Seasonal Reads and Viewings

 Our monthly round-up of favorite reads for the summer months, or winter if you're down-under, plus a few movies to help us through the extreme weather.

 

Mary Jo:

As an antidote to the high summer heat and humidity that have settled over Maryland, we recently watched Where Eagles Dare, a 1968 action movie set in World War II.  I first saw it many years ago, and I've seen it once or twice since, but not recently, and I was curious about how well it's held up.  (This because we'd Where Eagles Darerecently watched another WWII movie from the same era and it was pretty bad.)

But Where Eagles Dare still rocks!  Based on a novel and screenplay by Alistair MacLean, a favorite author of mine for many years, it's fast paced and full of twists and turns.  It features a very handsome and enigmatic Richard Burton, a very young and very deadly Clint Eastwood, and Mary Ure, Burton's love interest and fellow agent, a woman who is as skilled with a machine gun as Clint.

The plot has a group of British commandos going to a Nazi mountain fortress to rescue an American general who knows the D-Day plans, and they have to get him out before the information can be tortured out of him.  Eastwood is an American Army Ranger who is along for reasons that become clear at the end (when he says something to the effect of 'next time you Brits have a party like this, don't invite me.' <G>)

But what really makes this movie so suitable for summer viewing is the setting.  The Schloss Adler is on a mountaintop in Southern Bavaria in deep winter with snow, ice, and biting winds galore.  The only access by cable car sailing high above the icy slopes.  Delightful!  Recommended for all heat waves. <G> 

Nicola:

I've been reading a lovely book called The Giants Look Down by Sonja Price. It's a first novel and is one of the most original and interesting books I've picked up in a while. The heroine, Jaya, born in Kashmir, is determined to be a doctor like her father but a devastating natural disaster robs her of her family and her future. The scene then shifts Gians_to Scotland as she embarks on a new life. Both the scenes set in Kashmir and Scotland are beautifully and evocatively described, and the Kashmiri background in particular is unusual and fascinating. Jaya is a lovely heroine and I was rooting for her to succeed against all the odds. It's a fabulous debut book.

I was also lucky enough to pick up a pile of books at the Romantic Novelists' Association conference last week and can't wait to dive into them! One of them, The Cornish House by Liz Fenwick, is perfect summer
reading, with a heroine taking on an old cottage and discovering the secrets it has held for generations. I love Cornwall and Liz's books are so evocative that I can imagine I'm sitting in a rocky cove, gazing out over
the sea!

 

Andrea/Cara:

I’ve been reading The Eye of the Beholder: Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, and the Reinvention of Seeing, which is absolutely fascinating. It’s just the sort of non-fiction I love, as it weaves together important specific discoveries and personalities with an overview of the world and society at the time. The author, Eye of the beholderLaura J. Snyder, has also written another book I enjoyed (The Philosophical Breakfast Club, which is about the men who changed science in England) I think she’s both an elegant writer and a lively storyteller—something that doesn’t always go hand in hand in non-fiction.

This book is a wonderfully provocative exploration of art and science—Leewenhoek invented the microscope and Vermeer pioneered the use of optics in art (it’s thought he used a camera obscura in creating his luminous paintings.) The 1600s was the height of the Scientific Revolution, where empirical observation became the rallying cry for all those interested in understanding the world around them. She talks not only about how lenses helped see the world in a way the naked eye can't perceive, but also why Holland became a hotbed for creativity in art and science. It was a truly “eye-opening” book, and I highly recommend it!

 

 

Pat:

I’ve been reading a lot of women’s fiction and mysteries lately. So I picked up Swimsuit Body, A Cypress Bay Mystery, by Eileen Goudge through Netgalley because I enjoy Goudge’s writing and it seemed to be a lovely combination of both. Although this is Swimsuitlabeled a mystery, it’s so much more: a travelogue of the northern California coast, a tongue-in-cheek satire on Hollywood, and a wonderful insight into friends, small towns, and alcoholism. The solution to the mystery is in her well-drawn characters more than forensic evidence, a fact I appreciate. And while the heroine is a little too bold at times, she’s always smart, and she doesn’t pull her punches when it comes time for someone to pay. I loved the fabulously strong writing. 

Susan:

It's turning out to be a busy summer, so the reading hours have been fewer than I like! Currently I'm reading Death in the English Countryside by Sara Rosett – an English cozy set in a cozy English village, with twists. DeathLAmerican Kate Sharp is a film location scout and her company is helping to set up a new production of Pride and Prejudice. Kate–a huge fan of anything Austen–goes over to England not to look for settings this time–but to find her boss, who has inexplicably disappeared. She follows a very interesting trail of clues – why he's vanished, what became of him, who's responsible – that takes her around the English countryside and into nooks and crannies of village life far more mysterious than she anticipated. Well written, with likable characters, a setting that beautifully evokes the heart of England, good pacing and a smart mystery that keeps you guessing, this is a good mystery, the start of a series. I'll definitely return for more.  

 

Joanna:

It’s been hot and it’s been hectic this month. I feel very ambition-less.

I’m reading Jim Butcher’s Fool Moon which is Book Two of the Dresden Files. This is the werewolf book. I may possibly have read this one before, or maybe I saw it on the TV show. In any case, the series is always an exciting read and this is turning out to be one of my favorites.

Wench fool moonDresden is sturdily, doggedly idealistic. He’s a take-the-punch-and-roll-with-it-and-get-back-up type. I admire such folks. I want to write characters like that.

I also rewatched all the Dresden file TV series because I was reading the book so I am just filled to the gills with Jim Butcher. Nice.

 

Moving along to a second series book from a favorite author. I seem to be playing it safe this month.

Elizabeth Peters is an old, reliable favorite. I’ve moved right along in her Amelia Peabody books, (reading them very slowly as great treats,) and have now arrived at He Shall Thunder in the SkyThunder in sky
Ramses is a young man, now. For philosophical reasons he’s not joining the army to fight in the trenches in World War I — not a popular choice in Cairo. Is he doing his part another way …?

(no SPOILERS here …)

Anne:

I've also been reading cosy mysteries — the Toni Diamond series are by Nancy Warren. Set in the South, the protagonist is Toni Diamond, an ambitious make-up "home saleswoman" for the "Lady Bianca" cosmetic company. As the blurb for the first book says "Imagine Columbo in a lavender suit, with fake FrostedShadowdiamonds and big hair. The first story—and the first murder—takes place at a Lady Bianca convention, where consultants from all over the US gather.
I loved these books — there are four so far and I'm waiting for more. They're clever, warm-hearted, funny (I had a number of laugh-out-loud moments), sharply observed and very entertaining. The murders are ingenious, the characterization is delightful, and there's even a sexy detective and a blossoming romance. Highly recommended. And the first book, Frosted Shadow, is free.

I've also been reading more in the Liaden Universe series by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller (science fiction) and am continuing Jennifer Ashley's Shifter series.

 

And now we open the floor to our readers. Tell us what you've been enjoying this summer! We're always eager…hungry…for new books to devour!

 

 

270 thoughts on “Seasonal Reads and Viewings”

  1. I live in Romania and many books which are new releases here (in Romanian) were published and republished many times all around the world. My first books by Mary Jo, for instance, were in Romanian, all bought in the last couple of years. There is a publishing house specialised in romance novels and so I got ‘introduced’ to Mary Jo, to Amanda Quick, Teresa Medeiros, Johanna Lindsey, Sabrina Jeffries, Lorraine Heath, Meredith Duran etc Even so, I always prefer reading a book in the language in which it was written (if I happen to know that language :p). Once I was hooked, I talked to a former student of mine who currently resides in England and she started buying books for me there. Each time she comes to Romania, I get a suitcase full of books :)) When she came to spend her summer holidays, she brought me a lot of books by Susanna Kearsley (whom I had grown interested in due to your kind recommendations before her becoming a Wench herself). So that’s what I’ve been reading lately: Susanna’s books. And Lauren Willig’s before that.
    What else could I talk highly of? Any book by John Irving. And J. K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike series (written as Robert Galbraith) plus The Casual Vacancy.
    And a new (Romanian) release: Sarah Jio – Destine inlantuite (Blackberry Winter).

    Reply
  2. I live in Romania and many books which are new releases here (in Romanian) were published and republished many times all around the world. My first books by Mary Jo, for instance, were in Romanian, all bought in the last couple of years. There is a publishing house specialised in romance novels and so I got ‘introduced’ to Mary Jo, to Amanda Quick, Teresa Medeiros, Johanna Lindsey, Sabrina Jeffries, Lorraine Heath, Meredith Duran etc Even so, I always prefer reading a book in the language in which it was written (if I happen to know that language :p). Once I was hooked, I talked to a former student of mine who currently resides in England and she started buying books for me there. Each time she comes to Romania, I get a suitcase full of books :)) When she came to spend her summer holidays, she brought me a lot of books by Susanna Kearsley (whom I had grown interested in due to your kind recommendations before her becoming a Wench herself). So that’s what I’ve been reading lately: Susanna’s books. And Lauren Willig’s before that.
    What else could I talk highly of? Any book by John Irving. And J. K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike series (written as Robert Galbraith) plus The Casual Vacancy.
    And a new (Romanian) release: Sarah Jio – Destine inlantuite (Blackberry Winter).

    Reply
  3. I live in Romania and many books which are new releases here (in Romanian) were published and republished many times all around the world. My first books by Mary Jo, for instance, were in Romanian, all bought in the last couple of years. There is a publishing house specialised in romance novels and so I got ‘introduced’ to Mary Jo, to Amanda Quick, Teresa Medeiros, Johanna Lindsey, Sabrina Jeffries, Lorraine Heath, Meredith Duran etc Even so, I always prefer reading a book in the language in which it was written (if I happen to know that language :p). Once I was hooked, I talked to a former student of mine who currently resides in England and she started buying books for me there. Each time she comes to Romania, I get a suitcase full of books :)) When she came to spend her summer holidays, she brought me a lot of books by Susanna Kearsley (whom I had grown interested in due to your kind recommendations before her becoming a Wench herself). So that’s what I’ve been reading lately: Susanna’s books. And Lauren Willig’s before that.
    What else could I talk highly of? Any book by John Irving. And J. K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike series (written as Robert Galbraith) plus The Casual Vacancy.
    And a new (Romanian) release: Sarah Jio – Destine inlantuite (Blackberry Winter).

    Reply
  4. I live in Romania and many books which are new releases here (in Romanian) were published and republished many times all around the world. My first books by Mary Jo, for instance, were in Romanian, all bought in the last couple of years. There is a publishing house specialised in romance novels and so I got ‘introduced’ to Mary Jo, to Amanda Quick, Teresa Medeiros, Johanna Lindsey, Sabrina Jeffries, Lorraine Heath, Meredith Duran etc Even so, I always prefer reading a book in the language in which it was written (if I happen to know that language :p). Once I was hooked, I talked to a former student of mine who currently resides in England and she started buying books for me there. Each time she comes to Romania, I get a suitcase full of books :)) When she came to spend her summer holidays, she brought me a lot of books by Susanna Kearsley (whom I had grown interested in due to your kind recommendations before her becoming a Wench herself). So that’s what I’ve been reading lately: Susanna’s books. And Lauren Willig’s before that.
    What else could I talk highly of? Any book by John Irving. And J. K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike series (written as Robert Galbraith) plus The Casual Vacancy.
    And a new (Romanian) release: Sarah Jio – Destine inlantuite (Blackberry Winter).

    Reply
  5. I live in Romania and many books which are new releases here (in Romanian) were published and republished many times all around the world. My first books by Mary Jo, for instance, were in Romanian, all bought in the last couple of years. There is a publishing house specialised in romance novels and so I got ‘introduced’ to Mary Jo, to Amanda Quick, Teresa Medeiros, Johanna Lindsey, Sabrina Jeffries, Lorraine Heath, Meredith Duran etc Even so, I always prefer reading a book in the language in which it was written (if I happen to know that language :p). Once I was hooked, I talked to a former student of mine who currently resides in England and she started buying books for me there. Each time she comes to Romania, I get a suitcase full of books :)) When she came to spend her summer holidays, she brought me a lot of books by Susanna Kearsley (whom I had grown interested in due to your kind recommendations before her becoming a Wench herself). So that’s what I’ve been reading lately: Susanna’s books. And Lauren Willig’s before that.
    What else could I talk highly of? Any book by John Irving. And J. K. Rowling’s Cormoran Strike series (written as Robert Galbraith) plus The Casual Vacancy.
    And a new (Romanian) release: Sarah Jio – Destine inlantuite (Blackberry Winter).

    Reply
  6. Recently I read Death Comes to the Village by Catherine Lloyd, the first in the Kurland St. Mary series, in which mystery and romance are both in the mix. I’m waiting for the next couple of books in the series to come in the mail.
    I also read a kindle only book called Lady in the Smoke by Karen Odden, which I heard of somewhere, possibly here. It’s quite good, and I wondered why it hadn’t received a print edition, so I asked Ms Odden on twitter and she said it’s because the publisher felt it had too much romance in it. Have you ever heard anything so ridiculous as “too much romance”? She says her next book will be more of a straight procedural and will get a print edition. I think she’s an author to watch for.
    I also reread Persuasion – the book with the greatest love letter *ever* – and some more Barbara Metzgers which have been ebooked.
    Right now I’m in the middle of Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole, a two track love story set in WW1 and WW2, in epistolary form.

    Reply
  7. Recently I read Death Comes to the Village by Catherine Lloyd, the first in the Kurland St. Mary series, in which mystery and romance are both in the mix. I’m waiting for the next couple of books in the series to come in the mail.
    I also read a kindle only book called Lady in the Smoke by Karen Odden, which I heard of somewhere, possibly here. It’s quite good, and I wondered why it hadn’t received a print edition, so I asked Ms Odden on twitter and she said it’s because the publisher felt it had too much romance in it. Have you ever heard anything so ridiculous as “too much romance”? She says her next book will be more of a straight procedural and will get a print edition. I think she’s an author to watch for.
    I also reread Persuasion – the book with the greatest love letter *ever* – and some more Barbara Metzgers which have been ebooked.
    Right now I’m in the middle of Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole, a two track love story set in WW1 and WW2, in epistolary form.

    Reply
  8. Recently I read Death Comes to the Village by Catherine Lloyd, the first in the Kurland St. Mary series, in which mystery and romance are both in the mix. I’m waiting for the next couple of books in the series to come in the mail.
    I also read a kindle only book called Lady in the Smoke by Karen Odden, which I heard of somewhere, possibly here. It’s quite good, and I wondered why it hadn’t received a print edition, so I asked Ms Odden on twitter and she said it’s because the publisher felt it had too much romance in it. Have you ever heard anything so ridiculous as “too much romance”? She says her next book will be more of a straight procedural and will get a print edition. I think she’s an author to watch for.
    I also reread Persuasion – the book with the greatest love letter *ever* – and some more Barbara Metzgers which have been ebooked.
    Right now I’m in the middle of Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole, a two track love story set in WW1 and WW2, in epistolary form.

    Reply
  9. Recently I read Death Comes to the Village by Catherine Lloyd, the first in the Kurland St. Mary series, in which mystery and romance are both in the mix. I’m waiting for the next couple of books in the series to come in the mail.
    I also read a kindle only book called Lady in the Smoke by Karen Odden, which I heard of somewhere, possibly here. It’s quite good, and I wondered why it hadn’t received a print edition, so I asked Ms Odden on twitter and she said it’s because the publisher felt it had too much romance in it. Have you ever heard anything so ridiculous as “too much romance”? She says her next book will be more of a straight procedural and will get a print edition. I think she’s an author to watch for.
    I also reread Persuasion – the book with the greatest love letter *ever* – and some more Barbara Metzgers which have been ebooked.
    Right now I’m in the middle of Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole, a two track love story set in WW1 and WW2, in epistolary form.

    Reply
  10. Recently I read Death Comes to the Village by Catherine Lloyd, the first in the Kurland St. Mary series, in which mystery and romance are both in the mix. I’m waiting for the next couple of books in the series to come in the mail.
    I also read a kindle only book called Lady in the Smoke by Karen Odden, which I heard of somewhere, possibly here. It’s quite good, and I wondered why it hadn’t received a print edition, so I asked Ms Odden on twitter and she said it’s because the publisher felt it had too much romance in it. Have you ever heard anything so ridiculous as “too much romance”? She says her next book will be more of a straight procedural and will get a print edition. I think she’s an author to watch for.
    I also reread Persuasion – the book with the greatest love letter *ever* – and some more Barbara Metzgers which have been ebooked.
    Right now I’m in the middle of Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole, a two track love story set in WW1 and WW2, in epistolary form.

    Reply
  11. Right now I am doing a re-read of DARIUS by Grace Burrowes. Next on the agenda is THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley which is waiting to be picked up at the library.
    A favorite recent read was THE ROYAL NANNY by Karen Harper which I found out about on this blog. It’s not the type of book I normally read – a fiction based on real historical characters and events. The real character was Charlotte Bill (Lala) who was nanny to the children of Duke and Duchess of York who later became King George V and Queen Mary. I normally enjoy books that are just nice, cozy reads, but every now and then I like to read something that has me jumping up to google real life characters, events, and places. This was such a book.
    Ms. Harper has quite a back list of books at our library and the subjects seem widely varied. I’ll probably order several more from my library before I start ordering them for my kindle. That’s because of “the budget” don’t you know.

    Reply
  12. Right now I am doing a re-read of DARIUS by Grace Burrowes. Next on the agenda is THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley which is waiting to be picked up at the library.
    A favorite recent read was THE ROYAL NANNY by Karen Harper which I found out about on this blog. It’s not the type of book I normally read – a fiction based on real historical characters and events. The real character was Charlotte Bill (Lala) who was nanny to the children of Duke and Duchess of York who later became King George V and Queen Mary. I normally enjoy books that are just nice, cozy reads, but every now and then I like to read something that has me jumping up to google real life characters, events, and places. This was such a book.
    Ms. Harper has quite a back list of books at our library and the subjects seem widely varied. I’ll probably order several more from my library before I start ordering them for my kindle. That’s because of “the budget” don’t you know.

    Reply
  13. Right now I am doing a re-read of DARIUS by Grace Burrowes. Next on the agenda is THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley which is waiting to be picked up at the library.
    A favorite recent read was THE ROYAL NANNY by Karen Harper which I found out about on this blog. It’s not the type of book I normally read – a fiction based on real historical characters and events. The real character was Charlotte Bill (Lala) who was nanny to the children of Duke and Duchess of York who later became King George V and Queen Mary. I normally enjoy books that are just nice, cozy reads, but every now and then I like to read something that has me jumping up to google real life characters, events, and places. This was such a book.
    Ms. Harper has quite a back list of books at our library and the subjects seem widely varied. I’ll probably order several more from my library before I start ordering them for my kindle. That’s because of “the budget” don’t you know.

    Reply
  14. Right now I am doing a re-read of DARIUS by Grace Burrowes. Next on the agenda is THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley which is waiting to be picked up at the library.
    A favorite recent read was THE ROYAL NANNY by Karen Harper which I found out about on this blog. It’s not the type of book I normally read – a fiction based on real historical characters and events. The real character was Charlotte Bill (Lala) who was nanny to the children of Duke and Duchess of York who later became King George V and Queen Mary. I normally enjoy books that are just nice, cozy reads, but every now and then I like to read something that has me jumping up to google real life characters, events, and places. This was such a book.
    Ms. Harper has quite a back list of books at our library and the subjects seem widely varied. I’ll probably order several more from my library before I start ordering them for my kindle. That’s because of “the budget” don’t you know.

    Reply
  15. Right now I am doing a re-read of DARIUS by Grace Burrowes. Next on the agenda is THE ROSE GARDEN by Susanna Kearsley which is waiting to be picked up at the library.
    A favorite recent read was THE ROYAL NANNY by Karen Harper which I found out about on this blog. It’s not the type of book I normally read – a fiction based on real historical characters and events. The real character was Charlotte Bill (Lala) who was nanny to the children of Duke and Duchess of York who later became King George V and Queen Mary. I normally enjoy books that are just nice, cozy reads, but every now and then I like to read something that has me jumping up to google real life characters, events, and places. This was such a book.
    Ms. Harper has quite a back list of books at our library and the subjects seem widely varied. I’ll probably order several more from my library before I start ordering them for my kindle. That’s because of “the budget” don’t you know.

    Reply
  16. I have read a lot of books in July – and 4 of them stand out. Theory of Magic by an author who y’all may know, Patricia Rice (best of the series so far). The Royal Nanny by Karen Harper – to me it was rather sad on several levels. The Christie Curse by Victoria Abbott, I really like this book and look forward to reding the next books in the series. Finally, a genre I did not expect to like, Murder for Greenhorns. It is a western written by Robert Kresge. Mr Kresge was previously with the CIA and his attention to detail was terrific. The book is just plain fun. Wyoming Territory right after women get the vote, murder, mayhem and accounts of the way life was in the 19th century.
    These are all books I really enjoyed this month.

    Reply
  17. I have read a lot of books in July – and 4 of them stand out. Theory of Magic by an author who y’all may know, Patricia Rice (best of the series so far). The Royal Nanny by Karen Harper – to me it was rather sad on several levels. The Christie Curse by Victoria Abbott, I really like this book and look forward to reding the next books in the series. Finally, a genre I did not expect to like, Murder for Greenhorns. It is a western written by Robert Kresge. Mr Kresge was previously with the CIA and his attention to detail was terrific. The book is just plain fun. Wyoming Territory right after women get the vote, murder, mayhem and accounts of the way life was in the 19th century.
    These are all books I really enjoyed this month.

    Reply
  18. I have read a lot of books in July – and 4 of them stand out. Theory of Magic by an author who y’all may know, Patricia Rice (best of the series so far). The Royal Nanny by Karen Harper – to me it was rather sad on several levels. The Christie Curse by Victoria Abbott, I really like this book and look forward to reding the next books in the series. Finally, a genre I did not expect to like, Murder for Greenhorns. It is a western written by Robert Kresge. Mr Kresge was previously with the CIA and his attention to detail was terrific. The book is just plain fun. Wyoming Territory right after women get the vote, murder, mayhem and accounts of the way life was in the 19th century.
    These are all books I really enjoyed this month.

    Reply
  19. I have read a lot of books in July – and 4 of them stand out. Theory of Magic by an author who y’all may know, Patricia Rice (best of the series so far). The Royal Nanny by Karen Harper – to me it was rather sad on several levels. The Christie Curse by Victoria Abbott, I really like this book and look forward to reding the next books in the series. Finally, a genre I did not expect to like, Murder for Greenhorns. It is a western written by Robert Kresge. Mr Kresge was previously with the CIA and his attention to detail was terrific. The book is just plain fun. Wyoming Territory right after women get the vote, murder, mayhem and accounts of the way life was in the 19th century.
    These are all books I really enjoyed this month.

    Reply
  20. I have read a lot of books in July – and 4 of them stand out. Theory of Magic by an author who y’all may know, Patricia Rice (best of the series so far). The Royal Nanny by Karen Harper – to me it was rather sad on several levels. The Christie Curse by Victoria Abbott, I really like this book and look forward to reding the next books in the series. Finally, a genre I did not expect to like, Murder for Greenhorns. It is a western written by Robert Kresge. Mr Kresge was previously with the CIA and his attention to detail was terrific. The book is just plain fun. Wyoming Territory right after women get the vote, murder, mayhem and accounts of the way life was in the 19th century.
    These are all books I really enjoyed this month.

    Reply
  21. I’ve been ripping through the Victoria Thompson Gaslight series. Also paused to read the latest installment in Martin Walker’s Bruno series. We finally replaced our dvd player for a wifi capable model, and I’ve been enjoying Bourdain’s Parts Unknown and some old reliables like Frasier and Sherlock as I sew.

    Reply
  22. I’ve been ripping through the Victoria Thompson Gaslight series. Also paused to read the latest installment in Martin Walker’s Bruno series. We finally replaced our dvd player for a wifi capable model, and I’ve been enjoying Bourdain’s Parts Unknown and some old reliables like Frasier and Sherlock as I sew.

    Reply
  23. I’ve been ripping through the Victoria Thompson Gaslight series. Also paused to read the latest installment in Martin Walker’s Bruno series. We finally replaced our dvd player for a wifi capable model, and I’ve been enjoying Bourdain’s Parts Unknown and some old reliables like Frasier and Sherlock as I sew.

    Reply
  24. I’ve been ripping through the Victoria Thompson Gaslight series. Also paused to read the latest installment in Martin Walker’s Bruno series. We finally replaced our dvd player for a wifi capable model, and I’ve been enjoying Bourdain’s Parts Unknown and some old reliables like Frasier and Sherlock as I sew.

    Reply
  25. I’ve been ripping through the Victoria Thompson Gaslight series. Also paused to read the latest installment in Martin Walker’s Bruno series. We finally replaced our dvd player for a wifi capable model, and I’ve been enjoying Bourdain’s Parts Unknown and some old reliables like Frasier and Sherlock as I sew.

    Reply
  26. Oana-Maria Uliu, what a lovely tribute to reading! I’ve been delighted with the Romanian publisher who is making so many great romances available to Romanian readers–I hear from many on Facebook and I love when that happens.
    How great that you have your own import service, and that you can read in multiple languages. You have admirably diverse tastes, so read long and prosper!

    Reply
  27. Oana-Maria Uliu, what a lovely tribute to reading! I’ve been delighted with the Romanian publisher who is making so many great romances available to Romanian readers–I hear from many on Facebook and I love when that happens.
    How great that you have your own import service, and that you can read in multiple languages. You have admirably diverse tastes, so read long and prosper!

    Reply
  28. Oana-Maria Uliu, what a lovely tribute to reading! I’ve been delighted with the Romanian publisher who is making so many great romances available to Romanian readers–I hear from many on Facebook and I love when that happens.
    How great that you have your own import service, and that you can read in multiple languages. You have admirably diverse tastes, so read long and prosper!

    Reply
  29. Oana-Maria Uliu, what a lovely tribute to reading! I’ve been delighted with the Romanian publisher who is making so many great romances available to Romanian readers–I hear from many on Facebook and I love when that happens.
    How great that you have your own import service, and that you can read in multiple languages. You have admirably diverse tastes, so read long and prosper!

    Reply
  30. Oana-Maria Uliu, what a lovely tribute to reading! I’ve been delighted with the Romanian publisher who is making so many great romances available to Romanian readers–I hear from many on Facebook and I love when that happens.
    How great that you have your own import service, and that you can read in multiple languages. You have admirably diverse tastes, so read long and prosper!

    Reply
  31. Well I had several favourite authors with new releases this month (or late in June!) so I’ve been busy! I started with Mary Jo Putney’s Once A Soldier (I really enjoyed it and can’t wait for more in this series!) then I moved on to Julie Moffett’s latest Lexi Carmichael mystery No Strings Attached ( such fun stories! I love geeky and awkward Lexi.). I followed Lexi with Anne Gracie’s The Summer Bride (my favourite in the series, Daisy was so refreshing!) and I finished up the new release tour with Mercedes Lackey’s A Study in Sable, her latest Elemental Masters novel (very good! It’s nice to catch up with old favourite characters having new adventures!). Once finished those I’ve been restlessly re-reading books from each of the various series to refresh my memory! I’ve been all over the board in terms of genre and now need to decide what I’m really in the mood for to figure out what to read next. All in all, it’s been a good month book wise!

    Reply
  32. Well I had several favourite authors with new releases this month (or late in June!) so I’ve been busy! I started with Mary Jo Putney’s Once A Soldier (I really enjoyed it and can’t wait for more in this series!) then I moved on to Julie Moffett’s latest Lexi Carmichael mystery No Strings Attached ( such fun stories! I love geeky and awkward Lexi.). I followed Lexi with Anne Gracie’s The Summer Bride (my favourite in the series, Daisy was so refreshing!) and I finished up the new release tour with Mercedes Lackey’s A Study in Sable, her latest Elemental Masters novel (very good! It’s nice to catch up with old favourite characters having new adventures!). Once finished those I’ve been restlessly re-reading books from each of the various series to refresh my memory! I’ve been all over the board in terms of genre and now need to decide what I’m really in the mood for to figure out what to read next. All in all, it’s been a good month book wise!

    Reply
  33. Well I had several favourite authors with new releases this month (or late in June!) so I’ve been busy! I started with Mary Jo Putney’s Once A Soldier (I really enjoyed it and can’t wait for more in this series!) then I moved on to Julie Moffett’s latest Lexi Carmichael mystery No Strings Attached ( such fun stories! I love geeky and awkward Lexi.). I followed Lexi with Anne Gracie’s The Summer Bride (my favourite in the series, Daisy was so refreshing!) and I finished up the new release tour with Mercedes Lackey’s A Study in Sable, her latest Elemental Masters novel (very good! It’s nice to catch up with old favourite characters having new adventures!). Once finished those I’ve been restlessly re-reading books from each of the various series to refresh my memory! I’ve been all over the board in terms of genre and now need to decide what I’m really in the mood for to figure out what to read next. All in all, it’s been a good month book wise!

    Reply
  34. Well I had several favourite authors with new releases this month (or late in June!) so I’ve been busy! I started with Mary Jo Putney’s Once A Soldier (I really enjoyed it and can’t wait for more in this series!) then I moved on to Julie Moffett’s latest Lexi Carmichael mystery No Strings Attached ( such fun stories! I love geeky and awkward Lexi.). I followed Lexi with Anne Gracie’s The Summer Bride (my favourite in the series, Daisy was so refreshing!) and I finished up the new release tour with Mercedes Lackey’s A Study in Sable, her latest Elemental Masters novel (very good! It’s nice to catch up with old favourite characters having new adventures!). Once finished those I’ve been restlessly re-reading books from each of the various series to refresh my memory! I’ve been all over the board in terms of genre and now need to decide what I’m really in the mood for to figure out what to read next. All in all, it’s been a good month book wise!

    Reply
  35. Well I had several favourite authors with new releases this month (or late in June!) so I’ve been busy! I started with Mary Jo Putney’s Once A Soldier (I really enjoyed it and can’t wait for more in this series!) then I moved on to Julie Moffett’s latest Lexi Carmichael mystery No Strings Attached ( such fun stories! I love geeky and awkward Lexi.). I followed Lexi with Anne Gracie’s The Summer Bride (my favourite in the series, Daisy was so refreshing!) and I finished up the new release tour with Mercedes Lackey’s A Study in Sable, her latest Elemental Masters novel (very good! It’s nice to catch up with old favourite characters having new adventures!). Once finished those I’ve been restlessly re-reading books from each of the various series to refresh my memory! I’ve been all over the board in terms of genre and now need to decide what I’m really in the mood for to figure out what to read next. All in all, it’s been a good month book wise!

    Reply
  36. I bought and read “Once a Soldier.” I then read “Theory of Magic,” “Summer Bride,” and all three of Andrea Pickens’ Dangerous Liason novels. Thank you Ladies for those wonderful reads.
    I has been lucky enough to be part of Patricia Rice’s reading panel for the first of these latest “Magic” stories, but somehow, failed to be retained. (I think it was because my review failed to register.) I am sorry to have missed continuing this experience, but no matter HOW I get them, Patricia’s books are always good reads.
    As rereads, I read Anne Gracie’s 3 earlier Chance Sisters before reading “Summer Bride.” I have been slowly rereading Anne Bridge’s Julia Probyn books (and enjoying each one). And in hopes that Susanna Kearsley would be joining us, I have been rereading almost all of her earlier works.

    Reply
  37. I bought and read “Once a Soldier.” I then read “Theory of Magic,” “Summer Bride,” and all three of Andrea Pickens’ Dangerous Liason novels. Thank you Ladies for those wonderful reads.
    I has been lucky enough to be part of Patricia Rice’s reading panel for the first of these latest “Magic” stories, but somehow, failed to be retained. (I think it was because my review failed to register.) I am sorry to have missed continuing this experience, but no matter HOW I get them, Patricia’s books are always good reads.
    As rereads, I read Anne Gracie’s 3 earlier Chance Sisters before reading “Summer Bride.” I have been slowly rereading Anne Bridge’s Julia Probyn books (and enjoying each one). And in hopes that Susanna Kearsley would be joining us, I have been rereading almost all of her earlier works.

    Reply
  38. I bought and read “Once a Soldier.” I then read “Theory of Magic,” “Summer Bride,” and all three of Andrea Pickens’ Dangerous Liason novels. Thank you Ladies for those wonderful reads.
    I has been lucky enough to be part of Patricia Rice’s reading panel for the first of these latest “Magic” stories, but somehow, failed to be retained. (I think it was because my review failed to register.) I am sorry to have missed continuing this experience, but no matter HOW I get them, Patricia’s books are always good reads.
    As rereads, I read Anne Gracie’s 3 earlier Chance Sisters before reading “Summer Bride.” I have been slowly rereading Anne Bridge’s Julia Probyn books (and enjoying each one). And in hopes that Susanna Kearsley would be joining us, I have been rereading almost all of her earlier works.

    Reply
  39. I bought and read “Once a Soldier.” I then read “Theory of Magic,” “Summer Bride,” and all three of Andrea Pickens’ Dangerous Liason novels. Thank you Ladies for those wonderful reads.
    I has been lucky enough to be part of Patricia Rice’s reading panel for the first of these latest “Magic” stories, but somehow, failed to be retained. (I think it was because my review failed to register.) I am sorry to have missed continuing this experience, but no matter HOW I get them, Patricia’s books are always good reads.
    As rereads, I read Anne Gracie’s 3 earlier Chance Sisters before reading “Summer Bride.” I have been slowly rereading Anne Bridge’s Julia Probyn books (and enjoying each one). And in hopes that Susanna Kearsley would be joining us, I have been rereading almost all of her earlier works.

    Reply
  40. I bought and read “Once a Soldier.” I then read “Theory of Magic,” “Summer Bride,” and all three of Andrea Pickens’ Dangerous Liason novels. Thank you Ladies for those wonderful reads.
    I has been lucky enough to be part of Patricia Rice’s reading panel for the first of these latest “Magic” stories, but somehow, failed to be retained. (I think it was because my review failed to register.) I am sorry to have missed continuing this experience, but no matter HOW I get them, Patricia’s books are always good reads.
    As rereads, I read Anne Gracie’s 3 earlier Chance Sisters before reading “Summer Bride.” I have been slowly rereading Anne Bridge’s Julia Probyn books (and enjoying each one). And in hopes that Susanna Kearsley would be joining us, I have been rereading almost all of her earlier works.

    Reply
  41. Thank you. 🙂
    I have a degree in foreign languages and I read in English and Spanish as fast as in Romanian. Unfortunately, I have no friends in Spain who could bring me books in Spanish, but I travel more often to Spain than to the UK, so I can buy some myself. Favourite Spanish authors: Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Federico Garcia Lorca, Enrique Jardiel Poncela, and Rosa Montero. I also read Latin-American books, but usually translated into Romanian. I love Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Laura Esquivel.
    (On my blog you can see pictures of me and some colleagues in Alcala de Henares, Spain.)
    I can also read in French, Italian, Catalan, and Portuguese, even though I don’t speak these languages. I understand them because they are related to Spanish and Romanian, that’s all. Well, I used to study French, actually, but I stopped in 1997 and it’s been Spanish – and English – ever since.
    I’m addicted to reading 😉 – my parents realized that I could read when I was four. I also do some writing, too, occasionally, but I haven’t had anything published yet. And – Susanna may like this – I even illustrated a couple of books and magazines when I was younger. One of the books can be found at the local library, but not on the internet, I’m afraid.
    Wow, I realize all this sounds like… boasting :p – at least it’s about things I’m really good at, so let’s say I’m advertising. Hm, what for? Well, perhaps when I get my first novel published, you’ll be willing to read it (?) 😀
    Oh, I’ve just bought some pesto. It’s too late for dinner, but I’ll have some tomorrow. 🙂

    Reply
  42. Thank you. 🙂
    I have a degree in foreign languages and I read in English and Spanish as fast as in Romanian. Unfortunately, I have no friends in Spain who could bring me books in Spanish, but I travel more often to Spain than to the UK, so I can buy some myself. Favourite Spanish authors: Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Federico Garcia Lorca, Enrique Jardiel Poncela, and Rosa Montero. I also read Latin-American books, but usually translated into Romanian. I love Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Laura Esquivel.
    (On my blog you can see pictures of me and some colleagues in Alcala de Henares, Spain.)
    I can also read in French, Italian, Catalan, and Portuguese, even though I don’t speak these languages. I understand them because they are related to Spanish and Romanian, that’s all. Well, I used to study French, actually, but I stopped in 1997 and it’s been Spanish – and English – ever since.
    I’m addicted to reading 😉 – my parents realized that I could read when I was four. I also do some writing, too, occasionally, but I haven’t had anything published yet. And – Susanna may like this – I even illustrated a couple of books and magazines when I was younger. One of the books can be found at the local library, but not on the internet, I’m afraid.
    Wow, I realize all this sounds like… boasting :p – at least it’s about things I’m really good at, so let’s say I’m advertising. Hm, what for? Well, perhaps when I get my first novel published, you’ll be willing to read it (?) 😀
    Oh, I’ve just bought some pesto. It’s too late for dinner, but I’ll have some tomorrow. 🙂

    Reply
  43. Thank you. 🙂
    I have a degree in foreign languages and I read in English and Spanish as fast as in Romanian. Unfortunately, I have no friends in Spain who could bring me books in Spanish, but I travel more often to Spain than to the UK, so I can buy some myself. Favourite Spanish authors: Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Federico Garcia Lorca, Enrique Jardiel Poncela, and Rosa Montero. I also read Latin-American books, but usually translated into Romanian. I love Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Laura Esquivel.
    (On my blog you can see pictures of me and some colleagues in Alcala de Henares, Spain.)
    I can also read in French, Italian, Catalan, and Portuguese, even though I don’t speak these languages. I understand them because they are related to Spanish and Romanian, that’s all. Well, I used to study French, actually, but I stopped in 1997 and it’s been Spanish – and English – ever since.
    I’m addicted to reading 😉 – my parents realized that I could read when I was four. I also do some writing, too, occasionally, but I haven’t had anything published yet. And – Susanna may like this – I even illustrated a couple of books and magazines when I was younger. One of the books can be found at the local library, but not on the internet, I’m afraid.
    Wow, I realize all this sounds like… boasting :p – at least it’s about things I’m really good at, so let’s say I’m advertising. Hm, what for? Well, perhaps when I get my first novel published, you’ll be willing to read it (?) 😀
    Oh, I’ve just bought some pesto. It’s too late for dinner, but I’ll have some tomorrow. 🙂

    Reply
  44. Thank you. 🙂
    I have a degree in foreign languages and I read in English and Spanish as fast as in Romanian. Unfortunately, I have no friends in Spain who could bring me books in Spanish, but I travel more often to Spain than to the UK, so I can buy some myself. Favourite Spanish authors: Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Federico Garcia Lorca, Enrique Jardiel Poncela, and Rosa Montero. I also read Latin-American books, but usually translated into Romanian. I love Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Laura Esquivel.
    (On my blog you can see pictures of me and some colleagues in Alcala de Henares, Spain.)
    I can also read in French, Italian, Catalan, and Portuguese, even though I don’t speak these languages. I understand them because they are related to Spanish and Romanian, that’s all. Well, I used to study French, actually, but I stopped in 1997 and it’s been Spanish – and English – ever since.
    I’m addicted to reading 😉 – my parents realized that I could read when I was four. I also do some writing, too, occasionally, but I haven’t had anything published yet. And – Susanna may like this – I even illustrated a couple of books and magazines when I was younger. One of the books can be found at the local library, but not on the internet, I’m afraid.
    Wow, I realize all this sounds like… boasting :p – at least it’s about things I’m really good at, so let’s say I’m advertising. Hm, what for? Well, perhaps when I get my first novel published, you’ll be willing to read it (?) 😀
    Oh, I’ve just bought some pesto. It’s too late for dinner, but I’ll have some tomorrow. 🙂

    Reply
  45. Thank you. 🙂
    I have a degree in foreign languages and I read in English and Spanish as fast as in Romanian. Unfortunately, I have no friends in Spain who could bring me books in Spanish, but I travel more often to Spain than to the UK, so I can buy some myself. Favourite Spanish authors: Eduardo Mendoza, Javier Marias, Federico Garcia Lorca, Enrique Jardiel Poncela, and Rosa Montero. I also read Latin-American books, but usually translated into Romanian. I love Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Laura Esquivel.
    (On my blog you can see pictures of me and some colleagues in Alcala de Henares, Spain.)
    I can also read in French, Italian, Catalan, and Portuguese, even though I don’t speak these languages. I understand them because they are related to Spanish and Romanian, that’s all. Well, I used to study French, actually, but I stopped in 1997 and it’s been Spanish – and English – ever since.
    I’m addicted to reading 😉 – my parents realized that I could read when I was four. I also do some writing, too, occasionally, but I haven’t had anything published yet. And – Susanna may like this – I even illustrated a couple of books and magazines when I was younger. One of the books can be found at the local library, but not on the internet, I’m afraid.
    Wow, I realize all this sounds like… boasting :p – at least it’s about things I’m really good at, so let’s say I’m advertising. Hm, what for? Well, perhaps when I get my first novel published, you’ll be willing to read it (?) 😀
    Oh, I’ve just bought some pesto. It’s too late for dinner, but I’ll have some tomorrow. 🙂

    Reply
  46. Should I have added some favourite Romanian writers? One or two may have been translated into English, I’m not sure. Here we go: Camil Petrescu, Mircea Eliade, Mircea Cartarescu, Nicolae Filimon, Tudor Musatescu, and Radu Tudoran.
    Sorry for writing long comments. It’s a bad habit. I’ll try to make them shorter.

    Reply
  47. Should I have added some favourite Romanian writers? One or two may have been translated into English, I’m not sure. Here we go: Camil Petrescu, Mircea Eliade, Mircea Cartarescu, Nicolae Filimon, Tudor Musatescu, and Radu Tudoran.
    Sorry for writing long comments. It’s a bad habit. I’ll try to make them shorter.

    Reply
  48. Should I have added some favourite Romanian writers? One or two may have been translated into English, I’m not sure. Here we go: Camil Petrescu, Mircea Eliade, Mircea Cartarescu, Nicolae Filimon, Tudor Musatescu, and Radu Tudoran.
    Sorry for writing long comments. It’s a bad habit. I’ll try to make them shorter.

    Reply
  49. Should I have added some favourite Romanian writers? One or two may have been translated into English, I’m not sure. Here we go: Camil Petrescu, Mircea Eliade, Mircea Cartarescu, Nicolae Filimon, Tudor Musatescu, and Radu Tudoran.
    Sorry for writing long comments. It’s a bad habit. I’ll try to make them shorter.

    Reply
  50. Should I have added some favourite Romanian writers? One or two may have been translated into English, I’m not sure. Here we go: Camil Petrescu, Mircea Eliade, Mircea Cartarescu, Nicolae Filimon, Tudor Musatescu, and Radu Tudoran.
    Sorry for writing long comments. It’s a bad habit. I’ll try to make them shorter.

    Reply
  51. I,ve been reading like mad this month (too hot to do anything else!) Discovered a new series – Ben Aaronovitch is the author. The series builds, so readers are advised to start at the beginning, with Midnight Riot. It’s a police procedural leavened with magic;Peter Grant is the first apprentice sorcerer in 50 years, mixed race and thoroughly modern, his mentor is very “old-school” but brilliant. Witty and fast-paced. Along the same line, but different is Zen Cho’s The Sorcerer to the Crown. Set in Napoleonic times, it is also fast paced and witty, but the characters are definitely 19th century. Both good reads.

    Reply
  52. I,ve been reading like mad this month (too hot to do anything else!) Discovered a new series – Ben Aaronovitch is the author. The series builds, so readers are advised to start at the beginning, with Midnight Riot. It’s a police procedural leavened with magic;Peter Grant is the first apprentice sorcerer in 50 years, mixed race and thoroughly modern, his mentor is very “old-school” but brilliant. Witty and fast-paced. Along the same line, but different is Zen Cho’s The Sorcerer to the Crown. Set in Napoleonic times, it is also fast paced and witty, but the characters are definitely 19th century. Both good reads.

    Reply
  53. I,ve been reading like mad this month (too hot to do anything else!) Discovered a new series – Ben Aaronovitch is the author. The series builds, so readers are advised to start at the beginning, with Midnight Riot. It’s a police procedural leavened with magic;Peter Grant is the first apprentice sorcerer in 50 years, mixed race and thoroughly modern, his mentor is very “old-school” but brilliant. Witty and fast-paced. Along the same line, but different is Zen Cho’s The Sorcerer to the Crown. Set in Napoleonic times, it is also fast paced and witty, but the characters are definitely 19th century. Both good reads.

    Reply
  54. I,ve been reading like mad this month (too hot to do anything else!) Discovered a new series – Ben Aaronovitch is the author. The series builds, so readers are advised to start at the beginning, with Midnight Riot. It’s a police procedural leavened with magic;Peter Grant is the first apprentice sorcerer in 50 years, mixed race and thoroughly modern, his mentor is very “old-school” but brilliant. Witty and fast-paced. Along the same line, but different is Zen Cho’s The Sorcerer to the Crown. Set in Napoleonic times, it is also fast paced and witty, but the characters are definitely 19th century. Both good reads.

    Reply
  55. I,ve been reading like mad this month (too hot to do anything else!) Discovered a new series – Ben Aaronovitch is the author. The series builds, so readers are advised to start at the beginning, with Midnight Riot. It’s a police procedural leavened with magic;Peter Grant is the first apprentice sorcerer in 50 years, mixed race and thoroughly modern, his mentor is very “old-school” but brilliant. Witty and fast-paced. Along the same line, but different is Zen Cho’s The Sorcerer to the Crown. Set in Napoleonic times, it is also fast paced and witty, but the characters are definitely 19th century. Both good reads.

    Reply
  56. Oops, I forgot to mention a lovely lady, Rodica Ojog-Brasoveanu, author of many crime novels sprinkled with humour, plus a couple of historical novels which are incredibly well documented.

    Reply
  57. Oops, I forgot to mention a lovely lady, Rodica Ojog-Brasoveanu, author of many crime novels sprinkled with humour, plus a couple of historical novels which are incredibly well documented.

    Reply
  58. Oops, I forgot to mention a lovely lady, Rodica Ojog-Brasoveanu, author of many crime novels sprinkled with humour, plus a couple of historical novels which are incredibly well documented.

    Reply
  59. Oops, I forgot to mention a lovely lady, Rodica Ojog-Brasoveanu, author of many crime novels sprinkled with humour, plus a couple of historical novels which are incredibly well documented.

    Reply
  60. Oops, I forgot to mention a lovely lady, Rodica Ojog-Brasoveanu, author of many crime novels sprinkled with humour, plus a couple of historical novels which are incredibly well documented.

    Reply
  61. Long comments are fine as long as they’re interesting, and yours are! Clearly you were a word child from the beginning, with a real talent for foreign languages. Yes, all those Romance languages are related. but I suspect not many people read them was well as you do. *G* And of course English isn’t a Romance language at all.
    Now you need to cultivate a good reading friend in Spain!

    Reply
  62. Long comments are fine as long as they’re interesting, and yours are! Clearly you were a word child from the beginning, with a real talent for foreign languages. Yes, all those Romance languages are related. but I suspect not many people read them was well as you do. *G* And of course English isn’t a Romance language at all.
    Now you need to cultivate a good reading friend in Spain!

    Reply
  63. Long comments are fine as long as they’re interesting, and yours are! Clearly you were a word child from the beginning, with a real talent for foreign languages. Yes, all those Romance languages are related. but I suspect not many people read them was well as you do. *G* And of course English isn’t a Romance language at all.
    Now you need to cultivate a good reading friend in Spain!

    Reply
  64. Long comments are fine as long as they’re interesting, and yours are! Clearly you were a word child from the beginning, with a real talent for foreign languages. Yes, all those Romance languages are related. but I suspect not many people read them was well as you do. *G* And of course English isn’t a Romance language at all.
    Now you need to cultivate a good reading friend in Spain!

    Reply
  65. Long comments are fine as long as they’re interesting, and yours are! Clearly you were a word child from the beginning, with a real talent for foreign languages. Yes, all those Romance languages are related. but I suspect not many people read them was well as you do. *G* And of course English isn’t a Romance language at all.
    Now you need to cultivate a good reading friend in Spain!

    Reply
  66. Jana, you’ve had a good reading month indeed! Since I’m in the throes of deadline hell, mostly I’m rereading old favorites, which is nice when I’m writing hard, but doesn’t expand my horizons.

    Reply
  67. Jana, you’ve had a good reading month indeed! Since I’m in the throes of deadline hell, mostly I’m rereading old favorites, which is nice when I’m writing hard, but doesn’t expand my horizons.

    Reply
  68. Jana, you’ve had a good reading month indeed! Since I’m in the throes of deadline hell, mostly I’m rereading old favorites, which is nice when I’m writing hard, but doesn’t expand my horizons.

    Reply
  69. Jana, you’ve had a good reading month indeed! Since I’m in the throes of deadline hell, mostly I’m rereading old favorites, which is nice when I’m writing hard, but doesn’t expand my horizons.

    Reply
  70. Jana, you’ve had a good reading month indeed! Since I’m in the throes of deadline hell, mostly I’m rereading old favorites, which is nice when I’m writing hard, but doesn’t expand my horizons.

    Reply
  71. Annette, I also have Pat’s book on my e-reader, though haven’t read it yet. BTW she’s in the air, flying at the moment, so she can’t respond to any of these comments. But I’m sure she appreciates them.

    Reply
  72. Annette, I also have Pat’s book on my e-reader, though haven’t read it yet. BTW she’s in the air, flying at the moment, so she can’t respond to any of these comments. But I’m sure she appreciates them.

    Reply
  73. Annette, I also have Pat’s book on my e-reader, though haven’t read it yet. BTW she’s in the air, flying at the moment, so she can’t respond to any of these comments. But I’m sure she appreciates them.

    Reply
  74. Annette, I also have Pat’s book on my e-reader, though haven’t read it yet. BTW she’s in the air, flying at the moment, so she can’t respond to any of these comments. But I’m sure she appreciates them.

    Reply
  75. Annette, I also have Pat’s book on my e-reader, though haven’t read it yet. BTW she’s in the air, flying at the moment, so she can’t respond to any of these comments. But I’m sure she appreciates them.

    Reply
  76. Thanks, Jana — so glad you enjoyed Daisy’s story. And I’m so glad you mentioned Merceded Lackey — I love so many of her books, but I haven’t read her for ages. I think it might be time for me to catch up.
    As for rereads, I’m giving a short talk at a Georgette Heyer conference in Sydney next week, and I need to reread Venetia. Such a hardship 😉

    Reply
  77. Thanks, Jana — so glad you enjoyed Daisy’s story. And I’m so glad you mentioned Merceded Lackey — I love so many of her books, but I haven’t read her for ages. I think it might be time for me to catch up.
    As for rereads, I’m giving a short talk at a Georgette Heyer conference in Sydney next week, and I need to reread Venetia. Such a hardship 😉

    Reply
  78. Thanks, Jana — so glad you enjoyed Daisy’s story. And I’m so glad you mentioned Merceded Lackey — I love so many of her books, but I haven’t read her for ages. I think it might be time for me to catch up.
    As for rereads, I’m giving a short talk at a Georgette Heyer conference in Sydney next week, and I need to reread Venetia. Such a hardship 😉

    Reply
  79. Thanks, Jana — so glad you enjoyed Daisy’s story. And I’m so glad you mentioned Merceded Lackey — I love so many of her books, but I haven’t read her for ages. I think it might be time for me to catch up.
    As for rereads, I’m giving a short talk at a Georgette Heyer conference in Sydney next week, and I need to reread Venetia. Such a hardship 😉

    Reply
  80. Thanks, Jana — so glad you enjoyed Daisy’s story. And I’m so glad you mentioned Merceded Lackey — I love so many of her books, but I haven’t read her for ages. I think it might be time for me to catch up.
    As for rereads, I’m giving a short talk at a Georgette Heyer conference in Sydney next week, and I need to reread Venetia. Such a hardship 😉

    Reply
  81. Thanks for those very kind comments, Sue. I think we’re so lucky with the Wenches, that we all enjoy each others work. And rereading books you’ve enjoyed in the past is like catching up with old friends.

    Reply
  82. Thanks for those very kind comments, Sue. I think we’re so lucky with the Wenches, that we all enjoy each others work. And rereading books you’ve enjoyed in the past is like catching up with old friends.

    Reply
  83. Thanks for those very kind comments, Sue. I think we’re so lucky with the Wenches, that we all enjoy each others work. And rereading books you’ve enjoyed in the past is like catching up with old friends.

    Reply
  84. Thanks for those very kind comments, Sue. I think we’re so lucky with the Wenches, that we all enjoy each others work. And rereading books you’ve enjoyed in the past is like catching up with old friends.

    Reply
  85. Thanks for those very kind comments, Sue. I think we’re so lucky with the Wenches, that we all enjoy each others work. And rereading books you’ve enjoyed in the past is like catching up with old friends.

    Reply
  86. I read Courtney Milan’s The Suffragette Scandal recently–loved it! I also recently read Plastic Smile by SL Huang, a sci-fi thriller which was action-packed. Right now, I’m tucking into The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson.

    Reply
  87. I read Courtney Milan’s The Suffragette Scandal recently–loved it! I also recently read Plastic Smile by SL Huang, a sci-fi thriller which was action-packed. Right now, I’m tucking into The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson.

    Reply
  88. I read Courtney Milan’s The Suffragette Scandal recently–loved it! I also recently read Plastic Smile by SL Huang, a sci-fi thriller which was action-packed. Right now, I’m tucking into The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson.

    Reply
  89. I read Courtney Milan’s The Suffragette Scandal recently–loved it! I also recently read Plastic Smile by SL Huang, a sci-fi thriller which was action-packed. Right now, I’m tucking into The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson.

    Reply
  90. I read Courtney Milan’s The Suffragette Scandal recently–loved it! I also recently read Plastic Smile by SL Huang, a sci-fi thriller which was action-packed. Right now, I’m tucking into The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson.

    Reply
  91. Agent to the Stars, by John Scalzi. The most fun I’ve had reading since, oh, Marian Chesney’s genteel old-maid sisters pulled each other’s hair out on the dance floor at Almack’s.

    Reply
  92. Agent to the Stars, by John Scalzi. The most fun I’ve had reading since, oh, Marian Chesney’s genteel old-maid sisters pulled each other’s hair out on the dance floor at Almack’s.

    Reply
  93. Agent to the Stars, by John Scalzi. The most fun I’ve had reading since, oh, Marian Chesney’s genteel old-maid sisters pulled each other’s hair out on the dance floor at Almack’s.

    Reply
  94. Agent to the Stars, by John Scalzi. The most fun I’ve had reading since, oh, Marian Chesney’s genteel old-maid sisters pulled each other’s hair out on the dance floor at Almack’s.

    Reply
  95. Agent to the Stars, by John Scalzi. The most fun I’ve had reading since, oh, Marian Chesney’s genteel old-maid sisters pulled each other’s hair out on the dance floor at Almack’s.

    Reply
  96. :p I didn’t say English was a Romance language. Nevertheless, it is a very good language for romance. 😉
    Thank you for your kind words, Mary Jo.
    If you really don’t mind long comments, I’ll probably tell you stories from time to time (related to the topic, of course). I’ve read so many of yours that I feel I should give you something in return. I’ll make them interesting, I promise. 🙂

    Reply
  97. :p I didn’t say English was a Romance language. Nevertheless, it is a very good language for romance. 😉
    Thank you for your kind words, Mary Jo.
    If you really don’t mind long comments, I’ll probably tell you stories from time to time (related to the topic, of course). I’ve read so many of yours that I feel I should give you something in return. I’ll make them interesting, I promise. 🙂

    Reply
  98. :p I didn’t say English was a Romance language. Nevertheless, it is a very good language for romance. 😉
    Thank you for your kind words, Mary Jo.
    If you really don’t mind long comments, I’ll probably tell you stories from time to time (related to the topic, of course). I’ve read so many of yours that I feel I should give you something in return. I’ll make them interesting, I promise. 🙂

    Reply
  99. :p I didn’t say English was a Romance language. Nevertheless, it is a very good language for romance. 😉
    Thank you for your kind words, Mary Jo.
    If you really don’t mind long comments, I’ll probably tell you stories from time to time (related to the topic, of course). I’ve read so many of yours that I feel I should give you something in return. I’ll make them interesting, I promise. 🙂

    Reply
  100. :p I didn’t say English was a Romance language. Nevertheless, it is a very good language for romance. 😉
    Thank you for your kind words, Mary Jo.
    If you really don’t mind long comments, I’ll probably tell you stories from time to time (related to the topic, of course). I’ve read so many of yours that I feel I should give you something in return. I’ll make them interesting, I promise. 🙂

    Reply
  101. It’s been such a cold month here in Melbourne I’ve been reading nonstop – immersed in historical nonfiction, old favourites and new books. Mark Urban’s Rifles is a fascinating account of the 95th Rifles in Wellington’s army that I found in a second hand book shop a while ago. It provides great background to understanding all those tortured Regency heroes who survived Waterloo. Also I loved Anne’s Summer Bride – Aunt Bea must be quite satisfied to see all her girls married off happily! Now I’m reading a debut author, Dora Bramden’s A Dance With the Laird, a lovely contemporary romance set in Scotland. Oh, and I must reread Venetia too!

    Reply
  102. It’s been such a cold month here in Melbourne I’ve been reading nonstop – immersed in historical nonfiction, old favourites and new books. Mark Urban’s Rifles is a fascinating account of the 95th Rifles in Wellington’s army that I found in a second hand book shop a while ago. It provides great background to understanding all those tortured Regency heroes who survived Waterloo. Also I loved Anne’s Summer Bride – Aunt Bea must be quite satisfied to see all her girls married off happily! Now I’m reading a debut author, Dora Bramden’s A Dance With the Laird, a lovely contemporary romance set in Scotland. Oh, and I must reread Venetia too!

    Reply
  103. It’s been such a cold month here in Melbourne I’ve been reading nonstop – immersed in historical nonfiction, old favourites and new books. Mark Urban’s Rifles is a fascinating account of the 95th Rifles in Wellington’s army that I found in a second hand book shop a while ago. It provides great background to understanding all those tortured Regency heroes who survived Waterloo. Also I loved Anne’s Summer Bride – Aunt Bea must be quite satisfied to see all her girls married off happily! Now I’m reading a debut author, Dora Bramden’s A Dance With the Laird, a lovely contemporary romance set in Scotland. Oh, and I must reread Venetia too!

    Reply
  104. It’s been such a cold month here in Melbourne I’ve been reading nonstop – immersed in historical nonfiction, old favourites and new books. Mark Urban’s Rifles is a fascinating account of the 95th Rifles in Wellington’s army that I found in a second hand book shop a while ago. It provides great background to understanding all those tortured Regency heroes who survived Waterloo. Also I loved Anne’s Summer Bride – Aunt Bea must be quite satisfied to see all her girls married off happily! Now I’m reading a debut author, Dora Bramden’s A Dance With the Laird, a lovely contemporary romance set in Scotland. Oh, and I must reread Venetia too!

    Reply
  105. It’s been such a cold month here in Melbourne I’ve been reading nonstop – immersed in historical nonfiction, old favourites and new books. Mark Urban’s Rifles is a fascinating account of the 95th Rifles in Wellington’s army that I found in a second hand book shop a while ago. It provides great background to understanding all those tortured Regency heroes who survived Waterloo. Also I loved Anne’s Summer Bride – Aunt Bea must be quite satisfied to see all her girls married off happily! Now I’m reading a debut author, Dora Bramden’s A Dance With the Laird, a lovely contemporary romance set in Scotland. Oh, and I must reread Venetia too!

    Reply
  106. I’m currently throughly enjoying reading Helen Simonson’s new book – The Summer before the War. It has shades of Wodehouse, with an Aunt Agatha and it is a gentle, humorous but thought-provoking look at an English village with it foibles right before WWI. It’s bewitching writing, and I think I found this author because one of the Word Wenches had recommended her earlier book, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand.
    The Giants look down and The Cornish House sound like fascinating books – I’m off to reserve them at Overdrive! Thank you, Nicola. Also the movie recommend is going to my brother – he was watching the Bridge over the River Kwai last night, so that’s his Saturday night sorted 🙂

    Reply
  107. I’m currently throughly enjoying reading Helen Simonson’s new book – The Summer before the War. It has shades of Wodehouse, with an Aunt Agatha and it is a gentle, humorous but thought-provoking look at an English village with it foibles right before WWI. It’s bewitching writing, and I think I found this author because one of the Word Wenches had recommended her earlier book, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand.
    The Giants look down and The Cornish House sound like fascinating books – I’m off to reserve them at Overdrive! Thank you, Nicola. Also the movie recommend is going to my brother – he was watching the Bridge over the River Kwai last night, so that’s his Saturday night sorted 🙂

    Reply
  108. I’m currently throughly enjoying reading Helen Simonson’s new book – The Summer before the War. It has shades of Wodehouse, with an Aunt Agatha and it is a gentle, humorous but thought-provoking look at an English village with it foibles right before WWI. It’s bewitching writing, and I think I found this author because one of the Word Wenches had recommended her earlier book, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand.
    The Giants look down and The Cornish House sound like fascinating books – I’m off to reserve them at Overdrive! Thank you, Nicola. Also the movie recommend is going to my brother – he was watching the Bridge over the River Kwai last night, so that’s his Saturday night sorted 🙂

    Reply
  109. I’m currently throughly enjoying reading Helen Simonson’s new book – The Summer before the War. It has shades of Wodehouse, with an Aunt Agatha and it is a gentle, humorous but thought-provoking look at an English village with it foibles right before WWI. It’s bewitching writing, and I think I found this author because one of the Word Wenches had recommended her earlier book, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand.
    The Giants look down and The Cornish House sound like fascinating books – I’m off to reserve them at Overdrive! Thank you, Nicola. Also the movie recommend is going to my brother – he was watching the Bridge over the River Kwai last night, so that’s his Saturday night sorted 🙂

    Reply
  110. I’m currently throughly enjoying reading Helen Simonson’s new book – The Summer before the War. It has shades of Wodehouse, with an Aunt Agatha and it is a gentle, humorous but thought-provoking look at an English village with it foibles right before WWI. It’s bewitching writing, and I think I found this author because one of the Word Wenches had recommended her earlier book, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand.
    The Giants look down and The Cornish House sound like fascinating books – I’m off to reserve them at Overdrive! Thank you, Nicola. Also the movie recommend is going to my brother – he was watching the Bridge over the River Kwai last night, so that’s his Saturday night sorted 🙂

    Reply
  111. By the way, read Once a Soldier in June – ARC copy —-Loved that too. Now I hope to get the Summer Bride. Ladies, I am doing the best I can here.

    Reply
  112. By the way, read Once a Soldier in June – ARC copy —-Loved that too. Now I hope to get the Summer Bride. Ladies, I am doing the best I can here.

    Reply
  113. By the way, read Once a Soldier in June – ARC copy —-Loved that too. Now I hope to get the Summer Bride. Ladies, I am doing the best I can here.

    Reply
  114. By the way, read Once a Soldier in June – ARC copy —-Loved that too. Now I hope to get the Summer Bride. Ladies, I am doing the best I can here.

    Reply
  115. By the way, read Once a Soldier in June – ARC copy —-Loved that too. Now I hope to get the Summer Bride. Ladies, I am doing the best I can here.

    Reply
  116. A pleasure, Kanchb! I hope you enjoy them. The Cornish House is great – I love stories that focus on houses and the role they play in people’s lives. The Giants Look Down is a very unusual story, in a good way!

    Reply
  117. A pleasure, Kanchb! I hope you enjoy them. The Cornish House is great – I love stories that focus on houses and the role they play in people’s lives. The Giants Look Down is a very unusual story, in a good way!

    Reply
  118. A pleasure, Kanchb! I hope you enjoy them. The Cornish House is great – I love stories that focus on houses and the role they play in people’s lives. The Giants Look Down is a very unusual story, in a good way!

    Reply
  119. A pleasure, Kanchb! I hope you enjoy them. The Cornish House is great – I love stories that focus on houses and the role they play in people’s lives. The Giants Look Down is a very unusual story, in a good way!

    Reply
  120. A pleasure, Kanchb! I hope you enjoy them. The Cornish House is great – I love stories that focus on houses and the role they play in people’s lives. The Giants Look Down is a very unusual story, in a good way!

    Reply
  121. Thank you for the John Scalzi recommendation, Mary M. I have been following him on Twitter, where he is a lot of fun, but it really is past time that I read one of his books!
    “Once A Soldier” is on my reading list. I am currently reading “The Wicked Duke” by Madeline Hunter, and totally enjoying the last of a great trilogy.
    My goal is also to whittle down the pile of New Yorker magazines, because somehow I have fallen more than 2 months behind.
    Like Mary Jo, I think films set in winter make the best heatwave viewing. My choice would be Dr. Zhivago-that Russian winter!

    Reply
  122. Thank you for the John Scalzi recommendation, Mary M. I have been following him on Twitter, where he is a lot of fun, but it really is past time that I read one of his books!
    “Once A Soldier” is on my reading list. I am currently reading “The Wicked Duke” by Madeline Hunter, and totally enjoying the last of a great trilogy.
    My goal is also to whittle down the pile of New Yorker magazines, because somehow I have fallen more than 2 months behind.
    Like Mary Jo, I think films set in winter make the best heatwave viewing. My choice would be Dr. Zhivago-that Russian winter!

    Reply
  123. Thank you for the John Scalzi recommendation, Mary M. I have been following him on Twitter, where he is a lot of fun, but it really is past time that I read one of his books!
    “Once A Soldier” is on my reading list. I am currently reading “The Wicked Duke” by Madeline Hunter, and totally enjoying the last of a great trilogy.
    My goal is also to whittle down the pile of New Yorker magazines, because somehow I have fallen more than 2 months behind.
    Like Mary Jo, I think films set in winter make the best heatwave viewing. My choice would be Dr. Zhivago-that Russian winter!

    Reply
  124. Thank you for the John Scalzi recommendation, Mary M. I have been following him on Twitter, where he is a lot of fun, but it really is past time that I read one of his books!
    “Once A Soldier” is on my reading list. I am currently reading “The Wicked Duke” by Madeline Hunter, and totally enjoying the last of a great trilogy.
    My goal is also to whittle down the pile of New Yorker magazines, because somehow I have fallen more than 2 months behind.
    Like Mary Jo, I think films set in winter make the best heatwave viewing. My choice would be Dr. Zhivago-that Russian winter!

    Reply
  125. Thank you for the John Scalzi recommendation, Mary M. I have been following him on Twitter, where he is a lot of fun, but it really is past time that I read one of his books!
    “Once A Soldier” is on my reading list. I am currently reading “The Wicked Duke” by Madeline Hunter, and totally enjoying the last of a great trilogy.
    My goal is also to whittle down the pile of New Yorker magazines, because somehow I have fallen more than 2 months behind.
    Like Mary Jo, I think films set in winter make the best heatwave viewing. My choice would be Dr. Zhivago-that Russian winter!

    Reply
  126. Thank you so much! Do to traveling, I’ve been experiencing “technical difficulties” getting into the blog, but I’m home now and love that one of the first things I read is this. 😉 Since I adore mysteries, I’m off to track these down.

    Reply
  127. Thank you so much! Do to traveling, I’ve been experiencing “technical difficulties” getting into the blog, but I’m home now and love that one of the first things I read is this. 😉 Since I adore mysteries, I’m off to track these down.

    Reply
  128. Thank you so much! Do to traveling, I’ve been experiencing “technical difficulties” getting into the blog, but I’m home now and love that one of the first things I read is this. 😉 Since I adore mysteries, I’m off to track these down.

    Reply
  129. Thank you so much! Do to traveling, I’ve been experiencing “technical difficulties” getting into the blog, but I’m home now and love that one of the first things I read is this. 😉 Since I adore mysteries, I’m off to track these down.

    Reply
  130. Thank you so much! Do to traveling, I’ve been experiencing “technical difficulties” getting into the blog, but I’m home now and love that one of the first things I read is this. 😉 Since I adore mysteries, I’m off to track these down.

    Reply
  131. The ARC system is quirky. So sorry you got bounced. One of these days, in my spare time ;), I’ll try to figure it out. Right now, the gremlins handle it and they just don’t recognize names.

    Reply
  132. The ARC system is quirky. So sorry you got bounced. One of these days, in my spare time ;), I’ll try to figure it out. Right now, the gremlins handle it and they just don’t recognize names.

    Reply
  133. The ARC system is quirky. So sorry you got bounced. One of these days, in my spare time ;), I’ll try to figure it out. Right now, the gremlins handle it and they just don’t recognize names.

    Reply
  134. The ARC system is quirky. So sorry you got bounced. One of these days, in my spare time ;), I’ll try to figure it out. Right now, the gremlins handle it and they just don’t recognize names.

    Reply
  135. The ARC system is quirky. So sorry you got bounced. One of these days, in my spare time ;), I’ll try to figure it out. Right now, the gremlins handle it and they just don’t recognize names.

    Reply
  136. Zhivago should kill any summer heat, for certain! And it’s lovely to look at, too. Definitely try Scalzi. His twitter feed is amazing and just a small part of what he does well.

    Reply
  137. Zhivago should kill any summer heat, for certain! And it’s lovely to look at, too. Definitely try Scalzi. His twitter feed is amazing and just a small part of what he does well.

    Reply
  138. Zhivago should kill any summer heat, for certain! And it’s lovely to look at, too. Definitely try Scalzi. His twitter feed is amazing and just a small part of what he does well.

    Reply
  139. Zhivago should kill any summer heat, for certain! And it’s lovely to look at, too. Definitely try Scalzi. His twitter feed is amazing and just a small part of what he does well.

    Reply
  140. Zhivago should kill any summer heat, for certain! And it’s lovely to look at, too. Definitely try Scalzi. His twitter feed is amazing and just a small part of what he does well.

    Reply
  141. Started my July reading with Once A Soldier – absolutely loved the story and, as a cook, appreciated the basic cooking on the their “camping” trip. I will be re-reading it soon, Mary Jo.
    Then read As Death Draws Near, A Lady Darby Mystery – Ann Lee Huber; A Spanish Honeymoon – Anne Weale – a re-read; Indiscreet, Unforgiven, Irrisitible – Mary Balogh – I waited until Unforgiven finally arrived on my kindle to read the whole series as I like to read series in order; Lord Dashwood Missed Out (novella) – Tessa Dare; April Lady – Georgette Heyer (umpteenth re-read); If the Viscount Falls – Sabrina Jeffries; Concrete Evidence – Rachel Grant – new to me author, first book in a series, which I promptly ordered but I will space the reading of the series out; Burn – Linda Howard – another re-read – I re-read at least one LH every month; and finishing up July with Illusion Town – Jayne Castle.
    Mary Jo, I have Where Eagles Dare recorded on our PVR. I’ve seen it before, several times, but it’s one of those movies that you can really enjoy in repeat viewings. The twists and turns are incredible and you can certainly feel the chill from the snow.
    Lorraine

    Reply
  142. Started my July reading with Once A Soldier – absolutely loved the story and, as a cook, appreciated the basic cooking on the their “camping” trip. I will be re-reading it soon, Mary Jo.
    Then read As Death Draws Near, A Lady Darby Mystery – Ann Lee Huber; A Spanish Honeymoon – Anne Weale – a re-read; Indiscreet, Unforgiven, Irrisitible – Mary Balogh – I waited until Unforgiven finally arrived on my kindle to read the whole series as I like to read series in order; Lord Dashwood Missed Out (novella) – Tessa Dare; April Lady – Georgette Heyer (umpteenth re-read); If the Viscount Falls – Sabrina Jeffries; Concrete Evidence – Rachel Grant – new to me author, first book in a series, which I promptly ordered but I will space the reading of the series out; Burn – Linda Howard – another re-read – I re-read at least one LH every month; and finishing up July with Illusion Town – Jayne Castle.
    Mary Jo, I have Where Eagles Dare recorded on our PVR. I’ve seen it before, several times, but it’s one of those movies that you can really enjoy in repeat viewings. The twists and turns are incredible and you can certainly feel the chill from the snow.
    Lorraine

    Reply
  143. Started my July reading with Once A Soldier – absolutely loved the story and, as a cook, appreciated the basic cooking on the their “camping” trip. I will be re-reading it soon, Mary Jo.
    Then read As Death Draws Near, A Lady Darby Mystery – Ann Lee Huber; A Spanish Honeymoon – Anne Weale – a re-read; Indiscreet, Unforgiven, Irrisitible – Mary Balogh – I waited until Unforgiven finally arrived on my kindle to read the whole series as I like to read series in order; Lord Dashwood Missed Out (novella) – Tessa Dare; April Lady – Georgette Heyer (umpteenth re-read); If the Viscount Falls – Sabrina Jeffries; Concrete Evidence – Rachel Grant – new to me author, first book in a series, which I promptly ordered but I will space the reading of the series out; Burn – Linda Howard – another re-read – I re-read at least one LH every month; and finishing up July with Illusion Town – Jayne Castle.
    Mary Jo, I have Where Eagles Dare recorded on our PVR. I’ve seen it before, several times, but it’s one of those movies that you can really enjoy in repeat viewings. The twists and turns are incredible and you can certainly feel the chill from the snow.
    Lorraine

    Reply
  144. Started my July reading with Once A Soldier – absolutely loved the story and, as a cook, appreciated the basic cooking on the their “camping” trip. I will be re-reading it soon, Mary Jo.
    Then read As Death Draws Near, A Lady Darby Mystery – Ann Lee Huber; A Spanish Honeymoon – Anne Weale – a re-read; Indiscreet, Unforgiven, Irrisitible – Mary Balogh – I waited until Unforgiven finally arrived on my kindle to read the whole series as I like to read series in order; Lord Dashwood Missed Out (novella) – Tessa Dare; April Lady – Georgette Heyer (umpteenth re-read); If the Viscount Falls – Sabrina Jeffries; Concrete Evidence – Rachel Grant – new to me author, first book in a series, which I promptly ordered but I will space the reading of the series out; Burn – Linda Howard – another re-read – I re-read at least one LH every month; and finishing up July with Illusion Town – Jayne Castle.
    Mary Jo, I have Where Eagles Dare recorded on our PVR. I’ve seen it before, several times, but it’s one of those movies that you can really enjoy in repeat viewings. The twists and turns are incredible and you can certainly feel the chill from the snow.
    Lorraine

    Reply
  145. Started my July reading with Once A Soldier – absolutely loved the story and, as a cook, appreciated the basic cooking on the their “camping” trip. I will be re-reading it soon, Mary Jo.
    Then read As Death Draws Near, A Lady Darby Mystery – Ann Lee Huber; A Spanish Honeymoon – Anne Weale – a re-read; Indiscreet, Unforgiven, Irrisitible – Mary Balogh – I waited until Unforgiven finally arrived on my kindle to read the whole series as I like to read series in order; Lord Dashwood Missed Out (novella) – Tessa Dare; April Lady – Georgette Heyer (umpteenth re-read); If the Viscount Falls – Sabrina Jeffries; Concrete Evidence – Rachel Grant – new to me author, first book in a series, which I promptly ordered but I will space the reading of the series out; Burn – Linda Howard – another re-read – I re-read at least one LH every month; and finishing up July with Illusion Town – Jayne Castle.
    Mary Jo, I have Where Eagles Dare recorded on our PVR. I’ve seen it before, several times, but it’s one of those movies that you can really enjoy in repeat viewings. The twists and turns are incredible and you can certainly feel the chill from the snow.
    Lorraine

    Reply
  146. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I put it on a What We’re Reading post recently, it was so funny and delightful. Mary Jo and Pat put me onto John Scalzi — though they’re not all funny.

    Reply
  147. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I put it on a What We’re Reading post recently, it was so funny and delightful. Mary Jo and Pat put me onto John Scalzi — though they’re not all funny.

    Reply
  148. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I put it on a What We’re Reading post recently, it was so funny and delightful. Mary Jo and Pat put me onto John Scalzi — though they’re not all funny.

    Reply
  149. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I put it on a What We’re Reading post recently, it was so funny and delightful. Mary Jo and Pat put me onto John Scalzi — though they’re not all funny.

    Reply
  150. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Mary. I put it on a What We’re Reading post recently, it was so funny and delightful. Mary Jo and Pat put me onto John Scalzi — though they’re not all funny.

    Reply
  151. Oh boy! More books and authors for my wish lists. Yay!
    However, I HAVE to tackle my TBR list first, that list is positively embarrassing. I have MJP’s Soldiers, I am just now starting Patricia Rice’s Magic series, and my very first Anne Gracie. I know, where have I been?
    I’ve been doing some rereading this past month, and Mary T’s comment about Grace Burrowes makes me want to reread everything I haven’t reread to death in the last couple of years and even some of those too. I’m working on Ashley Gardner’s Captain Lacy mysteries, a Christie Caldwell series, Carolyn Jewel’s Indiscreet-which had me missing sleep and kept my heart in my throat for most of the whole book, love her stuff. I’m almost finished with Jane Charles’ Tenacious Trents series, rereading what I have already and acquiring the last few I didn’t already have.
    Mary Jo, I was surprised when I looked up Alastair MacClean that so many of his books have been made into movies I’m familiar with. In SOME those cases I hope the book was better than the movie, which is nearly always so.

    Reply
  152. Oh boy! More books and authors for my wish lists. Yay!
    However, I HAVE to tackle my TBR list first, that list is positively embarrassing. I have MJP’s Soldiers, I am just now starting Patricia Rice’s Magic series, and my very first Anne Gracie. I know, where have I been?
    I’ve been doing some rereading this past month, and Mary T’s comment about Grace Burrowes makes me want to reread everything I haven’t reread to death in the last couple of years and even some of those too. I’m working on Ashley Gardner’s Captain Lacy mysteries, a Christie Caldwell series, Carolyn Jewel’s Indiscreet-which had me missing sleep and kept my heart in my throat for most of the whole book, love her stuff. I’m almost finished with Jane Charles’ Tenacious Trents series, rereading what I have already and acquiring the last few I didn’t already have.
    Mary Jo, I was surprised when I looked up Alastair MacClean that so many of his books have been made into movies I’m familiar with. In SOME those cases I hope the book was better than the movie, which is nearly always so.

    Reply
  153. Oh boy! More books and authors for my wish lists. Yay!
    However, I HAVE to tackle my TBR list first, that list is positively embarrassing. I have MJP’s Soldiers, I am just now starting Patricia Rice’s Magic series, and my very first Anne Gracie. I know, where have I been?
    I’ve been doing some rereading this past month, and Mary T’s comment about Grace Burrowes makes me want to reread everything I haven’t reread to death in the last couple of years and even some of those too. I’m working on Ashley Gardner’s Captain Lacy mysteries, a Christie Caldwell series, Carolyn Jewel’s Indiscreet-which had me missing sleep and kept my heart in my throat for most of the whole book, love her stuff. I’m almost finished with Jane Charles’ Tenacious Trents series, rereading what I have already and acquiring the last few I didn’t already have.
    Mary Jo, I was surprised when I looked up Alastair MacClean that so many of his books have been made into movies I’m familiar with. In SOME those cases I hope the book was better than the movie, which is nearly always so.

    Reply
  154. Oh boy! More books and authors for my wish lists. Yay!
    However, I HAVE to tackle my TBR list first, that list is positively embarrassing. I have MJP’s Soldiers, I am just now starting Patricia Rice’s Magic series, and my very first Anne Gracie. I know, where have I been?
    I’ve been doing some rereading this past month, and Mary T’s comment about Grace Burrowes makes me want to reread everything I haven’t reread to death in the last couple of years and even some of those too. I’m working on Ashley Gardner’s Captain Lacy mysteries, a Christie Caldwell series, Carolyn Jewel’s Indiscreet-which had me missing sleep and kept my heart in my throat for most of the whole book, love her stuff. I’m almost finished with Jane Charles’ Tenacious Trents series, rereading what I have already and acquiring the last few I didn’t already have.
    Mary Jo, I was surprised when I looked up Alastair MacClean that so many of his books have been made into movies I’m familiar with. In SOME those cases I hope the book was better than the movie, which is nearly always so.

    Reply
  155. Oh boy! More books and authors for my wish lists. Yay!
    However, I HAVE to tackle my TBR list first, that list is positively embarrassing. I have MJP’s Soldiers, I am just now starting Patricia Rice’s Magic series, and my very first Anne Gracie. I know, where have I been?
    I’ve been doing some rereading this past month, and Mary T’s comment about Grace Burrowes makes me want to reread everything I haven’t reread to death in the last couple of years and even some of those too. I’m working on Ashley Gardner’s Captain Lacy mysteries, a Christie Caldwell series, Carolyn Jewel’s Indiscreet-which had me missing sleep and kept my heart in my throat for most of the whole book, love her stuff. I’m almost finished with Jane Charles’ Tenacious Trents series, rereading what I have already and acquiring the last few I didn’t already have.
    Mary Jo, I was surprised when I looked up Alastair MacClean that so many of his books have been made into movies I’m familiar with. In SOME those cases I hope the book was better than the movie, which is nearly always so.

    Reply
  156. Oh my word so many more new authors to try. I’ve just realised I have the first two in the Victoria Thompson gaslight books!!! I picked them up in an Oxfam shop while visiting my brother.
    I’ve been reading a mixed bag this summer. I started off with Sleeper’s Castle by Barbara Erskine. She is a favourite of mine and I always have her books on pre-order.Then followed Astercote by Penelope Lively. This was a book named on a Word Wench blog. I had never heard of it before that. The Land of my Dreams by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles. This is the third in a series and very enjoyable it is too. I finished off with Where Dragonflies Hover by Annemarie Brear and My Laird’s Heart by Bess McBride. Bess is another favourite of mine as I just love time travel novels.
    Hope some of these may become reads for someone else. Love all the recommendations I get here.

    Reply
  157. Oh my word so many more new authors to try. I’ve just realised I have the first two in the Victoria Thompson gaslight books!!! I picked them up in an Oxfam shop while visiting my brother.
    I’ve been reading a mixed bag this summer. I started off with Sleeper’s Castle by Barbara Erskine. She is a favourite of mine and I always have her books on pre-order.Then followed Astercote by Penelope Lively. This was a book named on a Word Wench blog. I had never heard of it before that. The Land of my Dreams by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles. This is the third in a series and very enjoyable it is too. I finished off with Where Dragonflies Hover by Annemarie Brear and My Laird’s Heart by Bess McBride. Bess is another favourite of mine as I just love time travel novels.
    Hope some of these may become reads for someone else. Love all the recommendations I get here.

    Reply
  158. Oh my word so many more new authors to try. I’ve just realised I have the first two in the Victoria Thompson gaslight books!!! I picked them up in an Oxfam shop while visiting my brother.
    I’ve been reading a mixed bag this summer. I started off with Sleeper’s Castle by Barbara Erskine. She is a favourite of mine and I always have her books on pre-order.Then followed Astercote by Penelope Lively. This was a book named on a Word Wench blog. I had never heard of it before that. The Land of my Dreams by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles. This is the third in a series and very enjoyable it is too. I finished off with Where Dragonflies Hover by Annemarie Brear and My Laird’s Heart by Bess McBride. Bess is another favourite of mine as I just love time travel novels.
    Hope some of these may become reads for someone else. Love all the recommendations I get here.

    Reply
  159. Oh my word so many more new authors to try. I’ve just realised I have the first two in the Victoria Thompson gaslight books!!! I picked them up in an Oxfam shop while visiting my brother.
    I’ve been reading a mixed bag this summer. I started off with Sleeper’s Castle by Barbara Erskine. She is a favourite of mine and I always have her books on pre-order.Then followed Astercote by Penelope Lively. This was a book named on a Word Wench blog. I had never heard of it before that. The Land of my Dreams by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles. This is the third in a series and very enjoyable it is too. I finished off with Where Dragonflies Hover by Annemarie Brear and My Laird’s Heart by Bess McBride. Bess is another favourite of mine as I just love time travel novels.
    Hope some of these may become reads for someone else. Love all the recommendations I get here.

    Reply
  160. Oh my word so many more new authors to try. I’ve just realised I have the first two in the Victoria Thompson gaslight books!!! I picked them up in an Oxfam shop while visiting my brother.
    I’ve been reading a mixed bag this summer. I started off with Sleeper’s Castle by Barbara Erskine. She is a favourite of mine and I always have her books on pre-order.Then followed Astercote by Penelope Lively. This was a book named on a Word Wench blog. I had never heard of it before that. The Land of my Dreams by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles. This is the third in a series and very enjoyable it is too. I finished off with Where Dragonflies Hover by Annemarie Brear and My Laird’s Heart by Bess McBride. Bess is another favourite of mine as I just love time travel novels.
    Hope some of these may become reads for someone else. Love all the recommendations I get here.

    Reply
  161. I’m sure you’ll love Victoria Thompson’s books. 🙂 I’ve read five of them and I’m expecting five more to be delivered to me soon.
    Are you familiar with Caleb Carr’s The Alienist?

    Reply
  162. I’m sure you’ll love Victoria Thompson’s books. 🙂 I’ve read five of them and I’m expecting five more to be delivered to me soon.
    Are you familiar with Caleb Carr’s The Alienist?

    Reply
  163. I’m sure you’ll love Victoria Thompson’s books. 🙂 I’ve read five of them and I’m expecting five more to be delivered to me soon.
    Are you familiar with Caleb Carr’s The Alienist?

    Reply
  164. I’m sure you’ll love Victoria Thompson’s books. 🙂 I’ve read five of them and I’m expecting five more to be delivered to me soon.
    Are you familiar with Caleb Carr’s The Alienist?

    Reply
  165. I’m sure you’ll love Victoria Thompson’s books. 🙂 I’ve read five of them and I’m expecting five more to be delivered to me soon.
    Are you familiar with Caleb Carr’s The Alienist?

    Reply
  166. Coming late to this thread as I’ve been on a couple of camping trips.
    I’m currently reading Kristen Ashley’s contemporary romance Bounty.
    — On a recent road trip with my husband, Patricia Briggs’ Moon Called: Mercy Thompson, Book 1 as narrated by Lorelei King.
    — On our return home, we started listening to China Mieville’s The City and the City as narrated by John Lee. We’re about two thirds of the way through but are finding it an intriguing book. It has a quite complex storyline.
    — a re-read of the historical romance Marrying The Captain by Carla Kelly
    — the paranormal romance Bleacke’s Geek (Bleacke Shifters) by Lesli Richardson; I had heard good things about this book but the reality fell a little short.
    — a re-read of the contemporary new adult romance The Score (Off-Campus Book 3) by Elle Kennedy
    — the paranormal romance Wild Things: Shifters Unbound by Jennifer Ashley which is currently free to Kindle readers
    — The most compelling book I read recently was The Last Hour of Gann by R. Lee Smith. This is a LONG book; I think my Kindle said it would take me some 13 hours or so to read. You can read a comprehensive review and comments on issues raised (religion, faith, rape, feminism) within the book at the Dear Author site: http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/overall-a-reviews/a-minus-reviews/review-the-last-hour-of-gann-by-r-lee-smith/

    Reply
  167. Coming late to this thread as I’ve been on a couple of camping trips.
    I’m currently reading Kristen Ashley’s contemporary romance Bounty.
    — On a recent road trip with my husband, Patricia Briggs’ Moon Called: Mercy Thompson, Book 1 as narrated by Lorelei King.
    — On our return home, we started listening to China Mieville’s The City and the City as narrated by John Lee. We’re about two thirds of the way through but are finding it an intriguing book. It has a quite complex storyline.
    — a re-read of the historical romance Marrying The Captain by Carla Kelly
    — the paranormal romance Bleacke’s Geek (Bleacke Shifters) by Lesli Richardson; I had heard good things about this book but the reality fell a little short.
    — a re-read of the contemporary new adult romance The Score (Off-Campus Book 3) by Elle Kennedy
    — the paranormal romance Wild Things: Shifters Unbound by Jennifer Ashley which is currently free to Kindle readers
    — The most compelling book I read recently was The Last Hour of Gann by R. Lee Smith. This is a LONG book; I think my Kindle said it would take me some 13 hours or so to read. You can read a comprehensive review and comments on issues raised (religion, faith, rape, feminism) within the book at the Dear Author site: http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/overall-a-reviews/a-minus-reviews/review-the-last-hour-of-gann-by-r-lee-smith/

    Reply
  168. Coming late to this thread as I’ve been on a couple of camping trips.
    I’m currently reading Kristen Ashley’s contemporary romance Bounty.
    — On a recent road trip with my husband, Patricia Briggs’ Moon Called: Mercy Thompson, Book 1 as narrated by Lorelei King.
    — On our return home, we started listening to China Mieville’s The City and the City as narrated by John Lee. We’re about two thirds of the way through but are finding it an intriguing book. It has a quite complex storyline.
    — a re-read of the historical romance Marrying The Captain by Carla Kelly
    — the paranormal romance Bleacke’s Geek (Bleacke Shifters) by Lesli Richardson; I had heard good things about this book but the reality fell a little short.
    — a re-read of the contemporary new adult romance The Score (Off-Campus Book 3) by Elle Kennedy
    — the paranormal romance Wild Things: Shifters Unbound by Jennifer Ashley which is currently free to Kindle readers
    — The most compelling book I read recently was The Last Hour of Gann by R. Lee Smith. This is a LONG book; I think my Kindle said it would take me some 13 hours or so to read. You can read a comprehensive review and comments on issues raised (religion, faith, rape, feminism) within the book at the Dear Author site: http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/overall-a-reviews/a-minus-reviews/review-the-last-hour-of-gann-by-r-lee-smith/

    Reply
  169. Coming late to this thread as I’ve been on a couple of camping trips.
    I’m currently reading Kristen Ashley’s contemporary romance Bounty.
    — On a recent road trip with my husband, Patricia Briggs’ Moon Called: Mercy Thompson, Book 1 as narrated by Lorelei King.
    — On our return home, we started listening to China Mieville’s The City and the City as narrated by John Lee. We’re about two thirds of the way through but are finding it an intriguing book. It has a quite complex storyline.
    — a re-read of the historical romance Marrying The Captain by Carla Kelly
    — the paranormal romance Bleacke’s Geek (Bleacke Shifters) by Lesli Richardson; I had heard good things about this book but the reality fell a little short.
    — a re-read of the contemporary new adult romance The Score (Off-Campus Book 3) by Elle Kennedy
    — the paranormal romance Wild Things: Shifters Unbound by Jennifer Ashley which is currently free to Kindle readers
    — The most compelling book I read recently was The Last Hour of Gann by R. Lee Smith. This is a LONG book; I think my Kindle said it would take me some 13 hours or so to read. You can read a comprehensive review and comments on issues raised (religion, faith, rape, feminism) within the book at the Dear Author site: http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/overall-a-reviews/a-minus-reviews/review-the-last-hour-of-gann-by-r-lee-smith/

    Reply
  170. Coming late to this thread as I’ve been on a couple of camping trips.
    I’m currently reading Kristen Ashley’s contemporary romance Bounty.
    — On a recent road trip with my husband, Patricia Briggs’ Moon Called: Mercy Thompson, Book 1 as narrated by Lorelei King.
    — On our return home, we started listening to China Mieville’s The City and the City as narrated by John Lee. We’re about two thirds of the way through but are finding it an intriguing book. It has a quite complex storyline.
    — a re-read of the historical romance Marrying The Captain by Carla Kelly
    — the paranormal romance Bleacke’s Geek (Bleacke Shifters) by Lesli Richardson; I had heard good things about this book but the reality fell a little short.
    — a re-read of the contemporary new adult romance The Score (Off-Campus Book 3) by Elle Kennedy
    — the paranormal romance Wild Things: Shifters Unbound by Jennifer Ashley which is currently free to Kindle readers
    — The most compelling book I read recently was The Last Hour of Gann by R. Lee Smith. This is a LONG book; I think my Kindle said it would take me some 13 hours or so to read. You can read a comprehensive review and comments on issues raised (religion, faith, rape, feminism) within the book at the Dear Author site: http://dearauthor.com/book-reviews/overall-a-reviews/a-minus-reviews/review-the-last-hour-of-gann-by-r-lee-smith/

    Reply
  171. I spend way TOO much time reading book reviews online and columns such as this, Patricia, which invariably add yet more titles to my to be read list!

    Reply
  172. I spend way TOO much time reading book reviews online and columns such as this, Patricia, which invariably add yet more titles to my to be read list!

    Reply
  173. I spend way TOO much time reading book reviews online and columns such as this, Patricia, which invariably add yet more titles to my to be read list!

    Reply
  174. I spend way TOO much time reading book reviews online and columns such as this, Patricia, which invariably add yet more titles to my to be read list!

    Reply
  175. I spend way TOO much time reading book reviews online and columns such as this, Patricia, which invariably add yet more titles to my to be read list!

    Reply

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