Sad News about a Great Lady: In memory of Edith Layton Felber

Edith_Layton_home To our regret, the Word Wenches must announce the death this morning of Edith Layton after five years of very private struggles with cancer.  During those years, she continued to write her wonderful books, post blogs, and welcome two much adored grandsons into the world. 

If any of you met Edith in person, you know what a warm, incredibly funny person she was.  And if you’ve read her books—you know exactly the same thing.   

She was a born New Yorker, with all the wit and sassiness that implies.  She was proud of her Jewish heritage, and adored blond men with English accents.  She loved her three children and two grandchildren deeply, and they returned that love. 

Edith was one of the first writers I met at my very first conference, when I’d just sold my first Signet Regency, and she has been a friend and mentor ever since.  I could go on about her for a very long time, but this blog is a tribute to Edith, and Rose there are many, many people who remember her with equal warmth.  Below are some of those tributes.  Please add your own—later we wish to collect these for her family.

From Wench Andrea Pickens:

I remember very vividly my first meeting with Edith. I had just sold my first Regency to Signet, and was attending my first RWA Conference. I was completely clueless about the publishing world, having by sheer blind luck managed to stumble through the process of  finding an agent and actually selling my manuscript. My editor, Hilary Ross, rolled her eyes at my dumb questions and said, "I think you need some advice." Looking around, she spotted Edith having a cup of coffee in the lounge. "Oh, there's Edith Layton. She's the perfect person to talk to."

Rose--Jo I froze in my tracks. THE Edith Layton? The goddess whose books I adored? No way I would dare approach her!  I tried to dig in my heels but Hilary had me firmly by the elbow and marched me to the chair—or rather, the throne. Edith, as always, looked perfectly regal decked out in her jewel tone florals and gorgeous jewelry. I was probably tongue-tied, but it didn't matter. She smiled and with her pithy wit and warmth spent the next little while making me feel welcome to the sisterhood of writers. I'll never forget her incredible kindness—and her generosity in sharing her experience and advice with a total stranger and unfledged author.

I was lucky enough to become friends with her over the years, and as a person and author she enriched my life more than I can say. Oh, I will miss you, Edith!

From Wench Jo Beverley:

I'll always remember Edith smiling. She's always been a warm and vibrant member
of the romance writing community, especially the regency romance writing
community. She'll be missed for her liveliness and her wit both in her person
and her books.

From regular Wench guest Margaret Evans Porter:

It's hard losing someone I've known since before I was published–more than 20 years.  When I first met Edith in person, at an RWA conference, I was an over-excited fan-girl who had just sold her first Regency.  In the blink of I eye, it seemed, I became not only her fan, but her friend.  We often corresponded by letter, way back in the pre-email days, and then by email. 

Purple flower There are so many memories, mostly associated with writers' conferences, but some were not.  Like the time I was at her house on Long Island and Abraham, her huge Bernese Mountain Dog jumped right into my lap, and we laughed and laughed.  Her home was full of love and laughter, with an eclectic mix of art and antiques.  I remember her study, her writing room, where she crafted all those memorable stories–the crammed bookshelves and books piled on the floor.  I adored Norbert, her delightful doctor husband, who accompanied her to many a conference (as did Abraham the dog, sometimes!) 

I fondly remember more than a few dinners together in various hotel restaurants–good food, entertaining–and often hilarious–conversations.  Eventually I met Susan and Adam and Mike, the kids of whom she was so proud.  She didn't have many years as a grandma, but how thrilled she was to be one.
 
She was incredibly talented and a consummate professional and so very brave.  I'm thankful for her body of work.  The phrase associated with Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire: "the face without a frown."  I've always thought of Edith that way, and told her so.  Because whenever I think of her, I see her smiling. 

From Robin Rue, a former agent of Edith’s:

She was a wonderful, classy, talented lady.  I loved working with her, and had so Orange rose much respect for what a research wonk she was.  She will be missed. 

From Wench Susan Holloway Scott:


When I was first published as a romance writer, one of the greatest compliments a reviewer paid me was to say my writing reminded her of Edith Layton's. Of course Edith's writing was in class by itself, full of the same wit and charm that were hers as a person. While books fall in and out of print, that special spark will continue through her much-loved children and grandchildren. 
The world is a little less merry today without her in it…we miss you, Edith!

From Wench Susan King/Sarah Gabriel:

The first time I saw the legendary Edith Layton was at an RWA conference, when I was a newbie in awe of her and she didn't have a clue who I was. Someone said, Vase "Look, here's Edith, let me introduce you–" I turned, and there she was riding alone down an escalator in bright sunlight — what a grand entrance! Dressed to kill, red hair and lips, and the biggest, warmest, most wonderful smile. She grabbed me in a hug – didn't know the trembling newbie but was sweet to her – and she was deliciously friendly, then and each time we met and chatted over the years.

What a Grande Dame she was, and showed the rest of us how to be the best – the bestest, as she would have said – that we could be, as writers and people. I was delighted each time I saw her, thrilled when she joined Wenches, and deeply grateful when she read my Lady Macbeth, loved it, effused in e-mails as we discussed writing medievals, and gave me a kind and generous quote that I will always treasure. That quote is frameable art to me now.
 
What I'll also remember about Edith is how funny she was just by her bubbly nature, without ever trying. And I will remember her wonderful, whimsical way with words (though she didn't like a string of "W's" in speech for some reason, sorry, Edith!). I learned new words from her, like: bestest, luff, lurvings, lurve, mostest, and she was all of those — the bestest, the most luffing, the mostest ever.
Thank you, Edith. We adore you.

From Wench Patricia Rice:

I remember meeting Edith first at a conference when she and Joan Wolf were sitting behind me, discussing horses.  I was a brand newbie, and they were two of my absolute favoritest authors. It was all I could do not to fall on my knees and worship, but I was too backward to do even that much. 

Later, after meeting Edith through our NAL editor's dinners, I learned she was the funniest, warmest woman I've ever met, par none.  Even through the devastation Purple flower 2 of the loss of her husband, she was reassuring others that she was fine, and she was making jokes in his memory. She and her wonderfully talented children showed me the real NYC nightlife and created evenings I'll never forget.

My life would not be the same if Edith hadn't been in it.  I'm not certain my life would have been the same even if I'd never met her, because it was wonderfully witty books like hers that enticed me into writing.  Beautiful amber and sunshine to you, Edith–I know you're up there, shining down on us all and laughing right now.

From Wench Anne Gracie:

I've only known Edith cyberly, on Regency loops and author loops great and small, but even on line, out of thousands of voices, hers always rang true and clear and original.  And funny. As for her books, I have a pile of keepers here in which she will live on forever.

My deepest sympathy to her family and her many close friends. And to her dog.
Vale that Layton Woman.

Pacific Northwest Oct. 2008 010 From Edith's long time editor, Hilary Ross:

From the beginning I liked Edith's books very much and enjoyed being her editor.   Then she needed a title for the last book in the Love trilogy.  I suggested the title Surrender to Love.  Edith wrote me that it sounded cheap, like something out of a movie magazine.  I wrote her back that it was a quote from Virgil. 

I then received an hysterically funny letter from Edith full of pseudo Latin along with agreement to use the quote as a title.  From that moment on I knew I had to have Edith as a personal friend.  It did work out that way and I will always
remember our close friendship and all the wonderful times we had together.  I will miss her tremendously.

From Wench Loretta Chase:

So there I was, a million years ago, trying to decide if it made sense to write romances.  My sister gave me some traditional Regencies to read.  One of them was The Duke’s Wager.  At the time, I still had a bit of snobbishness about romance.  But Edith cured me.  “She can write!  She can actually write!” thought I, astonished.  Lots of writers can tell a story, but she had a style, distinctive, and a true love of language.  Oh, those wonderful sentences! 

I met her at a New Jersey Romance Writers conference, where she was responsible for my first fangirl episode.  There she deservedly won an award for that very book.  The speech she gave was exactly like her writing, absolutely, totally Edith.  I was exchanging emails with her only a short time ago.  I can’t believe That Layton Woman, so full of life, is gone.

For more information about Edith, go to her website, http://edithlayton.com/ Or click on her name on the bottom of this blog, and that will bring up a page of her wonderfully witty blogs.  Here's are links to two delicious posts written by her daughter, Susie Felber, and titled Daughter of Romance 1 and Daughter of Romance 2.  They have lots of great pictures of Edith at work and at play. 

Plus, in the column on the right under "Additional Pages," you'll find a file for a downloadable commemorative Layton bookmark.

Pacific Northwest Oct. 2008 011 Tell us what Edith and her books meant to you, so we can smile through our tears. (To leave a comment, click on "comments" at the bottom of this post.)

Mary Jo and all the other Wenches

PS:  Several people have expressed regret that they've read the last Edith Layton book.  In fact, she finished one two months ago, so there is one more by the grande dame still to look forward to–MJP

630 thoughts on “Sad News about a Great Lady: In memory of Edith Layton Felber”

  1. I’m so shocked and sorry to hear this news. My condolences to the family, especially since I feel I know Edith’s daughter a very little bit following her highly memorable guest posts here.

    Reply
  2. I’m so shocked and sorry to hear this news. My condolences to the family, especially since I feel I know Edith’s daughter a very little bit following her highly memorable guest posts here.

    Reply
  3. I’m so shocked and sorry to hear this news. My condolences to the family, especially since I feel I know Edith’s daughter a very little bit following her highly memorable guest posts here.

    Reply
  4. I’m so shocked and sorry to hear this news. My condolences to the family, especially since I feel I know Edith’s daughter a very little bit following her highly memorable guest posts here.

    Reply
  5. I’m so shocked and sorry to hear this news. My condolences to the family, especially since I feel I know Edith’s daughter a very little bit following her highly memorable guest posts here.

    Reply
  6. My condolences to the family and to you all. The number of faithful fans and friends she leaves behind is a beautiful tribute to her talent and her kind spirit.

    Reply
  7. My condolences to the family and to you all. The number of faithful fans and friends she leaves behind is a beautiful tribute to her talent and her kind spirit.

    Reply
  8. My condolences to the family and to you all. The number of faithful fans and friends she leaves behind is a beautiful tribute to her talent and her kind spirit.

    Reply
  9. My condolences to the family and to you all. The number of faithful fans and friends she leaves behind is a beautiful tribute to her talent and her kind spirit.

    Reply
  10. My condolences to the family and to you all. The number of faithful fans and friends she leaves behind is a beautiful tribute to her talent and her kind spirit.

    Reply
  11. I am so very saddened by this news. I only knew Edith online and hoped to get to know her in person. Devastated to have missed the chance.
    Sympathies to all who were close to her. We have indeed lost a treasure.

    Reply
  12. I am so very saddened by this news. I only knew Edith online and hoped to get to know her in person. Devastated to have missed the chance.
    Sympathies to all who were close to her. We have indeed lost a treasure.

    Reply
  13. I am so very saddened by this news. I only knew Edith online and hoped to get to know her in person. Devastated to have missed the chance.
    Sympathies to all who were close to her. We have indeed lost a treasure.

    Reply
  14. I am so very saddened by this news. I only knew Edith online and hoped to get to know her in person. Devastated to have missed the chance.
    Sympathies to all who were close to her. We have indeed lost a treasure.

    Reply
  15. I am so very saddened by this news. I only knew Edith online and hoped to get to know her in person. Devastated to have missed the chance.
    Sympathies to all who were close to her. We have indeed lost a treasure.

    Reply
  16. I will miss her very much. I met her at one of my first RWA National conferences in the 90s when I was an awe-struck reader. Regencies remain one of my secret obsessions. I think I have every one of her books and anthologies. My thoughts and prayers are with you — her author colleagues and family.
    Sara Reyes
    http://FreshFiction.com … for today’s reader

    Reply
  17. I will miss her very much. I met her at one of my first RWA National conferences in the 90s when I was an awe-struck reader. Regencies remain one of my secret obsessions. I think I have every one of her books and anthologies. My thoughts and prayers are with you — her author colleagues and family.
    Sara Reyes
    http://FreshFiction.com … for today’s reader

    Reply
  18. I will miss her very much. I met her at one of my first RWA National conferences in the 90s when I was an awe-struck reader. Regencies remain one of my secret obsessions. I think I have every one of her books and anthologies. My thoughts and prayers are with you — her author colleagues and family.
    Sara Reyes
    http://FreshFiction.com … for today’s reader

    Reply
  19. I will miss her very much. I met her at one of my first RWA National conferences in the 90s when I was an awe-struck reader. Regencies remain one of my secret obsessions. I think I have every one of her books and anthologies. My thoughts and prayers are with you — her author colleagues and family.
    Sara Reyes
    http://FreshFiction.com … for today’s reader

    Reply
  20. I will miss her very much. I met her at one of my first RWA National conferences in the 90s when I was an awe-struck reader. Regencies remain one of my secret obsessions. I think I have every one of her books and anthologies. My thoughts and prayers are with you — her author colleagues and family.
    Sara Reyes
    http://FreshFiction.com … for today’s reader

    Reply
  21. My condolences to Edith’s family and friends.
    Ediths’s stories have given me hours of pleasure over the years and will be sadly missed.
    Helen

    Reply
  22. My condolences to Edith’s family and friends.
    Ediths’s stories have given me hours of pleasure over the years and will be sadly missed.
    Helen

    Reply
  23. My condolences to Edith’s family and friends.
    Ediths’s stories have given me hours of pleasure over the years and will be sadly missed.
    Helen

    Reply
  24. My condolences to Edith’s family and friends.
    Ediths’s stories have given me hours of pleasure over the years and will be sadly missed.
    Helen

    Reply
  25. My condolences to Edith’s family and friends.
    Ediths’s stories have given me hours of pleasure over the years and will be sadly missed.
    Helen

    Reply
  26. It’s so hard to express the depth of one’s grief at a time like this. I have all of Edith’s early Signet Regencies, collected diligently over many years. I love her books. Edith was the author who ushered me into the world of Regencies when I first discovered them. She will be greatly missed in the writing and reading community. I just want to go to my bookshelf and hug all her books.

    Reply
  27. It’s so hard to express the depth of one’s grief at a time like this. I have all of Edith’s early Signet Regencies, collected diligently over many years. I love her books. Edith was the author who ushered me into the world of Regencies when I first discovered them. She will be greatly missed in the writing and reading community. I just want to go to my bookshelf and hug all her books.

    Reply
  28. It’s so hard to express the depth of one’s grief at a time like this. I have all of Edith’s early Signet Regencies, collected diligently over many years. I love her books. Edith was the author who ushered me into the world of Regencies when I first discovered them. She will be greatly missed in the writing and reading community. I just want to go to my bookshelf and hug all her books.

    Reply
  29. It’s so hard to express the depth of one’s grief at a time like this. I have all of Edith’s early Signet Regencies, collected diligently over many years. I love her books. Edith was the author who ushered me into the world of Regencies when I first discovered them. She will be greatly missed in the writing and reading community. I just want to go to my bookshelf and hug all her books.

    Reply
  30. It’s so hard to express the depth of one’s grief at a time like this. I have all of Edith’s early Signet Regencies, collected diligently over many years. I love her books. Edith was the author who ushered me into the world of Regencies when I first discovered them. She will be greatly missed in the writing and reading community. I just want to go to my bookshelf and hug all her books.

    Reply
  31. I am so sorry that the world has lost Edith. I knew her through Novelists, Inc.; we were both longtime members. Whenever we talked, my New-York roots resonated in harmony with hers. She was funny and smart–and so proud of her children.
    She will live on in her books, and in our loving memories of her.

    Reply
  32. I am so sorry that the world has lost Edith. I knew her through Novelists, Inc.; we were both longtime members. Whenever we talked, my New-York roots resonated in harmony with hers. She was funny and smart–and so proud of her children.
    She will live on in her books, and in our loving memories of her.

    Reply
  33. I am so sorry that the world has lost Edith. I knew her through Novelists, Inc.; we were both longtime members. Whenever we talked, my New-York roots resonated in harmony with hers. She was funny and smart–and so proud of her children.
    She will live on in her books, and in our loving memories of her.

    Reply
  34. I am so sorry that the world has lost Edith. I knew her through Novelists, Inc.; we were both longtime members. Whenever we talked, my New-York roots resonated in harmony with hers. She was funny and smart–and so proud of her children.
    She will live on in her books, and in our loving memories of her.

    Reply
  35. I am so sorry that the world has lost Edith. I knew her through Novelists, Inc.; we were both longtime members. Whenever we talked, my New-York roots resonated in harmony with hers. She was funny and smart–and so proud of her children.
    She will live on in her books, and in our loving memories of her.

    Reply
  36. Such sad news. Edith was a terrific writer and one of the funniest people I ever met. Great company, too, in person or whenever I am reading one of her books. Love and condolences to her many friends and her family.

    Reply
  37. Such sad news. Edith was a terrific writer and one of the funniest people I ever met. Great company, too, in person or whenever I am reading one of her books. Love and condolences to her many friends and her family.

    Reply
  38. Such sad news. Edith was a terrific writer and one of the funniest people I ever met. Great company, too, in person or whenever I am reading one of her books. Love and condolences to her many friends and her family.

    Reply
  39. Such sad news. Edith was a terrific writer and one of the funniest people I ever met. Great company, too, in person or whenever I am reading one of her books. Love and condolences to her many friends and her family.

    Reply
  40. Such sad news. Edith was a terrific writer and one of the funniest people I ever met. Great company, too, in person or whenever I am reading one of her books. Love and condolences to her many friends and her family.

    Reply
  41. Our community has lost a great and wonderful treasure. She was one of the most incredibly sweet and generous people I have ever been lucky enough to cross paths with. She will be very missed.

    Reply
  42. Our community has lost a great and wonderful treasure. She was one of the most incredibly sweet and generous people I have ever been lucky enough to cross paths with. She will be very missed.

    Reply
  43. Our community has lost a great and wonderful treasure. She was one of the most incredibly sweet and generous people I have ever been lucky enough to cross paths with. She will be very missed.

    Reply
  44. Our community has lost a great and wonderful treasure. She was one of the most incredibly sweet and generous people I have ever been lucky enough to cross paths with. She will be very missed.

    Reply
  45. Our community has lost a great and wonderful treasure. She was one of the most incredibly sweet and generous people I have ever been lucky enough to cross paths with. She will be very missed.

    Reply
  46. I am so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton’s LORD OF DISHONOR was my very first keeper some twenty-odd years ago. And since then I’ve enjoyed and added her other books to that shelf. Condolences to her friends and family. This is a real loss to the romance community.

    Reply
  47. I am so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton’s LORD OF DISHONOR was my very first keeper some twenty-odd years ago. And since then I’ve enjoyed and added her other books to that shelf. Condolences to her friends and family. This is a real loss to the romance community.

    Reply
  48. I am so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton’s LORD OF DISHONOR was my very first keeper some twenty-odd years ago. And since then I’ve enjoyed and added her other books to that shelf. Condolences to her friends and family. This is a real loss to the romance community.

    Reply
  49. I am so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton’s LORD OF DISHONOR was my very first keeper some twenty-odd years ago. And since then I’ve enjoyed and added her other books to that shelf. Condolences to her friends and family. This is a real loss to the romance community.

    Reply
  50. I am so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton’s LORD OF DISHONOR was my very first keeper some twenty-odd years ago. And since then I’ve enjoyed and added her other books to that shelf. Condolences to her friends and family. This is a real loss to the romance community.

    Reply
  51. I first started corresponding with Edith in the very late 1980’s. I sent her a note about one of her books and to my surprise, she wrote back and invited me to talk with her further. Over the years we exchanged letters and then emails, eventually leading to her inviting me to this blog, when it formed. She unexpectedly sent me a baby gift for my first daughter in 1999, with a wonderful note. She was the best pen pal, in the old fashioned sense of the word, a person could have. I respected her privacy, I did not want to presume, and in return I was often surprised by what she would say. In addition to being a wonderful storyteller, my impression of her was so positive. Her words about her husband, her children, her dog – always entertaining and warm, even though life is often anything but. It’s hard to write this, not just for sadness, but also because I want to still refrain from presuming. In the 90’s she said “I think of you now as a friend” and I can’t regret never meeting her in person, because I felt the same way. Edith was my friend, she was a comfort to me and I will remember her for her tremendous humor. She sent me the second most perfect thing anyone said to me while I had cancer, and I had no idea she was fighting the same battle. I just realized here that she told me, and I didn’t pick up on it. What can I say, I had my hands full at the time. This might not be the best message I could send her children, it might not be the way I’d word it an hour or now or two days from now, but the core of it is “I valued your mother as a person, and she was consumed with love for you and wry observations for others. I wish you every comfort possible for her loss.”
    In response to a note from Edith last August I replied in part –
    “It goes – it was good to get out of the hospital routine and on the
    road (good for the kids especially) but it was hard to face how far I
    have to go to really recover. I get how lucky I am to have recovery
    as an option, believe me, and I still have the hospital a few times I
    month to keep me reminded. But I’m not ‘myself’ yet and I see her in
    the distance, impatient to get on with things, I just can’t catch her
    yet. It’s like the Olympics. She’s Phelps, and I’m that dude in lane
    eight who stays with him for a few minutes at a time then gets lapped
    by a body length or two.
    Hm. That was very complaining of me. Couldn’t be better, actually.
    They tell me and I believe them.”
    Edith responded –
    Huzzah for you. The way to go is to keep going. Been there, done that.
    Complaining is good for the soul. I believe in it. Only saints keep
    smiling through. Complaining, in moderation, gets the gripes out.
    And don’t worry, it gets tiresome, so you stop just because no one,
    not even yourself, enjoys hearing it for very long.
    Feel better and better and yet better again,
    Edith

    Reply
  52. I first started corresponding with Edith in the very late 1980’s. I sent her a note about one of her books and to my surprise, she wrote back and invited me to talk with her further. Over the years we exchanged letters and then emails, eventually leading to her inviting me to this blog, when it formed. She unexpectedly sent me a baby gift for my first daughter in 1999, with a wonderful note. She was the best pen pal, in the old fashioned sense of the word, a person could have. I respected her privacy, I did not want to presume, and in return I was often surprised by what she would say. In addition to being a wonderful storyteller, my impression of her was so positive. Her words about her husband, her children, her dog – always entertaining and warm, even though life is often anything but. It’s hard to write this, not just for sadness, but also because I want to still refrain from presuming. In the 90’s she said “I think of you now as a friend” and I can’t regret never meeting her in person, because I felt the same way. Edith was my friend, she was a comfort to me and I will remember her for her tremendous humor. She sent me the second most perfect thing anyone said to me while I had cancer, and I had no idea she was fighting the same battle. I just realized here that she told me, and I didn’t pick up on it. What can I say, I had my hands full at the time. This might not be the best message I could send her children, it might not be the way I’d word it an hour or now or two days from now, but the core of it is “I valued your mother as a person, and she was consumed with love for you and wry observations for others. I wish you every comfort possible for her loss.”
    In response to a note from Edith last August I replied in part –
    “It goes – it was good to get out of the hospital routine and on the
    road (good for the kids especially) but it was hard to face how far I
    have to go to really recover. I get how lucky I am to have recovery
    as an option, believe me, and I still have the hospital a few times I
    month to keep me reminded. But I’m not ‘myself’ yet and I see her in
    the distance, impatient to get on with things, I just can’t catch her
    yet. It’s like the Olympics. She’s Phelps, and I’m that dude in lane
    eight who stays with him for a few minutes at a time then gets lapped
    by a body length or two.
    Hm. That was very complaining of me. Couldn’t be better, actually.
    They tell me and I believe them.”
    Edith responded –
    Huzzah for you. The way to go is to keep going. Been there, done that.
    Complaining is good for the soul. I believe in it. Only saints keep
    smiling through. Complaining, in moderation, gets the gripes out.
    And don’t worry, it gets tiresome, so you stop just because no one,
    not even yourself, enjoys hearing it for very long.
    Feel better and better and yet better again,
    Edith

    Reply
  53. I first started corresponding with Edith in the very late 1980’s. I sent her a note about one of her books and to my surprise, she wrote back and invited me to talk with her further. Over the years we exchanged letters and then emails, eventually leading to her inviting me to this blog, when it formed. She unexpectedly sent me a baby gift for my first daughter in 1999, with a wonderful note. She was the best pen pal, in the old fashioned sense of the word, a person could have. I respected her privacy, I did not want to presume, and in return I was often surprised by what she would say. In addition to being a wonderful storyteller, my impression of her was so positive. Her words about her husband, her children, her dog – always entertaining and warm, even though life is often anything but. It’s hard to write this, not just for sadness, but also because I want to still refrain from presuming. In the 90’s she said “I think of you now as a friend” and I can’t regret never meeting her in person, because I felt the same way. Edith was my friend, she was a comfort to me and I will remember her for her tremendous humor. She sent me the second most perfect thing anyone said to me while I had cancer, and I had no idea she was fighting the same battle. I just realized here that she told me, and I didn’t pick up on it. What can I say, I had my hands full at the time. This might not be the best message I could send her children, it might not be the way I’d word it an hour or now or two days from now, but the core of it is “I valued your mother as a person, and she was consumed with love for you and wry observations for others. I wish you every comfort possible for her loss.”
    In response to a note from Edith last August I replied in part –
    “It goes – it was good to get out of the hospital routine and on the
    road (good for the kids especially) but it was hard to face how far I
    have to go to really recover. I get how lucky I am to have recovery
    as an option, believe me, and I still have the hospital a few times I
    month to keep me reminded. But I’m not ‘myself’ yet and I see her in
    the distance, impatient to get on with things, I just can’t catch her
    yet. It’s like the Olympics. She’s Phelps, and I’m that dude in lane
    eight who stays with him for a few minutes at a time then gets lapped
    by a body length or two.
    Hm. That was very complaining of me. Couldn’t be better, actually.
    They tell me and I believe them.”
    Edith responded –
    Huzzah for you. The way to go is to keep going. Been there, done that.
    Complaining is good for the soul. I believe in it. Only saints keep
    smiling through. Complaining, in moderation, gets the gripes out.
    And don’t worry, it gets tiresome, so you stop just because no one,
    not even yourself, enjoys hearing it for very long.
    Feel better and better and yet better again,
    Edith

    Reply
  54. I first started corresponding with Edith in the very late 1980’s. I sent her a note about one of her books and to my surprise, she wrote back and invited me to talk with her further. Over the years we exchanged letters and then emails, eventually leading to her inviting me to this blog, when it formed. She unexpectedly sent me a baby gift for my first daughter in 1999, with a wonderful note. She was the best pen pal, in the old fashioned sense of the word, a person could have. I respected her privacy, I did not want to presume, and in return I was often surprised by what she would say. In addition to being a wonderful storyteller, my impression of her was so positive. Her words about her husband, her children, her dog – always entertaining and warm, even though life is often anything but. It’s hard to write this, not just for sadness, but also because I want to still refrain from presuming. In the 90’s she said “I think of you now as a friend” and I can’t regret never meeting her in person, because I felt the same way. Edith was my friend, she was a comfort to me and I will remember her for her tremendous humor. She sent me the second most perfect thing anyone said to me while I had cancer, and I had no idea she was fighting the same battle. I just realized here that she told me, and I didn’t pick up on it. What can I say, I had my hands full at the time. This might not be the best message I could send her children, it might not be the way I’d word it an hour or now or two days from now, but the core of it is “I valued your mother as a person, and she was consumed with love for you and wry observations for others. I wish you every comfort possible for her loss.”
    In response to a note from Edith last August I replied in part –
    “It goes – it was good to get out of the hospital routine and on the
    road (good for the kids especially) but it was hard to face how far I
    have to go to really recover. I get how lucky I am to have recovery
    as an option, believe me, and I still have the hospital a few times I
    month to keep me reminded. But I’m not ‘myself’ yet and I see her in
    the distance, impatient to get on with things, I just can’t catch her
    yet. It’s like the Olympics. She’s Phelps, and I’m that dude in lane
    eight who stays with him for a few minutes at a time then gets lapped
    by a body length or two.
    Hm. That was very complaining of me. Couldn’t be better, actually.
    They tell me and I believe them.”
    Edith responded –
    Huzzah for you. The way to go is to keep going. Been there, done that.
    Complaining is good for the soul. I believe in it. Only saints keep
    smiling through. Complaining, in moderation, gets the gripes out.
    And don’t worry, it gets tiresome, so you stop just because no one,
    not even yourself, enjoys hearing it for very long.
    Feel better and better and yet better again,
    Edith

    Reply
  55. I first started corresponding with Edith in the very late 1980’s. I sent her a note about one of her books and to my surprise, she wrote back and invited me to talk with her further. Over the years we exchanged letters and then emails, eventually leading to her inviting me to this blog, when it formed. She unexpectedly sent me a baby gift for my first daughter in 1999, with a wonderful note. She was the best pen pal, in the old fashioned sense of the word, a person could have. I respected her privacy, I did not want to presume, and in return I was often surprised by what she would say. In addition to being a wonderful storyteller, my impression of her was so positive. Her words about her husband, her children, her dog – always entertaining and warm, even though life is often anything but. It’s hard to write this, not just for sadness, but also because I want to still refrain from presuming. In the 90’s she said “I think of you now as a friend” and I can’t regret never meeting her in person, because I felt the same way. Edith was my friend, she was a comfort to me and I will remember her for her tremendous humor. She sent me the second most perfect thing anyone said to me while I had cancer, and I had no idea she was fighting the same battle. I just realized here that she told me, and I didn’t pick up on it. What can I say, I had my hands full at the time. This might not be the best message I could send her children, it might not be the way I’d word it an hour or now or two days from now, but the core of it is “I valued your mother as a person, and she was consumed with love for you and wry observations for others. I wish you every comfort possible for her loss.”
    In response to a note from Edith last August I replied in part –
    “It goes – it was good to get out of the hospital routine and on the
    road (good for the kids especially) but it was hard to face how far I
    have to go to really recover. I get how lucky I am to have recovery
    as an option, believe me, and I still have the hospital a few times I
    month to keep me reminded. But I’m not ‘myself’ yet and I see her in
    the distance, impatient to get on with things, I just can’t catch her
    yet. It’s like the Olympics. She’s Phelps, and I’m that dude in lane
    eight who stays with him for a few minutes at a time then gets lapped
    by a body length or two.
    Hm. That was very complaining of me. Couldn’t be better, actually.
    They tell me and I believe them.”
    Edith responded –
    Huzzah for you. The way to go is to keep going. Been there, done that.
    Complaining is good for the soul. I believe in it. Only saints keep
    smiling through. Complaining, in moderation, gets the gripes out.
    And don’t worry, it gets tiresome, so you stop just because no one,
    not even yourself, enjoys hearing it for very long.
    Feel better and better and yet better again,
    Edith

    Reply
  56. I realize I took up more than my share of this blog – but I want to add one more thing before I leave – my cousin brought his new girlfriend up to meet me. We had a casual dinner, with light conversation, and as she was leaving she saw a romance novel – it wasn’t one of Edith’s, but I expected the usual ‘romance’ conversation. She said “Oh, I love regencies!” I asked who her favorite author was. She replied, “Edith Layton, do you know her?” I said “You’ve got great taste.” I turned to my cousin and said “Marry this girl.” A few months later, he did.

    Reply
  57. I realize I took up more than my share of this blog – but I want to add one more thing before I leave – my cousin brought his new girlfriend up to meet me. We had a casual dinner, with light conversation, and as she was leaving she saw a romance novel – it wasn’t one of Edith’s, but I expected the usual ‘romance’ conversation. She said “Oh, I love regencies!” I asked who her favorite author was. She replied, “Edith Layton, do you know her?” I said “You’ve got great taste.” I turned to my cousin and said “Marry this girl.” A few months later, he did.

    Reply
  58. I realize I took up more than my share of this blog – but I want to add one more thing before I leave – my cousin brought his new girlfriend up to meet me. We had a casual dinner, with light conversation, and as she was leaving she saw a romance novel – it wasn’t one of Edith’s, but I expected the usual ‘romance’ conversation. She said “Oh, I love regencies!” I asked who her favorite author was. She replied, “Edith Layton, do you know her?” I said “You’ve got great taste.” I turned to my cousin and said “Marry this girl.” A few months later, he did.

    Reply
  59. I realize I took up more than my share of this blog – but I want to add one more thing before I leave – my cousin brought his new girlfriend up to meet me. We had a casual dinner, with light conversation, and as she was leaving she saw a romance novel – it wasn’t one of Edith’s, but I expected the usual ‘romance’ conversation. She said “Oh, I love regencies!” I asked who her favorite author was. She replied, “Edith Layton, do you know her?” I said “You’ve got great taste.” I turned to my cousin and said “Marry this girl.” A few months later, he did.

    Reply
  60. I realize I took up more than my share of this blog – but I want to add one more thing before I leave – my cousin brought his new girlfriend up to meet me. We had a casual dinner, with light conversation, and as she was leaving she saw a romance novel – it wasn’t one of Edith’s, but I expected the usual ‘romance’ conversation. She said “Oh, I love regencies!” I asked who her favorite author was. She replied, “Edith Layton, do you know her?” I said “You’ve got great taste.” I turned to my cousin and said “Marry this girl.” A few months later, he did.

    Reply
  61. My deepest condolences to Edith’s family. She was a brilliant writer, a delightful person — and a great inspiration.

    Reply
  62. My deepest condolences to Edith’s family. She was a brilliant writer, a delightful person — and a great inspiration.

    Reply
  63. My deepest condolences to Edith’s family. She was a brilliant writer, a delightful person — and a great inspiration.

    Reply
  64. My deepest condolences to Edith’s family. She was a brilliant writer, a delightful person — and a great inspiration.

    Reply
  65. My deepest condolences to Edith’s family. She was a brilliant writer, a delightful person — and a great inspiration.

    Reply
  66. Such sad news. I always looked forward to Edith’s blogs and her books. The world of romance has lost one of it’s shining lights. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and her friends.

    Reply
  67. Such sad news. I always looked forward to Edith’s blogs and her books. The world of romance has lost one of it’s shining lights. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and her friends.

    Reply
  68. Such sad news. I always looked forward to Edith’s blogs and her books. The world of romance has lost one of it’s shining lights. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and her friends.

    Reply
  69. Such sad news. I always looked forward to Edith’s blogs and her books. The world of romance has lost one of it’s shining lights. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and her friends.

    Reply
  70. Such sad news. I always looked forward to Edith’s blogs and her books. The world of romance has lost one of it’s shining lights. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and her friends.

    Reply
  71. I’m so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton was one of the first authors I read when I rediscovered historical romance as a graduate student. My roommate hooked me on her Love trilogy and those three books are on my Keeper shelf, along with later titles like The Choice and To Wed a Stranger. It was a delight to discover she had such a bubbly, effervescent personality in her blog posts.
    Condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  72. I’m so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton was one of the first authors I read when I rediscovered historical romance as a graduate student. My roommate hooked me on her Love trilogy and those three books are on my Keeper shelf, along with later titles like The Choice and To Wed a Stranger. It was a delight to discover she had such a bubbly, effervescent personality in her blog posts.
    Condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  73. I’m so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton was one of the first authors I read when I rediscovered historical romance as a graduate student. My roommate hooked me on her Love trilogy and those three books are on my Keeper shelf, along with later titles like The Choice and To Wed a Stranger. It was a delight to discover she had such a bubbly, effervescent personality in her blog posts.
    Condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  74. I’m so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton was one of the first authors I read when I rediscovered historical romance as a graduate student. My roommate hooked me on her Love trilogy and those three books are on my Keeper shelf, along with later titles like The Choice and To Wed a Stranger. It was a delight to discover she had such a bubbly, effervescent personality in her blog posts.
    Condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  75. I’m so sorry to hear this. Edith Layton was one of the first authors I read when I rediscovered historical romance as a graduate student. My roommate hooked me on her Love trilogy and those three books are on my Keeper shelf, along with later titles like The Choice and To Wed a Stranger. It was a delight to discover she had such a bubbly, effervescent personality in her blog posts.
    Condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  76. This is very sad news. My condolences to her family and friends in your loss. I always enjoyed her books and her blogs here. I will treasure the autographed book that she sent me.

    Reply
  77. This is very sad news. My condolences to her family and friends in your loss. I always enjoyed her books and her blogs here. I will treasure the autographed book that she sent me.

    Reply
  78. This is very sad news. My condolences to her family and friends in your loss. I always enjoyed her books and her blogs here. I will treasure the autographed book that she sent me.

    Reply
  79. This is very sad news. My condolences to her family and friends in your loss. I always enjoyed her books and her blogs here. I will treasure the autographed book that she sent me.

    Reply
  80. This is very sad news. My condolences to her family and friends in your loss. I always enjoyed her books and her blogs here. I will treasure the autographed book that she sent me.

    Reply
  81. I am so sad about this news. She was certainly one of the reasons why I started reading Regencies and why I followed many of the Word Wenches to historicals. She was a lovely writer and will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  82. I am so sad about this news. She was certainly one of the reasons why I started reading Regencies and why I followed many of the Word Wenches to historicals. She was a lovely writer and will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  83. I am so sad about this news. She was certainly one of the reasons why I started reading Regencies and why I followed many of the Word Wenches to historicals. She was a lovely writer and will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  84. I am so sad about this news. She was certainly one of the reasons why I started reading Regencies and why I followed many of the Word Wenches to historicals. She was a lovely writer and will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  85. I am so sad about this news. She was certainly one of the reasons why I started reading Regencies and why I followed many of the Word Wenches to historicals. She was a lovely writer and will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  86. I can only repeat what everyone else has said: I am so sorry, and she will be missed.
    I loved many of the full-length Regencies, but her short stories were what first drew me to her writing. For example, in “The Gingerbread Man” she not only created a vivid hero and heroine, but she created three dimensional secondary characters (such as the hero’s heartbreaking former mistress) who jumped off the page. This is not easy to do — she just made it look easy.

    Reply
  87. I can only repeat what everyone else has said: I am so sorry, and she will be missed.
    I loved many of the full-length Regencies, but her short stories were what first drew me to her writing. For example, in “The Gingerbread Man” she not only created a vivid hero and heroine, but she created three dimensional secondary characters (such as the hero’s heartbreaking former mistress) who jumped off the page. This is not easy to do — she just made it look easy.

    Reply
  88. I can only repeat what everyone else has said: I am so sorry, and she will be missed.
    I loved many of the full-length Regencies, but her short stories were what first drew me to her writing. For example, in “The Gingerbread Man” she not only created a vivid hero and heroine, but she created three dimensional secondary characters (such as the hero’s heartbreaking former mistress) who jumped off the page. This is not easy to do — she just made it look easy.

    Reply
  89. I can only repeat what everyone else has said: I am so sorry, and she will be missed.
    I loved many of the full-length Regencies, but her short stories were what first drew me to her writing. For example, in “The Gingerbread Man” she not only created a vivid hero and heroine, but she created three dimensional secondary characters (such as the hero’s heartbreaking former mistress) who jumped off the page. This is not easy to do — she just made it look easy.

    Reply
  90. I can only repeat what everyone else has said: I am so sorry, and she will be missed.
    I loved many of the full-length Regencies, but her short stories were what first drew me to her writing. For example, in “The Gingerbread Man” she not only created a vivid hero and heroine, but she created three dimensional secondary characters (such as the hero’s heartbreaking former mistress) who jumped off the page. This is not easy to do — she just made it look easy.

    Reply
  91. I met Edith at my first RWA National event. I was launching Rakehell.com and she was the first author who gave me her email so that we could keep in touch for reviews. She was always a supporter of the genre, and anyone who has read her books knows she could write! Whenever I saw her at events she had a smile and a big hug for me. I’ll miss her, but feel blessed to have known her.

    Reply
  92. I met Edith at my first RWA National event. I was launching Rakehell.com and she was the first author who gave me her email so that we could keep in touch for reviews. She was always a supporter of the genre, and anyone who has read her books knows she could write! Whenever I saw her at events she had a smile and a big hug for me. I’ll miss her, but feel blessed to have known her.

    Reply
  93. I met Edith at my first RWA National event. I was launching Rakehell.com and she was the first author who gave me her email so that we could keep in touch for reviews. She was always a supporter of the genre, and anyone who has read her books knows she could write! Whenever I saw her at events she had a smile and a big hug for me. I’ll miss her, but feel blessed to have known her.

    Reply
  94. I met Edith at my first RWA National event. I was launching Rakehell.com and she was the first author who gave me her email so that we could keep in touch for reviews. She was always a supporter of the genre, and anyone who has read her books knows she could write! Whenever I saw her at events she had a smile and a big hug for me. I’ll miss her, but feel blessed to have known her.

    Reply
  95. I met Edith at my first RWA National event. I was launching Rakehell.com and she was the first author who gave me her email so that we could keep in touch for reviews. She was always a supporter of the genre, and anyone who has read her books knows she could write! Whenever I saw her at events she had a smile and a big hug for me. I’ll miss her, but feel blessed to have known her.

    Reply
  96. Gosh, I miss her already. She chatted with me on email a few times. Going to miss her so much. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends.

    Reply
  97. Gosh, I miss her already. She chatted with me on email a few times. Going to miss her so much. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends.

    Reply
  98. Gosh, I miss her already. She chatted with me on email a few times. Going to miss her so much. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends.

    Reply
  99. Gosh, I miss her already. She chatted with me on email a few times. Going to miss her so much. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends.

    Reply
  100. Gosh, I miss her already. She chatted with me on email a few times. Going to miss her so much. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends.

    Reply
  101. I loved Edith Layton’s books and the blogs she wrote. She always seemed like such a vibrant, loving person . . . she will be greatly missed. My deepest sympathies to her family and friends.

    Reply
  102. I loved Edith Layton’s books and the blogs she wrote. She always seemed like such a vibrant, loving person . . . she will be greatly missed. My deepest sympathies to her family and friends.

    Reply
  103. I loved Edith Layton’s books and the blogs she wrote. She always seemed like such a vibrant, loving person . . . she will be greatly missed. My deepest sympathies to her family and friends.

    Reply
  104. I loved Edith Layton’s books and the blogs she wrote. She always seemed like such a vibrant, loving person . . . she will be greatly missed. My deepest sympathies to her family and friends.

    Reply
  105. I loved Edith Layton’s books and the blogs she wrote. She always seemed like such a vibrant, loving person . . . she will be greatly missed. My deepest sympathies to her family and friends.

    Reply
  106. I feel terrible. From where I eat breakfast, I can see a long row of her books, from the beginning of her career to the most recent, which I suppose is the last. OI have always wished I knew her in person, and not just through her gracious notes.
    God rest her soul.
    I am just really bummed out over this. Why do the good people get taken and the bastards live on forever?

    Reply
  107. I feel terrible. From where I eat breakfast, I can see a long row of her books, from the beginning of her career to the most recent, which I suppose is the last. OI have always wished I knew her in person, and not just through her gracious notes.
    God rest her soul.
    I am just really bummed out over this. Why do the good people get taken and the bastards live on forever?

    Reply
  108. I feel terrible. From where I eat breakfast, I can see a long row of her books, from the beginning of her career to the most recent, which I suppose is the last. OI have always wished I knew her in person, and not just through her gracious notes.
    God rest her soul.
    I am just really bummed out over this. Why do the good people get taken and the bastards live on forever?

    Reply
  109. I feel terrible. From where I eat breakfast, I can see a long row of her books, from the beginning of her career to the most recent, which I suppose is the last. OI have always wished I knew her in person, and not just through her gracious notes.
    God rest her soul.
    I am just really bummed out over this. Why do the good people get taken and the bastards live on forever?

    Reply
  110. I feel terrible. From where I eat breakfast, I can see a long row of her books, from the beginning of her career to the most recent, which I suppose is the last. OI have always wished I knew her in person, and not just through her gracious notes.
    God rest her soul.
    I am just really bummed out over this. Why do the good people get taken and the bastards live on forever?

    Reply
  111. I had the great good fortune of meeting Edith and in the short visit she made me feel as if we were old friends. Her warmth and generosity of spirit will always stay with me.She will be greatly missed.

    Reply
  112. I had the great good fortune of meeting Edith and in the short visit she made me feel as if we were old friends. Her warmth and generosity of spirit will always stay with me.She will be greatly missed.

    Reply
  113. I had the great good fortune of meeting Edith and in the short visit she made me feel as if we were old friends. Her warmth and generosity of spirit will always stay with me.She will be greatly missed.

    Reply
  114. I had the great good fortune of meeting Edith and in the short visit she made me feel as if we were old friends. Her warmth and generosity of spirit will always stay with me.She will be greatly missed.

    Reply
  115. I had the great good fortune of meeting Edith and in the short visit she made me feel as if we were old friends. Her warmth and generosity of spirit will always stay with me.She will be greatly missed.

    Reply
  116. I’m so sad to hear of Edith’s peassing. When I think of Edith, what I remember is laughter. Whether talking, writng, blogging, or reading, when I communicated with Edith, she made me laugh out loud. Every time. She often made me think. She certainly made me more aware of the world. But she always, always made me laugh. She was a gift to the world that way. The world’s a poorer place today.

    Reply
  117. I’m so sad to hear of Edith’s peassing. When I think of Edith, what I remember is laughter. Whether talking, writng, blogging, or reading, when I communicated with Edith, she made me laugh out loud. Every time. She often made me think. She certainly made me more aware of the world. But she always, always made me laugh. She was a gift to the world that way. The world’s a poorer place today.

    Reply
  118. I’m so sad to hear of Edith’s peassing. When I think of Edith, what I remember is laughter. Whether talking, writng, blogging, or reading, when I communicated with Edith, she made me laugh out loud. Every time. She often made me think. She certainly made me more aware of the world. But she always, always made me laugh. She was a gift to the world that way. The world’s a poorer place today.

    Reply
  119. I’m so sad to hear of Edith’s peassing. When I think of Edith, what I remember is laughter. Whether talking, writng, blogging, or reading, when I communicated with Edith, she made me laugh out loud. Every time. She often made me think. She certainly made me more aware of the world. But she always, always made me laugh. She was a gift to the world that way. The world’s a poorer place today.

    Reply
  120. I’m so sad to hear of Edith’s peassing. When I think of Edith, what I remember is laughter. Whether talking, writng, blogging, or reading, when I communicated with Edith, she made me laugh out loud. Every time. She often made me think. She certainly made me more aware of the world. But she always, always made me laugh. She was a gift to the world that way. The world’s a poorer place today.

    Reply
  121. I’m very sorry to hear this. I will keep the family in my prayers. I hope they take comfort in knowing that her writing will live on and so she will live on in our memories with them.
    So very sad.
    hugs,
    WendyK

    Reply
  122. I’m very sorry to hear this. I will keep the family in my prayers. I hope they take comfort in knowing that her writing will live on and so she will live on in our memories with them.
    So very sad.
    hugs,
    WendyK

    Reply
  123. I’m very sorry to hear this. I will keep the family in my prayers. I hope they take comfort in knowing that her writing will live on and so she will live on in our memories with them.
    So very sad.
    hugs,
    WendyK

    Reply
  124. I’m very sorry to hear this. I will keep the family in my prayers. I hope they take comfort in knowing that her writing will live on and so she will live on in our memories with them.
    So very sad.
    hugs,
    WendyK

    Reply
  125. I’m very sorry to hear this. I will keep the family in my prayers. I hope they take comfort in knowing that her writing will live on and so she will live on in our memories with them.
    So very sad.
    hugs,
    WendyK

    Reply
  126. So sad to hear this, my sympathies to Edith’s family and friends. She’s entertained so many readers over the years with many wonderful stories. I’ve enjoyed her posts here, witty and whimsical as mentioned, her personality came through even though I didn’t know her personally.

    Reply
  127. So sad to hear this, my sympathies to Edith’s family and friends. She’s entertained so many readers over the years with many wonderful stories. I’ve enjoyed her posts here, witty and whimsical as mentioned, her personality came through even though I didn’t know her personally.

    Reply
  128. So sad to hear this, my sympathies to Edith’s family and friends. She’s entertained so many readers over the years with many wonderful stories. I’ve enjoyed her posts here, witty and whimsical as mentioned, her personality came through even though I didn’t know her personally.

    Reply
  129. So sad to hear this, my sympathies to Edith’s family and friends. She’s entertained so many readers over the years with many wonderful stories. I’ve enjoyed her posts here, witty and whimsical as mentioned, her personality came through even though I didn’t know her personally.

    Reply
  130. So sad to hear this, my sympathies to Edith’s family and friends. She’s entertained so many readers over the years with many wonderful stories. I’ve enjoyed her posts here, witty and whimsical as mentioned, her personality came through even though I didn’t know her personally.

    Reply
  131. She will be so much missed. I never met her, but I did send her “fan letters” by e-mail and she was always so kind and gracious. One of my favorite authors. I can hardly take it in.
    Jane

    Reply
  132. She will be so much missed. I never met her, but I did send her “fan letters” by e-mail and she was always so kind and gracious. One of my favorite authors. I can hardly take it in.
    Jane

    Reply
  133. She will be so much missed. I never met her, but I did send her “fan letters” by e-mail and she was always so kind and gracious. One of my favorite authors. I can hardly take it in.
    Jane

    Reply
  134. She will be so much missed. I never met her, but I did send her “fan letters” by e-mail and she was always so kind and gracious. One of my favorite authors. I can hardly take it in.
    Jane

    Reply
  135. She will be so much missed. I never met her, but I did send her “fan letters” by e-mail and she was always so kind and gracious. One of my favorite authors. I can hardly take it in.
    Jane

    Reply
  136. To Edith who taught me how to peel back emotion until nothing existed but love. Someday, may I be because you were.

    Reply
  137. To Edith who taught me how to peel back emotion until nothing existed but love. Someday, may I be because you were.

    Reply
  138. To Edith who taught me how to peel back emotion until nothing existed but love. Someday, may I be because you were.

    Reply
  139. To Edith who taught me how to peel back emotion until nothing existed but love. Someday, may I be because you were.

    Reply
  140. To Edith who taught me how to peel back emotion until nothing existed but love. Someday, may I be because you were.

    Reply
  141. From MJP:
    I’m glad to read the posts from so many others who share a sense of loss. Here’s are some comments taken with permission from a writers’ loop:
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    And angels take her to her rest. Her wonderful talent and unique view of the world were a gift to us all.
    Karyn Witmer-Gow
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Dear Layton Family:
    Your mom wrote some of the first Regency romances that I read when I returned to reading romance, and was thinking of writing one. I loved her writing, and some of her books remain my absolute favorites. I named a character in one of my books after a character in one of hers, and took a special pleasure that I was able to pay homage to her, albeit in a small way.
    When RWA was in NYC, I went to the Literacy Signing and met her there; I had brought my husband, whom she said should model for romance covers because he was so handsome. We talked about Park Slope, Brooklyn, where I live, and about walking in Prospect Park with her dogs.
    Please accept my sympathies during this difficult time, and know that your mom’s work is loved my many, many readers.
    Sincerely,
    Megan Frampton
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Knowing Edith was such a treat. I remember something funny or off-the-wall or interesting she talked about every time I encountered her, which was usually at conferences. (Among other things, I remember that it was through Edith that I learned to fear Carrot Addiction.) I also remember occasions when Edith said something encouraging or kind at exactly the moment I needed to hear it.
    Like so many others, I will miss her.
    Laura Resnick
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I knew her from the few times I’ve been able to go to Ninc confs. and online, and loved her wit and her love of dogs. The romance fiction world will be poorer for her loss.
    Laurie Kingery
    +++++++++++++++
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  142. From MJP:
    I’m glad to read the posts from so many others who share a sense of loss. Here’s are some comments taken with permission from a writers’ loop:
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    And angels take her to her rest. Her wonderful talent and unique view of the world were a gift to us all.
    Karyn Witmer-Gow
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Dear Layton Family:
    Your mom wrote some of the first Regency romances that I read when I returned to reading romance, and was thinking of writing one. I loved her writing, and some of her books remain my absolute favorites. I named a character in one of my books after a character in one of hers, and took a special pleasure that I was able to pay homage to her, albeit in a small way.
    When RWA was in NYC, I went to the Literacy Signing and met her there; I had brought my husband, whom she said should model for romance covers because he was so handsome. We talked about Park Slope, Brooklyn, where I live, and about walking in Prospect Park with her dogs.
    Please accept my sympathies during this difficult time, and know that your mom’s work is loved my many, many readers.
    Sincerely,
    Megan Frampton
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Knowing Edith was such a treat. I remember something funny or off-the-wall or interesting she talked about every time I encountered her, which was usually at conferences. (Among other things, I remember that it was through Edith that I learned to fear Carrot Addiction.) I also remember occasions when Edith said something encouraging or kind at exactly the moment I needed to hear it.
    Like so many others, I will miss her.
    Laura Resnick
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I knew her from the few times I’ve been able to go to Ninc confs. and online, and loved her wit and her love of dogs. The romance fiction world will be poorer for her loss.
    Laurie Kingery
    +++++++++++++++
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  143. From MJP:
    I’m glad to read the posts from so many others who share a sense of loss. Here’s are some comments taken with permission from a writers’ loop:
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    And angels take her to her rest. Her wonderful talent and unique view of the world were a gift to us all.
    Karyn Witmer-Gow
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Dear Layton Family:
    Your mom wrote some of the first Regency romances that I read when I returned to reading romance, and was thinking of writing one. I loved her writing, and some of her books remain my absolute favorites. I named a character in one of my books after a character in one of hers, and took a special pleasure that I was able to pay homage to her, albeit in a small way.
    When RWA was in NYC, I went to the Literacy Signing and met her there; I had brought my husband, whom she said should model for romance covers because he was so handsome. We talked about Park Slope, Brooklyn, where I live, and about walking in Prospect Park with her dogs.
    Please accept my sympathies during this difficult time, and know that your mom’s work is loved my many, many readers.
    Sincerely,
    Megan Frampton
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Knowing Edith was such a treat. I remember something funny or off-the-wall or interesting she talked about every time I encountered her, which was usually at conferences. (Among other things, I remember that it was through Edith that I learned to fear Carrot Addiction.) I also remember occasions when Edith said something encouraging or kind at exactly the moment I needed to hear it.
    Like so many others, I will miss her.
    Laura Resnick
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I knew her from the few times I’ve been able to go to Ninc confs. and online, and loved her wit and her love of dogs. The romance fiction world will be poorer for her loss.
    Laurie Kingery
    +++++++++++++++
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  144. From MJP:
    I’m glad to read the posts from so many others who share a sense of loss. Here’s are some comments taken with permission from a writers’ loop:
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    And angels take her to her rest. Her wonderful talent and unique view of the world were a gift to us all.
    Karyn Witmer-Gow
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Dear Layton Family:
    Your mom wrote some of the first Regency romances that I read when I returned to reading romance, and was thinking of writing one. I loved her writing, and some of her books remain my absolute favorites. I named a character in one of my books after a character in one of hers, and took a special pleasure that I was able to pay homage to her, albeit in a small way.
    When RWA was in NYC, I went to the Literacy Signing and met her there; I had brought my husband, whom she said should model for romance covers because he was so handsome. We talked about Park Slope, Brooklyn, where I live, and about walking in Prospect Park with her dogs.
    Please accept my sympathies during this difficult time, and know that your mom’s work is loved my many, many readers.
    Sincerely,
    Megan Frampton
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Knowing Edith was such a treat. I remember something funny or off-the-wall or interesting she talked about every time I encountered her, which was usually at conferences. (Among other things, I remember that it was through Edith that I learned to fear Carrot Addiction.) I also remember occasions when Edith said something encouraging or kind at exactly the moment I needed to hear it.
    Like so many others, I will miss her.
    Laura Resnick
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I knew her from the few times I’ve been able to go to Ninc confs. and online, and loved her wit and her love of dogs. The romance fiction world will be poorer for her loss.
    Laurie Kingery
    +++++++++++++++
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  145. From MJP:
    I’m glad to read the posts from so many others who share a sense of loss. Here’s are some comments taken with permission from a writers’ loop:
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    And angels take her to her rest. Her wonderful talent and unique view of the world were a gift to us all.
    Karyn Witmer-Gow
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Dear Layton Family:
    Your mom wrote some of the first Regency romances that I read when I returned to reading romance, and was thinking of writing one. I loved her writing, and some of her books remain my absolute favorites. I named a character in one of my books after a character in one of hers, and took a special pleasure that I was able to pay homage to her, albeit in a small way.
    When RWA was in NYC, I went to the Literacy Signing and met her there; I had brought my husband, whom she said should model for romance covers because he was so handsome. We talked about Park Slope, Brooklyn, where I live, and about walking in Prospect Park with her dogs.
    Please accept my sympathies during this difficult time, and know that your mom’s work is loved my many, many readers.
    Sincerely,
    Megan Frampton
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Knowing Edith was such a treat. I remember something funny or off-the-wall or interesting she talked about every time I encountered her, which was usually at conferences. (Among other things, I remember that it was through Edith that I learned to fear Carrot Addiction.) I also remember occasions when Edith said something encouraging or kind at exactly the moment I needed to hear it.
    Like so many others, I will miss her.
    Laura Resnick
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I knew her from the few times I’ve been able to go to Ninc confs. and online, and loved her wit and her love of dogs. The romance fiction world will be poorer for her loss.
    Laurie Kingery
    +++++++++++++++
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  146. Everyone has said it all before me. There is nothing new to add, is there, except that Edith’s passing brings with it a huge sense of loss. I loved her and I loved her books. I remember her telling me once (in her usual witty way) that she was a dying breed. There would be no Ediths after her generation, she told me, because of Edith Bunker in “All in the Family.” If that turns out to be true, perhaps we can ascribe it to a different cause. After Edith Layton, the world decided to retire the name in her honor!

    Reply
  147. Everyone has said it all before me. There is nothing new to add, is there, except that Edith’s passing brings with it a huge sense of loss. I loved her and I loved her books. I remember her telling me once (in her usual witty way) that she was a dying breed. There would be no Ediths after her generation, she told me, because of Edith Bunker in “All in the Family.” If that turns out to be true, perhaps we can ascribe it to a different cause. After Edith Layton, the world decided to retire the name in her honor!

    Reply
  148. Everyone has said it all before me. There is nothing new to add, is there, except that Edith’s passing brings with it a huge sense of loss. I loved her and I loved her books. I remember her telling me once (in her usual witty way) that she was a dying breed. There would be no Ediths after her generation, she told me, because of Edith Bunker in “All in the Family.” If that turns out to be true, perhaps we can ascribe it to a different cause. After Edith Layton, the world decided to retire the name in her honor!

    Reply
  149. Everyone has said it all before me. There is nothing new to add, is there, except that Edith’s passing brings with it a huge sense of loss. I loved her and I loved her books. I remember her telling me once (in her usual witty way) that she was a dying breed. There would be no Ediths after her generation, she told me, because of Edith Bunker in “All in the Family.” If that turns out to be true, perhaps we can ascribe it to a different cause. After Edith Layton, the world decided to retire the name in her honor!

    Reply
  150. Everyone has said it all before me. There is nothing new to add, is there, except that Edith’s passing brings with it a huge sense of loss. I loved her and I loved her books. I remember her telling me once (in her usual witty way) that she was a dying breed. There would be no Ediths after her generation, she told me, because of Edith Bunker in “All in the Family.” If that turns out to be true, perhaps we can ascribe it to a different cause. After Edith Layton, the world decided to retire the name in her honor!

    Reply
  151. I’m deeply saddened by the news. I have known her through her books and her Wenchly posts, and she always had a different take, often times funny, of the everyday that I adored. She’s going to be much, much missed.

    Reply
  152. I’m deeply saddened by the news. I have known her through her books and her Wenchly posts, and she always had a different take, often times funny, of the everyday that I adored. She’s going to be much, much missed.

    Reply
  153. I’m deeply saddened by the news. I have known her through her books and her Wenchly posts, and she always had a different take, often times funny, of the everyday that I adored. She’s going to be much, much missed.

    Reply
  154. I’m deeply saddened by the news. I have known her through her books and her Wenchly posts, and she always had a different take, often times funny, of the everyday that I adored. She’s going to be much, much missed.

    Reply
  155. I’m deeply saddened by the news. I have known her through her books and her Wenchly posts, and she always had a different take, often times funny, of the everyday that I adored. She’s going to be much, much missed.

    Reply
  156. What a loss but what a legacy! I have two shelves of Edith’s books and I will now re- read them all in her honour. I can’t think of a more fitting tribute. My sympathies to her friends and family.

    Reply
  157. What a loss but what a legacy! I have two shelves of Edith’s books and I will now re- read them all in her honour. I can’t think of a more fitting tribute. My sympathies to her friends and family.

    Reply
  158. What a loss but what a legacy! I have two shelves of Edith’s books and I will now re- read them all in her honour. I can’t think of a more fitting tribute. My sympathies to her friends and family.

    Reply
  159. What a loss but what a legacy! I have two shelves of Edith’s books and I will now re- read them all in her honour. I can’t think of a more fitting tribute. My sympathies to her friends and family.

    Reply
  160. What a loss but what a legacy! I have two shelves of Edith’s books and I will now re- read them all in her honour. I can’t think of a more fitting tribute. My sympathies to her friends and family.

    Reply
  161. So sad — she wrote so eloquently about the vagaries of love and affection. About what was worth loving. On my forever keeper shelves are To Wed a Stranger (a wonderful, poignant DIK), A Bride for His Convenience and Bound by Love.
    All my sympathy goes to her family, her friends and her wench sisters.

    Reply
  162. So sad — she wrote so eloquently about the vagaries of love and affection. About what was worth loving. On my forever keeper shelves are To Wed a Stranger (a wonderful, poignant DIK), A Bride for His Convenience and Bound by Love.
    All my sympathy goes to her family, her friends and her wench sisters.

    Reply
  163. So sad — she wrote so eloquently about the vagaries of love and affection. About what was worth loving. On my forever keeper shelves are To Wed a Stranger (a wonderful, poignant DIK), A Bride for His Convenience and Bound by Love.
    All my sympathy goes to her family, her friends and her wench sisters.

    Reply
  164. So sad — she wrote so eloquently about the vagaries of love and affection. About what was worth loving. On my forever keeper shelves are To Wed a Stranger (a wonderful, poignant DIK), A Bride for His Convenience and Bound by Love.
    All my sympathy goes to her family, her friends and her wench sisters.

    Reply
  165. So sad — she wrote so eloquently about the vagaries of love and affection. About what was worth loving. On my forever keeper shelves are To Wed a Stranger (a wonderful, poignant DIK), A Bride for His Convenience and Bound by Love.
    All my sympathy goes to her family, her friends and her wench sisters.

    Reply
  166. To Edith, who welcomed me here with open arms, though she knew me not. Her warmth and wit gave me such a sense of friendship and her books, hours upon hours of a wonderful world which she brought so alive, I wanted to live in it.
    Truly a classy lady, Edith Layton, you will be sorely missed.
    My condolences to the entire Layton family.

    Reply
  167. To Edith, who welcomed me here with open arms, though she knew me not. Her warmth and wit gave me such a sense of friendship and her books, hours upon hours of a wonderful world which she brought so alive, I wanted to live in it.
    Truly a classy lady, Edith Layton, you will be sorely missed.
    My condolences to the entire Layton family.

    Reply
  168. To Edith, who welcomed me here with open arms, though she knew me not. Her warmth and wit gave me such a sense of friendship and her books, hours upon hours of a wonderful world which she brought so alive, I wanted to live in it.
    Truly a classy lady, Edith Layton, you will be sorely missed.
    My condolences to the entire Layton family.

    Reply
  169. To Edith, who welcomed me here with open arms, though she knew me not. Her warmth and wit gave me such a sense of friendship and her books, hours upon hours of a wonderful world which she brought so alive, I wanted to live in it.
    Truly a classy lady, Edith Layton, you will be sorely missed.
    My condolences to the entire Layton family.

    Reply
  170. To Edith, who welcomed me here with open arms, though she knew me not. Her warmth and wit gave me such a sense of friendship and her books, hours upon hours of a wonderful world which she brought so alive, I wanted to live in it.
    Truly a classy lady, Edith Layton, you will be sorely missed.
    My condolences to the entire Layton family.

    Reply
  171. I’m sorry to hear about Edith Layton. I loved reading her novels and will miss her greatly.
    My condolences to the Layton family.

    Reply
  172. I’m sorry to hear about Edith Layton. I loved reading her novels and will miss her greatly.
    My condolences to the Layton family.

    Reply
  173. I’m sorry to hear about Edith Layton. I loved reading her novels and will miss her greatly.
    My condolences to the Layton family.

    Reply
  174. I’m sorry to hear about Edith Layton. I loved reading her novels and will miss her greatly.
    My condolences to the Layton family.

    Reply
  175. I’m sorry to hear about Edith Layton. I loved reading her novels and will miss her greatly.
    My condolences to the Layton family.

    Reply
  176. My condolences to the Layton family. Edith Layton’s regencies made me fall in love with the genre. Whenever I saw her at RWA, she was always laughing and chatting with everyone. A true Grand Dame of Romance.

    Reply
  177. My condolences to the Layton family. Edith Layton’s regencies made me fall in love with the genre. Whenever I saw her at RWA, she was always laughing and chatting with everyone. A true Grand Dame of Romance.

    Reply
  178. My condolences to the Layton family. Edith Layton’s regencies made me fall in love with the genre. Whenever I saw her at RWA, she was always laughing and chatting with everyone. A true Grand Dame of Romance.

    Reply
  179. My condolences to the Layton family. Edith Layton’s regencies made me fall in love with the genre. Whenever I saw her at RWA, she was always laughing and chatting with everyone. A true Grand Dame of Romance.

    Reply
  180. My condolences to the Layton family. Edith Layton’s regencies made me fall in love with the genre. Whenever I saw her at RWA, she was always laughing and chatting with everyone. A true Grand Dame of Romance.

    Reply
  181. What a terrible loss for the world of historical romance. Her novels have given and will continue to give me so much pleasure and entertainment. Her humor, class, and love of history shows in every page of her books. And her kindness to those who cannot speak for themselves – the animals of the North Shore Animal League – has always touched my heart. A true grand dame and all around glorious spirit has flown home.

    Reply
  182. What a terrible loss for the world of historical romance. Her novels have given and will continue to give me so much pleasure and entertainment. Her humor, class, and love of history shows in every page of her books. And her kindness to those who cannot speak for themselves – the animals of the North Shore Animal League – has always touched my heart. A true grand dame and all around glorious spirit has flown home.

    Reply
  183. What a terrible loss for the world of historical romance. Her novels have given and will continue to give me so much pleasure and entertainment. Her humor, class, and love of history shows in every page of her books. And her kindness to those who cannot speak for themselves – the animals of the North Shore Animal League – has always touched my heart. A true grand dame and all around glorious spirit has flown home.

    Reply
  184. What a terrible loss for the world of historical romance. Her novels have given and will continue to give me so much pleasure and entertainment. Her humor, class, and love of history shows in every page of her books. And her kindness to those who cannot speak for themselves – the animals of the North Shore Animal League – has always touched my heart. A true grand dame and all around glorious spirit has flown home.

    Reply
  185. What a terrible loss for the world of historical romance. Her novels have given and will continue to give me so much pleasure and entertainment. Her humor, class, and love of history shows in every page of her books. And her kindness to those who cannot speak for themselves – the animals of the North Shore Animal League – has always touched my heart. A true grand dame and all around glorious spirit has flown home.

    Reply
  186. So very sorry to hear of Edith’s passing away. I have lots of her books on my keeper shelves. They are the ones I go back and reread most often.
    I so enjoyed meeting her the one time I did. She was warm and smiling and generous with her time. “Vibrant” is probably the closest single word to describe her.
    She touched many many many peoples’ lives through her writing. And the world is a better place for Edith’s having been in it.
    My deepest sympathy to her family who were clearly blessed to have had her in their lives. As were we all.

    Reply
  187. So very sorry to hear of Edith’s passing away. I have lots of her books on my keeper shelves. They are the ones I go back and reread most often.
    I so enjoyed meeting her the one time I did. She was warm and smiling and generous with her time. “Vibrant” is probably the closest single word to describe her.
    She touched many many many peoples’ lives through her writing. And the world is a better place for Edith’s having been in it.
    My deepest sympathy to her family who were clearly blessed to have had her in their lives. As were we all.

    Reply
  188. So very sorry to hear of Edith’s passing away. I have lots of her books on my keeper shelves. They are the ones I go back and reread most often.
    I so enjoyed meeting her the one time I did. She was warm and smiling and generous with her time. “Vibrant” is probably the closest single word to describe her.
    She touched many many many peoples’ lives through her writing. And the world is a better place for Edith’s having been in it.
    My deepest sympathy to her family who were clearly blessed to have had her in their lives. As were we all.

    Reply
  189. So very sorry to hear of Edith’s passing away. I have lots of her books on my keeper shelves. They are the ones I go back and reread most often.
    I so enjoyed meeting her the one time I did. She was warm and smiling and generous with her time. “Vibrant” is probably the closest single word to describe her.
    She touched many many many peoples’ lives through her writing. And the world is a better place for Edith’s having been in it.
    My deepest sympathy to her family who were clearly blessed to have had her in their lives. As were we all.

    Reply
  190. So very sorry to hear of Edith’s passing away. I have lots of her books on my keeper shelves. They are the ones I go back and reread most often.
    I so enjoyed meeting her the one time I did. She was warm and smiling and generous with her time. “Vibrant” is probably the closest single word to describe her.
    She touched many many many peoples’ lives through her writing. And the world is a better place for Edith’s having been in it.
    My deepest sympathy to her family who were clearly blessed to have had her in their lives. As were we all.

    Reply
  191. I was so sorry to read about Edith’s passing on the Georgette Heyer blog, where so many members loved Edith and her work. My deepest sympathies to Edith’s family, she was a real gem and will be truly missed. You are all in my thoughts and prayers.

    Reply
  192. I was so sorry to read about Edith’s passing on the Georgette Heyer blog, where so many members loved Edith and her work. My deepest sympathies to Edith’s family, she was a real gem and will be truly missed. You are all in my thoughts and prayers.

    Reply
  193. I was so sorry to read about Edith’s passing on the Georgette Heyer blog, where so many members loved Edith and her work. My deepest sympathies to Edith’s family, she was a real gem and will be truly missed. You are all in my thoughts and prayers.

    Reply
  194. I was so sorry to read about Edith’s passing on the Georgette Heyer blog, where so many members loved Edith and her work. My deepest sympathies to Edith’s family, she was a real gem and will be truly missed. You are all in my thoughts and prayers.

    Reply
  195. I was so sorry to read about Edith’s passing on the Georgette Heyer blog, where so many members loved Edith and her work. My deepest sympathies to Edith’s family, she was a real gem and will be truly missed. You are all in my thoughts and prayers.

    Reply
  196. Edith Layton’s books were among the first to draw me into the wonderful world of Regency romances. Not only did she share her talent with us all, she shared her humanity as well.
    My condolences to Edith Layton’s family and friends during this time.

    Reply
  197. Edith Layton’s books were among the first to draw me into the wonderful world of Regency romances. Not only did she share her talent with us all, she shared her humanity as well.
    My condolences to Edith Layton’s family and friends during this time.

    Reply
  198. Edith Layton’s books were among the first to draw me into the wonderful world of Regency romances. Not only did she share her talent with us all, she shared her humanity as well.
    My condolences to Edith Layton’s family and friends during this time.

    Reply
  199. Edith Layton’s books were among the first to draw me into the wonderful world of Regency romances. Not only did she share her talent with us all, she shared her humanity as well.
    My condolences to Edith Layton’s family and friends during this time.

    Reply
  200. Edith Layton’s books were among the first to draw me into the wonderful world of Regency romances. Not only did she share her talent with us all, she shared her humanity as well.
    My condolences to Edith Layton’s family and friends during this time.

    Reply
  201. Just wanted to say that I was very saddened to hear of this author’s passing. I love Ms. Layton’s book The Duke’s Wager, and hope she had as much joy in life as she gave to her readers.

    Reply
  202. Just wanted to say that I was very saddened to hear of this author’s passing. I love Ms. Layton’s book The Duke’s Wager, and hope she had as much joy in life as she gave to her readers.

    Reply
  203. Just wanted to say that I was very saddened to hear of this author’s passing. I love Ms. Layton’s book The Duke’s Wager, and hope she had as much joy in life as she gave to her readers.

    Reply
  204. Just wanted to say that I was very saddened to hear of this author’s passing. I love Ms. Layton’s book The Duke’s Wager, and hope she had as much joy in life as she gave to her readers.

    Reply
  205. Just wanted to say that I was very saddened to hear of this author’s passing. I love Ms. Layton’s book The Duke’s Wager, and hope she had as much joy in life as she gave to her readers.

    Reply
  206. Thank you Edith, for so many marvelous moments you gave me through your books. And to Family and Friends I give my condolances.
    Helene

    Reply
  207. Thank you Edith, for so many marvelous moments you gave me through your books. And to Family and Friends I give my condolances.
    Helene

    Reply
  208. Thank you Edith, for so many marvelous moments you gave me through your books. And to Family and Friends I give my condolances.
    Helene

    Reply
  209. Thank you Edith, for so many marvelous moments you gave me through your books. And to Family and Friends I give my condolances.
    Helene

    Reply
  210. Thank you Edith, for so many marvelous moments you gave me through your books. And to Family and Friends I give my condolances.
    Helene

    Reply
  211. I join her many friends and admirers in offering my condolences to the family of Edith Layton. She will be missed by so many people who loved her stories and especially by those who were privileged enough to have meet her. What a sparkling person she was! Fun to talk to and a delight to read. She leaves us a wonderful legacy of books for us to enjoy. Thank you, Edith, for being you.

    Reply
  212. I join her many friends and admirers in offering my condolences to the family of Edith Layton. She will be missed by so many people who loved her stories and especially by those who were privileged enough to have meet her. What a sparkling person she was! Fun to talk to and a delight to read. She leaves us a wonderful legacy of books for us to enjoy. Thank you, Edith, for being you.

    Reply
  213. I join her many friends and admirers in offering my condolences to the family of Edith Layton. She will be missed by so many people who loved her stories and especially by those who were privileged enough to have meet her. What a sparkling person she was! Fun to talk to and a delight to read. She leaves us a wonderful legacy of books for us to enjoy. Thank you, Edith, for being you.

    Reply
  214. I join her many friends and admirers in offering my condolences to the family of Edith Layton. She will be missed by so many people who loved her stories and especially by those who were privileged enough to have meet her. What a sparkling person she was! Fun to talk to and a delight to read. She leaves us a wonderful legacy of books for us to enjoy. Thank you, Edith, for being you.

    Reply
  215. I join her many friends and admirers in offering my condolences to the family of Edith Layton. She will be missed by so many people who loved her stories and especially by those who were privileged enough to have meet her. What a sparkling person she was! Fun to talk to and a delight to read. She leaves us a wonderful legacy of books for us to enjoy. Thank you, Edith, for being you.

    Reply
  216. I don’t know which I enjoyed reading more: Edith Layton’s fiction or her blogs at WordWenches. I send my condolences to her family and friends. Her stories are a great legacy for everyone!

    Reply
  217. I don’t know which I enjoyed reading more: Edith Layton’s fiction or her blogs at WordWenches. I send my condolences to her family and friends. Her stories are a great legacy for everyone!

    Reply
  218. I don’t know which I enjoyed reading more: Edith Layton’s fiction or her blogs at WordWenches. I send my condolences to her family and friends. Her stories are a great legacy for everyone!

    Reply
  219. I don’t know which I enjoyed reading more: Edith Layton’s fiction or her blogs at WordWenches. I send my condolences to her family and friends. Her stories are a great legacy for everyone!

    Reply
  220. I don’t know which I enjoyed reading more: Edith Layton’s fiction or her blogs at WordWenches. I send my condolences to her family and friends. Her stories are a great legacy for everyone!

    Reply
  221. The Abandoned Bride was the first Regency I read–and it set a very high bar for other authors to follow. I still have that beat-up paperback copy which I reread every few years. Another of her best (although with such a great writer, it’s hard to quantify “best”) was The Fireflower–it was not a Regency and was quite a melancholy book (even though the heroine gets married to the hero in the end). I am saddened to know that we won’t have more Edith Layton to look forward to reading…but we still have that wonderful back catalog of all her titles.

    Reply
  222. The Abandoned Bride was the first Regency I read–and it set a very high bar for other authors to follow. I still have that beat-up paperback copy which I reread every few years. Another of her best (although with such a great writer, it’s hard to quantify “best”) was The Fireflower–it was not a Regency and was quite a melancholy book (even though the heroine gets married to the hero in the end). I am saddened to know that we won’t have more Edith Layton to look forward to reading…but we still have that wonderful back catalog of all her titles.

    Reply
  223. The Abandoned Bride was the first Regency I read–and it set a very high bar for other authors to follow. I still have that beat-up paperback copy which I reread every few years. Another of her best (although with such a great writer, it’s hard to quantify “best”) was The Fireflower–it was not a Regency and was quite a melancholy book (even though the heroine gets married to the hero in the end). I am saddened to know that we won’t have more Edith Layton to look forward to reading…but we still have that wonderful back catalog of all her titles.

    Reply
  224. The Abandoned Bride was the first Regency I read–and it set a very high bar for other authors to follow. I still have that beat-up paperback copy which I reread every few years. Another of her best (although with such a great writer, it’s hard to quantify “best”) was The Fireflower–it was not a Regency and was quite a melancholy book (even though the heroine gets married to the hero in the end). I am saddened to know that we won’t have more Edith Layton to look forward to reading…but we still have that wonderful back catalog of all her titles.

    Reply
  225. The Abandoned Bride was the first Regency I read–and it set a very high bar for other authors to follow. I still have that beat-up paperback copy which I reread every few years. Another of her best (although with such a great writer, it’s hard to quantify “best”) was The Fireflower–it was not a Regency and was quite a melancholy book (even though the heroine gets married to the hero in the end). I am saddened to know that we won’t have more Edith Layton to look forward to reading…but we still have that wonderful back catalog of all her titles.

    Reply
  226. Edith was one of the warmest, funniest ladies I’ve ever met. I feel so blessed that she was so generous with her talents. Both her wonderful books and her beautiful spirit made this world a better place to be.

    Reply
  227. Edith was one of the warmest, funniest ladies I’ve ever met. I feel so blessed that she was so generous with her talents. Both her wonderful books and her beautiful spirit made this world a better place to be.

    Reply
  228. Edith was one of the warmest, funniest ladies I’ve ever met. I feel so blessed that she was so generous with her talents. Both her wonderful books and her beautiful spirit made this world a better place to be.

    Reply
  229. Edith was one of the warmest, funniest ladies I’ve ever met. I feel so blessed that she was so generous with her talents. Both her wonderful books and her beautiful spirit made this world a better place to be.

    Reply
  230. Edith was one of the warmest, funniest ladies I’ve ever met. I feel so blessed that she was so generous with her talents. Both her wonderful books and her beautiful spirit made this world a better place to be.

    Reply
  231. This is devastating news. I so admire Edith’s lyrical writing. She may be gone but her voice hasn’t been silenced. It will live on each time we open one of her books.

    Reply
  232. This is devastating news. I so admire Edith’s lyrical writing. She may be gone but her voice hasn’t been silenced. It will live on each time we open one of her books.

    Reply
  233. This is devastating news. I so admire Edith’s lyrical writing. She may be gone but her voice hasn’t been silenced. It will live on each time we open one of her books.

    Reply
  234. This is devastating news. I so admire Edith’s lyrical writing. She may be gone but her voice hasn’t been silenced. It will live on each time we open one of her books.

    Reply
  235. This is devastating news. I so admire Edith’s lyrical writing. She may be gone but her voice hasn’t been silenced. It will live on each time we open one of her books.

    Reply
  236. I was so sorry to hear this news today. I have enjoyed reading her books for many years. I believe The Choice was the first book I read of hers and I have been reading her stories ever since.

    Reply
  237. I was so sorry to hear this news today. I have enjoyed reading her books for many years. I believe The Choice was the first book I read of hers and I have been reading her stories ever since.

    Reply
  238. I was so sorry to hear this news today. I have enjoyed reading her books for many years. I believe The Choice was the first book I read of hers and I have been reading her stories ever since.

    Reply
  239. I was so sorry to hear this news today. I have enjoyed reading her books for many years. I believe The Choice was the first book I read of hers and I have been reading her stories ever since.

    Reply
  240. I was so sorry to hear this news today. I have enjoyed reading her books for many years. I believe The Choice was the first book I read of hers and I have been reading her stories ever since.

    Reply
  241. I remember the very first book of Edith’s that I read — THE ABANDONED BRIDE — I knew from that moment she was a very special writer. Later, when Avon merged with Harper, we were thrilled to find Edith on the list, and we’ve loved publishing her ever since. She was not only a wonderful novelist; she was a true professional — always prompt, always cheerful. One would never know she was struggling with cancer.
    I loved her daughter’s blog today, and I am sorry that she is missing the flowers of summer. But her beautiful family remains. And so do her books.

    Reply
  242. I remember the very first book of Edith’s that I read — THE ABANDONED BRIDE — I knew from that moment she was a very special writer. Later, when Avon merged with Harper, we were thrilled to find Edith on the list, and we’ve loved publishing her ever since. She was not only a wonderful novelist; she was a true professional — always prompt, always cheerful. One would never know she was struggling with cancer.
    I loved her daughter’s blog today, and I am sorry that she is missing the flowers of summer. But her beautiful family remains. And so do her books.

    Reply
  243. I remember the very first book of Edith’s that I read — THE ABANDONED BRIDE — I knew from that moment she was a very special writer. Later, when Avon merged with Harper, we were thrilled to find Edith on the list, and we’ve loved publishing her ever since. She was not only a wonderful novelist; she was a true professional — always prompt, always cheerful. One would never know she was struggling with cancer.
    I loved her daughter’s blog today, and I am sorry that she is missing the flowers of summer. But her beautiful family remains. And so do her books.

    Reply
  244. I remember the very first book of Edith’s that I read — THE ABANDONED BRIDE — I knew from that moment she was a very special writer. Later, when Avon merged with Harper, we were thrilled to find Edith on the list, and we’ve loved publishing her ever since. She was not only a wonderful novelist; she was a true professional — always prompt, always cheerful. One would never know she was struggling with cancer.
    I loved her daughter’s blog today, and I am sorry that she is missing the flowers of summer. But her beautiful family remains. And so do her books.

    Reply
  245. I remember the very first book of Edith’s that I read — THE ABANDONED BRIDE — I knew from that moment she was a very special writer. Later, when Avon merged with Harper, we were thrilled to find Edith on the list, and we’ve loved publishing her ever since. She was not only a wonderful novelist; she was a true professional — always prompt, always cheerful. One would never know she was struggling with cancer.
    I loved her daughter’s blog today, and I am sorry that she is missing the flowers of summer. But her beautiful family remains. And so do her books.

    Reply
  246. For Edith, from one of my favorite books, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
    “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret; it is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
    We will miss your voice in our presence.

    Reply
  247. For Edith, from one of my favorite books, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
    “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret; it is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
    We will miss your voice in our presence.

    Reply
  248. For Edith, from one of my favorite books, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
    “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret; it is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
    We will miss your voice in our presence.

    Reply
  249. For Edith, from one of my favorite books, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
    “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret; it is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
    We will miss your voice in our presence.

    Reply
  250. For Edith, from one of my favorite books, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
    “And now here is my secret, a very simple secret; it is only with the heart that one can see rightly, what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
    We will miss your voice in our presence.

    Reply
  251. You couldn’t read a paragraph written by Edith and mistake it for another writer’s. This was a woman with a Voice. And so deeply romantic. The Duke’s Wager is one of my all-time keepers.

    Reply
  252. You couldn’t read a paragraph written by Edith and mistake it for another writer’s. This was a woman with a Voice. And so deeply romantic. The Duke’s Wager is one of my all-time keepers.

    Reply
  253. You couldn’t read a paragraph written by Edith and mistake it for another writer’s. This was a woman with a Voice. And so deeply romantic. The Duke’s Wager is one of my all-time keepers.

    Reply
  254. You couldn’t read a paragraph written by Edith and mistake it for another writer’s. This was a woman with a Voice. And so deeply romantic. The Duke’s Wager is one of my all-time keepers.

    Reply
  255. You couldn’t read a paragraph written by Edith and mistake it for another writer’s. This was a woman with a Voice. And so deeply romantic. The Duke’s Wager is one of my all-time keepers.

    Reply
  256. Edith Layton gave me mental holidays when I needed them most. I cared for my mother in our home (dementia) till she had to be moved to an assisted care home.
    Edith’s books filled with vibrant warm people gave me the mental vacation I so badly needed.
    My sympathy goes out to her family and to her other fans.
    She will be missed by readers who looked forward to their newest adventure with Edith as the leader!

    Reply
  257. Edith Layton gave me mental holidays when I needed them most. I cared for my mother in our home (dementia) till she had to be moved to an assisted care home.
    Edith’s books filled with vibrant warm people gave me the mental vacation I so badly needed.
    My sympathy goes out to her family and to her other fans.
    She will be missed by readers who looked forward to their newest adventure with Edith as the leader!

    Reply
  258. Edith Layton gave me mental holidays when I needed them most. I cared for my mother in our home (dementia) till she had to be moved to an assisted care home.
    Edith’s books filled with vibrant warm people gave me the mental vacation I so badly needed.
    My sympathy goes out to her family and to her other fans.
    She will be missed by readers who looked forward to their newest adventure with Edith as the leader!

    Reply
  259. Edith Layton gave me mental holidays when I needed them most. I cared for my mother in our home (dementia) till she had to be moved to an assisted care home.
    Edith’s books filled with vibrant warm people gave me the mental vacation I so badly needed.
    My sympathy goes out to her family and to her other fans.
    She will be missed by readers who looked forward to their newest adventure with Edith as the leader!

    Reply
  260. Edith Layton gave me mental holidays when I needed them most. I cared for my mother in our home (dementia) till she had to be moved to an assisted care home.
    Edith’s books filled with vibrant warm people gave me the mental vacation I so badly needed.
    My sympathy goes out to her family and to her other fans.
    She will be missed by readers who looked forward to their newest adventure with Edith as the leader!

    Reply
  261. I remember meeting Edith in New York in 2003 and being starstruck (she wrote one of my all time favorites), then charmed. She was a witty and wonderful lady. I feel blessed for having met her.

    Reply
  262. I remember meeting Edith in New York in 2003 and being starstruck (she wrote one of my all time favorites), then charmed. She was a witty and wonderful lady. I feel blessed for having met her.

    Reply
  263. I remember meeting Edith in New York in 2003 and being starstruck (she wrote one of my all time favorites), then charmed. She was a witty and wonderful lady. I feel blessed for having met her.

    Reply
  264. I remember meeting Edith in New York in 2003 and being starstruck (she wrote one of my all time favorites), then charmed. She was a witty and wonderful lady. I feel blessed for having met her.

    Reply
  265. I remember meeting Edith in New York in 2003 and being starstruck (she wrote one of my all time favorites), then charmed. She was a witty and wonderful lady. I feel blessed for having met her.

    Reply
  266. I never had the chance to meet Edith, but I’ve read many of her books. She was one of those authors I sought to read and learn from long before I was published. My sympathies go out to her family and friends.

    Reply
  267. I never had the chance to meet Edith, but I’ve read many of her books. She was one of those authors I sought to read and learn from long before I was published. My sympathies go out to her family and friends.

    Reply
  268. I never had the chance to meet Edith, but I’ve read many of her books. She was one of those authors I sought to read and learn from long before I was published. My sympathies go out to her family and friends.

    Reply
  269. I never had the chance to meet Edith, but I’ve read many of her books. She was one of those authors I sought to read and learn from long before I was published. My sympathies go out to her family and friends.

    Reply
  270. I never had the chance to meet Edith, but I’ve read many of her books. She was one of those authors I sought to read and learn from long before I was published. My sympathies go out to her family and friends.

    Reply
  271. I was totally shocked to hear of this sad news – I had no idea she was ill. My sincere sympathies to all her family and friends.

    Reply
  272. I was totally shocked to hear of this sad news – I had no idea she was ill. My sincere sympathies to all her family and friends.

    Reply
  273. I was totally shocked to hear of this sad news – I had no idea she was ill. My sincere sympathies to all her family and friends.

    Reply
  274. I was totally shocked to hear of this sad news – I had no idea she was ill. My sincere sympathies to all her family and friends.

    Reply
  275. I was totally shocked to hear of this sad news – I had no idea she was ill. My sincere sympathies to all her family and friends.

    Reply
  276. Edith Layton was to me the consummate romance writer. To this day when I’m asked about “conversion books,” the first one I suggest is THE CRIMSON CROWN. Her books hold an honored place on a very small shelf of HOLD ON TO FOREVER books.
    I’m so sad she won’t be adding to that collection but so happy she blessed the romance world with as many stories as she did.

    Reply
  277. Edith Layton was to me the consummate romance writer. To this day when I’m asked about “conversion books,” the first one I suggest is THE CRIMSON CROWN. Her books hold an honored place on a very small shelf of HOLD ON TO FOREVER books.
    I’m so sad she won’t be adding to that collection but so happy she blessed the romance world with as many stories as she did.

    Reply
  278. Edith Layton was to me the consummate romance writer. To this day when I’m asked about “conversion books,” the first one I suggest is THE CRIMSON CROWN. Her books hold an honored place on a very small shelf of HOLD ON TO FOREVER books.
    I’m so sad she won’t be adding to that collection but so happy she blessed the romance world with as many stories as she did.

    Reply
  279. Edith Layton was to me the consummate romance writer. To this day when I’m asked about “conversion books,” the first one I suggest is THE CRIMSON CROWN. Her books hold an honored place on a very small shelf of HOLD ON TO FOREVER books.
    I’m so sad she won’t be adding to that collection but so happy she blessed the romance world with as many stories as she did.

    Reply
  280. Edith Layton was to me the consummate romance writer. To this day when I’m asked about “conversion books,” the first one I suggest is THE CRIMSON CROWN. Her books hold an honored place on a very small shelf of HOLD ON TO FOREVER books.
    I’m so sad she won’t be adding to that collection but so happy she blessed the romance world with as many stories as she did.

    Reply
  281. When I first started reading Regencies, I enjoyed them, but, when I read my first Edith Layton, I knew I had found something different! They were never run-of-the-mill and involved my feelings so much that I almost do feel that I had met her. She earned extra stars in my rating system and placed on my list of top 10 books. I will miss her so!
    Rest in Peace, dear Edith!

    Reply
  282. When I first started reading Regencies, I enjoyed them, but, when I read my first Edith Layton, I knew I had found something different! They were never run-of-the-mill and involved my feelings so much that I almost do feel that I had met her. She earned extra stars in my rating system and placed on my list of top 10 books. I will miss her so!
    Rest in Peace, dear Edith!

    Reply
  283. When I first started reading Regencies, I enjoyed them, but, when I read my first Edith Layton, I knew I had found something different! They were never run-of-the-mill and involved my feelings so much that I almost do feel that I had met her. She earned extra stars in my rating system and placed on my list of top 10 books. I will miss her so!
    Rest in Peace, dear Edith!

    Reply
  284. When I first started reading Regencies, I enjoyed them, but, when I read my first Edith Layton, I knew I had found something different! They were never run-of-the-mill and involved my feelings so much that I almost do feel that I had met her. She earned extra stars in my rating system and placed on my list of top 10 books. I will miss her so!
    Rest in Peace, dear Edith!

    Reply
  285. When I first started reading Regencies, I enjoyed them, but, when I read my first Edith Layton, I knew I had found something different! They were never run-of-the-mill and involved my feelings so much that I almost do feel that I had met her. She earned extra stars in my rating system and placed on my list of top 10 books. I will miss her so!
    Rest in Peace, dear Edith!

    Reply
  286. When I was in graduate school both my roommate and my next door neighbor were in graduate writing programs and both were a little snarky about serious literature v. romance. I handed them a copy of “A Love for All Seasons”. it is one of the most intricately paced, tone conscious, intriguingly written romance novels in my vast collection. They both (somewhat grudgingly) read the book and were blown away. My sincerest compliments to Ms. Layton for being “writerly” and fun and interesting and being a master of her craft. She will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  287. When I was in graduate school both my roommate and my next door neighbor were in graduate writing programs and both were a little snarky about serious literature v. romance. I handed them a copy of “A Love for All Seasons”. it is one of the most intricately paced, tone conscious, intriguingly written romance novels in my vast collection. They both (somewhat grudgingly) read the book and were blown away. My sincerest compliments to Ms. Layton for being “writerly” and fun and interesting and being a master of her craft. She will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  288. When I was in graduate school both my roommate and my next door neighbor were in graduate writing programs and both were a little snarky about serious literature v. romance. I handed them a copy of “A Love for All Seasons”. it is one of the most intricately paced, tone conscious, intriguingly written romance novels in my vast collection. They both (somewhat grudgingly) read the book and were blown away. My sincerest compliments to Ms. Layton for being “writerly” and fun and interesting and being a master of her craft. She will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  289. When I was in graduate school both my roommate and my next door neighbor were in graduate writing programs and both were a little snarky about serious literature v. romance. I handed them a copy of “A Love for All Seasons”. it is one of the most intricately paced, tone conscious, intriguingly written romance novels in my vast collection. They both (somewhat grudgingly) read the book and were blown away. My sincerest compliments to Ms. Layton for being “writerly” and fun and interesting and being a master of her craft. She will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  290. When I was in graduate school both my roommate and my next door neighbor were in graduate writing programs and both were a little snarky about serious literature v. romance. I handed them a copy of “A Love for All Seasons”. it is one of the most intricately paced, tone conscious, intriguingly written romance novels in my vast collection. They both (somewhat grudgingly) read the book and were blown away. My sincerest compliments to Ms. Layton for being “writerly” and fun and interesting and being a master of her craft. She will be sorely missed.

    Reply
  291. Definitely saddened to hear of Edith’s passing; my heart goes out to her friends and family. How many wonderful, fabulous hours of love and enjoyment I’ve received reading her Regency stories, especially her Christmas novellas. Thank you Edith, for sharing yourself through the wonderful medium of print. Larissa

    Reply
  292. Definitely saddened to hear of Edith’s passing; my heart goes out to her friends and family. How many wonderful, fabulous hours of love and enjoyment I’ve received reading her Regency stories, especially her Christmas novellas. Thank you Edith, for sharing yourself through the wonderful medium of print. Larissa

    Reply
  293. Definitely saddened to hear of Edith’s passing; my heart goes out to her friends and family. How many wonderful, fabulous hours of love and enjoyment I’ve received reading her Regency stories, especially her Christmas novellas. Thank you Edith, for sharing yourself through the wonderful medium of print. Larissa

    Reply
  294. Definitely saddened to hear of Edith’s passing; my heart goes out to her friends and family. How many wonderful, fabulous hours of love and enjoyment I’ve received reading her Regency stories, especially her Christmas novellas. Thank you Edith, for sharing yourself through the wonderful medium of print. Larissa

    Reply
  295. Definitely saddened to hear of Edith’s passing; my heart goes out to her friends and family. How many wonderful, fabulous hours of love and enjoyment I’ve received reading her Regency stories, especially her Christmas novellas. Thank you Edith, for sharing yourself through the wonderful medium of print. Larissa

    Reply
  296. I have been a fan of Regency for so long. Even when I am on other genre kicks, nothing works for me like a Regency does to lift my mood. Edith Layton was one of my very favority authors. I am sad at the loss of her talent in my world and my condolences to her family and friends at the loss of her amazing spirit in theirs.
    She made such a difference in my life with her books. Thank you for lending her to us.

    Reply
  297. I have been a fan of Regency for so long. Even when I am on other genre kicks, nothing works for me like a Regency does to lift my mood. Edith Layton was one of my very favority authors. I am sad at the loss of her talent in my world and my condolences to her family and friends at the loss of her amazing spirit in theirs.
    She made such a difference in my life with her books. Thank you for lending her to us.

    Reply
  298. I have been a fan of Regency for so long. Even when I am on other genre kicks, nothing works for me like a Regency does to lift my mood. Edith Layton was one of my very favority authors. I am sad at the loss of her talent in my world and my condolences to her family and friends at the loss of her amazing spirit in theirs.
    She made such a difference in my life with her books. Thank you for lending her to us.

    Reply
  299. I have been a fan of Regency for so long. Even when I am on other genre kicks, nothing works for me like a Regency does to lift my mood. Edith Layton was one of my very favority authors. I am sad at the loss of her talent in my world and my condolences to her family and friends at the loss of her amazing spirit in theirs.
    She made such a difference in my life with her books. Thank you for lending her to us.

    Reply
  300. I have been a fan of Regency for so long. Even when I am on other genre kicks, nothing works for me like a Regency does to lift my mood. Edith Layton was one of my very favority authors. I am sad at the loss of her talent in my world and my condolences to her family and friends at the loss of her amazing spirit in theirs.
    She made such a difference in my life with her books. Thank you for lending her to us.

    Reply
  301. I’ve known Edith online, through the Romance Readers Anonymous loop, for a long time and always enjoyed her wit and wisdom. And I adored her books. I will miss both.

    Reply
  302. I’ve known Edith online, through the Romance Readers Anonymous loop, for a long time and always enjoyed her wit and wisdom. And I adored her books. I will miss both.

    Reply
  303. I’ve known Edith online, through the Romance Readers Anonymous loop, for a long time and always enjoyed her wit and wisdom. And I adored her books. I will miss both.

    Reply
  304. I’ve known Edith online, through the Romance Readers Anonymous loop, for a long time and always enjoyed her wit and wisdom. And I adored her books. I will miss both.

    Reply
  305. I’ve known Edith online, through the Romance Readers Anonymous loop, for a long time and always enjoyed her wit and wisdom. And I adored her books. I will miss both.

    Reply
  306. I wrote my first author email as a fan to Edith. She posted a comment on the original RRA list that inspired me to write and tell her how The Game of Love and its hero, the Shakespeare-quoting Arden Lyons, became a kind of talisman for me as I read my romances amid the taunts of my grad-school classmates. Her response was generous and gracious, qualities I learned were characteristic of her. I am glad that I will continue to hear her voice in all the Layton keepers on my bookshelves. The world was brighter and better for her presence. My condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  307. I wrote my first author email as a fan to Edith. She posted a comment on the original RRA list that inspired me to write and tell her how The Game of Love and its hero, the Shakespeare-quoting Arden Lyons, became a kind of talisman for me as I read my romances amid the taunts of my grad-school classmates. Her response was generous and gracious, qualities I learned were characteristic of her. I am glad that I will continue to hear her voice in all the Layton keepers on my bookshelves. The world was brighter and better for her presence. My condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  308. I wrote my first author email as a fan to Edith. She posted a comment on the original RRA list that inspired me to write and tell her how The Game of Love and its hero, the Shakespeare-quoting Arden Lyons, became a kind of talisman for me as I read my romances amid the taunts of my grad-school classmates. Her response was generous and gracious, qualities I learned were characteristic of her. I am glad that I will continue to hear her voice in all the Layton keepers on my bookshelves. The world was brighter and better for her presence. My condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  309. I wrote my first author email as a fan to Edith. She posted a comment on the original RRA list that inspired me to write and tell her how The Game of Love and its hero, the Shakespeare-quoting Arden Lyons, became a kind of talisman for me as I read my romances amid the taunts of my grad-school classmates. Her response was generous and gracious, qualities I learned were characteristic of her. I am glad that I will continue to hear her voice in all the Layton keepers on my bookshelves. The world was brighter and better for her presence. My condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  310. I wrote my first author email as a fan to Edith. She posted a comment on the original RRA list that inspired me to write and tell her how The Game of Love and its hero, the Shakespeare-quoting Arden Lyons, became a kind of talisman for me as I read my romances amid the taunts of my grad-school classmates. Her response was generous and gracious, qualities I learned were characteristic of her. I am glad that I will continue to hear her voice in all the Layton keepers on my bookshelves. The world was brighter and better for her presence. My condolences to her family and friends.

    Reply
  311. I’m so saddened by this. She was a wonderful author, with a huge spot on my keeper shelves. I think it’s amazing that she was going through this for years and still managed to keep writing. So many authors just drop out of sight. She must have been so strong and determined.

    Reply
  312. I’m so saddened by this. She was a wonderful author, with a huge spot on my keeper shelves. I think it’s amazing that she was going through this for years and still managed to keep writing. So many authors just drop out of sight. She must have been so strong and determined.

    Reply
  313. I’m so saddened by this. She was a wonderful author, with a huge spot on my keeper shelves. I think it’s amazing that she was going through this for years and still managed to keep writing. So many authors just drop out of sight. She must have been so strong and determined.

    Reply
  314. I’m so saddened by this. She was a wonderful author, with a huge spot on my keeper shelves. I think it’s amazing that she was going through this for years and still managed to keep writing. So many authors just drop out of sight. She must have been so strong and determined.

    Reply
  315. I’m so saddened by this. She was a wonderful author, with a huge spot on my keeper shelves. I think it’s amazing that she was going through this for years and still managed to keep writing. So many authors just drop out of sight. She must have been so strong and determined.

    Reply
  316. I’m personally saddened by this news. Edith has given me many hours of wonderful reading and I’ll miss her fabulous stories. My deepest condolences to her family.

    Reply
  317. I’m personally saddened by this news. Edith has given me many hours of wonderful reading and I’ll miss her fabulous stories. My deepest condolences to her family.

    Reply
  318. I’m personally saddened by this news. Edith has given me many hours of wonderful reading and I’ll miss her fabulous stories. My deepest condolences to her family.

    Reply
  319. I’m personally saddened by this news. Edith has given me many hours of wonderful reading and I’ll miss her fabulous stories. My deepest condolences to her family.

    Reply
  320. I’m personally saddened by this news. Edith has given me many hours of wonderful reading and I’ll miss her fabulous stories. My deepest condolences to her family.

    Reply
  321. I had the opportunity to meet Edith at a Long Island RWA luncheon and was in such awe of meeting someone whose work I admired so much, that I could not think of a thing to say to her! She was funny and talked to me anyway…
    My sincere condolences to her family — she will be missed by some many readers and writers but her work will stand for her.
    T

    Reply
  322. I had the opportunity to meet Edith at a Long Island RWA luncheon and was in such awe of meeting someone whose work I admired so much, that I could not think of a thing to say to her! She was funny and talked to me anyway…
    My sincere condolences to her family — she will be missed by some many readers and writers but her work will stand for her.
    T

    Reply
  323. I had the opportunity to meet Edith at a Long Island RWA luncheon and was in such awe of meeting someone whose work I admired so much, that I could not think of a thing to say to her! She was funny and talked to me anyway…
    My sincere condolences to her family — she will be missed by some many readers and writers but her work will stand for her.
    T

    Reply
  324. I had the opportunity to meet Edith at a Long Island RWA luncheon and was in such awe of meeting someone whose work I admired so much, that I could not think of a thing to say to her! She was funny and talked to me anyway…
    My sincere condolences to her family — she will be missed by some many readers and writers but her work will stand for her.
    T

    Reply
  325. I had the opportunity to meet Edith at a Long Island RWA luncheon and was in such awe of meeting someone whose work I admired so much, that I could not think of a thing to say to her! She was funny and talked to me anyway…
    My sincere condolences to her family — she will be missed by some many readers and writers but her work will stand for her.
    T

    Reply
  326. I am very sorry for your loss. I loved Edith’s books, she reminded me a lot of Amanda Quick. She will be missed. Cancer is a terrible Disease, I should know as everyone from my Father to my Aunts and Cousins have passed from this disease. I am pleased to be a member of her readers.
    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Breisblatt Delio

    Reply
  327. I am very sorry for your loss. I loved Edith’s books, she reminded me a lot of Amanda Quick. She will be missed. Cancer is a terrible Disease, I should know as everyone from my Father to my Aunts and Cousins have passed from this disease. I am pleased to be a member of her readers.
    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Breisblatt Delio

    Reply
  328. I am very sorry for your loss. I loved Edith’s books, she reminded me a lot of Amanda Quick. She will be missed. Cancer is a terrible Disease, I should know as everyone from my Father to my Aunts and Cousins have passed from this disease. I am pleased to be a member of her readers.
    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Breisblatt Delio

    Reply
  329. I am very sorry for your loss. I loved Edith’s books, she reminded me a lot of Amanda Quick. She will be missed. Cancer is a terrible Disease, I should know as everyone from my Father to my Aunts and Cousins have passed from this disease. I am pleased to be a member of her readers.
    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Breisblatt Delio

    Reply
  330. I am very sorry for your loss. I loved Edith’s books, she reminded me a lot of Amanda Quick. She will be missed. Cancer is a terrible Disease, I should know as everyone from my Father to my Aunts and Cousins have passed from this disease. I am pleased to be a member of her readers.
    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Breisblatt Delio

    Reply
  331. It’s always very sad when the amount of imagination flying free through the world is reduced. My very sincere sympathies.

    Reply
  332. It’s always very sad when the amount of imagination flying free through the world is reduced. My very sincere sympathies.

    Reply
  333. It’s always very sad when the amount of imagination flying free through the world is reduced. My very sincere sympathies.

    Reply
  334. It’s always very sad when the amount of imagination flying free through the world is reduced. My very sincere sympathies.

    Reply
  335. It’s always very sad when the amount of imagination flying free through the world is reduced. My very sincere sympathies.

    Reply
  336. My thoughts and prayers are with her family. Edith hooked me with the first book of hers I ever read, and I went out and bought every one I could find from that day to this. She was a wonderful person and writer, and we will all miss her.

    Reply
  337. My thoughts and prayers are with her family. Edith hooked me with the first book of hers I ever read, and I went out and bought every one I could find from that day to this. She was a wonderful person and writer, and we will all miss her.

    Reply
  338. My thoughts and prayers are with her family. Edith hooked me with the first book of hers I ever read, and I went out and bought every one I could find from that day to this. She was a wonderful person and writer, and we will all miss her.

    Reply
  339. My thoughts and prayers are with her family. Edith hooked me with the first book of hers I ever read, and I went out and bought every one I could find from that day to this. She was a wonderful person and writer, and we will all miss her.

    Reply
  340. My thoughts and prayers are with her family. Edith hooked me with the first book of hers I ever read, and I went out and bought every one I could find from that day to this. She was a wonderful person and writer, and we will all miss her.

    Reply
  341. Oh, that’s so sad! What a tragic loss not just for Edith’s adored family but for our writing community and her many readers.
    Having always had shelter mutts, I loved hearing her dog stories. (During the time I was living, horribly seasonally deprived, in Phoenix, tales of Abraham in the snow especially made me laugh.)
    A shining light might have been snuffed out here on earth, but its brilliance is now brightening up the heavens.

    Reply
  342. Oh, that’s so sad! What a tragic loss not just for Edith’s adored family but for our writing community and her many readers.
    Having always had shelter mutts, I loved hearing her dog stories. (During the time I was living, horribly seasonally deprived, in Phoenix, tales of Abraham in the snow especially made me laugh.)
    A shining light might have been snuffed out here on earth, but its brilliance is now brightening up the heavens.

    Reply
  343. Oh, that’s so sad! What a tragic loss not just for Edith’s adored family but for our writing community and her many readers.
    Having always had shelter mutts, I loved hearing her dog stories. (During the time I was living, horribly seasonally deprived, in Phoenix, tales of Abraham in the snow especially made me laugh.)
    A shining light might have been snuffed out here on earth, but its brilliance is now brightening up the heavens.

    Reply
  344. Oh, that’s so sad! What a tragic loss not just for Edith’s adored family but for our writing community and her many readers.
    Having always had shelter mutts, I loved hearing her dog stories. (During the time I was living, horribly seasonally deprived, in Phoenix, tales of Abraham in the snow especially made me laugh.)
    A shining light might have been snuffed out here on earth, but its brilliance is now brightening up the heavens.

    Reply
  345. Oh, that’s so sad! What a tragic loss not just for Edith’s adored family but for our writing community and her many readers.
    Having always had shelter mutts, I loved hearing her dog stories. (During the time I was living, horribly seasonally deprived, in Phoenix, tales of Abraham in the snow especially made me laugh.)
    A shining light might have been snuffed out here on earth, but its brilliance is now brightening up the heavens.

    Reply
  346. I knew Edith through the writer’s loop that Mary Jo posted from above. She was incredibly witty and smart and impressed me with her irascible sense of fairness and humor. She was so proud of her children! Every time I listen to Adam on Wait, Wait, I think of Edith…now even moreso. She will not be forgotten. Her books are on keeper’s shelves everywhere. God bless her and to her family, I’m so sorry for your loss.

    Reply
  347. I knew Edith through the writer’s loop that Mary Jo posted from above. She was incredibly witty and smart and impressed me with her irascible sense of fairness and humor. She was so proud of her children! Every time I listen to Adam on Wait, Wait, I think of Edith…now even moreso. She will not be forgotten. Her books are on keeper’s shelves everywhere. God bless her and to her family, I’m so sorry for your loss.

    Reply
  348. I knew Edith through the writer’s loop that Mary Jo posted from above. She was incredibly witty and smart and impressed me with her irascible sense of fairness and humor. She was so proud of her children! Every time I listen to Adam on Wait, Wait, I think of Edith…now even moreso. She will not be forgotten. Her books are on keeper’s shelves everywhere. God bless her and to her family, I’m so sorry for your loss.

    Reply
  349. I knew Edith through the writer’s loop that Mary Jo posted from above. She was incredibly witty and smart and impressed me with her irascible sense of fairness and humor. She was so proud of her children! Every time I listen to Adam on Wait, Wait, I think of Edith…now even moreso. She will not be forgotten. Her books are on keeper’s shelves everywhere. God bless her and to her family, I’m so sorry for your loss.

    Reply
  350. I knew Edith through the writer’s loop that Mary Jo posted from above. She was incredibly witty and smart and impressed me with her irascible sense of fairness and humor. She was so proud of her children! Every time I listen to Adam on Wait, Wait, I think of Edith…now even moreso. She will not be forgotten. Her books are on keeper’s shelves everywhere. God bless her and to her family, I’m so sorry for your loss.

    Reply
  351. I am an Italian reader woman. I have just readed my first book of Mrs Edith Layton “For the Love of a Pirate (Pirata e gentiluomo).Today I have read of Edith’s death.Im sure that other italian fan are as me sorry for Edith’s passing away.
    My condolences to the Layton family
    Fortuna Patrizia

    Reply
  352. I am an Italian reader woman. I have just readed my first book of Mrs Edith Layton “For the Love of a Pirate (Pirata e gentiluomo).Today I have read of Edith’s death.Im sure that other italian fan are as me sorry for Edith’s passing away.
    My condolences to the Layton family
    Fortuna Patrizia

    Reply
  353. I am an Italian reader woman. I have just readed my first book of Mrs Edith Layton “For the Love of a Pirate (Pirata e gentiluomo).Today I have read of Edith’s death.Im sure that other italian fan are as me sorry for Edith’s passing away.
    My condolences to the Layton family
    Fortuna Patrizia

    Reply
  354. I am an Italian reader woman. I have just readed my first book of Mrs Edith Layton “For the Love of a Pirate (Pirata e gentiluomo).Today I have read of Edith’s death.Im sure that other italian fan are as me sorry for Edith’s passing away.
    My condolences to the Layton family
    Fortuna Patrizia

    Reply
  355. I am an Italian reader woman. I have just readed my first book of Mrs Edith Layton “For the Love of a Pirate (Pirata e gentiluomo).Today I have read of Edith’s death.Im sure that other italian fan are as me sorry for Edith’s passing away.
    My condolences to the Layton family
    Fortuna Patrizia

    Reply
  356. Edith Layton was one of the very first historical romance writers that I read. I always looked forward to her novels.She will be greatly missed by our world.

    Reply
  357. Edith Layton was one of the very first historical romance writers that I read. I always looked forward to her novels.She will be greatly missed by our world.

    Reply
  358. Edith Layton was one of the very first historical romance writers that I read. I always looked forward to her novels.She will be greatly missed by our world.

    Reply
  359. Edith Layton was one of the very first historical romance writers that I read. I always looked forward to her novels.She will be greatly missed by our world.

    Reply
  360. Edith Layton was one of the very first historical romance writers that I read. I always looked forward to her novels.She will be greatly missed by our world.

    Reply
  361. Such sad news. Edith was gracious when I wrote her fawning fan letters, friendly and fun when I stepped into the Signet circle.
    Love in Disguise is the book that introduced me to the regency genre, and inspired me to write my own. She will always have a place in my heart.

    Reply
  362. Such sad news. Edith was gracious when I wrote her fawning fan letters, friendly and fun when I stepped into the Signet circle.
    Love in Disguise is the book that introduced me to the regency genre, and inspired me to write my own. She will always have a place in my heart.

    Reply
  363. Such sad news. Edith was gracious when I wrote her fawning fan letters, friendly and fun when I stepped into the Signet circle.
    Love in Disguise is the book that introduced me to the regency genre, and inspired me to write my own. She will always have a place in my heart.

    Reply
  364. Such sad news. Edith was gracious when I wrote her fawning fan letters, friendly and fun when I stepped into the Signet circle.
    Love in Disguise is the book that introduced me to the regency genre, and inspired me to write my own. She will always have a place in my heart.

    Reply
  365. Such sad news. Edith was gracious when I wrote her fawning fan letters, friendly and fun when I stepped into the Signet circle.
    Love in Disguise is the book that introduced me to the regency genre, and inspired me to write my own. She will always have a place in my heart.

    Reply
  366. I first read Mme. Layton in the early 80s, with The Duke’s Wager. As I was finishing all of Heyer’s books at the time, she was one of the authors that made me realize there was more for me in romance! I’ll always be grateful for that.
    It’s this simple: she will be missed.

    Reply
  367. I first read Mme. Layton in the early 80s, with The Duke’s Wager. As I was finishing all of Heyer’s books at the time, she was one of the authors that made me realize there was more for me in romance! I’ll always be grateful for that.
    It’s this simple: she will be missed.

    Reply
  368. I first read Mme. Layton in the early 80s, with The Duke’s Wager. As I was finishing all of Heyer’s books at the time, she was one of the authors that made me realize there was more for me in romance! I’ll always be grateful for that.
    It’s this simple: she will be missed.

    Reply
  369. I first read Mme. Layton in the early 80s, with The Duke’s Wager. As I was finishing all of Heyer’s books at the time, she was one of the authors that made me realize there was more for me in romance! I’ll always be grateful for that.
    It’s this simple: she will be missed.

    Reply
  370. I first read Mme. Layton in the early 80s, with The Duke’s Wager. As I was finishing all of Heyer’s books at the time, she was one of the authors that made me realize there was more for me in romance! I’ll always be grateful for that.
    It’s this simple: she will be missed.

    Reply
  371. I never met Edith but I feel I know her through her books. They reflected her love for family and friends, her wisdom and the warmth of her demeanor, and her courage. I feel a tremendous loss knowing that I have read her last new book. My condolences to her family and friends who are suffering at her loss.

    Reply
  372. I never met Edith but I feel I know her through her books. They reflected her love for family and friends, her wisdom and the warmth of her demeanor, and her courage. I feel a tremendous loss knowing that I have read her last new book. My condolences to her family and friends who are suffering at her loss.

    Reply
  373. I never met Edith but I feel I know her through her books. They reflected her love for family and friends, her wisdom and the warmth of her demeanor, and her courage. I feel a tremendous loss knowing that I have read her last new book. My condolences to her family and friends who are suffering at her loss.

    Reply
  374. I never met Edith but I feel I know her through her books. They reflected her love for family and friends, her wisdom and the warmth of her demeanor, and her courage. I feel a tremendous loss knowing that I have read her last new book. My condolences to her family and friends who are suffering at her loss.

    Reply
  375. I never met Edith but I feel I know her through her books. They reflected her love for family and friends, her wisdom and the warmth of her demeanor, and her courage. I feel a tremendous loss knowing that I have read her last new book. My condolences to her family and friends who are suffering at her loss.

    Reply
  376. How I enjoyed coming to know Edith through her books and through this blog. She was, and is, such a bright spirit. I am grateful for her voice, her humor, and her vision of love. Susie and all the Felber family–thank you for sharing your Mom with us. We loved her.
    Melinda

    Reply
  377. How I enjoyed coming to know Edith through her books and through this blog. She was, and is, such a bright spirit. I am grateful for her voice, her humor, and her vision of love. Susie and all the Felber family–thank you for sharing your Mom with us. We loved her.
    Melinda

    Reply
  378. How I enjoyed coming to know Edith through her books and through this blog. She was, and is, such a bright spirit. I am grateful for her voice, her humor, and her vision of love. Susie and all the Felber family–thank you for sharing your Mom with us. We loved her.
    Melinda

    Reply
  379. How I enjoyed coming to know Edith through her books and through this blog. She was, and is, such a bright spirit. I am grateful for her voice, her humor, and her vision of love. Susie and all the Felber family–thank you for sharing your Mom with us. We loved her.
    Melinda

    Reply
  380. How I enjoyed coming to know Edith through her books and through this blog. She was, and is, such a bright spirit. I am grateful for her voice, her humor, and her vision of love. Susie and all the Felber family–thank you for sharing your Mom with us. We loved her.
    Melinda

    Reply
  381. I met Edith Layton years ago at the only RWA conference I ever attended. It was a real thrill to meet one of my favorite authors, but I can’t really say I was in awe of her; we talked and laughed like old friends.
    I have almost every book she has written over a period of many years and I cannot think of one that didn’t live up to my expectations. She was a great writer and will be sorely missed.
    With sincere sympathy to the Felber family.

    Reply
  382. I met Edith Layton years ago at the only RWA conference I ever attended. It was a real thrill to meet one of my favorite authors, but I can’t really say I was in awe of her; we talked and laughed like old friends.
    I have almost every book she has written over a period of many years and I cannot think of one that didn’t live up to my expectations. She was a great writer and will be sorely missed.
    With sincere sympathy to the Felber family.

    Reply
  383. I met Edith Layton years ago at the only RWA conference I ever attended. It was a real thrill to meet one of my favorite authors, but I can’t really say I was in awe of her; we talked and laughed like old friends.
    I have almost every book she has written over a period of many years and I cannot think of one that didn’t live up to my expectations. She was a great writer and will be sorely missed.
    With sincere sympathy to the Felber family.

    Reply
  384. I met Edith Layton years ago at the only RWA conference I ever attended. It was a real thrill to meet one of my favorite authors, but I can’t really say I was in awe of her; we talked and laughed like old friends.
    I have almost every book she has written over a period of many years and I cannot think of one that didn’t live up to my expectations. She was a great writer and will be sorely missed.
    With sincere sympathy to the Felber family.

    Reply
  385. I met Edith Layton years ago at the only RWA conference I ever attended. It was a real thrill to meet one of my favorite authors, but I can’t really say I was in awe of her; we talked and laughed like old friends.
    I have almost every book she has written over a period of many years and I cannot think of one that didn’t live up to my expectations. She was a great writer and will be sorely missed.
    With sincere sympathy to the Felber family.

    Reply
  386. I know she will be missed, I wish I could have been able to let her know how much enjoyment her books have given me.

    Reply
  387. I know she will be missed, I wish I could have been able to let her know how much enjoyment her books have given me.

    Reply
  388. I know she will be missed, I wish I could have been able to let her know how much enjoyment her books have given me.

    Reply
  389. I know she will be missed, I wish I could have been able to let her know how much enjoyment her books have given me.

    Reply
  390. I know she will be missed, I wish I could have been able to let her know how much enjoyment her books have given me.

    Reply
  391. So very sorry to hear about Ms. Layotn. Her books were among my favorites and I have kept many of them. My sympathies to her family. I will miss her books very much as i am sure people who knew her will miss her.

    Reply
  392. So very sorry to hear about Ms. Layotn. Her books were among my favorites and I have kept many of them. My sympathies to her family. I will miss her books very much as i am sure people who knew her will miss her.

    Reply
  393. So very sorry to hear about Ms. Layotn. Her books were among my favorites and I have kept many of them. My sympathies to her family. I will miss her books very much as i am sure people who knew her will miss her.

    Reply
  394. So very sorry to hear about Ms. Layotn. Her books were among my favorites and I have kept many of them. My sympathies to her family. I will miss her books very much as i am sure people who knew her will miss her.

    Reply
  395. So very sorry to hear about Ms. Layotn. Her books were among my favorites and I have kept many of them. My sympathies to her family. I will miss her books very much as i am sure people who knew her will miss her.

    Reply
  396. I knew her as “That Layton Woman” who sent wonderfully witty and amusing posts to the Regency list. I loved her books, especially the C series and I’ll miss her very much.
    Strange how someone who lived half a world away and who you’d never met can leave such a hole in your life.

    Reply
  397. I knew her as “That Layton Woman” who sent wonderfully witty and amusing posts to the Regency list. I loved her books, especially the C series and I’ll miss her very much.
    Strange how someone who lived half a world away and who you’d never met can leave such a hole in your life.

    Reply
  398. I knew her as “That Layton Woman” who sent wonderfully witty and amusing posts to the Regency list. I loved her books, especially the C series and I’ll miss her very much.
    Strange how someone who lived half a world away and who you’d never met can leave such a hole in your life.

    Reply
  399. I knew her as “That Layton Woman” who sent wonderfully witty and amusing posts to the Regency list. I loved her books, especially the C series and I’ll miss her very much.
    Strange how someone who lived half a world away and who you’d never met can leave such a hole in your life.

    Reply
  400. I knew her as “That Layton Woman” who sent wonderfully witty and amusing posts to the Regency list. I loved her books, especially the C series and I’ll miss her very much.
    Strange how someone who lived half a world away and who you’d never met can leave such a hole in your life.

    Reply
  401. Thank you to everyone who has taken time to post these wonderful tributes to Edith. And you know she would have been thrilled herself to see this!!
    We’ll make sure that her family receives the tribute post and all the comments, so please keep them coming!
    the Wenches

    Reply
  402. Thank you to everyone who has taken time to post these wonderful tributes to Edith. And you know she would have been thrilled herself to see this!!
    We’ll make sure that her family receives the tribute post and all the comments, so please keep them coming!
    the Wenches

    Reply