Secrets Under Paris

Joanna here, talking about the secrets under the belly of Paris.  Women drinking beer manet
 
It's 1800 or so. 
There you are, sitting in a café in Paris, relaxing, wearing somethin
g Parisian with great éclat and style. 

Unless you are feeling deeply philosophical it's unlikely you wonder about what secrets lie hidden beneath your feet.   

"All secrets are deep. All secrets become dark. That's in the nature of secrets." 
Cory Doctorow

It is not solid earth down there.

By 1800 there's fourteen miles of sewers cut through the rock under Paris.  I don't know why folks always point out how far something like this could stretch, but that amount of Wiki _Nelson,_Nelson's_Column Eighteenth Century sewer would run from the Nelson column in Trafalgar Square to Terminal Five at Heathrow, neither of which was in existence in 1800, of course.  

We aren't going to talk about Regency-era sewerage, fascinating though that subject is.  We're going to delve deeper.  We're headed to the mines that lie far below that sidewalk café.

Carririere des caputchins pridian net

Paris feeds on itself, like the Worm Ouroboros chews its own tail.  The fine building stone of Paris is pulled from beneath the city's feet. 

From Medieval times onward, folks took that excellent limestone out of the ground and threw up little trifles of work like Notre Dame and the Louvre. 

 

Miners burrowed down sixty feet, cut blocks, hauled them out, and left behind a labyrinth of mine shafts, tunnels, and galleries under the earth.  

 

 

  Carririere des caputchins pridian net 2  Esprit de sel  escallier cc attrib no derive Esprit de sel  rue cuvier cc attrib no derive Esprit de sel  neons3 cc attrib no derive
 
There's 180 miles of tunnels and quarries running under the Left Bank.  When our Regency heroine sits in a café on the Boulevard Saint-Michel, she's a stone's throw above one of those old mines. Carririere des caputchins pridian net 4

And for a while there, the world crumbled from beneath.

While the miners were digging away over the centuries, they left big pillars of stone  in place, unexcavated, and built walls to support the roof of the mines.  This worked handily to keep the place upright while the stone was being removed, which was what the  miners were concerned about. 

 

However — you knew there was a 'however' coming — folks eventually came along and built on the ground above, having absent-mindedly forgotten about those pesky, empty underground spaces. 


Wiki Val_de_Grace_dsc04637

 It turned out the miner's pillars and walls were not so much sufficient to support the weight of cathedrals and palaces that were being built up top.  There was a bit of an 'oops' factor when some of these grand structures began subsiding into the ground. 

 

The French formed a bureaucracy to deal with this.  In 1777 Louis XVI — you will recall he came to a bad end — ordered the formation of an Inspection Générale des Carrières (General Inspectorate of the Quarries) to explore and map the underground, to dig wells, to control new mining, and to build stonework to shore up the old mines.  Plaque in quarries

They marked the place, so they could find their way around.   Since the tunnels tended to run under the main streets, they carved the names of those streets in the walls, matching the routes through the mines to the streets of Paris above.  

 

Le petit montreur de singe savant fragonard jaconde late c18

 

Streets and  houses stopped giving way and sinking into the bowels of the earth, much to the general rejoicing of the Parisians.

 

 

 

 

A visitor to the quarries in 1784 describes them —

"The general height of the roof is about nine or ten feet ; but in some parts not less than 30 and even 40. In many places there is a liquor continually dropping from it, which congeals immediately, and forms a species of transparent stone, but not so fine and clear as rock crystal.

As we continued our peregrination, we thought ourselves in no small danger from the roof, which we found but indifferently propped in some places with wood much decayed. Under the houses, and many of the streets, however, it seemed to be tolerably secured by immense stones set in mortar; in other parts, where there are only fields or gardens above it, it was totally unsupported for a considerable space, the roof being perfectly level, or a plain piece of rock."

 

When I came across these descriptiions of the quarries I just knew there had to be a story there. 

Aaajapanese fb

In Forbidden Rose I send my characters walking through the tunnels and galleries of these old abandoned quarries.  While I've never visited myself, I consulted some of the intrepid modern 'cataphiles' who do explore there.  

 

 

This is Maggie and her cohort entering the quarries: Candle light attrib florriebassingbourne

     This was what hell had been like when it was first constructed and lay empty, before the demons moved in with their cauldrons of fire and their pitchforks.  Hell would have smelled like wet plaster before it filled with the fumes of sulfur and whatever devils smell like.

     They carried candles, bringing five small points of light into this world.  Of all the uncanny occurrences since Marguerite had descended to this place, the strangest rested here in her hand.  The candle flame stood upward, only stirring when her breath fell across it.  There were no currents of air, no connection to the winds under the heavens.

 
     The rock around her was damp, full of minerals, without the least trace of life.  This was the Realm of the Underworld.  The Kingdom of Darkness.  Their candles did not challenge it at all. 

 

Author Real Life Note here:  I lived in Paris for a number of years and not once did I feel any urge to go exploring around below ground.  I don't say I'm claustrophobic, exactly.  I would just rather not walk about in dark places deep under the ground with tons of rock hanging above me just waiting to fall down, thank you very much.

Which may be why I put my characters down there . . . 

Picture attrib coffee roboppy, Carrières one, two and six by samuel marshall at pridan net, Carrières three, four and five by espritdesel, candle by florriebassingbourne.

"Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong.  No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always go there first, and is waiting for it."
Terry Pratchett

 

When you read, what's the scary environment you want to see the protagonists face? 
Or, what do you most definitely not want to read about?

130 thoughts on “Secrets Under Paris”

  1. I don’t think I’d want to go underground like that either. Not my cup of tea. It’s probably the one thing that makes me claustrophobic.
    I have to say though, History of the Underworld on the History channel is absolutely fascinating! They’ve done everything from where the Hellfire club met in London’s underground belly, to Celtic burial mounds under Edinburgh to Hitler’s underground bunkers. And I am amazed at the fact that almost every major city in Europe had at one time, a teeming underground city as well.

    Reply
  2. I don’t think I’d want to go underground like that either. Not my cup of tea. It’s probably the one thing that makes me claustrophobic.
    I have to say though, History of the Underworld on the History channel is absolutely fascinating! They’ve done everything from where the Hellfire club met in London’s underground belly, to Celtic burial mounds under Edinburgh to Hitler’s underground bunkers. And I am amazed at the fact that almost every major city in Europe had at one time, a teeming underground city as well.

    Reply
  3. I don’t think I’d want to go underground like that either. Not my cup of tea. It’s probably the one thing that makes me claustrophobic.
    I have to say though, History of the Underworld on the History channel is absolutely fascinating! They’ve done everything from where the Hellfire club met in London’s underground belly, to Celtic burial mounds under Edinburgh to Hitler’s underground bunkers. And I am amazed at the fact that almost every major city in Europe had at one time, a teeming underground city as well.

    Reply
  4. I don’t think I’d want to go underground like that either. Not my cup of tea. It’s probably the one thing that makes me claustrophobic.
    I have to say though, History of the Underworld on the History channel is absolutely fascinating! They’ve done everything from where the Hellfire club met in London’s underground belly, to Celtic burial mounds under Edinburgh to Hitler’s underground bunkers. And I am amazed at the fact that almost every major city in Europe had at one time, a teeming underground city as well.

    Reply
  5. I don’t think I’d want to go underground like that either. Not my cup of tea. It’s probably the one thing that makes me claustrophobic.
    I have to say though, History of the Underworld on the History channel is absolutely fascinating! They’ve done everything from where the Hellfire club met in London’s underground belly, to Celtic burial mounds under Edinburgh to Hitler’s underground bunkers. And I am amazed at the fact that almost every major city in Europe had at one time, a teeming underground city as well.

    Reply
  6. Not sure if I’d go under or not, would depend upon how adventurous I was feeling though I do find it interesting. I loved how you used them in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  7. Not sure if I’d go under or not, would depend upon how adventurous I was feeling though I do find it interesting. I loved how you used them in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  8. Not sure if I’d go under or not, would depend upon how adventurous I was feeling though I do find it interesting. I loved how you used them in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  9. Not sure if I’d go under or not, would depend upon how adventurous I was feeling though I do find it interesting. I loved how you used them in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  10. Not sure if I’d go under or not, would depend upon how adventurous I was feeling though I do find it interesting. I loved how you used them in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  11. What interesting information about the Paris underground. I’ve been to Paris but don’t remember learning that, especially the bit about the buildings above sinking. Scary!
    I’m not real big on small, dark spaces,especially when tons of dirt and rock are above me. Probably why I don’t visit too many caves. I have been down into the Roman Catacombs but that was when I was young and didn’t know better. It was fascinating!

    Reply
  12. What interesting information about the Paris underground. I’ve been to Paris but don’t remember learning that, especially the bit about the buildings above sinking. Scary!
    I’m not real big on small, dark spaces,especially when tons of dirt and rock are above me. Probably why I don’t visit too many caves. I have been down into the Roman Catacombs but that was when I was young and didn’t know better. It was fascinating!

    Reply
  13. What interesting information about the Paris underground. I’ve been to Paris but don’t remember learning that, especially the bit about the buildings above sinking. Scary!
    I’m not real big on small, dark spaces,especially when tons of dirt and rock are above me. Probably why I don’t visit too many caves. I have been down into the Roman Catacombs but that was when I was young and didn’t know better. It was fascinating!

    Reply
  14. What interesting information about the Paris underground. I’ve been to Paris but don’t remember learning that, especially the bit about the buildings above sinking. Scary!
    I’m not real big on small, dark spaces,especially when tons of dirt and rock are above me. Probably why I don’t visit too many caves. I have been down into the Roman Catacombs but that was when I was young and didn’t know better. It was fascinating!

    Reply
  15. What interesting information about the Paris underground. I’ve been to Paris but don’t remember learning that, especially the bit about the buildings above sinking. Scary!
    I’m not real big on small, dark spaces,especially when tons of dirt and rock are above me. Probably why I don’t visit too many caves. I have been down into the Roman Catacombs but that was when I was young and didn’t know better. It was fascinating!

    Reply
  16. Wow. I love the wealth of meaning in the phrase “indifferently propped.” The role of Maggie’s father is clearer to me now that I’ve read about Louis’s map-making directive.
    I’ve been in touristy mines, and I was fine there. But I’m absolutely phobic about burial alive. Tales of excavated coffins with deep grooves scratched into the top terrify me. Movies and stories that use that plot device? Yikes.
    For me, the other terrifying situation is the one of dreams in which someone has lost her voice and can’t scream for help. Burial alive and the loss of speech are both claustrophobic, though the former is more obviously so.

    Reply
  17. Wow. I love the wealth of meaning in the phrase “indifferently propped.” The role of Maggie’s father is clearer to me now that I’ve read about Louis’s map-making directive.
    I’ve been in touristy mines, and I was fine there. But I’m absolutely phobic about burial alive. Tales of excavated coffins with deep grooves scratched into the top terrify me. Movies and stories that use that plot device? Yikes.
    For me, the other terrifying situation is the one of dreams in which someone has lost her voice and can’t scream for help. Burial alive and the loss of speech are both claustrophobic, though the former is more obviously so.

    Reply
  18. Wow. I love the wealth of meaning in the phrase “indifferently propped.” The role of Maggie’s father is clearer to me now that I’ve read about Louis’s map-making directive.
    I’ve been in touristy mines, and I was fine there. But I’m absolutely phobic about burial alive. Tales of excavated coffins with deep grooves scratched into the top terrify me. Movies and stories that use that plot device? Yikes.
    For me, the other terrifying situation is the one of dreams in which someone has lost her voice and can’t scream for help. Burial alive and the loss of speech are both claustrophobic, though the former is more obviously so.

    Reply
  19. Wow. I love the wealth of meaning in the phrase “indifferently propped.” The role of Maggie’s father is clearer to me now that I’ve read about Louis’s map-making directive.
    I’ve been in touristy mines, and I was fine there. But I’m absolutely phobic about burial alive. Tales of excavated coffins with deep grooves scratched into the top terrify me. Movies and stories that use that plot device? Yikes.
    For me, the other terrifying situation is the one of dreams in which someone has lost her voice and can’t scream for help. Burial alive and the loss of speech are both claustrophobic, though the former is more obviously so.

    Reply
  20. Wow. I love the wealth of meaning in the phrase “indifferently propped.” The role of Maggie’s father is clearer to me now that I’ve read about Louis’s map-making directive.
    I’ve been in touristy mines, and I was fine there. But I’m absolutely phobic about burial alive. Tales of excavated coffins with deep grooves scratched into the top terrify me. Movies and stories that use that plot device? Yikes.
    For me, the other terrifying situation is the one of dreams in which someone has lost her voice and can’t scream for help. Burial alive and the loss of speech are both claustrophobic, though the former is more obviously so.

    Reply
  21. Hi Theo —
    Oh yes. That’s one of the TV programs I always try to catch. Fascinating stuff.
    People who edit or write or review are always pointing out that it ruins their pleasure in reading. They can’t just lose themselves in a book any more. They’re always analyzing it.
    I feel somewhat the same way about history programs on the tube. I can’t just watch them. I’m always thinking — ‘how can I use that.’

    Reply
  22. Hi Theo —
    Oh yes. That’s one of the TV programs I always try to catch. Fascinating stuff.
    People who edit or write or review are always pointing out that it ruins their pleasure in reading. They can’t just lose themselves in a book any more. They’re always analyzing it.
    I feel somewhat the same way about history programs on the tube. I can’t just watch them. I’m always thinking — ‘how can I use that.’

    Reply
  23. Hi Theo —
    Oh yes. That’s one of the TV programs I always try to catch. Fascinating stuff.
    People who edit or write or review are always pointing out that it ruins their pleasure in reading. They can’t just lose themselves in a book any more. They’re always analyzing it.
    I feel somewhat the same way about history programs on the tube. I can’t just watch them. I’m always thinking — ‘how can I use that.’

    Reply
  24. Hi Theo —
    Oh yes. That’s one of the TV programs I always try to catch. Fascinating stuff.
    People who edit or write or review are always pointing out that it ruins their pleasure in reading. They can’t just lose themselves in a book any more. They’re always analyzing it.
    I feel somewhat the same way about history programs on the tube. I can’t just watch them. I’m always thinking — ‘how can I use that.’

    Reply
  25. Hi Theo —
    Oh yes. That’s one of the TV programs I always try to catch. Fascinating stuff.
    People who edit or write or review are always pointing out that it ruins their pleasure in reading. They can’t just lose themselves in a book any more. They’re always analyzing it.
    I feel somewhat the same way about history programs on the tube. I can’t just watch them. I’m always thinking — ‘how can I use that.’

    Reply
  26. Hi Donna Ann —
    I would have got Doyle out of prison some way or other. But just imagine how delighted I was to learn about these caverns. And it’s all so splendidly symbolic, y’know.
    If I had it to write again, I’d let Doyle and Maggie make love, right there in the caverns, next to the bottom of the well shaft.
    I originally planned to do that. But it was hard to make the mood ‘fit’. I didn’t have the extra week I needed to tune that scene.
    Maybe it would never have been ‘right’, no matter how hard I worked on it. But as it came down to deadline, I figured it was better to leave that scene out than to write it hastily and get it wrong.

    Reply
  27. Hi Donna Ann —
    I would have got Doyle out of prison some way or other. But just imagine how delighted I was to learn about these caverns. And it’s all so splendidly symbolic, y’know.
    If I had it to write again, I’d let Doyle and Maggie make love, right there in the caverns, next to the bottom of the well shaft.
    I originally planned to do that. But it was hard to make the mood ‘fit’. I didn’t have the extra week I needed to tune that scene.
    Maybe it would never have been ‘right’, no matter how hard I worked on it. But as it came down to deadline, I figured it was better to leave that scene out than to write it hastily and get it wrong.

    Reply
  28. Hi Donna Ann —
    I would have got Doyle out of prison some way or other. But just imagine how delighted I was to learn about these caverns. And it’s all so splendidly symbolic, y’know.
    If I had it to write again, I’d let Doyle and Maggie make love, right there in the caverns, next to the bottom of the well shaft.
    I originally planned to do that. But it was hard to make the mood ‘fit’. I didn’t have the extra week I needed to tune that scene.
    Maybe it would never have been ‘right’, no matter how hard I worked on it. But as it came down to deadline, I figured it was better to leave that scene out than to write it hastily and get it wrong.

    Reply
  29. Hi Donna Ann —
    I would have got Doyle out of prison some way or other. But just imagine how delighted I was to learn about these caverns. And it’s all so splendidly symbolic, y’know.
    If I had it to write again, I’d let Doyle and Maggie make love, right there in the caverns, next to the bottom of the well shaft.
    I originally planned to do that. But it was hard to make the mood ‘fit’. I didn’t have the extra week I needed to tune that scene.
    Maybe it would never have been ‘right’, no matter how hard I worked on it. But as it came down to deadline, I figured it was better to leave that scene out than to write it hastily and get it wrong.

    Reply
  30. Hi Donna Ann —
    I would have got Doyle out of prison some way or other. But just imagine how delighted I was to learn about these caverns. And it’s all so splendidly symbolic, y’know.
    If I had it to write again, I’d let Doyle and Maggie make love, right there in the caverns, next to the bottom of the well shaft.
    I originally planned to do that. But it was hard to make the mood ‘fit’. I didn’t have the extra week I needed to tune that scene.
    Maybe it would never have been ‘right’, no matter how hard I worked on it. But as it came down to deadline, I figured it was better to leave that scene out than to write it hastily and get it wrong.

    Reply
  31. Hi pjpuppymom —
    Paris has an extensive ‘catacombs’ of its own.
    These catacombs aren’t ancient. The bones were moved from the overfilled graveyards of central Paris into underground caverns in late C18 and early C19. They’re arranged decoratively.
    The underground spaces they put the bones in are part of these caverns I’m writing about. I didn’t include pictures of that because I didn’t want to harrow anybody. It’s kinda eerie.
    They have tours. I will never understand people.

    Reply
  32. Hi pjpuppymom —
    Paris has an extensive ‘catacombs’ of its own.
    These catacombs aren’t ancient. The bones were moved from the overfilled graveyards of central Paris into underground caverns in late C18 and early C19. They’re arranged decoratively.
    The underground spaces they put the bones in are part of these caverns I’m writing about. I didn’t include pictures of that because I didn’t want to harrow anybody. It’s kinda eerie.
    They have tours. I will never understand people.

    Reply
  33. Hi pjpuppymom —
    Paris has an extensive ‘catacombs’ of its own.
    These catacombs aren’t ancient. The bones were moved from the overfilled graveyards of central Paris into underground caverns in late C18 and early C19. They’re arranged decoratively.
    The underground spaces they put the bones in are part of these caverns I’m writing about. I didn’t include pictures of that because I didn’t want to harrow anybody. It’s kinda eerie.
    They have tours. I will never understand people.

    Reply
  34. Hi pjpuppymom —
    Paris has an extensive ‘catacombs’ of its own.
    These catacombs aren’t ancient. The bones were moved from the overfilled graveyards of central Paris into underground caverns in late C18 and early C19. They’re arranged decoratively.
    The underground spaces they put the bones in are part of these caverns I’m writing about. I didn’t include pictures of that because I didn’t want to harrow anybody. It’s kinda eerie.
    They have tours. I will never understand people.

    Reply
  35. Hi pjpuppymom —
    Paris has an extensive ‘catacombs’ of its own.
    These catacombs aren’t ancient. The bones were moved from the overfilled graveyards of central Paris into underground caverns in late C18 and early C19. They’re arranged decoratively.
    The underground spaces they put the bones in are part of these caverns I’m writing about. I didn’t include pictures of that because I didn’t want to harrow anybody. It’s kinda eerie.
    They have tours. I will never understand people.

    Reply
  36. Hi Annie —
    All you have to do is go to Poe. He tapped into all the innate phobias, didn’t he?
    For me . . . I’m not writing ‘horror’. I want to just brush the edges of these deep fears. It’s not my job to take the reader into those places. I want the reader to see the heroine, (or hero,) facing these fears. I don’t want to go close enough that the reader experiences them herself.
    So the fear gets a light brush and we head for the interior of the protagonist and see what she’s doing with the fear.

    Reply
  37. Hi Annie —
    All you have to do is go to Poe. He tapped into all the innate phobias, didn’t he?
    For me . . . I’m not writing ‘horror’. I want to just brush the edges of these deep fears. It’s not my job to take the reader into those places. I want the reader to see the heroine, (or hero,) facing these fears. I don’t want to go close enough that the reader experiences them herself.
    So the fear gets a light brush and we head for the interior of the protagonist and see what she’s doing with the fear.

    Reply
  38. Hi Annie —
    All you have to do is go to Poe. He tapped into all the innate phobias, didn’t he?
    For me . . . I’m not writing ‘horror’. I want to just brush the edges of these deep fears. It’s not my job to take the reader into those places. I want the reader to see the heroine, (or hero,) facing these fears. I don’t want to go close enough that the reader experiences them herself.
    So the fear gets a light brush and we head for the interior of the protagonist and see what she’s doing with the fear.

    Reply
  39. Hi Annie —
    All you have to do is go to Poe. He tapped into all the innate phobias, didn’t he?
    For me . . . I’m not writing ‘horror’. I want to just brush the edges of these deep fears. It’s not my job to take the reader into those places. I want the reader to see the heroine, (or hero,) facing these fears. I don’t want to go close enough that the reader experiences them herself.
    So the fear gets a light brush and we head for the interior of the protagonist and see what she’s doing with the fear.

    Reply
  40. Hi Annie —
    All you have to do is go to Poe. He tapped into all the innate phobias, didn’t he?
    For me . . . I’m not writing ‘horror’. I want to just brush the edges of these deep fears. It’s not my job to take the reader into those places. I want the reader to see the heroine, (or hero,) facing these fears. I don’t want to go close enough that the reader experiences them herself.
    So the fear gets a light brush and we head for the interior of the protagonist and see what she’s doing with the fear.

    Reply
  41. And this is why I read historical adventure/romance and not horror!
    I loved all the Theseus and the Minotaur/Orpheus and Eurdyce, etc. symbolism in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  42. And this is why I read historical adventure/romance and not horror!
    I loved all the Theseus and the Minotaur/Orpheus and Eurdyce, etc. symbolism in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  43. And this is why I read historical adventure/romance and not horror!
    I loved all the Theseus and the Minotaur/Orpheus and Eurdyce, etc. symbolism in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  44. And this is why I read historical adventure/romance and not horror!
    I loved all the Theseus and the Minotaur/Orpheus and Eurdyce, etc. symbolism in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  45. And this is why I read historical adventure/romance and not horror!
    I loved all the Theseus and the Minotaur/Orpheus and Eurdyce, etc. symbolism in Forbidden Rose.

    Reply
  46. Hi pjpuppymom —
    You can track down pictures online. I get all heart-achy and distressed, myself.
    I could see running a character through the place to illustrate some character trait. And it has a fascinating history.
    But it’s not something I’d want to lay before a reader. Too strong. Too sad. Better to just not go there.

    Reply
  47. Hi pjpuppymom —
    You can track down pictures online. I get all heart-achy and distressed, myself.
    I could see running a character through the place to illustrate some character trait. And it has a fascinating history.
    But it’s not something I’d want to lay before a reader. Too strong. Too sad. Better to just not go there.

    Reply
  48. Hi pjpuppymom —
    You can track down pictures online. I get all heart-achy and distressed, myself.
    I could see running a character through the place to illustrate some character trait. And it has a fascinating history.
    But it’s not something I’d want to lay before a reader. Too strong. Too sad. Better to just not go there.

    Reply
  49. Hi pjpuppymom —
    You can track down pictures online. I get all heart-achy and distressed, myself.
    I could see running a character through the place to illustrate some character trait. And it has a fascinating history.
    But it’s not something I’d want to lay before a reader. Too strong. Too sad. Better to just not go there.

    Reply
  50. Hi pjpuppymom —
    You can track down pictures online. I get all heart-achy and distressed, myself.
    I could see running a character through the place to illustrate some character trait. And it has a fascinating history.
    But it’s not something I’d want to lay before a reader. Too strong. Too sad. Better to just not go there.

    Reply
  51. Hi Annie —
    I could be heavy-footed with the symbolism in FR because these are the terms Maggie would think in. I can put that stuff into her head.
    So I let myself run wild. *g* I think it shows.

    Reply
  52. Hi Annie —
    I could be heavy-footed with the symbolism in FR because these are the terms Maggie would think in. I can put that stuff into her head.
    So I let myself run wild. *g* I think it shows.

    Reply
  53. Hi Annie —
    I could be heavy-footed with the symbolism in FR because these are the terms Maggie would think in. I can put that stuff into her head.
    So I let myself run wild. *g* I think it shows.

    Reply
  54. Hi Annie —
    I could be heavy-footed with the symbolism in FR because these are the terms Maggie would think in. I can put that stuff into her head.
    So I let myself run wild. *g* I think it shows.

    Reply
  55. Hi Annie —
    I could be heavy-footed with the symbolism in FR because these are the terms Maggie would think in. I can put that stuff into her head.
    So I let myself run wild. *g* I think it shows.

    Reply
  56. My husband is French and we lived in France for a while after we were married. Not in Paris, but we had reasons to go to Paris a couple of times.
    One of those times, we ended up doing Paris Underground. We went to the old sewers (less smelly than I thought, plus right at one end of the bridge where Lady Di crashed). And yes, we went down to the catacombs with the bones. It’s actually really, really cool. A big memento mori (is that how you spell it?). There’s a spot where the bones at the end of a huge, neatly stacked pile are arranged in a valentine heart. Yikes.
    You have to think of it sort of like the Mexican Day of the Dead, where you celebrate your ancestors by having a party on their grave. Even now in France, you buy a grave either for a limited amount of time or in perpetuity and after the time is up, they dig up your old bones and plant someone else there.
    And there are still spots of subsidence these days. The tunnels really aren’t completely mapped. And there are homeless people and rave parties down there…

    Reply
  57. My husband is French and we lived in France for a while after we were married. Not in Paris, but we had reasons to go to Paris a couple of times.
    One of those times, we ended up doing Paris Underground. We went to the old sewers (less smelly than I thought, plus right at one end of the bridge where Lady Di crashed). And yes, we went down to the catacombs with the bones. It’s actually really, really cool. A big memento mori (is that how you spell it?). There’s a spot where the bones at the end of a huge, neatly stacked pile are arranged in a valentine heart. Yikes.
    You have to think of it sort of like the Mexican Day of the Dead, where you celebrate your ancestors by having a party on their grave. Even now in France, you buy a grave either for a limited amount of time or in perpetuity and after the time is up, they dig up your old bones and plant someone else there.
    And there are still spots of subsidence these days. The tunnels really aren’t completely mapped. And there are homeless people and rave parties down there…

    Reply
  58. My husband is French and we lived in France for a while after we were married. Not in Paris, but we had reasons to go to Paris a couple of times.
    One of those times, we ended up doing Paris Underground. We went to the old sewers (less smelly than I thought, plus right at one end of the bridge where Lady Di crashed). And yes, we went down to the catacombs with the bones. It’s actually really, really cool. A big memento mori (is that how you spell it?). There’s a spot where the bones at the end of a huge, neatly stacked pile are arranged in a valentine heart. Yikes.
    You have to think of it sort of like the Mexican Day of the Dead, where you celebrate your ancestors by having a party on their grave. Even now in France, you buy a grave either for a limited amount of time or in perpetuity and after the time is up, they dig up your old bones and plant someone else there.
    And there are still spots of subsidence these days. The tunnels really aren’t completely mapped. And there are homeless people and rave parties down there…

    Reply
  59. My husband is French and we lived in France for a while after we were married. Not in Paris, but we had reasons to go to Paris a couple of times.
    One of those times, we ended up doing Paris Underground. We went to the old sewers (less smelly than I thought, plus right at one end of the bridge where Lady Di crashed). And yes, we went down to the catacombs with the bones. It’s actually really, really cool. A big memento mori (is that how you spell it?). There’s a spot where the bones at the end of a huge, neatly stacked pile are arranged in a valentine heart. Yikes.
    You have to think of it sort of like the Mexican Day of the Dead, where you celebrate your ancestors by having a party on their grave. Even now in France, you buy a grave either for a limited amount of time or in perpetuity and after the time is up, they dig up your old bones and plant someone else there.
    And there are still spots of subsidence these days. The tunnels really aren’t completely mapped. And there are homeless people and rave parties down there…

    Reply
  60. My husband is French and we lived in France for a while after we were married. Not in Paris, but we had reasons to go to Paris a couple of times.
    One of those times, we ended up doing Paris Underground. We went to the old sewers (less smelly than I thought, plus right at one end of the bridge where Lady Di crashed). And yes, we went down to the catacombs with the bones. It’s actually really, really cool. A big memento mori (is that how you spell it?). There’s a spot where the bones at the end of a huge, neatly stacked pile are arranged in a valentine heart. Yikes.
    You have to think of it sort of like the Mexican Day of the Dead, where you celebrate your ancestors by having a party on their grave. Even now in France, you buy a grave either for a limited amount of time or in perpetuity and after the time is up, they dig up your old bones and plant someone else there.
    And there are still spots of subsidence these days. The tunnels really aren’t completely mapped. And there are homeless people and rave parties down there…

    Reply
  61. Joanna, it is so interesting that you have blogged about this. In the February issue of National Geographic magazine here in the US the cover article is titled “Under Paris” and is about these same mines and tunnels. It says that people even hold parties down there these days! I’m with you in that I’m not really fond of being that far underground with tons of rock, etc., ready to fall on me, and I really wouldn’t want to be down there partying!!!

    Reply
  62. Joanna, it is so interesting that you have blogged about this. In the February issue of National Geographic magazine here in the US the cover article is titled “Under Paris” and is about these same mines and tunnels. It says that people even hold parties down there these days! I’m with you in that I’m not really fond of being that far underground with tons of rock, etc., ready to fall on me, and I really wouldn’t want to be down there partying!!!

    Reply
  63. Joanna, it is so interesting that you have blogged about this. In the February issue of National Geographic magazine here in the US the cover article is titled “Under Paris” and is about these same mines and tunnels. It says that people even hold parties down there these days! I’m with you in that I’m not really fond of being that far underground with tons of rock, etc., ready to fall on me, and I really wouldn’t want to be down there partying!!!

    Reply
  64. Joanna, it is so interesting that you have blogged about this. In the February issue of National Geographic magazine here in the US the cover article is titled “Under Paris” and is about these same mines and tunnels. It says that people even hold parties down there these days! I’m with you in that I’m not really fond of being that far underground with tons of rock, etc., ready to fall on me, and I really wouldn’t want to be down there partying!!!

    Reply
  65. Joanna, it is so interesting that you have blogged about this. In the February issue of National Geographic magazine here in the US the cover article is titled “Under Paris” and is about these same mines and tunnels. It says that people even hold parties down there these days! I’m with you in that I’m not really fond of being that far underground with tons of rock, etc., ready to fall on me, and I really wouldn’t want to be down there partying!!!

    Reply
  66. Hi Phyllis —
    There’s a whole modern thingum of exploring those miles and miles of quarries. I ran my descriptions past a couple folks who do this, making sure I was at least close to reality. I list my cataphile beta readers in the Acks for Forbidden Rose and I am very grateful to them.
    Can I say there this something wonderfully ‘French’ about the whole cataphile scene? — the intrepid explorers; the dogged, patient officials tracking them down, (or sometimes looking the other way;) the galleries of art painted and carved on the walls.
    Only in France . . .

    Reply
  67. Hi Phyllis —
    There’s a whole modern thingum of exploring those miles and miles of quarries. I ran my descriptions past a couple folks who do this, making sure I was at least close to reality. I list my cataphile beta readers in the Acks for Forbidden Rose and I am very grateful to them.
    Can I say there this something wonderfully ‘French’ about the whole cataphile scene? — the intrepid explorers; the dogged, patient officials tracking them down, (or sometimes looking the other way;) the galleries of art painted and carved on the walls.
    Only in France . . .

    Reply
  68. Hi Phyllis —
    There’s a whole modern thingum of exploring those miles and miles of quarries. I ran my descriptions past a couple folks who do this, making sure I was at least close to reality. I list my cataphile beta readers in the Acks for Forbidden Rose and I am very grateful to them.
    Can I say there this something wonderfully ‘French’ about the whole cataphile scene? — the intrepid explorers; the dogged, patient officials tracking them down, (or sometimes looking the other way;) the galleries of art painted and carved on the walls.
    Only in France . . .

    Reply
  69. Hi Phyllis —
    There’s a whole modern thingum of exploring those miles and miles of quarries. I ran my descriptions past a couple folks who do this, making sure I was at least close to reality. I list my cataphile beta readers in the Acks for Forbidden Rose and I am very grateful to them.
    Can I say there this something wonderfully ‘French’ about the whole cataphile scene? — the intrepid explorers; the dogged, patient officials tracking them down, (or sometimes looking the other way;) the galleries of art painted and carved on the walls.
    Only in France . . .

    Reply
  70. Hi Phyllis —
    There’s a whole modern thingum of exploring those miles and miles of quarries. I ran my descriptions past a couple folks who do this, making sure I was at least close to reality. I list my cataphile beta readers in the Acks for Forbidden Rose and I am very grateful to them.
    Can I say there this something wonderfully ‘French’ about the whole cataphile scene? — the intrepid explorers; the dogged, patient officials tracking them down, (or sometimes looking the other way;) the galleries of art painted and carved on the walls.
    Only in France . . .

    Reply
  71. Hi Sharon —
    Rock (hah!) concerts underground.
    Hmmm.
    Enclosed spaces . . . check.
    Spotty sanitation . . . check.
    Crowds . . . check.
    Illegality . . . check.
    Loud music . . . check.
    Definitely sounds like one of the outer circles of Hell.

    Reply
  72. Hi Sharon —
    Rock (hah!) concerts underground.
    Hmmm.
    Enclosed spaces . . . check.
    Spotty sanitation . . . check.
    Crowds . . . check.
    Illegality . . . check.
    Loud music . . . check.
    Definitely sounds like one of the outer circles of Hell.

    Reply
  73. Hi Sharon —
    Rock (hah!) concerts underground.
    Hmmm.
    Enclosed spaces . . . check.
    Spotty sanitation . . . check.
    Crowds . . . check.
    Illegality . . . check.
    Loud music . . . check.
    Definitely sounds like one of the outer circles of Hell.

    Reply
  74. Hi Sharon —
    Rock (hah!) concerts underground.
    Hmmm.
    Enclosed spaces . . . check.
    Spotty sanitation . . . check.
    Crowds . . . check.
    Illegality . . . check.
    Loud music . . . check.
    Definitely sounds like one of the outer circles of Hell.

    Reply
  75. Hi Sharon —
    Rock (hah!) concerts underground.
    Hmmm.
    Enclosed spaces . . . check.
    Spotty sanitation . . . check.
    Crowds . . . check.
    Illegality . . . check.
    Loud music . . . check.
    Definitely sounds like one of the outer circles of Hell.

    Reply
  76. Our Venture Crew goes caving rather often and personally I love crawling around where temperature, light, sound and even our sensation of gravity is otherworldly (and even your guides get lost occasionally). It’s creepy though having to jump over or walk along gaps where even your flashlight can’t find the bottom…
    I want to imagine all sorts of smugglers and store houses (especially wine) and secret societies hidden in the tunnels–I know back home caves were often stops on the underground railroad. Is this likely/possible?

    Reply
  77. Our Venture Crew goes caving rather often and personally I love crawling around where temperature, light, sound and even our sensation of gravity is otherworldly (and even your guides get lost occasionally). It’s creepy though having to jump over or walk along gaps where even your flashlight can’t find the bottom…
    I want to imagine all sorts of smugglers and store houses (especially wine) and secret societies hidden in the tunnels–I know back home caves were often stops on the underground railroad. Is this likely/possible?

    Reply
  78. Our Venture Crew goes caving rather often and personally I love crawling around where temperature, light, sound and even our sensation of gravity is otherworldly (and even your guides get lost occasionally). It’s creepy though having to jump over or walk along gaps where even your flashlight can’t find the bottom…
    I want to imagine all sorts of smugglers and store houses (especially wine) and secret societies hidden in the tunnels–I know back home caves were often stops on the underground railroad. Is this likely/possible?

    Reply
  79. Our Venture Crew goes caving rather often and personally I love crawling around where temperature, light, sound and even our sensation of gravity is otherworldly (and even your guides get lost occasionally). It’s creepy though having to jump over or walk along gaps where even your flashlight can’t find the bottom…
    I want to imagine all sorts of smugglers and store houses (especially wine) and secret societies hidden in the tunnels–I know back home caves were often stops on the underground railroad. Is this likely/possible?

    Reply
  80. Our Venture Crew goes caving rather often and personally I love crawling around where temperature, light, sound and even our sensation of gravity is otherworldly (and even your guides get lost occasionally). It’s creepy though having to jump over or walk along gaps where even your flashlight can’t find the bottom…
    I want to imagine all sorts of smugglers and store houses (especially wine) and secret societies hidden in the tunnels–I know back home caves were often stops on the underground railroad. Is this likely/possible?

    Reply
  81. Hi Marybeth —
    Smugglers and store houses — It is not only possible. It’s historically accurate.
    These caverns were haunts of robbers in the Eighteenth Century, shelters for families in the Seventeenth, hideout for partisans in World War II. There was a famous shootout down there in the catacombs in 1781 when the Communards cornered a band of Monarchists.
    In 1794, the quarries provided a route in and out of Paris that bypassed inspection at the city gates. Perfect for smuggling goods in and people out.
    I dunnoh about secret societies, those being remarkably secretive and all. I don’t see any reason why they couldn’t have used the place. If I ever have the least cause to put them there, I will proceed to do so.

    Reply
  82. Hi Marybeth —
    Smugglers and store houses — It is not only possible. It’s historically accurate.
    These caverns were haunts of robbers in the Eighteenth Century, shelters for families in the Seventeenth, hideout for partisans in World War II. There was a famous shootout down there in the catacombs in 1781 when the Communards cornered a band of Monarchists.
    In 1794, the quarries provided a route in and out of Paris that bypassed inspection at the city gates. Perfect for smuggling goods in and people out.
    I dunnoh about secret societies, those being remarkably secretive and all. I don’t see any reason why they couldn’t have used the place. If I ever have the least cause to put them there, I will proceed to do so.

    Reply
  83. Hi Marybeth —
    Smugglers and store houses — It is not only possible. It’s historically accurate.
    These caverns were haunts of robbers in the Eighteenth Century, shelters for families in the Seventeenth, hideout for partisans in World War II. There was a famous shootout down there in the catacombs in 1781 when the Communards cornered a band of Monarchists.
    In 1794, the quarries provided a route in and out of Paris that bypassed inspection at the city gates. Perfect for smuggling goods in and people out.
    I dunnoh about secret societies, those being remarkably secretive and all. I don’t see any reason why they couldn’t have used the place. If I ever have the least cause to put them there, I will proceed to do so.

    Reply
  84. Hi Marybeth —
    Smugglers and store houses — It is not only possible. It’s historically accurate.
    These caverns were haunts of robbers in the Eighteenth Century, shelters for families in the Seventeenth, hideout for partisans in World War II. There was a famous shootout down there in the catacombs in 1781 when the Communards cornered a band of Monarchists.
    In 1794, the quarries provided a route in and out of Paris that bypassed inspection at the city gates. Perfect for smuggling goods in and people out.
    I dunnoh about secret societies, those being remarkably secretive and all. I don’t see any reason why they couldn’t have used the place. If I ever have the least cause to put them there, I will proceed to do so.

    Reply
  85. Hi Marybeth —
    Smugglers and store houses — It is not only possible. It’s historically accurate.
    These caverns were haunts of robbers in the Eighteenth Century, shelters for families in the Seventeenth, hideout for partisans in World War II. There was a famous shootout down there in the catacombs in 1781 when the Communards cornered a band of Monarchists.
    In 1794, the quarries provided a route in and out of Paris that bypassed inspection at the city gates. Perfect for smuggling goods in and people out.
    I dunnoh about secret societies, those being remarkably secretive and all. I don’t see any reason why they couldn’t have used the place. If I ever have the least cause to put them there, I will proceed to do so.

    Reply
  86. Fascinating post, Joanna! I’ve always wanted to visit the catacombs – Rome or Paris – doesn’t matter. I find the whole idea intriguing. What lies beneath – those are the things that brush past the imagination at night like that spider web you can’t see and can’t quite brush away.
    I have been spelunking and even explored one cave where we had to crawl through a space in which there was no possible way to turn around. At the end of the crawl it opened into a huge cave where the walls and roof appeared to be moving. Turned on our helmet lights and voila – bats.
    I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. I would imagine arranging bones in a catacomb is very much like whistling past the graveyard.

    Reply
  87. Fascinating post, Joanna! I’ve always wanted to visit the catacombs – Rome or Paris – doesn’t matter. I find the whole idea intriguing. What lies beneath – those are the things that brush past the imagination at night like that spider web you can’t see and can’t quite brush away.
    I have been spelunking and even explored one cave where we had to crawl through a space in which there was no possible way to turn around. At the end of the crawl it opened into a huge cave where the walls and roof appeared to be moving. Turned on our helmet lights and voila – bats.
    I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. I would imagine arranging bones in a catacomb is very much like whistling past the graveyard.

    Reply
  88. Fascinating post, Joanna! I’ve always wanted to visit the catacombs – Rome or Paris – doesn’t matter. I find the whole idea intriguing. What lies beneath – those are the things that brush past the imagination at night like that spider web you can’t see and can’t quite brush away.
    I have been spelunking and even explored one cave where we had to crawl through a space in which there was no possible way to turn around. At the end of the crawl it opened into a huge cave where the walls and roof appeared to be moving. Turned on our helmet lights and voila – bats.
    I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. I would imagine arranging bones in a catacomb is very much like whistling past the graveyard.

    Reply
  89. Fascinating post, Joanna! I’ve always wanted to visit the catacombs – Rome or Paris – doesn’t matter. I find the whole idea intriguing. What lies beneath – those are the things that brush past the imagination at night like that spider web you can’t see and can’t quite brush away.
    I have been spelunking and even explored one cave where we had to crawl through a space in which there was no possible way to turn around. At the end of the crawl it opened into a huge cave where the walls and roof appeared to be moving. Turned on our helmet lights and voila – bats.
    I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. I would imagine arranging bones in a catacomb is very much like whistling past the graveyard.

    Reply
  90. Fascinating post, Joanna! I’ve always wanted to visit the catacombs – Rome or Paris – doesn’t matter. I find the whole idea intriguing. What lies beneath – those are the things that brush past the imagination at night like that spider web you can’t see and can’t quite brush away.
    I have been spelunking and even explored one cave where we had to crawl through a space in which there was no possible way to turn around. At the end of the crawl it opened into a huge cave where the walls and roof appeared to be moving. Turned on our helmet lights and voila – bats.
    I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. I would imagine arranging bones in a catacomb is very much like whistling past the graveyard.

    Reply
  91. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    >>I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. <<< Oooh. Better you than me. And yet -- I'm sure there's a place for this in Romance. A shivery thrill added to the story. I think this was part of 'Gothic Romances'. I don't know whereas it's been carried through into Romantic Suspense.

    Reply
  92. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    >>I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. <<< Oooh. Better you than me. And yet -- I'm sure there's a place for this in Romance. A shivery thrill added to the story. I think this was part of 'Gothic Romances'. I don't know whereas it's been carried through into Romantic Suspense.

    Reply
  93. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    >>I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. <<< Oooh. Better you than me. And yet -- I'm sure there's a place for this in Romance. A shivery thrill added to the story. I think this was part of 'Gothic Romances'. I don't know whereas it's been carried through into Romantic Suspense.

    Reply
  94. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    >>I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. <<< Oooh. Better you than me. And yet -- I'm sure there's a place for this in Romance. A shivery thrill added to the story. I think this was part of 'Gothic Romances'. I don't know whereas it's been carried through into Romantic Suspense.

    Reply
  95. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    >>I’m always drawn in by the things that make us shiver or turn away, the things that go bump in the night. <<< Oooh. Better you than me. And yet -- I'm sure there's a place for this in Romance. A shivery thrill added to the story. I think this was part of 'Gothic Romances'. I don't know whereas it's been carried through into Romantic Suspense.

    Reply
  96. The Worm Ouroboros! That one’s been in my To Read pile for a while now.
    I didn’t stretch too far with my middle grade novel. But the romance I’m writing now features all sorts of things happening to my character that I doubt I would handle as well as her (pirate attacks, separation from family, language barriers, having to make decisions for herself at a young and abandoned age…) – at least, unless I was in the throws of a new love myself [g]
    That seems to make everything easier, somehow. Er, that is, until I come along and threaten his life…

    Reply
  97. The Worm Ouroboros! That one’s been in my To Read pile for a while now.
    I didn’t stretch too far with my middle grade novel. But the romance I’m writing now features all sorts of things happening to my character that I doubt I would handle as well as her (pirate attacks, separation from family, language barriers, having to make decisions for herself at a young and abandoned age…) – at least, unless I was in the throws of a new love myself [g]
    That seems to make everything easier, somehow. Er, that is, until I come along and threaten his life…

    Reply
  98. The Worm Ouroboros! That one’s been in my To Read pile for a while now.
    I didn’t stretch too far with my middle grade novel. But the romance I’m writing now features all sorts of things happening to my character that I doubt I would handle as well as her (pirate attacks, separation from family, language barriers, having to make decisions for herself at a young and abandoned age…) – at least, unless I was in the throws of a new love myself [g]
    That seems to make everything easier, somehow. Er, that is, until I come along and threaten his life…

    Reply
  99. The Worm Ouroboros! That one’s been in my To Read pile for a while now.
    I didn’t stretch too far with my middle grade novel. But the romance I’m writing now features all sorts of things happening to my character that I doubt I would handle as well as her (pirate attacks, separation from family, language barriers, having to make decisions for herself at a young and abandoned age…) – at least, unless I was in the throws of a new love myself [g]
    That seems to make everything easier, somehow. Er, that is, until I come along and threaten his life…

    Reply
  100. The Worm Ouroboros! That one’s been in my To Read pile for a while now.
    I didn’t stretch too far with my middle grade novel. But the romance I’m writing now features all sorts of things happening to my character that I doubt I would handle as well as her (pirate attacks, separation from family, language barriers, having to make decisions for herself at a young and abandoned age…) – at least, unless I was in the throws of a new love myself [g]
    That seems to make everything easier, somehow. Er, that is, until I come along and threaten his life…

    Reply
  101. Hi Deniz —
    When we set our hero and heroine against the antagonist — whether it’s an environment or an event or a person — we have to make that ‘baddie’ something the good guys fear, or something that strikes them at a deep personal level.
    But then, there’s the reader’s direct reaction to the antagonist, separate from the character’s reaction. If I run my people through a vast underground cavern, have I creeped the reader out and distracted her from the love story?

    Reply
  102. Hi Deniz —
    When we set our hero and heroine against the antagonist — whether it’s an environment or an event or a person — we have to make that ‘baddie’ something the good guys fear, or something that strikes them at a deep personal level.
    But then, there’s the reader’s direct reaction to the antagonist, separate from the character’s reaction. If I run my people through a vast underground cavern, have I creeped the reader out and distracted her from the love story?

    Reply
  103. Hi Deniz —
    When we set our hero and heroine against the antagonist — whether it’s an environment or an event or a person — we have to make that ‘baddie’ something the good guys fear, or something that strikes them at a deep personal level.
    But then, there’s the reader’s direct reaction to the antagonist, separate from the character’s reaction. If I run my people through a vast underground cavern, have I creeped the reader out and distracted her from the love story?

    Reply
  104. Hi Deniz —
    When we set our hero and heroine against the antagonist — whether it’s an environment or an event or a person — we have to make that ‘baddie’ something the good guys fear, or something that strikes them at a deep personal level.
    But then, there’s the reader’s direct reaction to the antagonist, separate from the character’s reaction. If I run my people through a vast underground cavern, have I creeped the reader out and distracted her from the love story?

    Reply
  105. Hi Deniz —
    When we set our hero and heroine against the antagonist — whether it’s an environment or an event or a person — we have to make that ‘baddie’ something the good guys fear, or something that strikes them at a deep personal level.
    But then, there’s the reader’s direct reaction to the antagonist, separate from the character’s reaction. If I run my people through a vast underground cavern, have I creeped the reader out and distracted her from the love story?

    Reply
  106. Well, there’s scary and then there’s scary. I call “fake scary” those old Dracula and Frankenstein movies. They might give you the odd chill or two, but there was no real danger involved. Real scary is something that is “real”–like an ax murderer, or torture, or someone stalking a woman. Especially if there’s lots of blood and guts, all lovingly described.
    I don’t like “real scary”, and I avoid those types of books. I’ve read some great books where the villain was too evil for my taste, and I won’t read another book by that author. I want chills of a different kind when I read a romance. *g*
    I loved THE FORBIDDEN ROSE. I loved your wonderful descriptions of the caverns under Paris. I think many modern books lack sufficient description. I want to “see” the time and place, and I love authors who paint pictures with words. You do. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  107. Well, there’s scary and then there’s scary. I call “fake scary” those old Dracula and Frankenstein movies. They might give you the odd chill or two, but there was no real danger involved. Real scary is something that is “real”–like an ax murderer, or torture, or someone stalking a woman. Especially if there’s lots of blood and guts, all lovingly described.
    I don’t like “real scary”, and I avoid those types of books. I’ve read some great books where the villain was too evil for my taste, and I won’t read another book by that author. I want chills of a different kind when I read a romance. *g*
    I loved THE FORBIDDEN ROSE. I loved your wonderful descriptions of the caverns under Paris. I think many modern books lack sufficient description. I want to “see” the time and place, and I love authors who paint pictures with words. You do. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  108. Well, there’s scary and then there’s scary. I call “fake scary” those old Dracula and Frankenstein movies. They might give you the odd chill or two, but there was no real danger involved. Real scary is something that is “real”–like an ax murderer, or torture, or someone stalking a woman. Especially if there’s lots of blood and guts, all lovingly described.
    I don’t like “real scary”, and I avoid those types of books. I’ve read some great books where the villain was too evil for my taste, and I won’t read another book by that author. I want chills of a different kind when I read a romance. *g*
    I loved THE FORBIDDEN ROSE. I loved your wonderful descriptions of the caverns under Paris. I think many modern books lack sufficient description. I want to “see” the time and place, and I love authors who paint pictures with words. You do. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  109. Well, there’s scary and then there’s scary. I call “fake scary” those old Dracula and Frankenstein movies. They might give you the odd chill or two, but there was no real danger involved. Real scary is something that is “real”–like an ax murderer, or torture, or someone stalking a woman. Especially if there’s lots of blood and guts, all lovingly described.
    I don’t like “real scary”, and I avoid those types of books. I’ve read some great books where the villain was too evil for my taste, and I won’t read another book by that author. I want chills of a different kind when I read a romance. *g*
    I loved THE FORBIDDEN ROSE. I loved your wonderful descriptions of the caverns under Paris. I think many modern books lack sufficient description. I want to “see” the time and place, and I love authors who paint pictures with words. You do. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  110. Well, there’s scary and then there’s scary. I call “fake scary” those old Dracula and Frankenstein movies. They might give you the odd chill or two, but there was no real danger involved. Real scary is something that is “real”–like an ax murderer, or torture, or someone stalking a woman. Especially if there’s lots of blood and guts, all lovingly described.
    I don’t like “real scary”, and I avoid those types of books. I’ve read some great books where the villain was too evil for my taste, and I won’t read another book by that author. I want chills of a different kind when I read a romance. *g*
    I loved THE FORBIDDEN ROSE. I loved your wonderful descriptions of the caverns under Paris. I think many modern books lack sufficient description. I want to “see” the time and place, and I love authors who paint pictures with words. You do. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  111. Hi Linda Banche —
    Thank you so much for the kind words about Forbidden Rose.
    I, too, have come across fine writers who touch on subject that are so very terrible I set the book down carefully and back away. In fact, I think I’m relatively sensitive. I’m heebie-jeebie prone, I guess.

    Reply
  112. Hi Linda Banche —
    Thank you so much for the kind words about Forbidden Rose.
    I, too, have come across fine writers who touch on subject that are so very terrible I set the book down carefully and back away. In fact, I think I’m relatively sensitive. I’m heebie-jeebie prone, I guess.

    Reply
  113. Hi Linda Banche —
    Thank you so much for the kind words about Forbidden Rose.
    I, too, have come across fine writers who touch on subject that are so very terrible I set the book down carefully and back away. In fact, I think I’m relatively sensitive. I’m heebie-jeebie prone, I guess.

    Reply
  114. Hi Linda Banche —
    Thank you so much for the kind words about Forbidden Rose.
    I, too, have come across fine writers who touch on subject that are so very terrible I set the book down carefully and back away. In fact, I think I’m relatively sensitive. I’m heebie-jeebie prone, I guess.

    Reply
  115. Hi Linda Banche —
    Thank you so much for the kind words about Forbidden Rose.
    I, too, have come across fine writers who touch on subject that are so very terrible I set the book down carefully and back away. In fact, I think I’m relatively sensitive. I’m heebie-jeebie prone, I guess.

    Reply
  116. I am not a fan of being underground. I have been in caves and mines, but it is not my favorite thing to do. A bit claustrophobic, yes. Feel free to write your characters into those situations. Much better to just read about it. It is the same with heights. I don’t want to be on the edge of cliff, but feel free to put your characters there.
    True evil is something I can’t really read about. My husband and I were listening to James Patterson’s SWIMSUIT. We never even made it through the first disc. It just really was too disturbing. I thought about trying to finish it, wanting to see the evil destroyed, but never did. It gave me nightmares and upset me for days. It is all the more frightening because there really are people like that out there.

    Reply
  117. I am not a fan of being underground. I have been in caves and mines, but it is not my favorite thing to do. A bit claustrophobic, yes. Feel free to write your characters into those situations. Much better to just read about it. It is the same with heights. I don’t want to be on the edge of cliff, but feel free to put your characters there.
    True evil is something I can’t really read about. My husband and I were listening to James Patterson’s SWIMSUIT. We never even made it through the first disc. It just really was too disturbing. I thought about trying to finish it, wanting to see the evil destroyed, but never did. It gave me nightmares and upset me for days. It is all the more frightening because there really are people like that out there.

    Reply
  118. I am not a fan of being underground. I have been in caves and mines, but it is not my favorite thing to do. A bit claustrophobic, yes. Feel free to write your characters into those situations. Much better to just read about it. It is the same with heights. I don’t want to be on the edge of cliff, but feel free to put your characters there.
    True evil is something I can’t really read about. My husband and I were listening to James Patterson’s SWIMSUIT. We never even made it through the first disc. It just really was too disturbing. I thought about trying to finish it, wanting to see the evil destroyed, but never did. It gave me nightmares and upset me for days. It is all the more frightening because there really are people like that out there.

    Reply
  119. I am not a fan of being underground. I have been in caves and mines, but it is not my favorite thing to do. A bit claustrophobic, yes. Feel free to write your characters into those situations. Much better to just read about it. It is the same with heights. I don’t want to be on the edge of cliff, but feel free to put your characters there.
    True evil is something I can’t really read about. My husband and I were listening to James Patterson’s SWIMSUIT. We never even made it through the first disc. It just really was too disturbing. I thought about trying to finish it, wanting to see the evil destroyed, but never did. It gave me nightmares and upset me for days. It is all the more frightening because there really are people like that out there.

    Reply
  120. I am not a fan of being underground. I have been in caves and mines, but it is not my favorite thing to do. A bit claustrophobic, yes. Feel free to write your characters into those situations. Much better to just read about it. It is the same with heights. I don’t want to be on the edge of cliff, but feel free to put your characters there.
    True evil is something I can’t really read about. My husband and I were listening to James Patterson’s SWIMSUIT. We never even made it through the first disc. It just really was too disturbing. I thought about trying to finish it, wanting to see the evil destroyed, but never did. It gave me nightmares and upset me for days. It is all the more frightening because there really are people like that out there.

    Reply
  121. Hi librarypat —
    I’m like you in this. Great evil is frightening. I need . . . distance. I need to intellectualize it, I think.
    So Sauron or Saruman in Lord of the Rings are fine and excellent evils. But I can’t — despite his excellence as a writer — read Stephen King.

    Reply
  122. Hi librarypat —
    I’m like you in this. Great evil is frightening. I need . . . distance. I need to intellectualize it, I think.
    So Sauron or Saruman in Lord of the Rings are fine and excellent evils. But I can’t — despite his excellence as a writer — read Stephen King.

    Reply
  123. Hi librarypat —
    I’m like you in this. Great evil is frightening. I need . . . distance. I need to intellectualize it, I think.
    So Sauron or Saruman in Lord of the Rings are fine and excellent evils. But I can’t — despite his excellence as a writer — read Stephen King.

    Reply
  124. Hi librarypat —
    I’m like you in this. Great evil is frightening. I need . . . distance. I need to intellectualize it, I think.
    So Sauron or Saruman in Lord of the Rings are fine and excellent evils. But I can’t — despite his excellence as a writer — read Stephen King.

    Reply
  125. Hi librarypat —
    I’m like you in this. Great evil is frightening. I need . . . distance. I need to intellectualize it, I think.
    So Sauron or Saruman in Lord of the Rings are fine and excellent evils. But I can’t — despite his excellence as a writer — read Stephen King.

    Reply

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