Series, book 2

Happy When Wench Anne asked the question, my reply was far too long, so I thought I'd blog a bit more about series, linked books, and worlds. (That's Charlie and Billy in Christmas garb, looking happy because they have lots of glitter-loot.)

 

Why write linked books?

As I said on Wednesday, my instinct toward series was there from the first, and I'm not sure why. I can't remember reading any. A series of books with the same protagonist or protagonists, yes, such an Angelique and the Lymond Chronicles, but not what we mean by a series today — a run of books, each about one member of a group.

The closest would be Baroness Orczy's Scarlet Pimpernel books, which I discovered and fell in love with at a very early age. However, I've only now read up about her and the books, and discover the popularity of The Scarlet Pimpernel came about because she and her husband wrote a play based on it and it did well in the West End.  Now that's a form of promotion I'd not thought of! Sp

I was delighted to read that she had a very happy marriage.

I wish I still had my battered old edition with line drawings, but I can only offer Anthony Andrews in the role.

Each book in the pimpernel series has a different romantic couple, but as best I remember they are all built around the French Revolution and rescuing aristocrats so that the context is arguably a stronger link than the people and their relationships.

Here's a scarlet pimpernel flower.

Scarp © Copyright Tony Atkin and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

In the modern romantic series, the links are through friendship and family and the context can be quite different for each story.

Questions. Am I correct? Please feel free to argue with me.

What character-linked series from the first part of the 20th century have I missed? There must have been some.

Anyway, as I said on Wednesday, as soon as I settled to writing romance novels, back in 1977, I had series in mind, and now it's hard to imagine writing a completely independent novel. If I started one it would turn out to be the beginning of a new series! This is not, however, true of novellas. I don't know why, but I'm not bothered by writing stand-alone novellas, and not tempted to make them the beginning of a series. Perhaps it's a matter of length. As long as I'm not with the world too long, I can escape their seductive tendrils.

My mindset about linked books is odd, and I'm about to reveal another oddity.

My big confession.

I'm not particularly fond of reading linked books.

I was interested to see other people express the same. 111p

I read and adored those Heyer books, and they were nearly all stand-alones. Thinking about it, I've decided that there was was a tidiness to them, a completion; a beginning, a middle, and an end, and at the end off they went into the sunset. The rest was left to my imagination, and I did imagine the future for my favourite characters, so that they lived on actively in my mind.

Perhaps I feel a bit deprived by a linked book because I know I'll probably meet those people now and then in later books and learn how they're getting on. I'm not free to invent it all for myself.

More Questions.

Does that resonate with anyone, or am I just crazy? Is inventing ongoing stories for characters perhaps something only writers can do?

How do I reconcile this contradiction? Well in part by writing as I want to write, which seems to have worked out pretty well, and also because my characters seem so real to me, I really have no choice.

Northal

The picture? This is the High Street of Northallerton, Yorkshire, which Prudence Youlgrave and Catesby Burgoyne cross in the early pages of An Unlikely Countess. It's slightly relevant because setting is part of continuity of fictional worlds.

This photograph isn't 18th century, of course, but it's probably closer to that period than the modern view. The width is typical of towns along the Great North Road, and of course it was lined with inns.

Most are now shops, but they're still there, with their Georgian lines above the modern shop fronts, and often still with the high arch into the coach yard.

Fictional Worlds

Over the years I have come to think of my linked books not as a series, but as set in a world.

All the characters I've written as being alive in, say, 1816, are alive in 1815. Nearly all of them live in England in aristocratic circles. They go to London and other fashionable places. Many of the men are Members of Parliament, in the Commons or the Lords. Some of them are keen hunters  who are bound to be in Melton Mowbray for at least part of the hunting season. Some are patrons of the arts and sciences, and some are interested in industry and technology. It really doesn't matter if I give any of them a part in a book, either walk on or speaking. They're there anyway.

Of course 15 of my Regency-set books are in the Company of Rogues series, so they have the link of friendship, and sometimes family links as well, so I call it my Rogues World, but there are others. The Ashbys and Kyles of the trad. regencies, and also the Dark Angel and the Daffodil Dandy. Sax and Meg from Forbidden Magic, and yes, Knox the parrot. I don't look for them, but when I need a reference to some member of the ton, quite likely it will be one of them, an Easter egg, as Janice put it for the fans who know the books as well, and perhaps better, than I do.

The ongoing characters that grab us.

Which reminds me of Susan/DC's comment about Beth and Lucien in the Rogues books. "For example, I liked many of Jo's Company of Rogue books. I'm sure, however, that I missed important details of some of the books because I was on the lookout for references to Beth and Lucien, my favorite couple in the series." That interested me, but I think I know why, and why they appear quite often.

Most of the couples end up with their problems solved and their future comfortable. That is the gift I try to give them after throwing a great many problems at them. Beth and Lucien  have substantial differences, however, and their marriage will clearly be a work-in-prograss. Thus, it's interesting to see how they're managing, whereas visiting many of the other couples would simply be a matter of sitting down to a cup of tea and a bit of a chat. Auccover

On the appearance of past characters in books, I try to pass the test that their part in the book will change something in a meaningful way. Which happens in An Unlikely Countess. (Have to put a plug in for my March book.)

One more thing. Despite my love for writing linked books, it can become overwhelming, when the background cast of characters is huge, and there is a delight in starting with a blank slate. So I've taken to writing trilogies that start with completely new characters. But still in the World, remember.Alsfrontsm2

At the moment, that's my Malloren World, set in the 1760s. All the characters from 12 books, including the minor ones, are alive there, but when Robin, Earl of Huntersdown met Petra d'Averio in a French inn, they were both new to me. 

In that case, I knew the Malloren link, but when Catesby Burgoyne rescued a woman on the dark streets of Northallerton, Yorkshire, they were both new to me and without any Malloren connection at all. It's very liberating. My vague intent there was to have a trilogy of countesses, and I'm now writing A Scandalous Countess, but I didn't plan any tight connection. Then along came Peregrine Perriam….

Any impression that I am in control of my worlds is, well, a fiction!

I've put up a new excerpt from An Unlikely Countess here. I'll be back to say more about it, especially the adventure of checking out the locations when I was still living in the north.

Here are some northern sheep and lambs. I saw lambs in a field on Wednesday and knew spring was here!

Sheep

Best wishes,

Jo

 

 

 

 

 

 

115 thoughts on “Series, book 2”

  1. Since I’m a new reader of Regency Romances (having just started a year ago) I’ve had the luxury of being able to read your Rogue series one after the other and within the period of a month. Needless to say I was totally absorbed into that world and loved every minute. Leaving it felt like I’d time traveled and had to return to a time period in which I’ve never felt totally comfortable. For a reader like me series are wonderful. If I had to wait a year or even 6 months for the next book, however, I might feel differently. I’ve gone on to read other Regency authors to fill the void and fully expect to meet up with one of your characters at Vauxhall or some such place.
    To answer your question, I can understand why you do not particularly like to read series. It’s because you are ABLE to write the “rest of the story”. We non-writers cannot. That is why we read–otherwise, we’d be writing!

    Reply
  2. Since I’m a new reader of Regency Romances (having just started a year ago) I’ve had the luxury of being able to read your Rogue series one after the other and within the period of a month. Needless to say I was totally absorbed into that world and loved every minute. Leaving it felt like I’d time traveled and had to return to a time period in which I’ve never felt totally comfortable. For a reader like me series are wonderful. If I had to wait a year or even 6 months for the next book, however, I might feel differently. I’ve gone on to read other Regency authors to fill the void and fully expect to meet up with one of your characters at Vauxhall or some such place.
    To answer your question, I can understand why you do not particularly like to read series. It’s because you are ABLE to write the “rest of the story”. We non-writers cannot. That is why we read–otherwise, we’d be writing!

    Reply
  3. Since I’m a new reader of Regency Romances (having just started a year ago) I’ve had the luxury of being able to read your Rogue series one after the other and within the period of a month. Needless to say I was totally absorbed into that world and loved every minute. Leaving it felt like I’d time traveled and had to return to a time period in which I’ve never felt totally comfortable. For a reader like me series are wonderful. If I had to wait a year or even 6 months for the next book, however, I might feel differently. I’ve gone on to read other Regency authors to fill the void and fully expect to meet up with one of your characters at Vauxhall or some such place.
    To answer your question, I can understand why you do not particularly like to read series. It’s because you are ABLE to write the “rest of the story”. We non-writers cannot. That is why we read–otherwise, we’d be writing!

    Reply
  4. Since I’m a new reader of Regency Romances (having just started a year ago) I’ve had the luxury of being able to read your Rogue series one after the other and within the period of a month. Needless to say I was totally absorbed into that world and loved every minute. Leaving it felt like I’d time traveled and had to return to a time period in which I’ve never felt totally comfortable. For a reader like me series are wonderful. If I had to wait a year or even 6 months for the next book, however, I might feel differently. I’ve gone on to read other Regency authors to fill the void and fully expect to meet up with one of your characters at Vauxhall or some such place.
    To answer your question, I can understand why you do not particularly like to read series. It’s because you are ABLE to write the “rest of the story”. We non-writers cannot. That is why we read–otherwise, we’d be writing!

    Reply
  5. Since I’m a new reader of Regency Romances (having just started a year ago) I’ve had the luxury of being able to read your Rogue series one after the other and within the period of a month. Needless to say I was totally absorbed into that world and loved every minute. Leaving it felt like I’d time traveled and had to return to a time period in which I’ve never felt totally comfortable. For a reader like me series are wonderful. If I had to wait a year or even 6 months for the next book, however, I might feel differently. I’ve gone on to read other Regency authors to fill the void and fully expect to meet up with one of your characters at Vauxhall or some such place.
    To answer your question, I can understand why you do not particularly like to read series. It’s because you are ABLE to write the “rest of the story”. We non-writers cannot. That is why we read–otherwise, we’d be writing!

    Reply
  6. In regard to your “confession”: I really enjoy series books, if they’re well done, as yours are. I get a bigger picture of the people’s lives. No one’s life is unconnected from the lives of those around them. The Rogues are a family, and what’s happening in their lives naturally affects everyone else in that family, be it trouble, common enemies, or death. The Mallorens are the same. I love the image of the strong center these “families” have, of a central figure that that is wise and powerful.
    Though Georgette Heyer didn’t write series books, there are at least that are linked, the stories of a father (These Old Shades), then of his son (Devil’s Cub), with the father and his wife having a significant role in the son’s adventures.
    I often wish that characters in books have stories of their own, and look for series. Not that I don’t enjoy the stand-alone books, too, but some books seem to leave too many loose ends. I want more of the characters. That doesn’t mean the book isn’t good by itself, or I wouldn’t want to read more from the author or about the characters.

    Reply
  7. In regard to your “confession”: I really enjoy series books, if they’re well done, as yours are. I get a bigger picture of the people’s lives. No one’s life is unconnected from the lives of those around them. The Rogues are a family, and what’s happening in their lives naturally affects everyone else in that family, be it trouble, common enemies, or death. The Mallorens are the same. I love the image of the strong center these “families” have, of a central figure that that is wise and powerful.
    Though Georgette Heyer didn’t write series books, there are at least that are linked, the stories of a father (These Old Shades), then of his son (Devil’s Cub), with the father and his wife having a significant role in the son’s adventures.
    I often wish that characters in books have stories of their own, and look for series. Not that I don’t enjoy the stand-alone books, too, but some books seem to leave too many loose ends. I want more of the characters. That doesn’t mean the book isn’t good by itself, or I wouldn’t want to read more from the author or about the characters.

    Reply
  8. In regard to your “confession”: I really enjoy series books, if they’re well done, as yours are. I get a bigger picture of the people’s lives. No one’s life is unconnected from the lives of those around them. The Rogues are a family, and what’s happening in their lives naturally affects everyone else in that family, be it trouble, common enemies, or death. The Mallorens are the same. I love the image of the strong center these “families” have, of a central figure that that is wise and powerful.
    Though Georgette Heyer didn’t write series books, there are at least that are linked, the stories of a father (These Old Shades), then of his son (Devil’s Cub), with the father and his wife having a significant role in the son’s adventures.
    I often wish that characters in books have stories of their own, and look for series. Not that I don’t enjoy the stand-alone books, too, but some books seem to leave too many loose ends. I want more of the characters. That doesn’t mean the book isn’t good by itself, or I wouldn’t want to read more from the author or about the characters.

    Reply
  9. In regard to your “confession”: I really enjoy series books, if they’re well done, as yours are. I get a bigger picture of the people’s lives. No one’s life is unconnected from the lives of those around them. The Rogues are a family, and what’s happening in their lives naturally affects everyone else in that family, be it trouble, common enemies, or death. The Mallorens are the same. I love the image of the strong center these “families” have, of a central figure that that is wise and powerful.
    Though Georgette Heyer didn’t write series books, there are at least that are linked, the stories of a father (These Old Shades), then of his son (Devil’s Cub), with the father and his wife having a significant role in the son’s adventures.
    I often wish that characters in books have stories of their own, and look for series. Not that I don’t enjoy the stand-alone books, too, but some books seem to leave too many loose ends. I want more of the characters. That doesn’t mean the book isn’t good by itself, or I wouldn’t want to read more from the author or about the characters.

    Reply
  10. In regard to your “confession”: I really enjoy series books, if they’re well done, as yours are. I get a bigger picture of the people’s lives. No one’s life is unconnected from the lives of those around them. The Rogues are a family, and what’s happening in their lives naturally affects everyone else in that family, be it trouble, common enemies, or death. The Mallorens are the same. I love the image of the strong center these “families” have, of a central figure that that is wise and powerful.
    Though Georgette Heyer didn’t write series books, there are at least that are linked, the stories of a father (These Old Shades), then of his son (Devil’s Cub), with the father and his wife having a significant role in the son’s adventures.
    I often wish that characters in books have stories of their own, and look for series. Not that I don’t enjoy the stand-alone books, too, but some books seem to leave too many loose ends. I want more of the characters. That doesn’t mean the book isn’t good by itself, or I wouldn’t want to read more from the author or about the characters.

    Reply
  11. I dislike sequels because the author(s) of sequels rarely have the couple existing as I imagine they do. I do make up futures for characters I like and dislike seeing them unhappy in sequels. I do like shared world stories when each book can be read alone.
    I don’t want to know that a hard won love( husband or wife) with whom I laughed and cried, died, or is miserable in a later book. I read romantic fiction just because it is not the real world. I can get enough real world in my family, nation, and world. I do like your books.
    About novellas not being in series.. wasn’t the first of the Georges presented in a novella?

    Reply
  12. I dislike sequels because the author(s) of sequels rarely have the couple existing as I imagine they do. I do make up futures for characters I like and dislike seeing them unhappy in sequels. I do like shared world stories when each book can be read alone.
    I don’t want to know that a hard won love( husband or wife) with whom I laughed and cried, died, or is miserable in a later book. I read romantic fiction just because it is not the real world. I can get enough real world in my family, nation, and world. I do like your books.
    About novellas not being in series.. wasn’t the first of the Georges presented in a novella?

    Reply
  13. I dislike sequels because the author(s) of sequels rarely have the couple existing as I imagine they do. I do make up futures for characters I like and dislike seeing them unhappy in sequels. I do like shared world stories when each book can be read alone.
    I don’t want to know that a hard won love( husband or wife) with whom I laughed and cried, died, or is miserable in a later book. I read romantic fiction just because it is not the real world. I can get enough real world in my family, nation, and world. I do like your books.
    About novellas not being in series.. wasn’t the first of the Georges presented in a novella?

    Reply
  14. I dislike sequels because the author(s) of sequels rarely have the couple existing as I imagine they do. I do make up futures for characters I like and dislike seeing them unhappy in sequels. I do like shared world stories when each book can be read alone.
    I don’t want to know that a hard won love( husband or wife) with whom I laughed and cried, died, or is miserable in a later book. I read romantic fiction just because it is not the real world. I can get enough real world in my family, nation, and world. I do like your books.
    About novellas not being in series.. wasn’t the first of the Georges presented in a novella?

    Reply
  15. I dislike sequels because the author(s) of sequels rarely have the couple existing as I imagine they do. I do make up futures for characters I like and dislike seeing them unhappy in sequels. I do like shared world stories when each book can be read alone.
    I don’t want to know that a hard won love( husband or wife) with whom I laughed and cried, died, or is miserable in a later book. I read romantic fiction just because it is not the real world. I can get enough real world in my family, nation, and world. I do like your books.
    About novellas not being in series.. wasn’t the first of the Georges presented in a novella?

    Reply
  16. Jo here. Heavens, Nancy, it’s horrid to have a happy situation made unhappy in subsequent books.
    But you do bring to mind a series I forgot — Roberta Gellis’s Roselynde books. Spoiler coming….
    The hero of the first book dies and Alinor marries someone else in the second book. That didn’t bother me, however, because Simon was much older than her and it seemed natural. As well, I don’t much like the idea of young women marrying much older men. It worked in the medieval context, but I liked seeing her get the young hunk.
    But no, in general I don’t want characters dying, or getting ill, or new sources of strife. As a woman once said at an RT session, “Don’t give me reality. Reality, I got lots of.”
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  17. Jo here. Heavens, Nancy, it’s horrid to have a happy situation made unhappy in subsequent books.
    But you do bring to mind a series I forgot — Roberta Gellis’s Roselynde books. Spoiler coming….
    The hero of the first book dies and Alinor marries someone else in the second book. That didn’t bother me, however, because Simon was much older than her and it seemed natural. As well, I don’t much like the idea of young women marrying much older men. It worked in the medieval context, but I liked seeing her get the young hunk.
    But no, in general I don’t want characters dying, or getting ill, or new sources of strife. As a woman once said at an RT session, “Don’t give me reality. Reality, I got lots of.”
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  18. Jo here. Heavens, Nancy, it’s horrid to have a happy situation made unhappy in subsequent books.
    But you do bring to mind a series I forgot — Roberta Gellis’s Roselynde books. Spoiler coming….
    The hero of the first book dies and Alinor marries someone else in the second book. That didn’t bother me, however, because Simon was much older than her and it seemed natural. As well, I don’t much like the idea of young women marrying much older men. It worked in the medieval context, but I liked seeing her get the young hunk.
    But no, in general I don’t want characters dying, or getting ill, or new sources of strife. As a woman once said at an RT session, “Don’t give me reality. Reality, I got lots of.”
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  19. Jo here. Heavens, Nancy, it’s horrid to have a happy situation made unhappy in subsequent books.
    But you do bring to mind a series I forgot — Roberta Gellis’s Roselynde books. Spoiler coming….
    The hero of the first book dies and Alinor marries someone else in the second book. That didn’t bother me, however, because Simon was much older than her and it seemed natural. As well, I don’t much like the idea of young women marrying much older men. It worked in the medieval context, but I liked seeing her get the young hunk.
    But no, in general I don’t want characters dying, or getting ill, or new sources of strife. As a woman once said at an RT session, “Don’t give me reality. Reality, I got lots of.”
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  20. Jo here. Heavens, Nancy, it’s horrid to have a happy situation made unhappy in subsequent books.
    But you do bring to mind a series I forgot — Roberta Gellis’s Roselynde books. Spoiler coming….
    The hero of the first book dies and Alinor marries someone else in the second book. That didn’t bother me, however, because Simon was much older than her and it seemed natural. As well, I don’t much like the idea of young women marrying much older men. It worked in the medieval context, but I liked seeing her get the young hunk.
    But no, in general I don’t want characters dying, or getting ill, or new sources of strife. As a woman once said at an RT session, “Don’t give me reality. Reality, I got lots of.”
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  21. The first linked books I ever read were Heyer’s These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army. I fall in love with characters and hate when a book ends, so sequels are a delight. Just like in life, the wedding is only the beginning of the marriage, and glimpsing a beloved couple as they succeed at marriage is a comforting reinforcement of the HEA.

    Reply
  22. The first linked books I ever read were Heyer’s These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army. I fall in love with characters and hate when a book ends, so sequels are a delight. Just like in life, the wedding is only the beginning of the marriage, and glimpsing a beloved couple as they succeed at marriage is a comforting reinforcement of the HEA.

    Reply
  23. The first linked books I ever read were Heyer’s These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army. I fall in love with characters and hate when a book ends, so sequels are a delight. Just like in life, the wedding is only the beginning of the marriage, and glimpsing a beloved couple as they succeed at marriage is a comforting reinforcement of the HEA.

    Reply
  24. The first linked books I ever read were Heyer’s These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army. I fall in love with characters and hate when a book ends, so sequels are a delight. Just like in life, the wedding is only the beginning of the marriage, and glimpsing a beloved couple as they succeed at marriage is a comforting reinforcement of the HEA.

    Reply
  25. The first linked books I ever read were Heyer’s These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub and An Infamous Army. I fall in love with characters and hate when a book ends, so sequels are a delight. Just like in life, the wedding is only the beginning of the marriage, and glimpsing a beloved couple as they succeed at marriage is a comforting reinforcement of the HEA.

    Reply
  26. I read both stand-alones and linked (series/world) novels with equal joy. As has been said above, I DO NOT want things to go bad (especially in romances); my real life is all to full of reality (as is true of most people); I read for refreshment before i go to the next real-life episode. (This doesn’t mean that continuing characters can’t have a bit of a set back — an illness, a turn or fortune, etc. — but in romances their stories should be upwards and onwards! The ship may be late, but it should come in.
    And I agree with one of the earlier responses, since you CAN write about the what next for your characters, you do write them. I imagine that you rather carefully refrain from intruding upon the worlds of other authors. This may be part of why those series don’t appeal to you as a reader.
    I enjoy your writing, stand-alone or in company; keep up the good work

    Reply
  27. I read both stand-alones and linked (series/world) novels with equal joy. As has been said above, I DO NOT want things to go bad (especially in romances); my real life is all to full of reality (as is true of most people); I read for refreshment before i go to the next real-life episode. (This doesn’t mean that continuing characters can’t have a bit of a set back — an illness, a turn or fortune, etc. — but in romances their stories should be upwards and onwards! The ship may be late, but it should come in.
    And I agree with one of the earlier responses, since you CAN write about the what next for your characters, you do write them. I imagine that you rather carefully refrain from intruding upon the worlds of other authors. This may be part of why those series don’t appeal to you as a reader.
    I enjoy your writing, stand-alone or in company; keep up the good work

    Reply
  28. I read both stand-alones and linked (series/world) novels with equal joy. As has been said above, I DO NOT want things to go bad (especially in romances); my real life is all to full of reality (as is true of most people); I read for refreshment before i go to the next real-life episode. (This doesn’t mean that continuing characters can’t have a bit of a set back — an illness, a turn or fortune, etc. — but in romances their stories should be upwards and onwards! The ship may be late, but it should come in.
    And I agree with one of the earlier responses, since you CAN write about the what next for your characters, you do write them. I imagine that you rather carefully refrain from intruding upon the worlds of other authors. This may be part of why those series don’t appeal to you as a reader.
    I enjoy your writing, stand-alone or in company; keep up the good work

    Reply
  29. I read both stand-alones and linked (series/world) novels with equal joy. As has been said above, I DO NOT want things to go bad (especially in romances); my real life is all to full of reality (as is true of most people); I read for refreshment before i go to the next real-life episode. (This doesn’t mean that continuing characters can’t have a bit of a set back — an illness, a turn or fortune, etc. — but in romances their stories should be upwards and onwards! The ship may be late, but it should come in.
    And I agree with one of the earlier responses, since you CAN write about the what next for your characters, you do write them. I imagine that you rather carefully refrain from intruding upon the worlds of other authors. This may be part of why those series don’t appeal to you as a reader.
    I enjoy your writing, stand-alone or in company; keep up the good work

    Reply
  30. I read both stand-alones and linked (series/world) novels with equal joy. As has been said above, I DO NOT want things to go bad (especially in romances); my real life is all to full of reality (as is true of most people); I read for refreshment before i go to the next real-life episode. (This doesn’t mean that continuing characters can’t have a bit of a set back — an illness, a turn or fortune, etc. — but in romances their stories should be upwards and onwards! The ship may be late, but it should come in.
    And I agree with one of the earlier responses, since you CAN write about the what next for your characters, you do write them. I imagine that you rather carefully refrain from intruding upon the worlds of other authors. This may be part of why those series don’t appeal to you as a reader.
    I enjoy your writing, stand-alone or in company; keep up the good work

    Reply
  31. Jo,
    I love linked books – either series like L.M. Montgomery’s Anne books, or the linked books like we have today, where they are all in the same ‘world’ and each story is about one of the companions or friends. I do enjoy stand alones as well, but quite frequently will want an ‘epilogue’, or will go to an author’s website, hoping for related books. I own and have read all of your Company of Rogue books, and just finished The Secret Duke. I’ll be buying the Unlikely Countess very soon as well, and will be on the hunt for The Demon’s Bride shortly as well. It’s funny that you write continuity’s but don’t like to read them! Love all your books!

    Reply
  32. Jo,
    I love linked books – either series like L.M. Montgomery’s Anne books, or the linked books like we have today, where they are all in the same ‘world’ and each story is about one of the companions or friends. I do enjoy stand alones as well, but quite frequently will want an ‘epilogue’, or will go to an author’s website, hoping for related books. I own and have read all of your Company of Rogue books, and just finished The Secret Duke. I’ll be buying the Unlikely Countess very soon as well, and will be on the hunt for The Demon’s Bride shortly as well. It’s funny that you write continuity’s but don’t like to read them! Love all your books!

    Reply
  33. Jo,
    I love linked books – either series like L.M. Montgomery’s Anne books, or the linked books like we have today, where they are all in the same ‘world’ and each story is about one of the companions or friends. I do enjoy stand alones as well, but quite frequently will want an ‘epilogue’, or will go to an author’s website, hoping for related books. I own and have read all of your Company of Rogue books, and just finished The Secret Duke. I’ll be buying the Unlikely Countess very soon as well, and will be on the hunt for The Demon’s Bride shortly as well. It’s funny that you write continuity’s but don’t like to read them! Love all your books!

    Reply
  34. Jo,
    I love linked books – either series like L.M. Montgomery’s Anne books, or the linked books like we have today, where they are all in the same ‘world’ and each story is about one of the companions or friends. I do enjoy stand alones as well, but quite frequently will want an ‘epilogue’, or will go to an author’s website, hoping for related books. I own and have read all of your Company of Rogue books, and just finished The Secret Duke. I’ll be buying the Unlikely Countess very soon as well, and will be on the hunt for The Demon’s Bride shortly as well. It’s funny that you write continuity’s but don’t like to read them! Love all your books!

    Reply
  35. Jo,
    I love linked books – either series like L.M. Montgomery’s Anne books, or the linked books like we have today, where they are all in the same ‘world’ and each story is about one of the companions or friends. I do enjoy stand alones as well, but quite frequently will want an ‘epilogue’, or will go to an author’s website, hoping for related books. I own and have read all of your Company of Rogue books, and just finished The Secret Duke. I’ll be buying the Unlikely Countess very soon as well, and will be on the hunt for The Demon’s Bride shortly as well. It’s funny that you write continuity’s but don’t like to read them! Love all your books!

    Reply
  36. Jo, I completely agree about the deprivation when it comes to reading some linked books. (Note, I will be diving on your newest like the starved wildebeest that I am) It can be like seeing a movie made from a favorite book – different from what I’d been playing out in my head for the couple’s future.
    I can definitely relate to the writing instinct, though. Mine goes the other way. I think in single books; get this couple to HEA and then start something new for the next one. Secondary characters, when I write, are secondary characters, and I’d be hard pressed to find a way to make one of them the star in a subsequent installment. To me, it wouldn’t make sense, but I think it works perfectly well for the Malloren world (haven’t started on Rogues yet.)

    Reply
  37. Jo, I completely agree about the deprivation when it comes to reading some linked books. (Note, I will be diving on your newest like the starved wildebeest that I am) It can be like seeing a movie made from a favorite book – different from what I’d been playing out in my head for the couple’s future.
    I can definitely relate to the writing instinct, though. Mine goes the other way. I think in single books; get this couple to HEA and then start something new for the next one. Secondary characters, when I write, are secondary characters, and I’d be hard pressed to find a way to make one of them the star in a subsequent installment. To me, it wouldn’t make sense, but I think it works perfectly well for the Malloren world (haven’t started on Rogues yet.)

    Reply
  38. Jo, I completely agree about the deprivation when it comes to reading some linked books. (Note, I will be diving on your newest like the starved wildebeest that I am) It can be like seeing a movie made from a favorite book – different from what I’d been playing out in my head for the couple’s future.
    I can definitely relate to the writing instinct, though. Mine goes the other way. I think in single books; get this couple to HEA and then start something new for the next one. Secondary characters, when I write, are secondary characters, and I’d be hard pressed to find a way to make one of them the star in a subsequent installment. To me, it wouldn’t make sense, but I think it works perfectly well for the Malloren world (haven’t started on Rogues yet.)

    Reply
  39. Jo, I completely agree about the deprivation when it comes to reading some linked books. (Note, I will be diving on your newest like the starved wildebeest that I am) It can be like seeing a movie made from a favorite book – different from what I’d been playing out in my head for the couple’s future.
    I can definitely relate to the writing instinct, though. Mine goes the other way. I think in single books; get this couple to HEA and then start something new for the next one. Secondary characters, when I write, are secondary characters, and I’d be hard pressed to find a way to make one of them the star in a subsequent installment. To me, it wouldn’t make sense, but I think it works perfectly well for the Malloren world (haven’t started on Rogues yet.)

    Reply
  40. Jo, I completely agree about the deprivation when it comes to reading some linked books. (Note, I will be diving on your newest like the starved wildebeest that I am) It can be like seeing a movie made from a favorite book – different from what I’d been playing out in my head for the couple’s future.
    I can definitely relate to the writing instinct, though. Mine goes the other way. I think in single books; get this couple to HEA and then start something new for the next one. Secondary characters, when I write, are secondary characters, and I’d be hard pressed to find a way to make one of them the star in a subsequent installment. To me, it wouldn’t make sense, but I think it works perfectly well for the Malloren world (haven’t started on Rogues yet.)

    Reply
  41. I love to read linked books when the author has made me really care about the characters. Too often, however, the hero and heroine of a previous book make their cameo and then rush off for a not-very-discreet middle-of-the-day round of love-making. I want to see my characters again, but not acting like sex-starved teenagers. I appreciate when authors show us in some other way how strong the marriage is! (Gads, I sound like a prude.) But Sherry Thomas did this nicely in her Rita-winner by having a previous heroine mention fondly how her kids fight like cats and dogs. It let me know the marriage had resulted in children, and that the hero/heroine were enjoying the challenge of raising them.

    Reply
  42. I love to read linked books when the author has made me really care about the characters. Too often, however, the hero and heroine of a previous book make their cameo and then rush off for a not-very-discreet middle-of-the-day round of love-making. I want to see my characters again, but not acting like sex-starved teenagers. I appreciate when authors show us in some other way how strong the marriage is! (Gads, I sound like a prude.) But Sherry Thomas did this nicely in her Rita-winner by having a previous heroine mention fondly how her kids fight like cats and dogs. It let me know the marriage had resulted in children, and that the hero/heroine were enjoying the challenge of raising them.

    Reply
  43. I love to read linked books when the author has made me really care about the characters. Too often, however, the hero and heroine of a previous book make their cameo and then rush off for a not-very-discreet middle-of-the-day round of love-making. I want to see my characters again, but not acting like sex-starved teenagers. I appreciate when authors show us in some other way how strong the marriage is! (Gads, I sound like a prude.) But Sherry Thomas did this nicely in her Rita-winner by having a previous heroine mention fondly how her kids fight like cats and dogs. It let me know the marriage had resulted in children, and that the hero/heroine were enjoying the challenge of raising them.

    Reply
  44. I love to read linked books when the author has made me really care about the characters. Too often, however, the hero and heroine of a previous book make their cameo and then rush off for a not-very-discreet middle-of-the-day round of love-making. I want to see my characters again, but not acting like sex-starved teenagers. I appreciate when authors show us in some other way how strong the marriage is! (Gads, I sound like a prude.) But Sherry Thomas did this nicely in her Rita-winner by having a previous heroine mention fondly how her kids fight like cats and dogs. It let me know the marriage had resulted in children, and that the hero/heroine were enjoying the challenge of raising them.

    Reply
  45. I love to read linked books when the author has made me really care about the characters. Too often, however, the hero and heroine of a previous book make their cameo and then rush off for a not-very-discreet middle-of-the-day round of love-making. I want to see my characters again, but not acting like sex-starved teenagers. I appreciate when authors show us in some other way how strong the marriage is! (Gads, I sound like a prude.) But Sherry Thomas did this nicely in her Rita-winner by having a previous heroine mention fondly how her kids fight like cats and dogs. It let me know the marriage had resulted in children, and that the hero/heroine were enjoying the challenge of raising them.

    Reply
  46. I love series books if they are well written. I first got hooked on romance novels as a freshman in college with My Lady Notorious. Loved every minute of it and couldn’t wait to read the rest. I like series and the little epilogues and the imagining the rest myself. It’s fun seeing past characters in future books. I enjoy writing as well, but I think the difference between some series is the way they are written. For instance, your books are written as part of the world and it seems natural that character A is included in character B’s book. Also there are loose ends that as a reader I want tied up and series help with that plus they are fun. The writing and the ability of the author to transport the reader to their world can make or break the book itself and then the series as well. The waiting for the new book to come out can drag on sometimes, but I just fill the gaps with other books.

    Reply
  47. I love series books if they are well written. I first got hooked on romance novels as a freshman in college with My Lady Notorious. Loved every minute of it and couldn’t wait to read the rest. I like series and the little epilogues and the imagining the rest myself. It’s fun seeing past characters in future books. I enjoy writing as well, but I think the difference between some series is the way they are written. For instance, your books are written as part of the world and it seems natural that character A is included in character B’s book. Also there are loose ends that as a reader I want tied up and series help with that plus they are fun. The writing and the ability of the author to transport the reader to their world can make or break the book itself and then the series as well. The waiting for the new book to come out can drag on sometimes, but I just fill the gaps with other books.

    Reply
  48. I love series books if they are well written. I first got hooked on romance novels as a freshman in college with My Lady Notorious. Loved every minute of it and couldn’t wait to read the rest. I like series and the little epilogues and the imagining the rest myself. It’s fun seeing past characters in future books. I enjoy writing as well, but I think the difference between some series is the way they are written. For instance, your books are written as part of the world and it seems natural that character A is included in character B’s book. Also there are loose ends that as a reader I want tied up and series help with that plus they are fun. The writing and the ability of the author to transport the reader to their world can make or break the book itself and then the series as well. The waiting for the new book to come out can drag on sometimes, but I just fill the gaps with other books.

    Reply
  49. I love series books if they are well written. I first got hooked on romance novels as a freshman in college with My Lady Notorious. Loved every minute of it and couldn’t wait to read the rest. I like series and the little epilogues and the imagining the rest myself. It’s fun seeing past characters in future books. I enjoy writing as well, but I think the difference between some series is the way they are written. For instance, your books are written as part of the world and it seems natural that character A is included in character B’s book. Also there are loose ends that as a reader I want tied up and series help with that plus they are fun. The writing and the ability of the author to transport the reader to their world can make or break the book itself and then the series as well. The waiting for the new book to come out can drag on sometimes, but I just fill the gaps with other books.

    Reply
  50. I love series books if they are well written. I first got hooked on romance novels as a freshman in college with My Lady Notorious. Loved every minute of it and couldn’t wait to read the rest. I like series and the little epilogues and the imagining the rest myself. It’s fun seeing past characters in future books. I enjoy writing as well, but I think the difference between some series is the way they are written. For instance, your books are written as part of the world and it seems natural that character A is included in character B’s book. Also there are loose ends that as a reader I want tied up and series help with that plus they are fun. The writing and the ability of the author to transport the reader to their world can make or break the book itself and then the series as well. The waiting for the new book to come out can drag on sometimes, but I just fill the gaps with other books.

    Reply
  51. Sometimes I like series books, but I do prefer a singular story over series. Sometimes, I’ll pick up a book and it will be the 3rd in the series. And most times, I won’t go buy the first 2. If I am aware of a series, I will buy 1,2 and so forth, if the stories are good. Most of the time they are, your’s are always good.

    Reply
  52. Sometimes I like series books, but I do prefer a singular story over series. Sometimes, I’ll pick up a book and it will be the 3rd in the series. And most times, I won’t go buy the first 2. If I am aware of a series, I will buy 1,2 and so forth, if the stories are good. Most of the time they are, your’s are always good.

    Reply
  53. Sometimes I like series books, but I do prefer a singular story over series. Sometimes, I’ll pick up a book and it will be the 3rd in the series. And most times, I won’t go buy the first 2. If I am aware of a series, I will buy 1,2 and so forth, if the stories are good. Most of the time they are, your’s are always good.

    Reply
  54. Sometimes I like series books, but I do prefer a singular story over series. Sometimes, I’ll pick up a book and it will be the 3rd in the series. And most times, I won’t go buy the first 2. If I am aware of a series, I will buy 1,2 and so forth, if the stories are good. Most of the time they are, your’s are always good.

    Reply
  55. Sometimes I like series books, but I do prefer a singular story over series. Sometimes, I’ll pick up a book and it will be the 3rd in the series. And most times, I won’t go buy the first 2. If I am aware of a series, I will buy 1,2 and so forth, if the stories are good. Most of the time they are, your’s are always good.

    Reply
  56. I love your linked books, each containing characters whom I already know and love (or know and already dislike). Linking creates facets of pre-existing emotion created in previous books. From my very personal standpoint, it seems like a very effective technique to increase the depth and roundness in each new book.
    And# 1: Of course, there’s the marketing angle, if it’s not too crass to mention it here. For instance, linked books drive me to routinely overspend my book allowance to buy even peripheral word of old loves who have quite captured my heart: Racecomb De Vere, St. Raven, Rothgar, Fitzroger, and others. I am sorry to report that I fall in love with every hero you present us with, as it reveals with stunning clarity that I must be a compleat emotional slut.
    And #2: For too many years fiction fell into the category of “quality” only if the author killed off his/her main character(s)leaving hero and/or heroine– and also the poor reader–bereft and grieving. Take Hemingway as one example. That’s one reason I love the romance genre so much. I am happy to trust my heart to your characters, knowing you’ll treat it tenderly.
    Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.
    My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverly. Thank you.

    Reply
  57. I love your linked books, each containing characters whom I already know and love (or know and already dislike). Linking creates facets of pre-existing emotion created in previous books. From my very personal standpoint, it seems like a very effective technique to increase the depth and roundness in each new book.
    And# 1: Of course, there’s the marketing angle, if it’s not too crass to mention it here. For instance, linked books drive me to routinely overspend my book allowance to buy even peripheral word of old loves who have quite captured my heart: Racecomb De Vere, St. Raven, Rothgar, Fitzroger, and others. I am sorry to report that I fall in love with every hero you present us with, as it reveals with stunning clarity that I must be a compleat emotional slut.
    And #2: For too many years fiction fell into the category of “quality” only if the author killed off his/her main character(s)leaving hero and/or heroine– and also the poor reader–bereft and grieving. Take Hemingway as one example. That’s one reason I love the romance genre so much. I am happy to trust my heart to your characters, knowing you’ll treat it tenderly.
    Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.
    My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverly. Thank you.

    Reply
  58. I love your linked books, each containing characters whom I already know and love (or know and already dislike). Linking creates facets of pre-existing emotion created in previous books. From my very personal standpoint, it seems like a very effective technique to increase the depth and roundness in each new book.
    And# 1: Of course, there’s the marketing angle, if it’s not too crass to mention it here. For instance, linked books drive me to routinely overspend my book allowance to buy even peripheral word of old loves who have quite captured my heart: Racecomb De Vere, St. Raven, Rothgar, Fitzroger, and others. I am sorry to report that I fall in love with every hero you present us with, as it reveals with stunning clarity that I must be a compleat emotional slut.
    And #2: For too many years fiction fell into the category of “quality” only if the author killed off his/her main character(s)leaving hero and/or heroine– and also the poor reader–bereft and grieving. Take Hemingway as one example. That’s one reason I love the romance genre so much. I am happy to trust my heart to your characters, knowing you’ll treat it tenderly.
    Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.
    My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverly. Thank you.

    Reply
  59. I love your linked books, each containing characters whom I already know and love (or know and already dislike). Linking creates facets of pre-existing emotion created in previous books. From my very personal standpoint, it seems like a very effective technique to increase the depth and roundness in each new book.
    And# 1: Of course, there’s the marketing angle, if it’s not too crass to mention it here. For instance, linked books drive me to routinely overspend my book allowance to buy even peripheral word of old loves who have quite captured my heart: Racecomb De Vere, St. Raven, Rothgar, Fitzroger, and others. I am sorry to report that I fall in love with every hero you present us with, as it reveals with stunning clarity that I must be a compleat emotional slut.
    And #2: For too many years fiction fell into the category of “quality” only if the author killed off his/her main character(s)leaving hero and/or heroine– and also the poor reader–bereft and grieving. Take Hemingway as one example. That’s one reason I love the romance genre so much. I am happy to trust my heart to your characters, knowing you’ll treat it tenderly.
    Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.
    My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverly. Thank you.

    Reply
  60. I love your linked books, each containing characters whom I already know and love (or know and already dislike). Linking creates facets of pre-existing emotion created in previous books. From my very personal standpoint, it seems like a very effective technique to increase the depth and roundness in each new book.
    And# 1: Of course, there’s the marketing angle, if it’s not too crass to mention it here. For instance, linked books drive me to routinely overspend my book allowance to buy even peripheral word of old loves who have quite captured my heart: Racecomb De Vere, St. Raven, Rothgar, Fitzroger, and others. I am sorry to report that I fall in love with every hero you present us with, as it reveals with stunning clarity that I must be a compleat emotional slut.
    And #2: For too many years fiction fell into the category of “quality” only if the author killed off his/her main character(s)leaving hero and/or heroine– and also the poor reader–bereft and grieving. Take Hemingway as one example. That’s one reason I love the romance genre so much. I am happy to trust my heart to your characters, knowing you’ll treat it tenderly.
    Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.
    My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverly. Thank you.

    Reply
  61. “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Oh, I love that, Judy!
    And it leads me to other thoughts. Outsiders will persist in thinking that romance readers lack good relationships and sex lives.
    Do misery-fic readers lack misery?
    “My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverley. Thank you.”
    Thank you!
    Jo

    Reply
  62. “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Oh, I love that, Judy!
    And it leads me to other thoughts. Outsiders will persist in thinking that romance readers lack good relationships and sex lives.
    Do misery-fic readers lack misery?
    “My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverley. Thank you.”
    Thank you!
    Jo

    Reply
  63. “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Oh, I love that, Judy!
    And it leads me to other thoughts. Outsiders will persist in thinking that romance readers lack good relationships and sex lives.
    Do misery-fic readers lack misery?
    “My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverley. Thank you.”
    Thank you!
    Jo

    Reply
  64. “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Oh, I love that, Judy!
    And it leads me to other thoughts. Outsiders will persist in thinking that romance readers lack good relationships and sex lives.
    Do misery-fic readers lack misery?
    “My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverley. Thank you.”
    Thank you!
    Jo

    Reply
  65. “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Oh, I love that, Judy!
    And it leads me to other thoughts. Outsiders will persist in thinking that romance readers lack good relationships and sex lives.
    Do misery-fic readers lack misery?
    “My life is richer for the literary labors of Jo Beverley. Thank you.”
    Thank you!
    Jo

    Reply
  66. I’m delighted when characters with whom I’ve fallen in love appear in linked novels, as I always want to see more of them. Nicholas may be my favorite of the rogue heroes, and I appreciate how he is utterly himself (ie, the person who assembled the original company) in subsequent novels. To give just one small example, it was perfect that he was the one who noticed no one was paying attention to Clarissa at the end of an Unwilling Bride. “That’s so like Nicholas,” I thought to myself. It’s at moments like those that you know an author has created magic for the reader.
    And yes, I am a bit obsessive about detail!

    Reply
  67. I’m delighted when characters with whom I’ve fallen in love appear in linked novels, as I always want to see more of them. Nicholas may be my favorite of the rogue heroes, and I appreciate how he is utterly himself (ie, the person who assembled the original company) in subsequent novels. To give just one small example, it was perfect that he was the one who noticed no one was paying attention to Clarissa at the end of an Unwilling Bride. “That’s so like Nicholas,” I thought to myself. It’s at moments like those that you know an author has created magic for the reader.
    And yes, I am a bit obsessive about detail!

    Reply
  68. I’m delighted when characters with whom I’ve fallen in love appear in linked novels, as I always want to see more of them. Nicholas may be my favorite of the rogue heroes, and I appreciate how he is utterly himself (ie, the person who assembled the original company) in subsequent novels. To give just one small example, it was perfect that he was the one who noticed no one was paying attention to Clarissa at the end of an Unwilling Bride. “That’s so like Nicholas,” I thought to myself. It’s at moments like those that you know an author has created magic for the reader.
    And yes, I am a bit obsessive about detail!

    Reply
  69. I’m delighted when characters with whom I’ve fallen in love appear in linked novels, as I always want to see more of them. Nicholas may be my favorite of the rogue heroes, and I appreciate how he is utterly himself (ie, the person who assembled the original company) in subsequent novels. To give just one small example, it was perfect that he was the one who noticed no one was paying attention to Clarissa at the end of an Unwilling Bride. “That’s so like Nicholas,” I thought to myself. It’s at moments like those that you know an author has created magic for the reader.
    And yes, I am a bit obsessive about detail!

    Reply
  70. I’m delighted when characters with whom I’ve fallen in love appear in linked novels, as I always want to see more of them. Nicholas may be my favorite of the rogue heroes, and I appreciate how he is utterly himself (ie, the person who assembled the original company) in subsequent novels. To give just one small example, it was perfect that he was the one who noticed no one was paying attention to Clarissa at the end of an Unwilling Bride. “That’s so like Nicholas,” I thought to myself. It’s at moments like those that you know an author has created magic for the reader.
    And yes, I am a bit obsessive about detail!

    Reply
  71. I love to see characters I fell in love with appear in subsequent books. If it’s done well, and the Wenches just have that “well” knack, then it makes each book all the richer.
    However, (and you knew that was coming, didn’t you? ;0) ) when they’re tossed in as the obligatory half to full page let’s-make-sure-readers-know-things-are-connected appearance, then no. I don’t care for those at all and will quit reading them.

    Reply
  72. I love to see characters I fell in love with appear in subsequent books. If it’s done well, and the Wenches just have that “well” knack, then it makes each book all the richer.
    However, (and you knew that was coming, didn’t you? ;0) ) when they’re tossed in as the obligatory half to full page let’s-make-sure-readers-know-things-are-connected appearance, then no. I don’t care for those at all and will quit reading them.

    Reply
  73. I love to see characters I fell in love with appear in subsequent books. If it’s done well, and the Wenches just have that “well” knack, then it makes each book all the richer.
    However, (and you knew that was coming, didn’t you? ;0) ) when they’re tossed in as the obligatory half to full page let’s-make-sure-readers-know-things-are-connected appearance, then no. I don’t care for those at all and will quit reading them.

    Reply
  74. I love to see characters I fell in love with appear in subsequent books. If it’s done well, and the Wenches just have that “well” knack, then it makes each book all the richer.
    However, (and you knew that was coming, didn’t you? ;0) ) when they’re tossed in as the obligatory half to full page let’s-make-sure-readers-know-things-are-connected appearance, then no. I don’t care for those at all and will quit reading them.

    Reply
  75. I love to see characters I fell in love with appear in subsequent books. If it’s done well, and the Wenches just have that “well” knack, then it makes each book all the richer.
    However, (and you knew that was coming, didn’t you? ;0) ) when they’re tossed in as the obligatory half to full page let’s-make-sure-readers-know-things-are-connected appearance, then no. I don’t care for those at all and will quit reading them.

    Reply
  76. Can’t wait for the new Countess book! I like stand alone books and linked books, but the linked books can be be more comfortable and easier to dive into, because you’re meeting old friends.

    Reply
  77. Can’t wait for the new Countess book! I like stand alone books and linked books, but the linked books can be be more comfortable and easier to dive into, because you’re meeting old friends.

    Reply
  78. Can’t wait for the new Countess book! I like stand alone books and linked books, but the linked books can be be more comfortable and easier to dive into, because you’re meeting old friends.

    Reply
  79. Can’t wait for the new Countess book! I like stand alone books and linked books, but the linked books can be be more comfortable and easier to dive into, because you’re meeting old friends.

    Reply
  80. Can’t wait for the new Countess book! I like stand alone books and linked books, but the linked books can be be more comfortable and easier to dive into, because you’re meeting old friends.

    Reply
  81. Have you seen Richard E. Grant as The Scarlet Pimpernel in the A&E series? I liked him as the character, but that’s about all I liked about the production.
    I’m not really fond of closely connected books. I don’t read nearly as much as I used to and keeping up with a series can seem daunting.

    Reply
  82. Have you seen Richard E. Grant as The Scarlet Pimpernel in the A&E series? I liked him as the character, but that’s about all I liked about the production.
    I’m not really fond of closely connected books. I don’t read nearly as much as I used to and keeping up with a series can seem daunting.

    Reply
  83. Have you seen Richard E. Grant as The Scarlet Pimpernel in the A&E series? I liked him as the character, but that’s about all I liked about the production.
    I’m not really fond of closely connected books. I don’t read nearly as much as I used to and keeping up with a series can seem daunting.

    Reply
  84. Have you seen Richard E. Grant as The Scarlet Pimpernel in the A&E series? I liked him as the character, but that’s about all I liked about the production.
    I’m not really fond of closely connected books. I don’t read nearly as much as I used to and keeping up with a series can seem daunting.

    Reply
  85. Have you seen Richard E. Grant as The Scarlet Pimpernel in the A&E series? I liked him as the character, but that’s about all I liked about the production.
    I’m not really fond of closely connected books. I don’t read nearly as much as I used to and keeping up with a series can seem daunting.

    Reply
  86. I love series, but will only read them after I have them all. I started in the middle of your Rogues books and frantically searched for the second which was OOP. I enjoy that parts of the stories are told from different points of view, that you find a tidbit in another book that explains why a character did what they did or what really happened behind that door. I attempted to do it in my contemporary novels, but ended up with over 700 pages. The things I cut I kept in a computer file. They may show up later, if I garner publishing success. But, thank you, your books are keepers indeed and I too loved Judy’s comments. Appreciate your time!

    Reply
  87. I love series, but will only read them after I have them all. I started in the middle of your Rogues books and frantically searched for the second which was OOP. I enjoy that parts of the stories are told from different points of view, that you find a tidbit in another book that explains why a character did what they did or what really happened behind that door. I attempted to do it in my contemporary novels, but ended up with over 700 pages. The things I cut I kept in a computer file. They may show up later, if I garner publishing success. But, thank you, your books are keepers indeed and I too loved Judy’s comments. Appreciate your time!

    Reply
  88. I love series, but will only read them after I have them all. I started in the middle of your Rogues books and frantically searched for the second which was OOP. I enjoy that parts of the stories are told from different points of view, that you find a tidbit in another book that explains why a character did what they did or what really happened behind that door. I attempted to do it in my contemporary novels, but ended up with over 700 pages. The things I cut I kept in a computer file. They may show up later, if I garner publishing success. But, thank you, your books are keepers indeed and I too loved Judy’s comments. Appreciate your time!

    Reply
  89. I love series, but will only read them after I have them all. I started in the middle of your Rogues books and frantically searched for the second which was OOP. I enjoy that parts of the stories are told from different points of view, that you find a tidbit in another book that explains why a character did what they did or what really happened behind that door. I attempted to do it in my contemporary novels, but ended up with over 700 pages. The things I cut I kept in a computer file. They may show up later, if I garner publishing success. But, thank you, your books are keepers indeed and I too loved Judy’s comments. Appreciate your time!

    Reply
  90. I love series, but will only read them after I have them all. I started in the middle of your Rogues books and frantically searched for the second which was OOP. I enjoy that parts of the stories are told from different points of view, that you find a tidbit in another book that explains why a character did what they did or what really happened behind that door. I attempted to do it in my contemporary novels, but ended up with over 700 pages. The things I cut I kept in a computer file. They may show up later, if I garner publishing success. But, thank you, your books are keepers indeed and I too loved Judy’s comments. Appreciate your time!

    Reply
  91. I do love series books and while I read each one as I acquire it, if I find out I have started in the middle I will find the other books, read through to the end and then start at the beginning so I can enjoy them all over again.
    When I am having a rough time and need some comfort I tend to pick up a series of books and read them again back to back. There is something about that continuity, about visiting old friends and immersing myself in their world that really cheers me.
    “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Judy I am printing that out and posting it on my noteboard! SO true! I read to escape the real world not to wallow in the misery of it!
    And to all of the Word Wenches, thank you so very much for all of the lovely afternoons I’ve spent visiting with old friends and new! You will never know what a difference your books have made in my life!

    Reply
  92. I do love series books and while I read each one as I acquire it, if I find out I have started in the middle I will find the other books, read through to the end and then start at the beginning so I can enjoy them all over again.
    When I am having a rough time and need some comfort I tend to pick up a series of books and read them again back to back. There is something about that continuity, about visiting old friends and immersing myself in their world that really cheers me.
    “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Judy I am printing that out and posting it on my noteboard! SO true! I read to escape the real world not to wallow in the misery of it!
    And to all of the Word Wenches, thank you so very much for all of the lovely afternoons I’ve spent visiting with old friends and new! You will never know what a difference your books have made in my life!

    Reply
  93. I do love series books and while I read each one as I acquire it, if I find out I have started in the middle I will find the other books, read through to the end and then start at the beginning so I can enjoy them all over again.
    When I am having a rough time and need some comfort I tend to pick up a series of books and read them again back to back. There is something about that continuity, about visiting old friends and immersing myself in their world that really cheers me.
    “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Judy I am printing that out and posting it on my noteboard! SO true! I read to escape the real world not to wallow in the misery of it!
    And to all of the Word Wenches, thank you so very much for all of the lovely afternoons I’ve spent visiting with old friends and new! You will never know what a difference your books have made in my life!

    Reply
  94. I do love series books and while I read each one as I acquire it, if I find out I have started in the middle I will find the other books, read through to the end and then start at the beginning so I can enjoy them all over again.
    When I am having a rough time and need some comfort I tend to pick up a series of books and read them again back to back. There is something about that continuity, about visiting old friends and immersing myself in their world that really cheers me.
    “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Judy I am printing that out and posting it on my noteboard! SO true! I read to escape the real world not to wallow in the misery of it!
    And to all of the Word Wenches, thank you so very much for all of the lovely afternoons I’ve spent visiting with old friends and new! You will never know what a difference your books have made in my life!

    Reply
  95. I do love series books and while I read each one as I acquire it, if I find out I have started in the middle I will find the other books, read through to the end and then start at the beginning so I can enjoy them all over again.
    When I am having a rough time and need some comfort I tend to pick up a series of books and read them again back to back. There is something about that continuity, about visiting old friends and immersing myself in their world that really cheers me.
    “Only a fool spends money on fictional grief when so much real grief available for free.”
    Judy I am printing that out and posting it on my noteboard! SO true! I read to escape the real world not to wallow in the misery of it!
    And to all of the Word Wenches, thank you so very much for all of the lovely afternoons I’ve spent visiting with old friends and new! You will never know what a difference your books have made in my life!

    Reply
  96. I loved the Scarlet Pimpernel too and especially enjoyed the movies with Leslie Howard – I know most of you are too young to remember that dashing cavalier.

    Reply
  97. I loved the Scarlet Pimpernel too and especially enjoyed the movies with Leslie Howard – I know most of you are too young to remember that dashing cavalier.

    Reply
  98. I loved the Scarlet Pimpernel too and especially enjoyed the movies with Leslie Howard – I know most of you are too young to remember that dashing cavalier.

    Reply
  99. I loved the Scarlet Pimpernel too and especially enjoyed the movies with Leslie Howard – I know most of you are too young to remember that dashing cavalier.

    Reply
  100. I loved the Scarlet Pimpernel too and especially enjoyed the movies with Leslie Howard – I know most of you are too young to remember that dashing cavalier.

    Reply
  101. I’m with you, Jo. I really hate series books. I hate coming in on the middle of a story. To me, it’s like starting in the middle of a novel where I don’t know everything that’s happened before. It’s better if I start with the first book, and when I can read the books one after the other. Having to wait a year for the next one really irritates me because I’ll forget details of the previous book.
    But I’m in the minority. Apparently, most people don’t mind missing the beginning.
    But I love the Scarlet Pimpernel in any way, manner or form. *g*

    Reply
  102. I’m with you, Jo. I really hate series books. I hate coming in on the middle of a story. To me, it’s like starting in the middle of a novel where I don’t know everything that’s happened before. It’s better if I start with the first book, and when I can read the books one after the other. Having to wait a year for the next one really irritates me because I’ll forget details of the previous book.
    But I’m in the minority. Apparently, most people don’t mind missing the beginning.
    But I love the Scarlet Pimpernel in any way, manner or form. *g*

    Reply
  103. I’m with you, Jo. I really hate series books. I hate coming in on the middle of a story. To me, it’s like starting in the middle of a novel where I don’t know everything that’s happened before. It’s better if I start with the first book, and when I can read the books one after the other. Having to wait a year for the next one really irritates me because I’ll forget details of the previous book.
    But I’m in the minority. Apparently, most people don’t mind missing the beginning.
    But I love the Scarlet Pimpernel in any way, manner or form. *g*

    Reply
  104. I’m with you, Jo. I really hate series books. I hate coming in on the middle of a story. To me, it’s like starting in the middle of a novel where I don’t know everything that’s happened before. It’s better if I start with the first book, and when I can read the books one after the other. Having to wait a year for the next one really irritates me because I’ll forget details of the previous book.
    But I’m in the minority. Apparently, most people don’t mind missing the beginning.
    But I love the Scarlet Pimpernel in any way, manner or form. *g*

    Reply
  105. I’m with you, Jo. I really hate series books. I hate coming in on the middle of a story. To me, it’s like starting in the middle of a novel where I don’t know everything that’s happened before. It’s better if I start with the first book, and when I can read the books one after the other. Having to wait a year for the next one really irritates me because I’ll forget details of the previous book.
    But I’m in the minority. Apparently, most people don’t mind missing the beginning.
    But I love the Scarlet Pimpernel in any way, manner or form. *g*

    Reply
  106. I know I’m probably unusual in that (to my daughter’s horror) if I pick up a book & it piques my interest, I read it. Then, if I enjoyed the story line, I’ll go on the hunt to fill in the gaps I’ve incurred by reading it out of order. 🙂 It is still enjoyable, as I found with your books Jo, I’ve fallen in love with “all” of your rogues! And, when life gets too much..a comfort read is a comfort read, the book plucked out of a series or read in order.
    I think I read the Scarlet Pimpernel years ago, but do remember a swashbuckler movie that had me in thrall as a girl. I guess I’ll have to remedy that & work it in between “my” favorite authors new books. Best of luck to all The word Wenches who have new books out that I (& everyone else) look forward to escaping into.

    Reply
  107. I know I’m probably unusual in that (to my daughter’s horror) if I pick up a book & it piques my interest, I read it. Then, if I enjoyed the story line, I’ll go on the hunt to fill in the gaps I’ve incurred by reading it out of order. 🙂 It is still enjoyable, as I found with your books Jo, I’ve fallen in love with “all” of your rogues! And, when life gets too much..a comfort read is a comfort read, the book plucked out of a series or read in order.
    I think I read the Scarlet Pimpernel years ago, but do remember a swashbuckler movie that had me in thrall as a girl. I guess I’ll have to remedy that & work it in between “my” favorite authors new books. Best of luck to all The word Wenches who have new books out that I (& everyone else) look forward to escaping into.

    Reply
  108. I know I’m probably unusual in that (to my daughter’s horror) if I pick up a book & it piques my interest, I read it. Then, if I enjoyed the story line, I’ll go on the hunt to fill in the gaps I’ve incurred by reading it out of order. 🙂 It is still enjoyable, as I found with your books Jo, I’ve fallen in love with “all” of your rogues! And, when life gets too much..a comfort read is a comfort read, the book plucked out of a series or read in order.
    I think I read the Scarlet Pimpernel years ago, but do remember a swashbuckler movie that had me in thrall as a girl. I guess I’ll have to remedy that & work it in between “my” favorite authors new books. Best of luck to all The word Wenches who have new books out that I (& everyone else) look forward to escaping into.

    Reply
  109. I know I’m probably unusual in that (to my daughter’s horror) if I pick up a book & it piques my interest, I read it. Then, if I enjoyed the story line, I’ll go on the hunt to fill in the gaps I’ve incurred by reading it out of order. 🙂 It is still enjoyable, as I found with your books Jo, I’ve fallen in love with “all” of your rogues! And, when life gets too much..a comfort read is a comfort read, the book plucked out of a series or read in order.
    I think I read the Scarlet Pimpernel years ago, but do remember a swashbuckler movie that had me in thrall as a girl. I guess I’ll have to remedy that & work it in between “my” favorite authors new books. Best of luck to all The word Wenches who have new books out that I (& everyone else) look forward to escaping into.

    Reply
  110. I know I’m probably unusual in that (to my daughter’s horror) if I pick up a book & it piques my interest, I read it. Then, if I enjoyed the story line, I’ll go on the hunt to fill in the gaps I’ve incurred by reading it out of order. 🙂 It is still enjoyable, as I found with your books Jo, I’ve fallen in love with “all” of your rogues! And, when life gets too much..a comfort read is a comfort read, the book plucked out of a series or read in order.
    I think I read the Scarlet Pimpernel years ago, but do remember a swashbuckler movie that had me in thrall as a girl. I guess I’ll have to remedy that & work it in between “my” favorite authors new books. Best of luck to all The word Wenches who have new books out that I (& everyone else) look forward to escaping into.

    Reply

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