the ones in Georgette Heyer’s books – there’s often one very sensible one who looks after the other(s), but the hero always falls in love with her in the end. Perfect!

    Reply
  14. Like you, I don’t have any sisters, but a younger brother. I do, however, have a lovely sister-in-law and several cousins who are very close to me in age and it always feels more like we’re sisters. I dreamed of having a twin sister when I was a child, although an older brother to look out for me at school might have been more useful 🙂 As regards sisters in literature, I like the ones in Georgette Heyer’s books – there’s often one very sensible one who looks after the other(s), but the hero always falls in love with her in the end. Perfect!

    Reply
  15. Like you, I don’t have any sisters, but a younger brother. I do, however, have a lovely sister-in-law and several cousins who are very close to me in age and it always feels more like we’re sisters. I dreamed of having a twin sister when I was a child, although an older brother to look out for me at school might have been more useful 🙂 As regards sisters in literature, I like the ones in Georgette Heyer’s books – there’s often one very sensible one who looks after the other(s), but the hero always falls in love with her in the end. Perfect!

    Reply
  16. I have only a brother in real life, but a have a friend who is as dear to me as family. We call each other “Sis.” I recently read a book by Lynsay Sands, “Hunting for a Highlander,” the two younger sisters think this is their older sister’s last shot at finding a husband,They think she is too plain to attract a man , but she has a large bustline. So they take her dresses in just a little too tightly at the waist and cut her neckline way to low for comfort so that her breasts will fall out with too deep a breath. Well it does catch one of the Buchanan brother’s attention, only after she climbs a tree to get away from her sisters for a little peace and quiet. Other than the breasts, he falls for her honesty, intelligence, and sense of humor. Siblings definitely add a lot to a story and can bring out a lot in the character and backstory. Eloisa James recent release, “Say Yes to the Duke,” goes in to Viola’s story. She was adopted into the Wilde family and has always felt different, not a true Wilde and is painfully shy so that during her ball at 15, she vomits into a lemon tree. Her brother’s tease her horribly that that tree has never born fruit since. Now at 17, she has convinced herself she is not a real Wilde and no one will like her. She hides in the library during the debut ball she is sharing with her adopted sister, Joan. She over hears a duke blythely remark that he is looking to make a match with the real Wilde sister. She’s livid, he has confirmed everything she was afraid of. She can be herself around him. She informs him that Joan will not have him and dismisses him, sets him up for the dinner dance with the one girl that scares the crap out of him and walks off. She is the first person to say no to him and he’s intrigued. It is one of the most delightful books I’ve read in a very long time because the heroine is so unique. If you haven’t read these books, they belong in your TBR.

    Reply
  17. I have only a brother in real life, but a have a friend who is as dear to me as family. We call each other “Sis.” I recently read a book by Lynsay Sands, “Hunting for a Highlander,” the two younger sisters think this is their older sister’s last shot at finding a husband,They think she is too plain to attract a man , but she has a large bustline. So they take her dresses in just a little too tightly at the waist and cut her neckline way to low for comfort so that her breasts will fall out with too deep a breath. Well it does catch one of the Buchanan brother’s attention, only after she climbs a tree to get away from her sisters for a little peace and quiet. Other than the breasts, he falls for her honesty, intelligence, and sense of humor. Siblings definitely add a lot to a story and can bring out a lot in the character and backstory. Eloisa James recent release, “Say Yes to the Duke,” goes in to Viola’s story. She was adopted into the Wilde family and has always felt different, not a true Wilde and is painfully shy so that during her ball at 15, she vomits into a lemon tree. Her brother’s tease her horribly that that tree has never born fruit since. Now at 17, she has convinced herself she is not a real Wilde and no one will like her. She hides in the library during the debut ball she is sharing with her adopted sister, Joan. She over hears a duke blythely remark that he is looking to make a match with the real Wilde sister. She’s livid, he has confirmed everything she was afraid of. She can be herself around him. She informs him that Joan will not have him and dismisses him, sets him up for the dinner dance with the one girl that scares the crap out of him and walks off. She is the first person to say no to him and he’s intrigued. It is one of the most delightful books I’ve read in a very long time because the heroine is so unique. If you haven’t read these books, they belong in your TBR.

    Reply
  18. I have only a brother in real life, but a have a friend who is as dear to me as family. We call each other “Sis.” I recently read a book by Lynsay Sands, “Hunting for a Highlander,” the two younger sisters think this is their older sister’s last shot at finding a husband,They think she is too plain to attract a man , but she has a large bustline. So they take her dresses in just a little too tightly at the waist and cut her neckline way to low for comfort so that her breasts will fall out with too deep a breath. Well it does catch one of the Buchanan brother’s attention, only after she climbs a tree to get away from her sisters for a little peace and quiet. Other than the breasts, he falls for her honesty, intelligence, and sense of humor. Siblings definitely add a lot to a story and can bring out a lot in the character and backstory. Eloisa James recent release, “Say Yes to the Duke,” goes in to Viola’s story. She was adopted into the Wilde family and has always felt different, not a true Wilde and is painfully shy so that during her ball at 15, she vomits into a lemon tree. Her brother’s tease her horribly that that tree has never born fruit since. Now at 17, she has convinced herself she is not a real Wilde and no one will like her. She hides in the library during the debut ball she is sharing with her adopted sister, Joan. She over hears a duke blythely remark that he is looking to make a match with the real Wilde sister. She’s livid, he has confirmed everything she was afraid of. She can be herself around him. She informs him that Joan will not have him and dismisses him, sets him up for the dinner dance with the one girl that scares the crap out of him and walks off. She is the first person to say no to him and he’s intrigued. It is one of the most delightful books I’ve read in a very long time because the heroine is so unique. If you haven’t read these books, they belong in your TBR.

    Reply
  19. I have only a brother in real life, but a have a friend who is as dear to me as family. We call each other “Sis.” I recently read a book by Lynsay Sands, “Hunting for a Highlander,” the two younger sisters think this is their older sister’s last shot at finding a husband,They think she is too plain to attract a man , but she has a large bustline. So they take her dresses in just a little too tightly at the waist and cut her neckline way to low for comfort so that her breasts will fall out with too deep a breath. Well it does catch one of the Buchanan brother’s attention, only after she climbs a tree to get away from her sisters for a little peace and quiet. Other than the breasts, he falls for her honesty, intelligence, and sense of humor. Siblings definitely add a lot to a story and can bring out a lot in the character and backstory. Eloisa James recent release, “Say Yes to the Duke,” goes in to Viola’s story. She was adopted into the Wilde family and has always felt different, not a true Wilde and is painfully shy so that during her ball at 15, she vomits into a lemon tree. Her brother’s tease her horribly that that tree has never born fruit since. Now at 17, she has convinced herself she is not a real Wilde and no one will like her. She hides in the library during the debut ball she is sharing with her adopted sister, Joan. She over hears a duke blythely remark that he is looking to make a match with the real Wilde sister. She’s livid, he has confirmed everything she was afraid of. She can be herself around him. She informs him that Joan will not have him and dismisses him, sets him up for the dinner dance with the one girl that scares the crap out of him and walks off. She is the first person to say no to him and he’s intrigued. It is one of the most delightful books I’ve read in a very long time because the heroine is so unique. If you haven’t read these books, they belong in your TBR.

    Reply
  20. I have only a brother in real life, but a have a friend who is as dear to me as family. We call each other “Sis.” I recently read a book by Lynsay Sands, “Hunting for a Highlander,” the two younger sisters think this is their older sister’s last shot at finding a husband,They think she is too plain to attract a man , but she has a large bustline. So they take her dresses in just a little too tightly at the waist and cut her neckline way to low for comfort so that her breasts will fall out with too deep a breath. Well it does catch one of the Buchanan brother’s attention, only after she climbs a tree to get away from her sisters for a little peace and quiet. Other than the breasts, he falls for her honesty, intelligence, and sense of humor. Siblings definitely add a lot to a story and can bring out a lot in the character and backstory. Eloisa James recent release, “Say Yes to the Duke,” goes in to Viola’s story. She was adopted into the Wilde family and has always felt different, not a true Wilde and is painfully shy so that during her ball at 15, she vomits into a lemon tree. Her brother’s tease her horribly that that tree has never born fruit since. Now at 17, she has convinced herself she is not a real Wilde and no one will like her. She hides in the library during the debut ball she is sharing with her adopted sister, Joan. She over hears a duke blythely remark that he is looking to make a match with the real Wilde sister. She’s livid, he has confirmed everything she was afraid of. She can be herself around him. She informs him that Joan will not have him and dismisses him, sets him up for the dinner dance with the one girl that scares the crap out of him and walks off. She is the first person to say no to him and he’s intrigued. It is one of the most delightful books I’ve read in a very long time because the heroine is so unique. If you haven’t read these books, they belong in your TBR.

    Reply
  21. My favorite literary sisters were always the March girls from LITTLE WOMEN. But there are so many others out there. I especially enjoy Series that focus on families, and sibling relationships. A good example is Ms. Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series.
    My own sisters are treasures. We lost our youngest sister 12 years ago, but there are three of us left. And we are fortunate that we live close to each other. We have had our ups and downs over the years, but we have become closer with each passing year.
    Loved this post Nicola.

    Reply
  22. My favorite literary sisters were always the March girls from LITTLE WOMEN. But there are so many others out there. I especially enjoy Series that focus on families, and sibling relationships. A good example is Ms. Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series.
    My own sisters are treasures. We lost our youngest sister 12 years ago, but there are three of us left. And we are fortunate that we live close to each other. We have had our ups and downs over the years, but we have become closer with each passing year.
    Loved this post Nicola.

    Reply
  23. My favorite literary sisters were always the March girls from LITTLE WOMEN. But there are so many others out there. I especially enjoy Series that focus on families, and sibling relationships. A good example is Ms. Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series.
    My own sisters are treasures. We lost our youngest sister 12 years ago, but there are three of us left. And we are fortunate that we live close to each other. We have had our ups and downs over the years, but we have become closer with each passing year.
    Loved this post Nicola.

    Reply
  24. My favorite literary sisters were always the March girls from LITTLE WOMEN. But there are so many others out there. I especially enjoy Series that focus on families, and sibling relationships. A good example is Ms. Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series.
    My own sisters are treasures. We lost our youngest sister 12 years ago, but there are three of us left. And we are fortunate that we live close to each other. We have had our ups and downs over the years, but we have become closer with each passing year.
    Loved this post Nicola.

    Reply
  25. My favorite literary sisters were always the March girls from LITTLE WOMEN. But there are so many others out there. I especially enjoy Series that focus on families, and sibling relationships. A good example is Ms. Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series.
    My own sisters are treasures. We lost our youngest sister 12 years ago, but there are three of us left. And we are fortunate that we live close to each other. We have had our ups and downs over the years, but we have become closer with each passing year.
    Loved this post Nicola.

    Reply
  26. What a lovely post, Nicola! I am very fortunate to have a wonderful sister; we live across the country from each other, but I’m happy to see her when I can.
    Thinking of authors who are sisters: Two Australian sisters, Sherylyn and Karen Dunstall, are the authors of one of my favorite books, Linesman by SK Dunstall.

    Reply
  27. What a lovely post, Nicola! I am very fortunate to have a wonderful sister; we live across the country from each other, but I’m happy to see her when I can.
    Thinking of authors who are sisters: Two Australian sisters, Sherylyn and Karen Dunstall, are the authors of one of my favorite books, Linesman by SK Dunstall.

    Reply
  28. What a lovely post, Nicola! I am very fortunate to have a wonderful sister; we live across the country from each other, but I’m happy to see her when I can.
    Thinking of authors who are sisters: Two Australian sisters, Sherylyn and Karen Dunstall, are the authors of one of my favorite books, Linesman by SK Dunstall.

    Reply
  29. What a lovely post, Nicola! I am very fortunate to have a wonderful sister; we live across the country from each other, but I’m happy to see her when I can.
    Thinking of authors who are sisters: Two Australian sisters, Sherylyn and Karen Dunstall, are the authors of one of my favorite books, Linesman by SK Dunstall.

    Reply
  30. What a lovely post, Nicola! I am very fortunate to have a wonderful sister; we live across the country from each other, but I’m happy to see her when I can.
    Thinking of authors who are sisters: Two Australian sisters, Sherylyn and Karen Dunstall, are the authors of one of my favorite books, Linesman by SK Dunstall.

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Mary Jo. What a marvellous premise for Mariah and Sarah’s story, and how lovely that you have an excellent big sister of your own!

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Mary Jo. What a marvellous premise for Mariah and Sarah’s story, and how lovely that you have an excellent big sister of your own!

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Mary Jo. What a marvellous premise for Mariah and Sarah’s story, and how lovely that you have an excellent big sister of your own!

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Mary Jo. What a marvellous premise for Mariah and Sarah’s story, and how lovely that you have an excellent big sister of your own!

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Mary Jo. What a marvellous premise for Mariah and Sarah’s story, and how lovely that you have an excellent big sister of your own!

    Reply
  36. Christina, like you I have two great sisters-in-law and various other relatives with whom we are very close, and it is wonderful to have those relationships.
    Georgette Heyer did write marvellous sibling relationships, didn’t she. I love it when the practical sister gets the hero!

    Reply
  37. Christina, like you I have two great sisters-in-law and various other relatives with whom we are very close, and it is wonderful to have those relationships.
    Georgette Heyer did write marvellous sibling relationships, didn’t she. I love it when the practical sister gets the hero!

    Reply
  38. Christina, like you I have two great sisters-in-law and various other relatives with whom we are very close, and it is wonderful to have those relationships.
    Georgette Heyer did write marvellous sibling relationships, didn’t she. I love it when the practical sister gets the hero!

    Reply
  39. Christina, like you I have two great sisters-in-law and various other relatives with whom we are very close, and it is wonderful to have those relationships.
    Georgette Heyer did write marvellous sibling relationships, didn’t she. I love it when the practical sister gets the hero!

    Reply
  40. Christina, like you I have two great sisters-in-law and various other relatives with whom we are very close, and it is wonderful to have those relationships.
    Georgette Heyer did write marvellous sibling relationships, didn’t she. I love it when the practical sister gets the hero!

    Reply
  41. I love the sound of “Hunting for a Highlander” Pamela! I will look out for that. And the Wilde family books are autobuys for me too!

    Reply
  42. I love the sound of “Hunting for a Highlander” Pamela! I will look out for that. And the Wilde family books are autobuys for me too!

    Reply
  43. I love the sound of “Hunting for a Highlander” Pamela! I will look out for that. And the Wilde family books are autobuys for me too!

    Reply
  44. I love the sound of “Hunting for a Highlander” Pamela! I will look out for that. And the Wilde family books are autobuys for me too!

    Reply
  45. I love the sound of “Hunting for a Highlander” Pamela! I will look out for that. And the Wilde family books are autobuys for me too!

    Reply
  46. Thanks so much, Mary. How lovely to have that closeness with your sisters.
    I haven’t read Little Women for a long time but do remember that the sisterly relationships fascinated me, especially as I was reading the book as a teenager with no siblings.

    Reply
  47. Thanks so much, Mary. How lovely to have that closeness with your sisters.
    I haven’t read Little Women for a long time but do remember that the sisterly relationships fascinated me, especially as I was reading the book as a teenager with no siblings.

    Reply
  48. Thanks so much, Mary. How lovely to have that closeness with your sisters.
    I haven’t read Little Women for a long time but do remember that the sisterly relationships fascinated me, especially as I was reading the book as a teenager with no siblings.

    Reply
  49. Thanks so much, Mary. How lovely to have that closeness with your sisters.
    I haven’t read Little Women for a long time but do remember that the sisterly relationships fascinated me, especially as I was reading the book as a teenager with no siblings.

    Reply
  50. Thanks so much, Mary. How lovely to have that closeness with your sisters.
    I haven’t read Little Women for a long time but do remember that the sisterly relationships fascinated me, especially as I was reading the book as a teenager with no siblings.

    Reply
  51. Lovely to have a recommendation of two more sister scribes, Kareni. Thank you so much for that. The book is on my list now!

    Reply
  52. Lovely to have a recommendation of two more sister scribes, Kareni. Thank you so much for that. The book is on my list now!

    Reply
  53. Lovely to have a recommendation of two more sister scribes, Kareni. Thank you so much for that. The book is on my list now!

    Reply
  54. Lovely to have a recommendation of two more sister scribes, Kareni. Thank you so much for that. The book is on my list now!

    Reply
  55. Lovely to have a recommendation of two more sister scribes, Kareni. Thank you so much for that. The book is on my list now!

    Reply
  56. Thanks for this post. I like Jane Austen’s sisters in Pride and Prejudice as well as Sense and Sensibility. I think both stories feel realistic.
    I had a younger sister. Unfortunately she died at the beginning of the pandemic. We were very much alike in some things and completely different in others. We had times when we were close and times when we were on two different planets.
    The thing is, the last months of her life we talked nearly every day. She was able to talk about how she truly felt and I was able to listen. Although we lived many miles apart, we were close in our hearts.
    When I read stories which include sister’s relationships, I hope to see truth. It can be a beautiful sense of closeness….and it can be WWIII. Both of those situations make for a fun roller coaster ride.
    And Jill (she was a twin and her twin is named Jack, my parents had a mean streak) made our ride together very interesting and fun and loving. Cancer sucks.

    Reply
  57. Thanks for this post. I like Jane Austen’s sisters in Pride and Prejudice as well as Sense and Sensibility. I think both stories feel realistic.
    I had a younger sister. Unfortunately she died at the beginning of the pandemic. We were very much alike in some things and completely different in others. We had times when we were close and times when we were on two different planets.
    The thing is, the last months of her life we talked nearly every day. She was able to talk about how she truly felt and I was able to listen. Although we lived many miles apart, we were close in our hearts.
    When I read stories which include sister’s relationships, I hope to see truth. It can be a beautiful sense of closeness….and it can be WWIII. Both of those situations make for a fun roller coaster ride.
    And Jill (she was a twin and her twin is named Jack, my parents had a mean streak) made our ride together very interesting and fun and loving. Cancer sucks.

    Reply
  58. Thanks for this post. I like Jane Austen’s sisters in Pride and Prejudice as well as Sense and Sensibility. I think both stories feel realistic.
    I had a younger sister. Unfortunately she died at the beginning of the pandemic. We were very much alike in some things and completely different in others. We had times when we were close and times when we were on two different planets.
    The thing is, the last months of her life we talked nearly every day. She was able to talk about how she truly felt and I was able to listen. Although we lived many miles apart, we were close in our hearts.
    When I read stories which include sister’s relationships, I hope to see truth. It can be a beautiful sense of closeness….and it can be WWIII. Both of those situations make for a fun roller coaster ride.
    And Jill (she was a twin and her twin is named Jack, my parents had a mean streak) made our ride together very interesting and fun and loving. Cancer sucks.

    Reply
  59. Thanks for this post. I like Jane Austen’s sisters in Pride and Prejudice as well as Sense and Sensibility. I think both stories feel realistic.
    I had a younger sister. Unfortunately she died at the beginning of the pandemic. We were very much alike in some things and completely different in others. We had times when we were close and times when we were on two different planets.
    The thing is, the last months of her life we talked nearly every day. She was able to talk about how she truly felt and I was able to listen. Although we lived many miles apart, we were close in our hearts.
    When I read stories which include sister’s relationships, I hope to see truth. It can be a beautiful sense of closeness….and it can be WWIII. Both of those situations make for a fun roller coaster ride.
    And Jill (she was a twin and her twin is named Jack, my parents had a mean streak) made our ride together very interesting and fun and loving. Cancer sucks.

    Reply
  60. Thanks for this post. I like Jane Austen’s sisters in Pride and Prejudice as well as Sense and Sensibility. I think both stories feel realistic.
    I had a younger sister. Unfortunately she died at the beginning of the pandemic. We were very much alike in some things and completely different in others. We had times when we were close and times when we were on two different planets.
    The thing is, the last months of her life we talked nearly every day. She was able to talk about how she truly felt and I was able to listen. Although we lived many miles apart, we were close in our hearts.
    When I read stories which include sister’s relationships, I hope to see truth. It can be a beautiful sense of closeness….and it can be WWIII. Both of those situations make for a fun roller coaster ride.
    And Jill (she was a twin and her twin is named Jack, my parents had a mean streak) made our ride together very interesting and fun and loving. Cancer sucks.

    Reply
  61. Oh Annette, I’m so sorry. Cancer does indeed suck.
    Jack and Jill? Did your parents really do that on purpose? Jill sounds amazing and it’s wonderful that you had the chance to talk and listen so openly to one another. I’m so glad you had that opportunity and sibling relationship.
    In a completely different but similar way, I have had the chance to get to know my stepsister in the last few months. We didn’t grow up together and haven’t been close but the death of her father (my stepfather) brought us closer and now we talk a lot. It’s been extraordinary to rediscover my step-siblings through a sad event but I won’t waste that chance I’ve been given now.

    Reply
  62. Oh Annette, I’m so sorry. Cancer does indeed suck.
    Jack and Jill? Did your parents really do that on purpose? Jill sounds amazing and it’s wonderful that you had the chance to talk and listen so openly to one another. I’m so glad you had that opportunity and sibling relationship.
    In a completely different but similar way, I have had the chance to get to know my stepsister in the last few months. We didn’t grow up together and haven’t been close but the death of her father (my stepfather) brought us closer and now we talk a lot. It’s been extraordinary to rediscover my step-siblings through a sad event but I won’t waste that chance I’ve been given now.

    Reply
  63. Oh Annette, I’m so sorry. Cancer does indeed suck.
    Jack and Jill? Did your parents really do that on purpose? Jill sounds amazing and it’s wonderful that you had the chance to talk and listen so openly to one another. I’m so glad you had that opportunity and sibling relationship.
    In a completely different but similar way, I have had the chance to get to know my stepsister in the last few months. We didn’t grow up together and haven’t been close but the death of her father (my stepfather) brought us closer and now we talk a lot. It’s been extraordinary to rediscover my step-siblings through a sad event but I won’t waste that chance I’ve been given now.

    Reply
  64. Oh Annette, I’m so sorry. Cancer does indeed suck.
    Jack and Jill? Did your parents really do that on purpose? Jill sounds amazing and it’s wonderful that you had the chance to talk and listen so openly to one another. I’m so glad you had that opportunity and sibling relationship.
    In a completely different but similar way, I have had the chance to get to know my stepsister in the last few months. We didn’t grow up together and haven’t been close but the death of her father (my stepfather) brought us closer and now we talk a lot. It’s been extraordinary to rediscover my step-siblings through a sad event but I won’t waste that chance I’ve been given now.

    Reply
  65. Oh Annette, I’m so sorry. Cancer does indeed suck.
    Jack and Jill? Did your parents really do that on purpose? Jill sounds amazing and it’s wonderful that you had the chance to talk and listen so openly to one another. I’m so glad you had that opportunity and sibling relationship.
    In a completely different but similar way, I have had the chance to get to know my stepsister in the last few months. We didn’t grow up together and haven’t been close but the death of her father (my stepfather) brought us closer and now we talk a lot. It’s been extraordinary to rediscover my step-siblings through a sad event but I won’t waste that chance I’ve been given now.

    Reply
  66. I am an older sister (with a younger sister and a brother) and it’s always interesting to see that dynamic played out in stories. My relationship with my siblings was one of rockiness due to a home-life that we are all better off out of, but the one truth I knew was that we had each others backs. In fiction, growing up my favourite siblings are the Pevensie’s from the Chronicles of Narnia. I love Mary Balogh’s way of writing siblings – the Westcott series, especially the first two novels are full of complicated and beautiful sister moments in a world that’s been turned upside down for them all. And Stephanie Lauren’s wonderful sister quartet in Four In Hand are just so delightful.

    Reply
  67. I am an older sister (with a younger sister and a brother) and it’s always interesting to see that dynamic played out in stories. My relationship with my siblings was one of rockiness due to a home-life that we are all better off out of, but the one truth I knew was that we had each others backs. In fiction, growing up my favourite siblings are the Pevensie’s from the Chronicles of Narnia. I love Mary Balogh’s way of writing siblings – the Westcott series, especially the first two novels are full of complicated and beautiful sister moments in a world that’s been turned upside down for them all. And Stephanie Lauren’s wonderful sister quartet in Four In Hand are just so delightful.

    Reply
  68. I am an older sister (with a younger sister and a brother) and it’s always interesting to see that dynamic played out in stories. My relationship with my siblings was one of rockiness due to a home-life that we are all better off out of, but the one truth I knew was that we had each others backs. In fiction, growing up my favourite siblings are the Pevensie’s from the Chronicles of Narnia. I love Mary Balogh’s way of writing siblings – the Westcott series, especially the first two novels are full of complicated and beautiful sister moments in a world that’s been turned upside down for them all. And Stephanie Lauren’s wonderful sister quartet in Four In Hand are just so delightful.

    Reply
  69. I am an older sister (with a younger sister and a brother) and it’s always interesting to see that dynamic played out in stories. My relationship with my siblings was one of rockiness due to a home-life that we are all better off out of, but the one truth I knew was that we had each others backs. In fiction, growing up my favourite siblings are the Pevensie’s from the Chronicles of Narnia. I love Mary Balogh’s way of writing siblings – the Westcott series, especially the first two novels are full of complicated and beautiful sister moments in a world that’s been turned upside down for them all. And Stephanie Lauren’s wonderful sister quartet in Four In Hand are just so delightful.

    Reply
  70. I am an older sister (with a younger sister and a brother) and it’s always interesting to see that dynamic played out in stories. My relationship with my siblings was one of rockiness due to a home-life that we are all better off out of, but the one truth I knew was that we had each others backs. In fiction, growing up my favourite siblings are the Pevensie’s from the Chronicles of Narnia. I love Mary Balogh’s way of writing siblings – the Westcott series, especially the first two novels are full of complicated and beautiful sister moments in a world that’s been turned upside down for them all. And Stephanie Lauren’s wonderful sister quartet in Four In Hand are just so delightful.

    Reply
  71. I have 1 brother and 2 stepbrothers, no sisters, alas. But I have had very close girlfriends from an early age, including some I’ve known literally my entire life. So I never particularly missed having a sister, or wished for one.
    I do love the sibling relationships in books. Julie Anne Long did a great trilogy with 3 sisters quite a few years ago. The first book is called “Beauty and the Spy” and I recommend it. Loretta Chase’s Dressmaker series also has 3 sisters, and it’s a lot of fun.

    Reply
  72. I have 1 brother and 2 stepbrothers, no sisters, alas. But I have had very close girlfriends from an early age, including some I’ve known literally my entire life. So I never particularly missed having a sister, or wished for one.
    I do love the sibling relationships in books. Julie Anne Long did a great trilogy with 3 sisters quite a few years ago. The first book is called “Beauty and the Spy” and I recommend it. Loretta Chase’s Dressmaker series also has 3 sisters, and it’s a lot of fun.

    Reply
  73. I have 1 brother and 2 stepbrothers, no sisters, alas. But I have had very close girlfriends from an early age, including some I’ve known literally my entire life. So I never particularly missed having a sister, or wished for one.
    I do love the sibling relationships in books. Julie Anne Long did a great trilogy with 3 sisters quite a few years ago. The first book is called “Beauty and the Spy” and I recommend it. Loretta Chase’s Dressmaker series also has 3 sisters, and it’s a lot of fun.

    Reply
  74. I have 1 brother and 2 stepbrothers, no sisters, alas. But I have had very close girlfriends from an early age, including some I’ve known literally my entire life. So I never particularly missed having a sister, or wished for one.
    I do love the sibling relationships in books. Julie Anne Long did a great trilogy with 3 sisters quite a few years ago. The first book is called “Beauty and the Spy” and I recommend it. Loretta Chase’s Dressmaker series also has 3 sisters, and it’s a lot of fun.

    Reply
  75. I have 1 brother and 2 stepbrothers, no sisters, alas. But I have had very close girlfriends from an early age, including some I’ve known literally my entire life. So I never particularly missed having a sister, or wished for one.
    I do love the sibling relationships in books. Julie Anne Long did a great trilogy with 3 sisters quite a few years ago. The first book is called “Beauty and the Spy” and I recommend it. Loretta Chase’s Dressmaker series also has 3 sisters, and it’s a lot of fun.

    Reply
  76. I know this is very predictable, but my favourite sisters are Anne and Mary Boleyn – so different, and ultimately pawns of ruthless ambition by those surrounding them. I’m fascinated by the way they both were used by the same man – and then simply discarded. Their relationship was at times fraught, but I find their stories to be compelling. I am the eldest of 5 – I have 2 sisters and 2 brothers, and I love them all dearly. We’ve encouraged and supported each other throughout our lives, as we lost our parents when we were very young and I brought the others up. I’m very proud of all of them, they are wonderful people.

    Reply
  77. I know this is very predictable, but my favourite sisters are Anne and Mary Boleyn – so different, and ultimately pawns of ruthless ambition by those surrounding them. I’m fascinated by the way they both were used by the same man – and then simply discarded. Their relationship was at times fraught, but I find their stories to be compelling. I am the eldest of 5 – I have 2 sisters and 2 brothers, and I love them all dearly. We’ve encouraged and supported each other throughout our lives, as we lost our parents when we were very young and I brought the others up. I’m very proud of all of them, they are wonderful people.

    Reply
  78. I know this is very predictable, but my favourite sisters are Anne and Mary Boleyn – so different, and ultimately pawns of ruthless ambition by those surrounding them. I’m fascinated by the way they both were used by the same man – and then simply discarded. Their relationship was at times fraught, but I find their stories to be compelling. I am the eldest of 5 – I have 2 sisters and 2 brothers, and I love them all dearly. We’ve encouraged and supported each other throughout our lives, as we lost our parents when we were very young and I brought the others up. I’m very proud of all of them, they are wonderful people.

    Reply
  79. I know this is very predictable, but my favourite sisters are Anne and Mary Boleyn – so different, and ultimately pawns of ruthless ambition by those surrounding them. I’m fascinated by the way they both were used by the same man – and then simply discarded. Their relationship was at times fraught, but I find their stories to be compelling. I am the eldest of 5 – I have 2 sisters and 2 brothers, and I love them all dearly. We’ve encouraged and supported each other throughout our lives, as we lost our parents when we were very young and I brought the others up. I’m very proud of all of them, they are wonderful people.

    Reply
  80. I know this is very predictable, but my favourite sisters are Anne and Mary Boleyn – so different, and ultimately pawns of ruthless ambition by those surrounding them. I’m fascinated by the way they both were used by the same man – and then simply discarded. Their relationship was at times fraught, but I find their stories to be compelling. I am the eldest of 5 – I have 2 sisters and 2 brothers, and I love them all dearly. We’ve encouraged and supported each other throughout our lives, as we lost our parents when we were very young and I brought the others up. I’m very proud of all of them, they are wonderful people.

    Reply
  81. I love Four in Hand! It’s on my keeper shelf.
    It’s great that you had that strong bond with your siblings, Chelsea. I imagine that was something you could rely on in such a difficult home situation.

    Reply
  82. I love Four in Hand! It’s on my keeper shelf.
    It’s great that you had that strong bond with your siblings, Chelsea. I imagine that was something you could rely on in such a difficult home situation.

    Reply
  83. I love Four in Hand! It’s on my keeper shelf.
    It’s great that you had that strong bond with your siblings, Chelsea. I imagine that was something you could rely on in such a difficult home situation.

    Reply
  84. I love Four in Hand! It’s on my keeper shelf.
    It’s great that you had that strong bond with your siblings, Chelsea. I imagine that was something you could rely on in such a difficult home situation.

    Reply
  85. I love Four in Hand! It’s on my keeper shelf.
    It’s great that you had that strong bond with your siblings, Chelsea. I imagine that was something you could rely on in such a difficult home situation.

    Reply
  86. Thanks for those recommendations, Karin. I will look out for those books. I’m enjoying exploring sister series at the moment. I totally agree that good friends and step-siblings can be a great gift!

    Reply
  87. Thanks for those recommendations, Karin. I will look out for those books. I’m enjoying exploring sister series at the moment. I totally agree that good friends and step-siblings can be a great gift!

    Reply
  88. Thanks for those recommendations, Karin. I will look out for those books. I’m enjoying exploring sister series at the moment. I totally agree that good friends and step-siblings can be a great gift!

    Reply
  89. Thanks for those recommendations, Karin. I will look out for those books. I’m enjoying exploring sister series at the moment. I totally agree that good friends and step-siblings can be a great gift!

    Reply
  90. Thanks for those recommendations, Karin. I will look out for those books. I’m enjoying exploring sister series at the moment. I totally agree that good friends and step-siblings can be a great gift!

    Reply
  91. Oh Elaine, what a moving story of you and your siblings. Thank you for sharing that with us.
    The relationship between Mary and Anne Boleyn is enduringly fascinating, I think.

    Reply
  92. Oh Elaine, what a moving story of you and your siblings. Thank you for sharing that with us.
    The relationship between Mary and Anne Boleyn is enduringly fascinating, I think.

    Reply
  93. Oh Elaine, what a moving story of you and your siblings. Thank you for sharing that with us.
    The relationship between Mary and Anne Boleyn is enduringly fascinating, I think.

    Reply
  94. Oh Elaine, what a moving story of you and your siblings. Thank you for sharing that with us.
    The relationship between Mary and Anne Boleyn is enduringly fascinating, I think.

    Reply
  95. Oh Elaine, what a moving story of you and your siblings. Thank you for sharing that with us.
    The relationship between Mary and Anne Boleyn is enduringly fascinating, I think.

    Reply

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