The Rose Windows of Notre Dame. Where Do We Go From Here?

 

Rose window 1

Rose window, Notre Dame

Many ingenious lovely things are gone
That seemed sheer miracle to the multitude,
protected from the circle of the moon
That pitches common things about. There stood
Amid the ornamental bronze and stone
An ancient image made of olive wood –
And gone are Phidias' famous ivories
And all the golden grasshoppers and bees.
 
    Yeats

 

Joanna here, talking about something that shocked and horrified me last week. I watched fire burning next to the rose windows of Notre Dame.

Those rose windows are perhaps the most famous stained glass in the world. Very old. Very lovely. Anyone who’s been privileged to see them has been moved by the experience.

We still don’t know what shape they’re in.

Notre Dame has three of them over the doors on the south, west, and north of the Cathedral. 

They’re called “rose windows” not because of the color or because they have roses in the stained glass itself, but from the shape. The circle with spoke-like mullions and the delicate  tracery of stone is thought to resemble an open rose. They’re madly characteristic of Gothic architecture and are found in great churches all over northern France.

San Miguel de Lillo 840

Oviedo, Spain 845
Interior Pantheon C18

oculus, Pantheon, Rome, 126 AD

The idea of a simple round window is ancient. Classical domes were often topped by a round, unglassed opening that let in both light and the passing rain shower. See the pantheon (126 AD) over to the left. They called windows like these oculi, from Latin oculus, “eye”. Here’s a much fancier one with glass one from a Romanesque church in Oviedo, Spain dating to 845 AD.

The term “rose window” was used from the Seventeenth Century onward for oculi of splendid stained glass laid out in that circular wheel-like design. They certainly had rose windows before that but I don’t know what people called them.
“Particularly Fancy Oculi” maybe. Or “those round windows full of little bits of stained glass.”

So how old are the three rose windows of Notre Dame? How old is Notre Dame, anyway?

First thing to consider is that Notre Dame was built by stages, one church on another. One religious structure, I should say, on an older one. Before the first Christian church was built in France, the ground was used to being holy.  

In 1711, workmen digging out a vault under the choir of Notre Dame came across nine large cubical stones with bas-reliefs and inscriptions. Sparing you the original Latin, one stone read,
     “Under Tiberius Cæsar Augustus,
     the Parisian watermen
     publicly erected this altar
     to Jupiter Optimus, Maximus,”
which places a Roman temple under Notre Dame.  The stash of stones was carved in the neighborhood of 14 AD to 37 AD when Tiberius was emperor. Other carvings show Vulcan, Castor, and a well-known divinity of the Gauls, Esus, on various bas-reliefs. That Gaulish divinity is a broad hint that the Romans had helped themselves to a previously sacred space.

Various exciting historical events intervened in the three-and-a-half centuries between 37-ish and 375 AD. The Roman temple disappeared. The church of Saint Stephen was built on its ruins. A separate church dedicated to the Virgin Mary arose close by and

San Miguel de Lillo  Oviedo  Spain. Towards 850

Romanesque church,
Spain. c 850

over the next centuries expanded its way south to engulf St. Stephen’s. These would have been Romanesque churches, perhaps a bit like the church at the left from Ninth Century Spain.

Whatever the merits of these churches — Fortunatus speaks of thirty marble columns in the church of the Virgin — nothing now remains.The Virgin's Mary's church was pulled down in 1160 to make way for a new, improved church, constructed in the latest Gothic style. That's the Notre Dame of today.  In 1218, the even more ancient structure of St. Stephen’s was leveled to make a roomy spot for the south transcept.

And so our Notre Dame was built, (I’m about to get to the rose

Wench notre dame wiki

Yep. Finally Notre Dame

windows.)
Maybe they put signs up saying “Pardon the inconvenience. We’re building for a new and greater Paris.”

Now, Medieval folk did not just install a sturdy construction barrier, drive in heavy equipment, and and toss up yer major stone buildings in a couple months. No. They took their time and did it right.
Maybe they were on time-plus-materials contracts.

Or going for deeper historical accuracy here — much of the work on these great cathedrals was done as pious labor donation and financed with sporadic gifts of money. I suspect stuff got built when the dibs were in tune and construction projects sat around with not much happening for a couple decades when folks got distracted.

In any case, the cornerstone of Notre Dame was laid in 1163, the rose windows were constructed 1225 to 1260, and the cathedral completed in 1343. That’s (jo counts on her fingers) 180 years which is pretty much lickety-split in terms of cathedrals.

As to the rose windows . . .

No. Let me digress for a minute to give you interesting news about the colors in Medieval stained glass.

The wide of spectrum of colors achieved in Medieval France's stained glass windows was produced by varying both the proportion of metal added to molten glass and the temperature to which the mixture was heated. Impurities in the metals, bubbles in the cooled glass and variations in the thickness of the cut panes would ultimately contribute to the jewel-like quality of finished windows. Colored glass was cut to size by heating or with a diamond. Details (facial features, drapery, foliage, etc.) were painted on with a mix of cullet (scrap glass), copper and Greek sapphire dissolved in wine or urine.
        Digital Georgetown

and

Such windows were not depicted merely in transparent colours, as we are apt to think; but from the thickness, texture, and quality of the old glass. It holds the sunlight, as it were, within it, so that the whole becomes a mosaic of coloured fire.
        William Richard Lethaby, Medieval Art

 

But back to the rose windows:

There are three rose windows in Norte Dame, the North, South and West. These were ambitious projects, these windows, technical projects that pushed the boundaries of state–of-the-art both in size and in artistic splendor.

The North Rose Window dates in at 1250 to 1260. The central medalion is the image of Mary holding the Christ child. The figures surrounding are from the Old Testament. That's the North Rose Window way up at the top of the screen. Most of the original glass is still intact in this one.

 

Wench south rose window

South Rose Window

The rose window in the south is devoted to New Testament notables; the apostles, wise virgins,
martyrs, and saints, including St Denis, the patron saint of France, carrying his head. A practical and visually riveting solution.

 

This window has suffered a good deal of restoration. The masonry settled disasterously on this wall and the window had to be supported. It was extensively restored in 1725 and again in 1861, under the direction of Viollet-le-Duc, of whom more anon. In its latter restoration the rosette was turned by 15° to give it a more stable vertical and horizontal axis. Expert glassmakers restored the remaining 13th century glass and reconstructed missing medallions.

But in the process of this restoration they rearranged the placement of the glass panels, taking the apostles from their original inner circle and scattering them at random over the whole design. This seems careless.

The West Rose Window was completed first, in 1225, and is the smallest of the three. It was restored between 1844 and 1867, again, under the direction of Viollet-le-Duc. It is telling that, after restoration, none of the original Thirteenth Century glass survives.

Wench Laurent diacre avec le gril de son martyre

Saint Laurent
and the grill of his martyrdom

A restoration may be more disastrous for a monument than the ravages of centuries.
    Prosper Mérimée to Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, 1843

Notre Dame is considered the first of Viollet-le-Duc’s extremist interventions in churches . . .
”old statues were removed, often to museums, and new ones designed.” . . .
“In spite of all his scholarship, he still had a Romantic approach to Gothic architecture.”

Folks have had unkind things to say about Viollet-le-Duc's work for the last century. Did he restore Notre Dame or create an unscholarly Victorian Medieval fantasy? 

 

But he did bring the gargoyles back and that was certainly the right thing to do.

So, this week we’re asking ourselves — Have we been fantastically lucky? Is there only salvageable damage? Angls nd
Or are we seeing an early, overly optimistic assessment? 

Should we take this opportunity to undo the Victorian meddling?
Or will we just meddle in our own Twenty-first Century way?

Is Notre Dame a museum fixed in time or does it continue to grow and change and interact with its visitors and the worshippers who come?
Notre Dame has been a work in progress for 800 years. Are we next in line to contribute?

Where do we go from here?

150 thoughts on “The Rose Windows of Notre Dame. Where Do We Go From Here?”

  1. Jo, we’ve all been riveted by the dramatic fire and heroic rescue efforts. Anyone who has seen Notre Dame de Paris remembers the rose windows and weeps for the damage. It’s good that you’ve explained the history more. Yes, great buildings grow and change, and if we’re lucky, they survive for future generations to appreciate.

    Reply
  2. Jo, we’ve all been riveted by the dramatic fire and heroic rescue efforts. Anyone who has seen Notre Dame de Paris remembers the rose windows and weeps for the damage. It’s good that you’ve explained the history more. Yes, great buildings grow and change, and if we’re lucky, they survive for future generations to appreciate.

    Reply
  3. Jo, we’ve all been riveted by the dramatic fire and heroic rescue efforts. Anyone who has seen Notre Dame de Paris remembers the rose windows and weeps for the damage. It’s good that you’ve explained the history more. Yes, great buildings grow and change, and if we’re lucky, they survive for future generations to appreciate.

    Reply
  4. Jo, we’ve all been riveted by the dramatic fire and heroic rescue efforts. Anyone who has seen Notre Dame de Paris remembers the rose windows and weeps for the damage. It’s good that you’ve explained the history more. Yes, great buildings grow and change, and if we’re lucky, they survive for future generations to appreciate.

    Reply
  5. Jo, we’ve all been riveted by the dramatic fire and heroic rescue efforts. Anyone who has seen Notre Dame de Paris remembers the rose windows and weeps for the damage. It’s good that you’ve explained the history more. Yes, great buildings grow and change, and if we’re lucky, they survive for future generations to appreciate.

    Reply
  6. Joanna, I just read an article that said three of the Rose Windows from the 12-13th century have been saved, but the building is unstable. The others were from the 19th-century and didn’t survive as well.
    Artisans are working to make sure nothing else is lost.

    Reply
  7. Joanna, I just read an article that said three of the Rose Windows from the 12-13th century have been saved, but the building is unstable. The others were from the 19th-century and didn’t survive as well.
    Artisans are working to make sure nothing else is lost.

    Reply
  8. Joanna, I just read an article that said three of the Rose Windows from the 12-13th century have been saved, but the building is unstable. The others were from the 19th-century and didn’t survive as well.
    Artisans are working to make sure nothing else is lost.

    Reply
  9. Joanna, I just read an article that said three of the Rose Windows from the 12-13th century have been saved, but the building is unstable. The others were from the 19th-century and didn’t survive as well.
    Artisans are working to make sure nothing else is lost.

    Reply
  10. Joanna, I just read an article that said three of the Rose Windows from the 12-13th century have been saved, but the building is unstable. The others were from the 19th-century and didn’t survive as well.
    Artisans are working to make sure nothing else is lost.

    Reply
  11. The photo titled ‘Notre Dame 21st century, before the fire’ looks remarkably like Chartre Cathedral with its unmatched towers; another beautiful French gothic church with a well-known labyrinth.

    Reply
  12. The photo titled ‘Notre Dame 21st century, before the fire’ looks remarkably like Chartre Cathedral with its unmatched towers; another beautiful French gothic church with a well-known labyrinth.

    Reply
  13. The photo titled ‘Notre Dame 21st century, before the fire’ looks remarkably like Chartre Cathedral with its unmatched towers; another beautiful French gothic church with a well-known labyrinth.

    Reply
  14. The photo titled ‘Notre Dame 21st century, before the fire’ looks remarkably like Chartre Cathedral with its unmatched towers; another beautiful French gothic church with a well-known labyrinth.

    Reply
  15. The photo titled ‘Notre Dame 21st century, before the fire’ looks remarkably like Chartre Cathedral with its unmatched towers; another beautiful French gothic church with a well-known labyrinth.

    Reply
  16. I’ll admit it. I cried when I saw this happening in real time
    .
    I lived in Paris when the kids were growing up and I often took them to Notre Dame. The building is so wrapped up in my mind with wonderful years in my life.

    Reply
  17. I’ll admit it. I cried when I saw this happening in real time
    .
    I lived in Paris when the kids were growing up and I often took them to Notre Dame. The building is so wrapped up in my mind with wonderful years in my life.

    Reply
  18. I’ll admit it. I cried when I saw this happening in real time
    .
    I lived in Paris when the kids were growing up and I often took them to Notre Dame. The building is so wrapped up in my mind with wonderful years in my life.

    Reply
  19. I’ll admit it. I cried when I saw this happening in real time
    .
    I lived in Paris when the kids were growing up and I often took them to Notre Dame. The building is so wrapped up in my mind with wonderful years in my life.

    Reply
  20. I’ll admit it. I cried when I saw this happening in real time
    .
    I lived in Paris when the kids were growing up and I often took them to Notre Dame. The building is so wrapped up in my mind with wonderful years in my life.

    Reply
  21. I never got to Paris, so this is a visit I will never make. I admire history; my husband and I frequently discuss history during our meals. (One of us has read something, or heard something, and the discussion starts. It’s an interest we share.
    I believe that we should cherish history and nurture it as much as possible. BUT old buildings need constant care and frequent restoration. On that famous trip to Great Britain, we saw more scaffolding than anything else. And we felt that it was important to keep those historical buildings in good repair.
    So, we still have those buildings because we have kept them in repair (are “sort of” did so) and each such generation has had its impact. And that, too, is a part of history.

    Reply
  22. I never got to Paris, so this is a visit I will never make. I admire history; my husband and I frequently discuss history during our meals. (One of us has read something, or heard something, and the discussion starts. It’s an interest we share.
    I believe that we should cherish history and nurture it as much as possible. BUT old buildings need constant care and frequent restoration. On that famous trip to Great Britain, we saw more scaffolding than anything else. And we felt that it was important to keep those historical buildings in good repair.
    So, we still have those buildings because we have kept them in repair (are “sort of” did so) and each such generation has had its impact. And that, too, is a part of history.

    Reply
  23. I never got to Paris, so this is a visit I will never make. I admire history; my husband and I frequently discuss history during our meals. (One of us has read something, or heard something, and the discussion starts. It’s an interest we share.
    I believe that we should cherish history and nurture it as much as possible. BUT old buildings need constant care and frequent restoration. On that famous trip to Great Britain, we saw more scaffolding than anything else. And we felt that it was important to keep those historical buildings in good repair.
    So, we still have those buildings because we have kept them in repair (are “sort of” did so) and each such generation has had its impact. And that, too, is a part of history.

    Reply
  24. I never got to Paris, so this is a visit I will never make. I admire history; my husband and I frequently discuss history during our meals. (One of us has read something, or heard something, and the discussion starts. It’s an interest we share.
    I believe that we should cherish history and nurture it as much as possible. BUT old buildings need constant care and frequent restoration. On that famous trip to Great Britain, we saw more scaffolding than anything else. And we felt that it was important to keep those historical buildings in good repair.
    So, we still have those buildings because we have kept them in repair (are “sort of” did so) and each such generation has had its impact. And that, too, is a part of history.

    Reply
  25. I never got to Paris, so this is a visit I will never make. I admire history; my husband and I frequently discuss history during our meals. (One of us has read something, or heard something, and the discussion starts. It’s an interest we share.
    I believe that we should cherish history and nurture it as much as possible. BUT old buildings need constant care and frequent restoration. On that famous trip to Great Britain, we saw more scaffolding than anything else. And we felt that it was important to keep those historical buildings in good repair.
    So, we still have those buildings because we have kept them in repair (are “sort of” did so) and each such generation has had its impact. And that, too, is a part of history.

    Reply
  26. Thank you so much for this post. I have never been to Paris, I have never seen Notre Dame. But, I am a history nut and I have read a great deal about this wonderful cathedral. I have seen many pictures and watched video tours.
    I want to say that I am praying for a wonderful restoration.
    I believe the French will do their very best. I wonder if it will be difficult to find artisans who have the knowledge and ability to restore. I hope so. I hope that the world will see a new icon rising from the literal ashes.
    Because this is too important for us to lose such a blessing and treasure.
    Again, thanks for the post. You are going in my history file.

    Reply
  27. Thank you so much for this post. I have never been to Paris, I have never seen Notre Dame. But, I am a history nut and I have read a great deal about this wonderful cathedral. I have seen many pictures and watched video tours.
    I want to say that I am praying for a wonderful restoration.
    I believe the French will do their very best. I wonder if it will be difficult to find artisans who have the knowledge and ability to restore. I hope so. I hope that the world will see a new icon rising from the literal ashes.
    Because this is too important for us to lose such a blessing and treasure.
    Again, thanks for the post. You are going in my history file.

    Reply
  28. Thank you so much for this post. I have never been to Paris, I have never seen Notre Dame. But, I am a history nut and I have read a great deal about this wonderful cathedral. I have seen many pictures and watched video tours.
    I want to say that I am praying for a wonderful restoration.
    I believe the French will do their very best. I wonder if it will be difficult to find artisans who have the knowledge and ability to restore. I hope so. I hope that the world will see a new icon rising from the literal ashes.
    Because this is too important for us to lose such a blessing and treasure.
    Again, thanks for the post. You are going in my history file.

    Reply
  29. Thank you so much for this post. I have never been to Paris, I have never seen Notre Dame. But, I am a history nut and I have read a great deal about this wonderful cathedral. I have seen many pictures and watched video tours.
    I want to say that I am praying for a wonderful restoration.
    I believe the French will do their very best. I wonder if it will be difficult to find artisans who have the knowledge and ability to restore. I hope so. I hope that the world will see a new icon rising from the literal ashes.
    Because this is too important for us to lose such a blessing and treasure.
    Again, thanks for the post. You are going in my history file.

    Reply
  30. Thank you so much for this post. I have never been to Paris, I have never seen Notre Dame. But, I am a history nut and I have read a great deal about this wonderful cathedral. I have seen many pictures and watched video tours.
    I want to say that I am praying for a wonderful restoration.
    I believe the French will do their very best. I wonder if it will be difficult to find artisans who have the knowledge and ability to restore. I hope so. I hope that the world will see a new icon rising from the literal ashes.
    Because this is too important for us to lose such a blessing and treasure.
    Again, thanks for the post. You are going in my history file.

    Reply
  31. I was in Paris about 50 years ago, and I have such fond memories of the city. I know we toured Notre Dame, but I don’t remember our tour guide being as informative as your post is. Or maybe my young mind was just on other things.
    When I turned on the TV and saw the church burning, my heart sank. I’m so thankful it was not totally destroyed and that it can be re-built.
    Thank you for such an interesting and informative post.

    Reply
  32. I was in Paris about 50 years ago, and I have such fond memories of the city. I know we toured Notre Dame, but I don’t remember our tour guide being as informative as your post is. Or maybe my young mind was just on other things.
    When I turned on the TV and saw the church burning, my heart sank. I’m so thankful it was not totally destroyed and that it can be re-built.
    Thank you for such an interesting and informative post.

    Reply
  33. I was in Paris about 50 years ago, and I have such fond memories of the city. I know we toured Notre Dame, but I don’t remember our tour guide being as informative as your post is. Or maybe my young mind was just on other things.
    When I turned on the TV and saw the church burning, my heart sank. I’m so thankful it was not totally destroyed and that it can be re-built.
    Thank you for such an interesting and informative post.

    Reply
  34. I was in Paris about 50 years ago, and I have such fond memories of the city. I know we toured Notre Dame, but I don’t remember our tour guide being as informative as your post is. Or maybe my young mind was just on other things.
    When I turned on the TV and saw the church burning, my heart sank. I’m so thankful it was not totally destroyed and that it can be re-built.
    Thank you for such an interesting and informative post.

    Reply
  35. I was in Paris about 50 years ago, and I have such fond memories of the city. I know we toured Notre Dame, but I don’t remember our tour guide being as informative as your post is. Or maybe my young mind was just on other things.
    When I turned on the TV and saw the church burning, my heart sank. I’m so thankful it was not totally destroyed and that it can be re-built.
    Thank you for such an interesting and informative post.

    Reply
  36. That is such a thoughtful and informative post. The destruction of Norte Dame, to my mind, equals 9/11. Although one was a human act of violence, and the other, an accident, the enormity and the feelings of restlessness and helplessness are similar.
    Paris was on my personal bucket list. Now, I don’t know. I do believe it will be rebuilt. But. A very big But. Will we ever see what it used to be like before the fire? Or will it be our new 21st century technology and virtual reality? I have nothing against technology. I love it. But, the world moves on. No matter the tragedy. The world will move on. Whether it be “better and more beautiful “ than the original, remains to be seen. Future generations will decide.

    Reply
  37. That is such a thoughtful and informative post. The destruction of Norte Dame, to my mind, equals 9/11. Although one was a human act of violence, and the other, an accident, the enormity and the feelings of restlessness and helplessness are similar.
    Paris was on my personal bucket list. Now, I don’t know. I do believe it will be rebuilt. But. A very big But. Will we ever see what it used to be like before the fire? Or will it be our new 21st century technology and virtual reality? I have nothing against technology. I love it. But, the world moves on. No matter the tragedy. The world will move on. Whether it be “better and more beautiful “ than the original, remains to be seen. Future generations will decide.

    Reply
  38. That is such a thoughtful and informative post. The destruction of Norte Dame, to my mind, equals 9/11. Although one was a human act of violence, and the other, an accident, the enormity and the feelings of restlessness and helplessness are similar.
    Paris was on my personal bucket list. Now, I don’t know. I do believe it will be rebuilt. But. A very big But. Will we ever see what it used to be like before the fire? Or will it be our new 21st century technology and virtual reality? I have nothing against technology. I love it. But, the world moves on. No matter the tragedy. The world will move on. Whether it be “better and more beautiful “ than the original, remains to be seen. Future generations will decide.

    Reply
  39. That is such a thoughtful and informative post. The destruction of Norte Dame, to my mind, equals 9/11. Although one was a human act of violence, and the other, an accident, the enormity and the feelings of restlessness and helplessness are similar.
    Paris was on my personal bucket list. Now, I don’t know. I do believe it will be rebuilt. But. A very big But. Will we ever see what it used to be like before the fire? Or will it be our new 21st century technology and virtual reality? I have nothing against technology. I love it. But, the world moves on. No matter the tragedy. The world will move on. Whether it be “better and more beautiful “ than the original, remains to be seen. Future generations will decide.

    Reply
  40. That is such a thoughtful and informative post. The destruction of Norte Dame, to my mind, equals 9/11. Although one was a human act of violence, and the other, an accident, the enormity and the feelings of restlessness and helplessness are similar.
    Paris was on my personal bucket list. Now, I don’t know. I do believe it will be rebuilt. But. A very big But. Will we ever see what it used to be like before the fire? Or will it be our new 21st century technology and virtual reality? I have nothing against technology. I love it. But, the world moves on. No matter the tragedy. The world will move on. Whether it be “better and more beautiful “ than the original, remains to be seen. Future generations will decide.

    Reply
  41. If you ever make it to Paris — and I hope you do — and you love stained glass, see if you can go to the Sainte-Chapelle.
    It’s not as imposing as Notre Dame and doesn’t invoke the same emotions, but it’s Medieval glass of the same date. It’s a jewel box of a place.

    Reply
  42. If you ever make it to Paris — and I hope you do — and you love stained glass, see if you can go to the Sainte-Chapelle.
    It’s not as imposing as Notre Dame and doesn’t invoke the same emotions, but it’s Medieval glass of the same date. It’s a jewel box of a place.

    Reply
  43. If you ever make it to Paris — and I hope you do — and you love stained glass, see if you can go to the Sainte-Chapelle.
    It’s not as imposing as Notre Dame and doesn’t invoke the same emotions, but it’s Medieval glass of the same date. It’s a jewel box of a place.

    Reply
  44. If you ever make it to Paris — and I hope you do — and you love stained glass, see if you can go to the Sainte-Chapelle.
    It’s not as imposing as Notre Dame and doesn’t invoke the same emotions, but it’s Medieval glass of the same date. It’s a jewel box of a place.

    Reply
  45. If you ever make it to Paris — and I hope you do — and you love stained glass, see if you can go to the Sainte-Chapelle.
    It’s not as imposing as Notre Dame and doesn’t invoke the same emotions, but it’s Medieval glass of the same date. It’s a jewel box of a place.

    Reply
  46. I happened to be on Twitter at the time and so I heard about the fire minutes after it started.
    I went around showing everybody in the coffee shop what was happening. About half of them immediately recognized the building. I don’t know whether that’s low for an educated and sophisticated crowd or an incredibly high percentage for Americans.

    Reply
  47. I happened to be on Twitter at the time and so I heard about the fire minutes after it started.
    I went around showing everybody in the coffee shop what was happening. About half of them immediately recognized the building. I don’t know whether that’s low for an educated and sophisticated crowd or an incredibly high percentage for Americans.

    Reply
  48. I happened to be on Twitter at the time and so I heard about the fire minutes after it started.
    I went around showing everybody in the coffee shop what was happening. About half of them immediately recognized the building. I don’t know whether that’s low for an educated and sophisticated crowd or an incredibly high percentage for Americans.

    Reply
  49. I happened to be on Twitter at the time and so I heard about the fire minutes after it started.
    I went around showing everybody in the coffee shop what was happening. About half of them immediately recognized the building. I don’t know whether that’s low for an educated and sophisticated crowd or an incredibly high percentage for Americans.

    Reply
  50. I happened to be on Twitter at the time and so I heard about the fire minutes after it started.
    I went around showing everybody in the coffee shop what was happening. About half of them immediately recognized the building. I don’t know whether that’s low for an educated and sophisticated crowd or an incredibly high percentage for Americans.

    Reply
  51. I live near Monticello in Virginia and many of my friends have volunteered there.
    It’s a continuing struggle to keep stuff from falling apart and to make the history a living experience for visitors.
    Nothing like a Medieval cathedral, of course, but on our own small scale …

    Reply
  52. I live near Monticello in Virginia and many of my friends have volunteered there.
    It’s a continuing struggle to keep stuff from falling apart and to make the history a living experience for visitors.
    Nothing like a Medieval cathedral, of course, but on our own small scale …

    Reply
  53. I live near Monticello in Virginia and many of my friends have volunteered there.
    It’s a continuing struggle to keep stuff from falling apart and to make the history a living experience for visitors.
    Nothing like a Medieval cathedral, of course, but on our own small scale …

    Reply
  54. I live near Monticello in Virginia and many of my friends have volunteered there.
    It’s a continuing struggle to keep stuff from falling apart and to make the history a living experience for visitors.
    Nothing like a Medieval cathedral, of course, but on our own small scale …

    Reply
  55. I live near Monticello in Virginia and many of my friends have volunteered there.
    It’s a continuing struggle to keep stuff from falling apart and to make the history a living experience for visitors.
    Nothing like a Medieval cathedral, of course, but on our own small scale …

    Reply
  56. At least it didn’t burn to the ground. I imagine it will have something old and something new when Notre Dame is eventually repaired. Believe me, it would have been so much worse if it would have burned to the ground and if someone actually did it deliberately. I know how that feels, because every time I visit my home county Kiihtelysvaara, I still have hard time believing my eyes. Instead of old wood church there’s just empty space because of an arson. Now all that’s left of the old church is a cross made of the remains of the burnt church set on the wall of church community center, some tetiles, the altar painting and church silverware.
    http://kirkkokerays.fi/
    https://www.mtvuutiset.fi/artikkeli/mtv-joensuussa-seurakuntalaisen-uskomaton-uroteko-jarkytyksen-keskella-pelasti-alttaritaulun-ja-kirkkohopeat-taydelta-tuholta/7084650#gs.6d9030

    Reply
  57. At least it didn’t burn to the ground. I imagine it will have something old and something new when Notre Dame is eventually repaired. Believe me, it would have been so much worse if it would have burned to the ground and if someone actually did it deliberately. I know how that feels, because every time I visit my home county Kiihtelysvaara, I still have hard time believing my eyes. Instead of old wood church there’s just empty space because of an arson. Now all that’s left of the old church is a cross made of the remains of the burnt church set on the wall of church community center, some tetiles, the altar painting and church silverware.
    http://kirkkokerays.fi/
    https://www.mtvuutiset.fi/artikkeli/mtv-joensuussa-seurakuntalaisen-uskomaton-uroteko-jarkytyksen-keskella-pelasti-alttaritaulun-ja-kirkkohopeat-taydelta-tuholta/7084650#gs.6d9030

    Reply
  58. At least it didn’t burn to the ground. I imagine it will have something old and something new when Notre Dame is eventually repaired. Believe me, it would have been so much worse if it would have burned to the ground and if someone actually did it deliberately. I know how that feels, because every time I visit my home county Kiihtelysvaara, I still have hard time believing my eyes. Instead of old wood church there’s just empty space because of an arson. Now all that’s left of the old church is a cross made of the remains of the burnt church set on the wall of church community center, some tetiles, the altar painting and church silverware.
    http://kirkkokerays.fi/
    https://www.mtvuutiset.fi/artikkeli/mtv-joensuussa-seurakuntalaisen-uskomaton-uroteko-jarkytyksen-keskella-pelasti-alttaritaulun-ja-kirkkohopeat-taydelta-tuholta/7084650#gs.6d9030

    Reply
  59. At least it didn’t burn to the ground. I imagine it will have something old and something new when Notre Dame is eventually repaired. Believe me, it would have been so much worse if it would have burned to the ground and if someone actually did it deliberately. I know how that feels, because every time I visit my home county Kiihtelysvaara, I still have hard time believing my eyes. Instead of old wood church there’s just empty space because of an arson. Now all that’s left of the old church is a cross made of the remains of the burnt church set on the wall of church community center, some tetiles, the altar painting and church silverware.
    http://kirkkokerays.fi/
    https://www.mtvuutiset.fi/artikkeli/mtv-joensuussa-seurakuntalaisen-uskomaton-uroteko-jarkytyksen-keskella-pelasti-alttaritaulun-ja-kirkkohopeat-taydelta-tuholta/7084650#gs.6d9030

    Reply
  60. At least it didn’t burn to the ground. I imagine it will have something old and something new when Notre Dame is eventually repaired. Believe me, it would have been so much worse if it would have burned to the ground and if someone actually did it deliberately. I know how that feels, because every time I visit my home county Kiihtelysvaara, I still have hard time believing my eyes. Instead of old wood church there’s just empty space because of an arson. Now all that’s left of the old church is a cross made of the remains of the burnt church set on the wall of church community center, some tetiles, the altar painting and church silverware.
    http://kirkkokerays.fi/
    https://www.mtvuutiset.fi/artikkeli/mtv-joensuussa-seurakuntalaisen-uskomaton-uroteko-jarkytyksen-keskella-pelasti-alttaritaulun-ja-kirkkohopeat-taydelta-tuholta/7084650#gs.6d9030

    Reply
  61. I don’t know if it’s still true but you used to be able to go to medieval music concerts in Saints-Chappelle . That was amazing.

    Reply
  62. I don’t know if it’s still true but you used to be able to go to medieval music concerts in Saints-Chappelle . That was amazing.

    Reply
  63. I don’t know if it’s still true but you used to be able to go to medieval music concerts in Saints-Chappelle . That was amazing.

    Reply
  64. I don’t know if it’s still true but you used to be able to go to medieval music concerts in Saints-Chappelle . That was amazing.

    Reply
  65. I don’t know if it’s still true but you used to be able to go to medieval music concerts in Saints-Chappelle . That was amazing.

    Reply
  66. Thank you for this post, Joanne. I do appreciate the history information on Notre Dame. I never believed I would be able to visit Paris, but I was just heartsick when I heard the news and started watching it.
    Difficult question, and I don’t feel qualified to answer it. It will be a miracle if it is restored in the time I have left on earth, which makes me sad. My only thought is, for what it’s worth, that anyone alive today will remember it the way it was the day before the fire. To go back centuries and restore what got changed then might appeal to someone who lives and breathes ancient architecture. But to us living now, this IS ancient architecture. I would hope that enough can be salvaged of what we all know and love, and then newly built parts will have to be argued over by the French.

    Reply
  67. Thank you for this post, Joanne. I do appreciate the history information on Notre Dame. I never believed I would be able to visit Paris, but I was just heartsick when I heard the news and started watching it.
    Difficult question, and I don’t feel qualified to answer it. It will be a miracle if it is restored in the time I have left on earth, which makes me sad. My only thought is, for what it’s worth, that anyone alive today will remember it the way it was the day before the fire. To go back centuries and restore what got changed then might appeal to someone who lives and breathes ancient architecture. But to us living now, this IS ancient architecture. I would hope that enough can be salvaged of what we all know and love, and then newly built parts will have to be argued over by the French.

    Reply
  68. Thank you for this post, Joanne. I do appreciate the history information on Notre Dame. I never believed I would be able to visit Paris, but I was just heartsick when I heard the news and started watching it.
    Difficult question, and I don’t feel qualified to answer it. It will be a miracle if it is restored in the time I have left on earth, which makes me sad. My only thought is, for what it’s worth, that anyone alive today will remember it the way it was the day before the fire. To go back centuries and restore what got changed then might appeal to someone who lives and breathes ancient architecture. But to us living now, this IS ancient architecture. I would hope that enough can be salvaged of what we all know and love, and then newly built parts will have to be argued over by the French.

    Reply
  69. Thank you for this post, Joanne. I do appreciate the history information on Notre Dame. I never believed I would be able to visit Paris, but I was just heartsick when I heard the news and started watching it.
    Difficult question, and I don’t feel qualified to answer it. It will be a miracle if it is restored in the time I have left on earth, which makes me sad. My only thought is, for what it’s worth, that anyone alive today will remember it the way it was the day before the fire. To go back centuries and restore what got changed then might appeal to someone who lives and breathes ancient architecture. But to us living now, this IS ancient architecture. I would hope that enough can be salvaged of what we all know and love, and then newly built parts will have to be argued over by the French.

    Reply
  70. Thank you for this post, Joanne. I do appreciate the history information on Notre Dame. I never believed I would be able to visit Paris, but I was just heartsick when I heard the news and started watching it.
    Difficult question, and I don’t feel qualified to answer it. It will be a miracle if it is restored in the time I have left on earth, which makes me sad. My only thought is, for what it’s worth, that anyone alive today will remember it the way it was the day before the fire. To go back centuries and restore what got changed then might appeal to someone who lives and breathes ancient architecture. But to us living now, this IS ancient architecture. I would hope that enough can be salvaged of what we all know and love, and then newly built parts will have to be argued over by the French.

    Reply
  71. I’m so sorry what happened to your home church. And glad that Notre Dame was stone so we didn’t lose the whole thing.

    Reply
  72. I’m so sorry what happened to your home church. And glad that Notre Dame was stone so we didn’t lose the whole thing.

    Reply
  73. I’m so sorry what happened to your home church. And glad that Notre Dame was stone so we didn’t lose the whole thing.

    Reply
  74. I’m so sorry what happened to your home church. And glad that Notre Dame was stone so we didn’t lose the whole thing.

    Reply
  75. I’m so sorry what happened to your home church. And glad that Notre Dame was stone so we didn’t lose the whole thing.

    Reply
  76. Thanks for all the historic background. I fell in love with the French Gothic cathedrals when I traveled around Europe in the ’70’s. Chartres, Rheims, Strasbourg, I loved them all.

    Reply
  77. Thanks for all the historic background. I fell in love with the French Gothic cathedrals when I traveled around Europe in the ’70’s. Chartres, Rheims, Strasbourg, I loved them all.

    Reply
  78. Thanks for all the historic background. I fell in love with the French Gothic cathedrals when I traveled around Europe in the ’70’s. Chartres, Rheims, Strasbourg, I loved them all.

    Reply
  79. Thanks for all the historic background. I fell in love with the French Gothic cathedrals when I traveled around Europe in the ’70’s. Chartres, Rheims, Strasbourg, I loved them all.

    Reply
  80. Thanks for all the historic background. I fell in love with the French Gothic cathedrals when I traveled around Europe in the ’70’s. Chartres, Rheims, Strasbourg, I loved them all.

    Reply
  81. I LOVE Monticello! Went to summer school at University of Virginia, and we made a run over to visit “Marse Tom” both summers. They do a very good job there.
    We celebrate him here in Missouri also — after all, we named our Capitol city in his honor. Although we don’t have anything likethat lovely building to visit.

    Reply
  82. I LOVE Monticello! Went to summer school at University of Virginia, and we made a run over to visit “Marse Tom” both summers. They do a very good job there.
    We celebrate him here in Missouri also — after all, we named our Capitol city in his honor. Although we don’t have anything likethat lovely building to visit.

    Reply
  83. I LOVE Monticello! Went to summer school at University of Virginia, and we made a run over to visit “Marse Tom” both summers. They do a very good job there.
    We celebrate him here in Missouri also — after all, we named our Capitol city in his honor. Although we don’t have anything likethat lovely building to visit.

    Reply
  84. I LOVE Monticello! Went to summer school at University of Virginia, and we made a run over to visit “Marse Tom” both summers. They do a very good job there.
    We celebrate him here in Missouri also — after all, we named our Capitol city in his honor. Although we don’t have anything likethat lovely building to visit.

    Reply
  85. I LOVE Monticello! Went to summer school at University of Virginia, and we made a run over to visit “Marse Tom” both summers. They do a very good job there.
    We celebrate him here in Missouri also — after all, we named our Capitol city in his honor. Although we don’t have anything likethat lovely building to visit.

    Reply
  86. My daughter and her husband visited last year, and their tour guide was a member of the congregation. She said it was really nice in one way, and a little frustrating in another, in that the guide passed some of the relics with little information, but told them lots of important church-going facts, like which were the least draughty pews, and where you got the nice biscuits.
    Anyway, their tour guide hated one of the rose windows (I’m assuming, from what you’ve said, one of the badly restored ones).
    And I suppose, from that, I think that as well as being a monument, it also is a church, and it would be nice to see that reflected in the renovations – maybe the congregation could have many, many comfortable pews – and perhaps if a window is beyond restoration, a new design that spoke to the current congregation might be better than even a perfect replica.

    Reply
  87. My daughter and her husband visited last year, and their tour guide was a member of the congregation. She said it was really nice in one way, and a little frustrating in another, in that the guide passed some of the relics with little information, but told them lots of important church-going facts, like which were the least draughty pews, and where you got the nice biscuits.
    Anyway, their tour guide hated one of the rose windows (I’m assuming, from what you’ve said, one of the badly restored ones).
    And I suppose, from that, I think that as well as being a monument, it also is a church, and it would be nice to see that reflected in the renovations – maybe the congregation could have many, many comfortable pews – and perhaps if a window is beyond restoration, a new design that spoke to the current congregation might be better than even a perfect replica.

    Reply
  88. My daughter and her husband visited last year, and their tour guide was a member of the congregation. She said it was really nice in one way, and a little frustrating in another, in that the guide passed some of the relics with little information, but told them lots of important church-going facts, like which were the least draughty pews, and where you got the nice biscuits.
    Anyway, their tour guide hated one of the rose windows (I’m assuming, from what you’ve said, one of the badly restored ones).
    And I suppose, from that, I think that as well as being a monument, it also is a church, and it would be nice to see that reflected in the renovations – maybe the congregation could have many, many comfortable pews – and perhaps if a window is beyond restoration, a new design that spoke to the current congregation might be better than even a perfect replica.

    Reply
  89. My daughter and her husband visited last year, and their tour guide was a member of the congregation. She said it was really nice in one way, and a little frustrating in another, in that the guide passed some of the relics with little information, but told them lots of important church-going facts, like which were the least draughty pews, and where you got the nice biscuits.
    Anyway, their tour guide hated one of the rose windows (I’m assuming, from what you’ve said, one of the badly restored ones).
    And I suppose, from that, I think that as well as being a monument, it also is a church, and it would be nice to see that reflected in the renovations – maybe the congregation could have many, many comfortable pews – and perhaps if a window is beyond restoration, a new design that spoke to the current congregation might be better than even a perfect replica.

    Reply
  90. My daughter and her husband visited last year, and their tour guide was a member of the congregation. She said it was really nice in one way, and a little frustrating in another, in that the guide passed some of the relics with little information, but told them lots of important church-going facts, like which were the least draughty pews, and where you got the nice biscuits.
    Anyway, their tour guide hated one of the rose windows (I’m assuming, from what you’ve said, one of the badly restored ones).
    And I suppose, from that, I think that as well as being a monument, it also is a church, and it would be nice to see that reflected in the renovations – maybe the congregation could have many, many comfortable pews – and perhaps if a window is beyond restoration, a new design that spoke to the current congregation might be better than even a perfect replica.

    Reply
  91. Reims Cathedral is just lovely. Remarkable stained glass everywhere.
    I was in Reims only once. Went to see the total eclipse there some years back. Toured the oldest parts of the town on foot and saw the church while I was waiting for the sun to disappear.
    Getting two or three bites at the apple, as it were.

    Reply
  92. Reims Cathedral is just lovely. Remarkable stained glass everywhere.
    I was in Reims only once. Went to see the total eclipse there some years back. Toured the oldest parts of the town on foot and saw the church while I was waiting for the sun to disappear.
    Getting two or three bites at the apple, as it were.

    Reply
  93. Reims Cathedral is just lovely. Remarkable stained glass everywhere.
    I was in Reims only once. Went to see the total eclipse there some years back. Toured the oldest parts of the town on foot and saw the church while I was waiting for the sun to disappear.
    Getting two or three bites at the apple, as it were.

    Reply
  94. Reims Cathedral is just lovely. Remarkable stained glass everywhere.
    I was in Reims only once. Went to see the total eclipse there some years back. Toured the oldest parts of the town on foot and saw the church while I was waiting for the sun to disappear.
    Getting two or three bites at the apple, as it were.

    Reply
  95. Reims Cathedral is just lovely. Remarkable stained glass everywhere.
    I was in Reims only once. Went to see the total eclipse there some years back. Toured the oldest parts of the town on foot and saw the church while I was waiting for the sun to disappear.
    Getting two or three bites at the apple, as it were.

    Reply
  96. Interesting take on this.
    And how funny the tour guide had his immediate, personal, and idiosyncratic take on what was truly important.
    I would like to see the folks who make the decisions on the restoration at least consulting the folks actually use it for the purpose for which it was intended.

    Reply
  97. Interesting take on this.
    And how funny the tour guide had his immediate, personal, and idiosyncratic take on what was truly important.
    I would like to see the folks who make the decisions on the restoration at least consulting the folks actually use it for the purpose for which it was intended.

    Reply
  98. Interesting take on this.
    And how funny the tour guide had his immediate, personal, and idiosyncratic take on what was truly important.
    I would like to see the folks who make the decisions on the restoration at least consulting the folks actually use it for the purpose for which it was intended.

    Reply
  99. Interesting take on this.
    And how funny the tour guide had his immediate, personal, and idiosyncratic take on what was truly important.
    I would like to see the folks who make the decisions on the restoration at least consulting the folks actually use it for the purpose for which it was intended.

    Reply
  100. Interesting take on this.
    And how funny the tour guide had his immediate, personal, and idiosyncratic take on what was truly important.
    I would like to see the folks who make the decisions on the restoration at least consulting the folks actually use it for the purpose for which it was intended.

    Reply
  101. We’ll be confronted with the wreck of Notre Dame, in every photo of Paris from now on. Not something we can ignore. And not something that can be razed to the ground and replaced with another structure.
    Just as the Victorian response to a crumbling structure tells us a lot about the Victorians, OUr response is going to tell the future a lot about us.
    We’ll have a long time to think about this.

    Reply
  102. We’ll be confronted with the wreck of Notre Dame, in every photo of Paris from now on. Not something we can ignore. And not something that can be razed to the ground and replaced with another structure.
    Just as the Victorian response to a crumbling structure tells us a lot about the Victorians, OUr response is going to tell the future a lot about us.
    We’ll have a long time to think about this.

    Reply
  103. We’ll be confronted with the wreck of Notre Dame, in every photo of Paris from now on. Not something we can ignore. And not something that can be razed to the ground and replaced with another structure.
    Just as the Victorian response to a crumbling structure tells us a lot about the Victorians, OUr response is going to tell the future a lot about us.
    We’ll have a long time to think about this.

    Reply
  104. We’ll be confronted with the wreck of Notre Dame, in every photo of Paris from now on. Not something we can ignore. And not something that can be razed to the ground and replaced with another structure.
    Just as the Victorian response to a crumbling structure tells us a lot about the Victorians, OUr response is going to tell the future a lot about us.
    We’ll have a long time to think about this.

    Reply
  105. We’ll be confronted with the wreck of Notre Dame, in every photo of Paris from now on. Not something we can ignore. And not something that can be razed to the ground and replaced with another structure.
    Just as the Victorian response to a crumbling structure tells us a lot about the Victorians, OUr response is going to tell the future a lot about us.
    We’ll have a long time to think about this.

    Reply
  106. Going by other times I’ve talked about something historical in Europe to other Americans here on our side of the pond (that is, here in the US), I would say that’s an incredibly high percentage for Americans.
    It might also be simply a very intelligent coffee shop!

    Reply
  107. Going by other times I’ve talked about something historical in Europe to other Americans here on our side of the pond (that is, here in the US), I would say that’s an incredibly high percentage for Americans.
    It might also be simply a very intelligent coffee shop!

    Reply
  108. Going by other times I’ve talked about something historical in Europe to other Americans here on our side of the pond (that is, here in the US), I would say that’s an incredibly high percentage for Americans.
    It might also be simply a very intelligent coffee shop!

    Reply
  109. Going by other times I’ve talked about something historical in Europe to other Americans here on our side of the pond (that is, here in the US), I would say that’s an incredibly high percentage for Americans.
    It might also be simply a very intelligent coffee shop!

    Reply
  110. Going by other times I’ve talked about something historical in Europe to other Americans here on our side of the pond (that is, here in the US), I would say that’s an incredibly high percentage for Americans.
    It might also be simply a very intelligent coffee shop!

    Reply
  111. Yes, one can attend still concerts from the Medieaval and Baroque periods there.
    However, for the best pipe organ experience, go to San Sulpice. It’s a fantastic organ, and the history of the organists there is fascinating!! Some of the best composers were organists there over the centuries!!

    Reply
  112. Yes, one can attend still concerts from the Medieaval and Baroque periods there.
    However, for the best pipe organ experience, go to San Sulpice. It’s a fantastic organ, and the history of the organists there is fascinating!! Some of the best composers were organists there over the centuries!!

    Reply
  113. Yes, one can attend still concerts from the Medieaval and Baroque periods there.
    However, for the best pipe organ experience, go to San Sulpice. It’s a fantastic organ, and the history of the organists there is fascinating!! Some of the best composers were organists there over the centuries!!

    Reply
  114. Yes, one can attend still concerts from the Medieaval and Baroque periods there.
    However, for the best pipe organ experience, go to San Sulpice. It’s a fantastic organ, and the history of the organists there is fascinating!! Some of the best composers were organists there over the centuries!!

    Reply
  115. Yes, one can attend still concerts from the Medieaval and Baroque periods there.
    However, for the best pipe organ experience, go to San Sulpice. It’s a fantastic organ, and the history of the organists there is fascinating!! Some of the best composers were organists there over the centuries!!

    Reply

Leave a Comment