Ruined Castles Tour Part 1

Christina and NicolaNicola here. On one of the last hot days of August, Wench Christina and I met up for a mini-Wench get together at Goodrich Castle, on the border of Wales and England. It was one of my first trips out after Lockdown and such a treat to be able to visit a historic site and even better to be able to chat about history and writing with a fellow Wench!

Goodrich is one of the finest and best-preserved of all English medieval castles but it isn’t very well known. We approached it the way that visitors would have done in the medieval period, on a path along a deep cutting in the rock. Here, the guidebook tells you, you could admire the red sandstone tower and the green stone of the keep – whilst being in range of the bowmen stationed on the roof (fortunately not a feature of a 21st century castle!)

The castle at Goodrich was built in the 11th century although it’s probable that there was an earlier fortification on the site, Goodrich1“Godric’s castle” which gave its name to the Goodrich. It guarded one of the few safe crossings of the River Wye and held a strategic position on the English/Welsh border. For a while was the home of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, who was known as “Strongbow.” A little-known fact is that the popular English brand of cider called Strongbow was named after him. This is the sort of factoid I love!  Two hundred years down the line, though, the castle was no longer considered comfortable enough for the de Valence family, who had inherited it, and so they created a palatial “modern” home within the shell of the old walls. Many of the rooms in the towers and around the courtyard had fireplaces, window seats, wash basins and latrines – the height of luxury! The castle even has a “garderobe tower” providing latrines for the convenience of the whole household, although we would all probably shy away from the communal arrangements these days!

Goodrich-castle-solar-blockThe account books of Joan, Countess of Pembroke (known as the Lady of Swanscombe) at the end of the 13th century throw some light on the sort of costs that went into the upkeep of the castle and the people who lived there. In November 1296, 114 pounds of wax for candles cost four pounds, five shillings and sixpence. Two pence was spent on wooden frames for the Countess’s fourposter bed! The household included several coachmen, chaplains, clerks, an usher, a herald and a laundress. There is a history of notable women at Goodrich Castle; in the Tudor period it belonged to the Earls of Shrewsbury and one of the daughters of Bess of Hardwick lived there.

We climbed to the top of the Keep tower (with difficulty, it was one of the narrowest and darkest spiral staircases either of us have Download (6) ever tackled!) and the views from the top were very impressive. You would certainly see the enemy coming and the natural advantage of being on a rocky outcrop with a river and moat below would make the castle very difficult to attack.

Like many other castles in Herefordshire, Goodrich saw plenty of action in the English Civil War. Originally it was garrisoned with parliamentarian troops in 1642 but the Royalists took it in 1644 and it became the centre of Royalist activity in the region under Sir Henry Lingen who was stationed there with 120 soldiers and 50 officers. The castle must have been quite packed! In March 1646 the parliamentarian commander Colonel John Birch stole all the royalists’ horses and torched the stables in something of a propaganda coup.

800px-RoaringMegFrontThree months later he besieged the castle, bringing in a cannon called “Roaring Meg” which finally brought down one of the towers and led to the garrison surrendering. Roaring Meg is the only mortar to have survived from the English Civil Wars and she is small but mighty!  She is on display in the courtyard.

After the Civil War, the castle was left in ruins. It then took on a different role as one of the SW_NPMAG_1981_35-001earliest tourist attractions. The Wye Valley was one of the first places in England to draw visitors as part of the Romantic Movement. “Observations on the River Wye” by William Gilpin was published in 1782 and started a trend for organised itineraries and guided tours. By the 19th century the ruins were enhanced by ivy, wild roses and a famous ash tree in the courtyard and intrepid visitors could use ladders to climb the keep, which makes our trip up the spiral staircase seem rather tame!

On Friday, Christina is going to take you on Part 2 of the Ruined Castles Tour! In the meantime our question is: Do you have a nickname, like Strongbow and Roaring Meg? And if you had lived in the medieval period, what do you think your nickname would have been? My family call me "Duchess" but I'm not sure why!

 

130 thoughts on “Ruined Castles Tour Part 1”

  1. I don’t have a nickname, and I can’t think of any special characteristics I have that would inspire a nickname. But I love “Strongbow”, it is a great name for a medieval hero!
    I also love castles of any type and I wish I could see this one.

    Reply
  2. I don’t have a nickname, and I can’t think of any special characteristics I have that would inspire a nickname. But I love “Strongbow”, it is a great name for a medieval hero!
    I also love castles of any type and I wish I could see this one.

    Reply
  3. I don’t have a nickname, and I can’t think of any special characteristics I have that would inspire a nickname. But I love “Strongbow”, it is a great name for a medieval hero!
    I also love castles of any type and I wish I could see this one.

    Reply
  4. I don’t have a nickname, and I can’t think of any special characteristics I have that would inspire a nickname. But I love “Strongbow”, it is a great name for a medieval hero!
    I also love castles of any type and I wish I could see this one.

    Reply
  5. I don’t have a nickname, and I can’t think of any special characteristics I have that would inspire a nickname. But I love “Strongbow”, it is a great name for a medieval hero!
    I also love castles of any type and I wish I could see this one.

    Reply
  6. When I was little, my brother called me “Toots” but do not think it would go over for a nickname in medieval times! How fortunate you are to live in a country and be able to visit places like this, I envy you!

    Reply
  7. When I was little, my brother called me “Toots” but do not think it would go over for a nickname in medieval times! How fortunate you are to live in a country and be able to visit places like this, I envy you!

    Reply
  8. When I was little, my brother called me “Toots” but do not think it would go over for a nickname in medieval times! How fortunate you are to live in a country and be able to visit places like this, I envy you!

    Reply
  9. When I was little, my brother called me “Toots” but do not think it would go over for a nickname in medieval times! How fortunate you are to live in a country and be able to visit places like this, I envy you!

    Reply
  10. When I was little, my brother called me “Toots” but do not think it would go over for a nickname in medieval times! How fortunate you are to live in a country and be able to visit places like this, I envy you!

    Reply
  11. I just love the tours you ladies take us on – so interesting! Interesting also is the fact that they were giving their weapons nicknames back then. I know that in WWII fighter planes were given names. Memphis Belle is the first one that comes to mind.
    The only nickname that I was ever given was “Mollie Darlin” which was given to me by my maternal grandmother. I think it was a nod to my Irish heritage. She was the only one who ever called me that though.
    Looking forward to Christina’s half of the tour.

    Reply
  12. I just love the tours you ladies take us on – so interesting! Interesting also is the fact that they were giving their weapons nicknames back then. I know that in WWII fighter planes were given names. Memphis Belle is the first one that comes to mind.
    The only nickname that I was ever given was “Mollie Darlin” which was given to me by my maternal grandmother. I think it was a nod to my Irish heritage. She was the only one who ever called me that though.
    Looking forward to Christina’s half of the tour.

    Reply
  13. I just love the tours you ladies take us on – so interesting! Interesting also is the fact that they were giving their weapons nicknames back then. I know that in WWII fighter planes were given names. Memphis Belle is the first one that comes to mind.
    The only nickname that I was ever given was “Mollie Darlin” which was given to me by my maternal grandmother. I think it was a nod to my Irish heritage. She was the only one who ever called me that though.
    Looking forward to Christina’s half of the tour.

    Reply
  14. I just love the tours you ladies take us on – so interesting! Interesting also is the fact that they were giving their weapons nicknames back then. I know that in WWII fighter planes were given names. Memphis Belle is the first one that comes to mind.
    The only nickname that I was ever given was “Mollie Darlin” which was given to me by my maternal grandmother. I think it was a nod to my Irish heritage. She was the only one who ever called me that though.
    Looking forward to Christina’s half of the tour.

    Reply
  15. I just love the tours you ladies take us on – so interesting! Interesting also is the fact that they were giving their weapons nicknames back then. I know that in WWII fighter planes were given names. Memphis Belle is the first one that comes to mind.
    The only nickname that I was ever given was “Mollie Darlin” which was given to me by my maternal grandmother. I think it was a nod to my Irish heritage. She was the only one who ever called me that though.
    Looking forward to Christina’s half of the tour.

    Reply
  16. I love your nickname, Nicola – far better than mine which was the Swedish equivalent of “four-eyes”! The only other thing I’ve ever been called is “Small” (in an affectionate way) which I suppose would do for medieval times 🙂 Although back then I would probably have been considered tall at five foot three!
    Goodrich was wonderful, wasn’t it! And we were very lucky with the weather.

    Reply
  17. I love your nickname, Nicola – far better than mine which was the Swedish equivalent of “four-eyes”! The only other thing I’ve ever been called is “Small” (in an affectionate way) which I suppose would do for medieval times 🙂 Although back then I would probably have been considered tall at five foot three!
    Goodrich was wonderful, wasn’t it! And we were very lucky with the weather.

    Reply
  18. I love your nickname, Nicola – far better than mine which was the Swedish equivalent of “four-eyes”! The only other thing I’ve ever been called is “Small” (in an affectionate way) which I suppose would do for medieval times 🙂 Although back then I would probably have been considered tall at five foot three!
    Goodrich was wonderful, wasn’t it! And we were very lucky with the weather.

    Reply
  19. I love your nickname, Nicola – far better than mine which was the Swedish equivalent of “four-eyes”! The only other thing I’ve ever been called is “Small” (in an affectionate way) which I suppose would do for medieval times 🙂 Although back then I would probably have been considered tall at five foot three!
    Goodrich was wonderful, wasn’t it! And we were very lucky with the weather.

    Reply
  20. I love your nickname, Nicola – far better than mine which was the Swedish equivalent of “four-eyes”! The only other thing I’ve ever been called is “Small” (in an affectionate way) which I suppose would do for medieval times 🙂 Although back then I would probably have been considered tall at five foot three!
    Goodrich was wonderful, wasn’t it! And we were very lucky with the weather.

    Reply
  21. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Now I’m looking forward to Christina’s post on Friday. I’ve had Strongbow cider and thought the name sounded medieval, but didn’t realize it was a particular person.
    I think you were called Duchess because of your natural classiness. *G* As for ‘Four Eyes” Christina, I’d qualify for that, too.
    The closest I’ve to a nickname is MJP, which is mostly a convenient shortening.

    Reply
  22. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Now I’m looking forward to Christina’s post on Friday. I’ve had Strongbow cider and thought the name sounded medieval, but didn’t realize it was a particular person.
    I think you were called Duchess because of your natural classiness. *G* As for ‘Four Eyes” Christina, I’d qualify for that, too.
    The closest I’ve to a nickname is MJP, which is mostly a convenient shortening.

    Reply
  23. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Now I’m looking forward to Christina’s post on Friday. I’ve had Strongbow cider and thought the name sounded medieval, but didn’t realize it was a particular person.
    I think you were called Duchess because of your natural classiness. *G* As for ‘Four Eyes” Christina, I’d qualify for that, too.
    The closest I’ve to a nickname is MJP, which is mostly a convenient shortening.

    Reply
  24. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Now I’m looking forward to Christina’s post on Friday. I’ve had Strongbow cider and thought the name sounded medieval, but didn’t realize it was a particular person.
    I think you were called Duchess because of your natural classiness. *G* As for ‘Four Eyes” Christina, I’d qualify for that, too.
    The closest I’ve to a nickname is MJP, which is mostly a convenient shortening.

    Reply
  25. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Now I’m looking forward to Christina’s post on Friday. I’ve had Strongbow cider and thought the name sounded medieval, but didn’t realize it was a particular person.
    I think you were called Duchess because of your natural classiness. *G* As for ‘Four Eyes” Christina, I’d qualify for that, too.
    The closest I’ve to a nickname is MJP, which is mostly a convenient shortening.

    Reply
  26. I’ve long been known as “Grace,” which was not/not a compliment. I was not coordinated. Still am not. I come down spiral stairs at an annoying slow pace. I’m always grateful if there are rooms where I can step out of the way to let speedy families go by.
    I want to get to Framlingham Castle, but it’s just not worked out. Maybe the gardens of Ightham Mote, a medieval fortified Manor House.

    Reply
  27. I’ve long been known as “Grace,” which was not/not a compliment. I was not coordinated. Still am not. I come down spiral stairs at an annoying slow pace. I’m always grateful if there are rooms where I can step out of the way to let speedy families go by.
    I want to get to Framlingham Castle, but it’s just not worked out. Maybe the gardens of Ightham Mote, a medieval fortified Manor House.

    Reply
  28. I’ve long been known as “Grace,” which was not/not a compliment. I was not coordinated. Still am not. I come down spiral stairs at an annoying slow pace. I’m always grateful if there are rooms where I can step out of the way to let speedy families go by.
    I want to get to Framlingham Castle, but it’s just not worked out. Maybe the gardens of Ightham Mote, a medieval fortified Manor House.

    Reply
  29. I’ve long been known as “Grace,” which was not/not a compliment. I was not coordinated. Still am not. I come down spiral stairs at an annoying slow pace. I’m always grateful if there are rooms where I can step out of the way to let speedy families go by.
    I want to get to Framlingham Castle, but it’s just not worked out. Maybe the gardens of Ightham Mote, a medieval fortified Manor House.

    Reply
  30. I’ve long been known as “Grace,” which was not/not a compliment. I was not coordinated. Still am not. I come down spiral stairs at an annoying slow pace. I’m always grateful if there are rooms where I can step out of the way to let speedy families go by.
    I want to get to Framlingham Castle, but it’s just not worked out. Maybe the gardens of Ightham Mote, a medieval fortified Manor House.

    Reply
  31. My middle name is Sue (a shortening of Susan); my mother called ne Suzy whenever she wanted me to do something; when he was about 6 my son noticed that and began to call me Suzy when HE wanted something, as a way of teasing his grandmother, who never noticed the tease.
    My husband and a fellow worker also called me Suzy, this time as a matter of affection.
    This is not the type of nickname you’re asking about, but it’s as close as I’ve ever come to a nickname.

    Reply
  32. My middle name is Sue (a shortening of Susan); my mother called ne Suzy whenever she wanted me to do something; when he was about 6 my son noticed that and began to call me Suzy when HE wanted something, as a way of teasing his grandmother, who never noticed the tease.
    My husband and a fellow worker also called me Suzy, this time as a matter of affection.
    This is not the type of nickname you’re asking about, but it’s as close as I’ve ever come to a nickname.

    Reply
  33. My middle name is Sue (a shortening of Susan); my mother called ne Suzy whenever she wanted me to do something; when he was about 6 my son noticed that and began to call me Suzy when HE wanted something, as a way of teasing his grandmother, who never noticed the tease.
    My husband and a fellow worker also called me Suzy, this time as a matter of affection.
    This is not the type of nickname you’re asking about, but it’s as close as I’ve ever come to a nickname.

    Reply
  34. My middle name is Sue (a shortening of Susan); my mother called ne Suzy whenever she wanted me to do something; when he was about 6 my son noticed that and began to call me Suzy when HE wanted something, as a way of teasing his grandmother, who never noticed the tease.
    My husband and a fellow worker also called me Suzy, this time as a matter of affection.
    This is not the type of nickname you’re asking about, but it’s as close as I’ve ever come to a nickname.

    Reply
  35. My middle name is Sue (a shortening of Susan); my mother called ne Suzy whenever she wanted me to do something; when he was about 6 my son noticed that and began to call me Suzy when HE wanted something, as a way of teasing his grandmother, who never noticed the tease.
    My husband and a fellow worker also called me Suzy, this time as a matter of affection.
    This is not the type of nickname you’re asking about, but it’s as close as I’ve ever come to a nickname.

    Reply
  36. How wonderful that you and Christina were able to meet in person, Nicola; thanks for sharing the experience with us.
    My first man-friend called me ‘la grande horizontale’ because I loved to recline (I still do!); it sounds like the name a courtesan might have and could likely have worked in medieval times!

    Reply
  37. How wonderful that you and Christina were able to meet in person, Nicola; thanks for sharing the experience with us.
    My first man-friend called me ‘la grande horizontale’ because I loved to recline (I still do!); it sounds like the name a courtesan might have and could likely have worked in medieval times!

    Reply
  38. How wonderful that you and Christina were able to meet in person, Nicola; thanks for sharing the experience with us.
    My first man-friend called me ‘la grande horizontale’ because I loved to recline (I still do!); it sounds like the name a courtesan might have and could likely have worked in medieval times!

    Reply
  39. How wonderful that you and Christina were able to meet in person, Nicola; thanks for sharing the experience with us.
    My first man-friend called me ‘la grande horizontale’ because I loved to recline (I still do!); it sounds like the name a courtesan might have and could likely have worked in medieval times!

    Reply
  40. How wonderful that you and Christina were able to meet in person, Nicola; thanks for sharing the experience with us.
    My first man-friend called me ‘la grande horizontale’ because I loved to recline (I still do!); it sounds like the name a courtesan might have and could likely have worked in medieval times!

    Reply
  41. I’m not coordinated either, Shannon – more like a total klutz! And I’ve been to Ightham Mote – it’s a fascinating place!

    Reply
  42. I’m not coordinated either, Shannon – more like a total klutz! And I’ve been to Ightham Mote – it’s a fascinating place!

    Reply
  43. I’m not coordinated either, Shannon – more like a total klutz! And I’ve been to Ightham Mote – it’s a fascinating place!

    Reply
  44. I’m not coordinated either, Shannon – more like a total klutz! And I’ve been to Ightham Mote – it’s a fascinating place!

    Reply
  45. I’m not coordinated either, Shannon – more like a total klutz! And I’ve been to Ightham Mote – it’s a fascinating place!

    Reply
  46. My father called me Pooch. I don’t know why and it’s way too late to ask, sadly, because now I’d really like to know. Also too late for me to tour more castles, but I’ve surely enjoyed the ones I’ve visited over the years. Looks like you two had the place all to yourselves, lucky for you, since it’s hard to catch the past when current tourists are swarming over the premises. Looking forward to Friday’s post!

    Reply
  47. My father called me Pooch. I don’t know why and it’s way too late to ask, sadly, because now I’d really like to know. Also too late for me to tour more castles, but I’ve surely enjoyed the ones I’ve visited over the years. Looks like you two had the place all to yourselves, lucky for you, since it’s hard to catch the past when current tourists are swarming over the premises. Looking forward to Friday’s post!

    Reply
  48. My father called me Pooch. I don’t know why and it’s way too late to ask, sadly, because now I’d really like to know. Also too late for me to tour more castles, but I’ve surely enjoyed the ones I’ve visited over the years. Looks like you two had the place all to yourselves, lucky for you, since it’s hard to catch the past when current tourists are swarming over the premises. Looking forward to Friday’s post!

    Reply
  49. My father called me Pooch. I don’t know why and it’s way too late to ask, sadly, because now I’d really like to know. Also too late for me to tour more castles, but I’ve surely enjoyed the ones I’ve visited over the years. Looks like you two had the place all to yourselves, lucky for you, since it’s hard to catch the past when current tourists are swarming over the premises. Looking forward to Friday’s post!

    Reply
  50. My father called me Pooch. I don’t know why and it’s way too late to ask, sadly, because now I’d really like to know. Also too late for me to tour more castles, but I’ve surely enjoyed the ones I’ve visited over the years. Looks like you two had the place all to yourselves, lucky for you, since it’s hard to catch the past when current tourists are swarming over the premises. Looking forward to Friday’s post!

    Reply
  51. Amazing how much damage those early cannons could inflict! I expect you had to book a time to get in …. great for reducing numbers. These old ruins can be very atmospheric, which must be inspiring for authors. Looking forward to part 2.
    I never had a lasting nick name though for a short period after success on the soccer field I became ‘twinkle toes’. In medieval times I can see myself as William Marshall sparing the life of ‘Richard Cœur de Lion’. nickname would be Will.

    Reply
  52. Amazing how much damage those early cannons could inflict! I expect you had to book a time to get in …. great for reducing numbers. These old ruins can be very atmospheric, which must be inspiring for authors. Looking forward to part 2.
    I never had a lasting nick name though for a short period after success on the soccer field I became ‘twinkle toes’. In medieval times I can see myself as William Marshall sparing the life of ‘Richard Cœur de Lion’. nickname would be Will.

    Reply
  53. Amazing how much damage those early cannons could inflict! I expect you had to book a time to get in …. great for reducing numbers. These old ruins can be very atmospheric, which must be inspiring for authors. Looking forward to part 2.
    I never had a lasting nick name though for a short period after success on the soccer field I became ‘twinkle toes’. In medieval times I can see myself as William Marshall sparing the life of ‘Richard Cœur de Lion’. nickname would be Will.

    Reply
  54. Amazing how much damage those early cannons could inflict! I expect you had to book a time to get in …. great for reducing numbers. These old ruins can be very atmospheric, which must be inspiring for authors. Looking forward to part 2.
    I never had a lasting nick name though for a short period after success on the soccer field I became ‘twinkle toes’. In medieval times I can see myself as William Marshall sparing the life of ‘Richard Cœur de Lion’. nickname would be Will.

    Reply
  55. Amazing how much damage those early cannons could inflict! I expect you had to book a time to get in …. great for reducing numbers. These old ruins can be very atmospheric, which must be inspiring for authors. Looking forward to part 2.
    I never had a lasting nick name though for a short period after success on the soccer field I became ‘twinkle toes’. In medieval times I can see myself as William Marshall sparing the life of ‘Richard Cœur de Lion’. nickname would be Will.

    Reply
  56. I LOVE castles and have visited quite a few here in Ireland over the years. My favorite is one I mentioned before on this blog, Bunratty Castle. Wonderful place. Looking forward to Friday’s post.
    My grandmother used to call me Fanny Adams. I have no idea why!!

    Reply
  57. I LOVE castles and have visited quite a few here in Ireland over the years. My favorite is one I mentioned before on this blog, Bunratty Castle. Wonderful place. Looking forward to Friday’s post.
    My grandmother used to call me Fanny Adams. I have no idea why!!

    Reply
  58. I LOVE castles and have visited quite a few here in Ireland over the years. My favorite is one I mentioned before on this blog, Bunratty Castle. Wonderful place. Looking forward to Friday’s post.
    My grandmother used to call me Fanny Adams. I have no idea why!!

    Reply
  59. I LOVE castles and have visited quite a few here in Ireland over the years. My favorite is one I mentioned before on this blog, Bunratty Castle. Wonderful place. Looking forward to Friday’s post.
    My grandmother used to call me Fanny Adams. I have no idea why!!

    Reply
  60. I LOVE castles and have visited quite a few here in Ireland over the years. My favorite is one I mentioned before on this blog, Bunratty Castle. Wonderful place. Looking forward to Friday’s post.
    My grandmother used to call me Fanny Adams. I have no idea why!!

    Reply
  61. I have never had a nickname. I have to thank you for this marvelous post. And the stories about the castle are quite interesting. I am looking forward to the next chapter in the story.
    At times, when I hear what enemies do to one another, it makes me realize that apparently we have not learned a heck of a lot over the last thousand years or so. It makes me want to cry.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying safe.

    Reply
  62. I have never had a nickname. I have to thank you for this marvelous post. And the stories about the castle are quite interesting. I am looking forward to the next chapter in the story.
    At times, when I hear what enemies do to one another, it makes me realize that apparently we have not learned a heck of a lot over the last thousand years or so. It makes me want to cry.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying safe.

    Reply
  63. I have never had a nickname. I have to thank you for this marvelous post. And the stories about the castle are quite interesting. I am looking forward to the next chapter in the story.
    At times, when I hear what enemies do to one another, it makes me realize that apparently we have not learned a heck of a lot over the last thousand years or so. It makes me want to cry.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying safe.

    Reply
  64. I have never had a nickname. I have to thank you for this marvelous post. And the stories about the castle are quite interesting. I am looking forward to the next chapter in the story.
    At times, when I hear what enemies do to one another, it makes me realize that apparently we have not learned a heck of a lot over the last thousand years or so. It makes me want to cry.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying safe.

    Reply
  65. I have never had a nickname. I have to thank you for this marvelous post. And the stories about the castle are quite interesting. I am looking forward to the next chapter in the story.
    At times, when I hear what enemies do to one another, it makes me realize that apparently we have not learned a heck of a lot over the last thousand years or so. It makes me want to cry.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying safe.

    Reply
  66. Yes, I think ‘Roaring Meg’ was used on Raglan once they’d finished off Goodrich. I find it even more amazing that the walls held for as long as they did!

    Reply
  67. Yes, I think ‘Roaring Meg’ was used on Raglan once they’d finished off Goodrich. I find it even more amazing that the walls held for as long as they did!

    Reply
  68. Yes, I think ‘Roaring Meg’ was used on Raglan once they’d finished off Goodrich. I find it even more amazing that the walls held for as long as they did!

    Reply
  69. Yes, I think ‘Roaring Meg’ was used on Raglan once they’d finished off Goodrich. I find it even more amazing that the walls held for as long as they did!

    Reply
  70. Yes, I think ‘Roaring Meg’ was used on Raglan once they’d finished off Goodrich. I find it even more amazing that the walls held for as long as they did!

    Reply
  71. It’s the perfect medieval nickname, isn’t it. One assumes it was a compliment and that they weren’t making fun of him!

    Reply
  72. It’s the perfect medieval nickname, isn’t it. One assumes it was a compliment and that they weren’t making fun of him!

    Reply
  73. It’s the perfect medieval nickname, isn’t it. One assumes it was a compliment and that they weren’t making fun of him!

    Reply
  74. It’s the perfect medieval nickname, isn’t it. One assumes it was a compliment and that they weren’t making fun of him!

    Reply
  75. It’s the perfect medieval nickname, isn’t it. One assumes it was a compliment and that they weren’t making fun of him!

    Reply
  76. Thanks. Donna – we are so very fortunate to have such special places to visit, especially at the moment when so many things are closed.
    I rather like “toots”!

    Reply
  77. Thanks. Donna – we are so very fortunate to have such special places to visit, especially at the moment when so many things are closed.
    I rather like “toots”!

    Reply
  78. Thanks. Donna – we are so very fortunate to have such special places to visit, especially at the moment when so many things are closed.
    I rather like “toots”!

    Reply
  79. Thanks. Donna – we are so very fortunate to have such special places to visit, especially at the moment when so many things are closed.
    I rather like “toots”!

    Reply
  80. Thanks. Donna – we are so very fortunate to have such special places to visit, especially at the moment when so many things are closed.
    I rather like “toots”!

    Reply
  81. I hadn’t thought of that, Mary, but the habit of naming weapons has evidently been going on for centuries.
    I love that your grandmother had a special name for you!

    Reply
  82. I hadn’t thought of that, Mary, but the habit of naming weapons has evidently been going on for centuries.
    I love that your grandmother had a special name for you!

    Reply
  83. I hadn’t thought of that, Mary, but the habit of naming weapons has evidently been going on for centuries.
    I love that your grandmother had a special name for you!

    Reply
  84. I hadn’t thought of that, Mary, but the habit of naming weapons has evidently been going on for centuries.
    I love that your grandmother had a special name for you!

    Reply
  85. I hadn’t thought of that, Mary, but the habit of naming weapons has evidently been going on for centuries.
    I love that your grandmother had a special name for you!

    Reply
  86. LOL, Mary Jo, thank you for the compliment about “Duchess!”
    Strongbow is a perfect name for a cider, I think. I hadn’t realised it was named after Richard de Clare either.

    Reply
  87. LOL, Mary Jo, thank you for the compliment about “Duchess!”
    Strongbow is a perfect name for a cider, I think. I hadn’t realised it was named after Richard de Clare either.

    Reply
  88. LOL, Mary Jo, thank you for the compliment about “Duchess!”
    Strongbow is a perfect name for a cider, I think. I hadn’t realised it was named after Richard de Clare either.

    Reply
  89. LOL, Mary Jo, thank you for the compliment about “Duchess!”
    Strongbow is a perfect name for a cider, I think. I hadn’t realised it was named after Richard de Clare either.

    Reply
  90. LOL, Mary Jo, thank you for the compliment about “Duchess!”
    Strongbow is a perfect name for a cider, I think. I hadn’t realised it was named after Richard de Clare either.

    Reply
  91. Grace is such a lovely name, Shannon. Hopefully the teasing is kind!
    I’ve never been to Framlingham either and would love to see it. Igtham Mote is a stunning place – I hope you get to visit!

    Reply
  92. Grace is such a lovely name, Shannon. Hopefully the teasing is kind!
    I’ve never been to Framlingham either and would love to see it. Igtham Mote is a stunning place – I hope you get to visit!

    Reply
  93. Grace is such a lovely name, Shannon. Hopefully the teasing is kind!
    I’ve never been to Framlingham either and would love to see it. Igtham Mote is a stunning place – I hope you get to visit!

    Reply
  94. Grace is such a lovely name, Shannon. Hopefully the teasing is kind!
    I’ve never been to Framlingham either and would love to see it. Igtham Mote is a stunning place – I hope you get to visit!

    Reply
  95. Grace is such a lovely name, Shannon. Hopefully the teasing is kind!
    I’ve never been to Framlingham either and would love to see it. Igtham Mote is a stunning place – I hope you get to visit!

    Reply
  96. Hi Sue, I think people do use cute forms of our names in an affectionate way and that’s really lovely. My father’s family always called me Nicky. No one else does. Nick, sometimes, but not Nicky!

    Reply
  97. Hi Sue, I think people do use cute forms of our names in an affectionate way and that’s really lovely. My father’s family always called me Nicky. No one else does. Nick, sometimes, but not Nicky!

    Reply
  98. Hi Sue, I think people do use cute forms of our names in an affectionate way and that’s really lovely. My father’s family always called me Nicky. No one else does. Nick, sometimes, but not Nicky!

    Reply
  99. Hi Sue, I think people do use cute forms of our names in an affectionate way and that’s really lovely. My father’s family always called me Nicky. No one else does. Nick, sometimes, but not Nicky!

    Reply
  100. Hi Sue, I think people do use cute forms of our names in an affectionate way and that’s really lovely. My father’s family always called me Nicky. No one else does. Nick, sometimes, but not Nicky!

    Reply
  101. That’s so true, Mary. It’s much easier to capture the atmosphere of a place when it’s quiet. We were so lucky and had a wonderful time.
    How mysterious about Pooch, but how sweet!

    Reply
  102. That’s so true, Mary. It’s much easier to capture the atmosphere of a place when it’s quiet. We were so lucky and had a wonderful time.
    How mysterious about Pooch, but how sweet!

    Reply
  103. That’s so true, Mary. It’s much easier to capture the atmosphere of a place when it’s quiet. We were so lucky and had a wonderful time.
    How mysterious about Pooch, but how sweet!

    Reply
  104. That’s so true, Mary. It’s much easier to capture the atmosphere of a place when it’s quiet. We were so lucky and had a wonderful time.
    How mysterious about Pooch, but how sweet!

    Reply
  105. That’s so true, Mary. It’s much easier to capture the atmosphere of a place when it’s quiet. We were so lucky and had a wonderful time.
    How mysterious about Pooch, but how sweet!

    Reply
  106. Yes, it’s certainly quieter visiting all these places now you have to book a time ticket. They were saying at Goodrich that they never previously restricted entry, so it’s all new for them.
    That cannon was small but mighty! I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the inside during the siege.
    Love both the different nicknames!

    Reply
  107. Yes, it’s certainly quieter visiting all these places now you have to book a time ticket. They were saying at Goodrich that they never previously restricted entry, so it’s all new for them.
    That cannon was small but mighty! I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the inside during the siege.
    Love both the different nicknames!

    Reply
  108. Yes, it’s certainly quieter visiting all these places now you have to book a time ticket. They were saying at Goodrich that they never previously restricted entry, so it’s all new for them.
    That cannon was small but mighty! I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the inside during the siege.
    Love both the different nicknames!

    Reply
  109. Yes, it’s certainly quieter visiting all these places now you have to book a time ticket. They were saying at Goodrich that they never previously restricted entry, so it’s all new for them.
    That cannon was small but mighty! I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the inside during the siege.
    Love both the different nicknames!

    Reply
  110. Yes, it’s certainly quieter visiting all these places now you have to book a time ticket. They were saying at Goodrich that they never previously restricted entry, so it’s all new for them.
    That cannon was small but mighty! I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the inside during the siege.
    Love both the different nicknames!

    Reply
  111. LOL, Teresa, that’s funny!
    Next time I go to Ireland (I’m currently planning a visit) I’d love to see Bunratty Castle. It looks fantastic.

    Reply
  112. LOL, Teresa, that’s funny!
    Next time I go to Ireland (I’m currently planning a visit) I’d love to see Bunratty Castle. It looks fantastic.

    Reply
  113. LOL, Teresa, that’s funny!
    Next time I go to Ireland (I’m currently planning a visit) I’d love to see Bunratty Castle. It looks fantastic.

    Reply
  114. LOL, Teresa, that’s funny!
    Next time I go to Ireland (I’m currently planning a visit) I’d love to see Bunratty Castle. It looks fantastic.

    Reply
  115. LOL, Teresa, that’s funny!
    Next time I go to Ireland (I’m currently planning a visit) I’d love to see Bunratty Castle. It looks fantastic.

    Reply
  116. Thank you, Annette, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Yes, it can be dispiriting to think that people haven’t learned much and history repeats. We can only hope that things do get better over time.
    Take care, Nicola.

    Reply
  117. Thank you, Annette, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Yes, it can be dispiriting to think that people haven’t learned much and history repeats. We can only hope that things do get better over time.
    Take care, Nicola.

    Reply
  118. Thank you, Annette, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Yes, it can be dispiriting to think that people haven’t learned much and history repeats. We can only hope that things do get better over time.
    Take care, Nicola.

    Reply
  119. Thank you, Annette, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Yes, it can be dispiriting to think that people haven’t learned much and history repeats. We can only hope that things do get better over time.
    Take care, Nicola.

    Reply
  120. Thank you, Annette, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Yes, it can be dispiriting to think that people haven’t learned much and history repeats. We can only hope that things do get better over time.
    Take care, Nicola.

    Reply

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