Riots and rebellions

J6426ct Charlie & Billy working on Jo's novel, 28UCHi, Jo here. I'm writing about social unrest. Not just here, but in a novel.

(It would be useful if Charlie and Billy could really work on my books when I'm not there! Or perhaps not — depending on what they came up with.) 

I follow a timeline in my more recent novels. I didn't in my first books, the traditional Regencies, which I think it the usual thing in most Regency romances. Some of Georgette Heyer's are fixed against events in the war, but most could be in any year.

My Company of Rogues books were pinned to time from the beginning, however, because the plot links to the time around Napoleon's abdication in 1814. Having begun, I had to continue because the seasons and pregnancies clearly mark the passage of time. I've written 16 books set between 1814 and 1817, and the time between them is often very small, but I'm pushed onward. And here I am in 1817, with peacetime bringing economic depression, unemployment, and a high cost of living.

And social unrest.

I didn't intend to become embroiled, until a man slipped into a lady's bedroom in an inn, clearly avoiding people pursuing him with unpleasant intentions.

More about that later. Much later. The book won't appear until 2015. But I'm having to really look at the situation at the time, and some of it is surprising me. Peterloo_Massacre

I learned about all this in school. The Corn Laws, the price of bread, Spa Fields, and then Peterloo, where a large gathering of the protesting poor were dispersed by the military, leading to many deaths. The meeting was held in St. Peter's Field in London, and the name of course, refers to Waterloo.

The tone of my education was that the protestors were in the right and the government oppressive, but I've learned since that underneath that lay something else — terrorism. There were people planning to completely change the social order — in effect to bring about a revolution similar to the one that had ravaged France. That had begun with reasonable protest and then spun out of control under the power of mob violence to become known as the Terror, which consumed most of those who had started it.

The peak of the French Revolution had been in 1793, only 24 years earlier, easily within memory for most, and many French had fled to Britain. Many British people knew people who had died on the guillotine, or at the hands of a violent mob. Mob terror wasn't only a French affair. There'd been many examples of mob violence in Britain, and especially in London for many decades. Windows were broken, sometimes houses set on fire, and anyone caught up in it was in danger of their lives.

The fear of revolution in the post-Waterloo wasn't imaginary. In any riot, there were people ready to target gunshops, arm themselves and kill, and others planning to break open the prisons to recruit those incarcerated, just as the Bastille had been stormed, hoping to build the riot into destruction of the state.

So was the government justified to forbid large gatherings and break them up by force? Was it wicked or wise to have secret agents within the organizers of protest, trying to find and stop those who planned bloody revolution? 

How does all this resonate with Americans, whose nation is founded upon armed revolution, though thankfully a much less violent one? I'm truly interested in opinions.

Obviously my book won't be weighed down by all these issues, but they'll play a part, and the questions are fascinating me. What side would I have been on at the time? Would I have been marching against the Corn Laws, demanding employment and a living wage, or would I have been cheering on the government and soldiers who were saving me from the mob? Where do you think you would stand?

Do you like historical romances that involve real political and military events, or do you prefer them to me in a more general period setting. After all, it would be hard to date most of Jane Austen's novels, wouldn't it?  Caepub

Another Christmas offering — Christmas Angel, a Rogues book set in the post war period, but in this case not much touched by the depression. A widow, children, older-woman/younger-man, a vile villain and elderberry wine for Christmas.

Enjoy!

Jo

 

100 thoughts on “Riots and rebellions”

  1. Yes I do like those sort of books , Love Company of Rogues. One of the first series of regency books I read
    The books about the war offer up so many story possibilities

    Reply
  2. Yes I do like those sort of books , Love Company of Rogues. One of the first series of regency books I read
    The books about the war offer up so many story possibilities

    Reply
  3. Yes I do like those sort of books , Love Company of Rogues. One of the first series of regency books I read
    The books about the war offer up so many story possibilities

    Reply
  4. Yes I do like those sort of books , Love Company of Rogues. One of the first series of regency books I read
    The books about the war offer up so many story possibilities

    Reply
  5. Yes I do like those sort of books , Love Company of Rogues. One of the first series of regency books I read
    The books about the war offer up so many story possibilities

    Reply
  6. I’m happy if a book is set in a more general period, as long a it has the right feeling for that period. I do like books set in a specific timeframe too, although I like the information about that time to be unobtrusive: as if one were writing a contemporary novel during that period. Sometimes authors overdo or shoe-horn in the historical references. I can understand why, given all that research, but readers don’t like it! Nothing that holds up the story, or which has the characters having unnatural or unlikely conversations.

    Reply
  7. I’m happy if a book is set in a more general period, as long a it has the right feeling for that period. I do like books set in a specific timeframe too, although I like the information about that time to be unobtrusive: as if one were writing a contemporary novel during that period. Sometimes authors overdo or shoe-horn in the historical references. I can understand why, given all that research, but readers don’t like it! Nothing that holds up the story, or which has the characters having unnatural or unlikely conversations.

    Reply
  8. I’m happy if a book is set in a more general period, as long a it has the right feeling for that period. I do like books set in a specific timeframe too, although I like the information about that time to be unobtrusive: as if one were writing a contemporary novel during that period. Sometimes authors overdo or shoe-horn in the historical references. I can understand why, given all that research, but readers don’t like it! Nothing that holds up the story, or which has the characters having unnatural or unlikely conversations.

    Reply
  9. I’m happy if a book is set in a more general period, as long a it has the right feeling for that period. I do like books set in a specific timeframe too, although I like the information about that time to be unobtrusive: as if one were writing a contemporary novel during that period. Sometimes authors overdo or shoe-horn in the historical references. I can understand why, given all that research, but readers don’t like it! Nothing that holds up the story, or which has the characters having unnatural or unlikely conversations.

    Reply
  10. I’m happy if a book is set in a more general period, as long a it has the right feeling for that period. I do like books set in a specific timeframe too, although I like the information about that time to be unobtrusive: as if one were writing a contemporary novel during that period. Sometimes authors overdo or shoe-horn in the historical references. I can understand why, given all that research, but readers don’t like it! Nothing that holds up the story, or which has the characters having unnatural or unlikely conversations.

    Reply
  11. Absolutely on those unnatural conversations!
    “We’re here because the queen’s necklace has been stolen.”
    “And if we don’t get it back by midnight the government could fall.”
    “That could lead to state bankruptcy.”
    “I know. We can’t let that happen.”
    It is tempting to put in the juicy stuff we’ve learned doing research, but I try to keep it for an author’s note unless it naturally comes up in the story.

    Reply
  12. Absolutely on those unnatural conversations!
    “We’re here because the queen’s necklace has been stolen.”
    “And if we don’t get it back by midnight the government could fall.”
    “That could lead to state bankruptcy.”
    “I know. We can’t let that happen.”
    It is tempting to put in the juicy stuff we’ve learned doing research, but I try to keep it for an author’s note unless it naturally comes up in the story.

    Reply
  13. Absolutely on those unnatural conversations!
    “We’re here because the queen’s necklace has been stolen.”
    “And if we don’t get it back by midnight the government could fall.”
    “That could lead to state bankruptcy.”
    “I know. We can’t let that happen.”
    It is tempting to put in the juicy stuff we’ve learned doing research, but I try to keep it for an author’s note unless it naturally comes up in the story.

    Reply
  14. Absolutely on those unnatural conversations!
    “We’re here because the queen’s necklace has been stolen.”
    “And if we don’t get it back by midnight the government could fall.”
    “That could lead to state bankruptcy.”
    “I know. We can’t let that happen.”
    It is tempting to put in the juicy stuff we’ve learned doing research, but I try to keep it for an author’s note unless it naturally comes up in the story.

    Reply
  15. Absolutely on those unnatural conversations!
    “We’re here because the queen’s necklace has been stolen.”
    “And if we don’t get it back by midnight the government could fall.”
    “That could lead to state bankruptcy.”
    “I know. We can’t let that happen.”
    It is tempting to put in the juicy stuff we’ve learned doing research, but I try to keep it for an author’s note unless it naturally comes up in the story.

    Reply
  16. I have Christmas Angel set aside to re read this Christmas. A lovely story.
    I like some stories set in specific time periods when it adds to the plot. If the hero of a story is the publisher of a newspaper, it makes a difference whether he publishes during a time of relatively free pres or when the governmment was cracking down on publishers.
    or the event could have happened in the immediate past when the book opens.
    There is also something to be said for the stories with vague dates of spring or summer of some year.
    I also like stories set around holidays

    Reply
  17. I have Christmas Angel set aside to re read this Christmas. A lovely story.
    I like some stories set in specific time periods when it adds to the plot. If the hero of a story is the publisher of a newspaper, it makes a difference whether he publishes during a time of relatively free pres or when the governmment was cracking down on publishers.
    or the event could have happened in the immediate past when the book opens.
    There is also something to be said for the stories with vague dates of spring or summer of some year.
    I also like stories set around holidays

    Reply
  18. I have Christmas Angel set aside to re read this Christmas. A lovely story.
    I like some stories set in specific time periods when it adds to the plot. If the hero of a story is the publisher of a newspaper, it makes a difference whether he publishes during a time of relatively free pres or when the governmment was cracking down on publishers.
    or the event could have happened in the immediate past when the book opens.
    There is also something to be said for the stories with vague dates of spring or summer of some year.
    I also like stories set around holidays

    Reply
  19. I have Christmas Angel set aside to re read this Christmas. A lovely story.
    I like some stories set in specific time periods when it adds to the plot. If the hero of a story is the publisher of a newspaper, it makes a difference whether he publishes during a time of relatively free pres or when the governmment was cracking down on publishers.
    or the event could have happened in the immediate past when the book opens.
    There is also something to be said for the stories with vague dates of spring or summer of some year.
    I also like stories set around holidays

    Reply
  20. I have Christmas Angel set aside to re read this Christmas. A lovely story.
    I like some stories set in specific time periods when it adds to the plot. If the hero of a story is the publisher of a newspaper, it makes a difference whether he publishes during a time of relatively free pres or when the governmment was cracking down on publishers.
    or the event could have happened in the immediate past when the book opens.
    There is also something to be said for the stories with vague dates of spring or summer of some year.
    I also like stories set around holidays

    Reply
  21. Where we would have stood is linked rather closely to where we would have been in the social order IMO. I imagine I’d have been vocally horrified at the deaths (as many victims were, as I understand it, not the fomenters of the mob, but innocent bystanders), but also relieved that the government was keeping me and mine safe from the kind of violent revolution France had undergone.

    Reply
  22. Where we would have stood is linked rather closely to where we would have been in the social order IMO. I imagine I’d have been vocally horrified at the deaths (as many victims were, as I understand it, not the fomenters of the mob, but innocent bystanders), but also relieved that the government was keeping me and mine safe from the kind of violent revolution France had undergone.

    Reply
  23. Where we would have stood is linked rather closely to where we would have been in the social order IMO. I imagine I’d have been vocally horrified at the deaths (as many victims were, as I understand it, not the fomenters of the mob, but innocent bystanders), but also relieved that the government was keeping me and mine safe from the kind of violent revolution France had undergone.

    Reply
  24. Where we would have stood is linked rather closely to where we would have been in the social order IMO. I imagine I’d have been vocally horrified at the deaths (as many victims were, as I understand it, not the fomenters of the mob, but innocent bystanders), but also relieved that the government was keeping me and mine safe from the kind of violent revolution France had undergone.

    Reply
  25. Where we would have stood is linked rather closely to where we would have been in the social order IMO. I imagine I’d have been vocally horrified at the deaths (as many victims were, as I understand it, not the fomenters of the mob, but innocent bystanders), but also relieved that the government was keeping me and mine safe from the kind of violent revolution France had undergone.

    Reply
  26. Jo – I’ve never had a problem with the way you include historical details in your books. To me it seems that you only give the information (historical context) that is necessary for events in the story to be understood.
    That’s the important point to me – is it something that I as a reader need to know. For example, in Hazard, the discussion of Luddites in Frances’ boudoir early in the books, makes it clear who the men encountered by a character later in the book must be.
    If I want to know more than is in the novel or in the end notes, these days it’s usually easy enough to find the information – or the names of good reference books – online.
    I love Christmas stories and reread Christmas Angel not long ago. I especially love the ending of that book.
    There haven’t been many new (historical) Christmas books or anthologies this year, so I’m hoping to find a reissue of one I haven’t read.

    Reply
  27. Jo – I’ve never had a problem with the way you include historical details in your books. To me it seems that you only give the information (historical context) that is necessary for events in the story to be understood.
    That’s the important point to me – is it something that I as a reader need to know. For example, in Hazard, the discussion of Luddites in Frances’ boudoir early in the books, makes it clear who the men encountered by a character later in the book must be.
    If I want to know more than is in the novel or in the end notes, these days it’s usually easy enough to find the information – or the names of good reference books – online.
    I love Christmas stories and reread Christmas Angel not long ago. I especially love the ending of that book.
    There haven’t been many new (historical) Christmas books or anthologies this year, so I’m hoping to find a reissue of one I haven’t read.

    Reply
  28. Jo – I’ve never had a problem with the way you include historical details in your books. To me it seems that you only give the information (historical context) that is necessary for events in the story to be understood.
    That’s the important point to me – is it something that I as a reader need to know. For example, in Hazard, the discussion of Luddites in Frances’ boudoir early in the books, makes it clear who the men encountered by a character later in the book must be.
    If I want to know more than is in the novel or in the end notes, these days it’s usually easy enough to find the information – or the names of good reference books – online.
    I love Christmas stories and reread Christmas Angel not long ago. I especially love the ending of that book.
    There haven’t been many new (historical) Christmas books or anthologies this year, so I’m hoping to find a reissue of one I haven’t read.

    Reply
  29. Jo – I’ve never had a problem with the way you include historical details in your books. To me it seems that you only give the information (historical context) that is necessary for events in the story to be understood.
    That’s the important point to me – is it something that I as a reader need to know. For example, in Hazard, the discussion of Luddites in Frances’ boudoir early in the books, makes it clear who the men encountered by a character later in the book must be.
    If I want to know more than is in the novel or in the end notes, these days it’s usually easy enough to find the information – or the names of good reference books – online.
    I love Christmas stories and reread Christmas Angel not long ago. I especially love the ending of that book.
    There haven’t been many new (historical) Christmas books or anthologies this year, so I’m hoping to find a reissue of one I haven’t read.

    Reply
  30. Jo – I’ve never had a problem with the way you include historical details in your books. To me it seems that you only give the information (historical context) that is necessary for events in the story to be understood.
    That’s the important point to me – is it something that I as a reader need to know. For example, in Hazard, the discussion of Luddites in Frances’ boudoir early in the books, makes it clear who the men encountered by a character later in the book must be.
    If I want to know more than is in the novel or in the end notes, these days it’s usually easy enough to find the information – or the names of good reference books – online.
    I love Christmas stories and reread Christmas Angel not long ago. I especially love the ending of that book.
    There haven’t been many new (historical) Christmas books or anthologies this year, so I’m hoping to find a reissue of one I haven’t read.

    Reply
  31. Love it when stories are set in times of real turmoil and historical significance. An easy way to experience the drama of those times and comprehend the values that shape us today. What makes ordinary people rise and get involved in changing order is very mysterious. I am from India and born after independence. But grew up with stories of ordinary individuals who stood up for their rights and struggled to make the future better for the poorest class of society. It makes for very inspiring heroes and heroines from very ordinary circumstances.

    Reply
  32. Love it when stories are set in times of real turmoil and historical significance. An easy way to experience the drama of those times and comprehend the values that shape us today. What makes ordinary people rise and get involved in changing order is very mysterious. I am from India and born after independence. But grew up with stories of ordinary individuals who stood up for their rights and struggled to make the future better for the poorest class of society. It makes for very inspiring heroes and heroines from very ordinary circumstances.

    Reply
  33. Love it when stories are set in times of real turmoil and historical significance. An easy way to experience the drama of those times and comprehend the values that shape us today. What makes ordinary people rise and get involved in changing order is very mysterious. I am from India and born after independence. But grew up with stories of ordinary individuals who stood up for their rights and struggled to make the future better for the poorest class of society. It makes for very inspiring heroes and heroines from very ordinary circumstances.

    Reply
  34. Love it when stories are set in times of real turmoil and historical significance. An easy way to experience the drama of those times and comprehend the values that shape us today. What makes ordinary people rise and get involved in changing order is very mysterious. I am from India and born after independence. But grew up with stories of ordinary individuals who stood up for their rights and struggled to make the future better for the poorest class of society. It makes for very inspiring heroes and heroines from very ordinary circumstances.

    Reply
  35. Love it when stories are set in times of real turmoil and historical significance. An easy way to experience the drama of those times and comprehend the values that shape us today. What makes ordinary people rise and get involved in changing order is very mysterious. I am from India and born after independence. But grew up with stories of ordinary individuals who stood up for their rights and struggled to make the future better for the poorest class of society. It makes for very inspiring heroes and heroines from very ordinary circumstances.

    Reply
  36. Good point, Isobel. I wasn’t so much talking about Peterloo, which I think horrified nearly everyone, but the general trend post war to limit the size of gatherings and, if a body of people didn’t disperse, read the Riot Act and bring in the military.
    There were ardent reformers in the upper class, and I suspect nearly all property owners, even if only a small shop or tavern, feared the mob.

    Reply
  37. Good point, Isobel. I wasn’t so much talking about Peterloo, which I think horrified nearly everyone, but the general trend post war to limit the size of gatherings and, if a body of people didn’t disperse, read the Riot Act and bring in the military.
    There were ardent reformers in the upper class, and I suspect nearly all property owners, even if only a small shop or tavern, feared the mob.

    Reply
  38. Good point, Isobel. I wasn’t so much talking about Peterloo, which I think horrified nearly everyone, but the general trend post war to limit the size of gatherings and, if a body of people didn’t disperse, read the Riot Act and bring in the military.
    There were ardent reformers in the upper class, and I suspect nearly all property owners, even if only a small shop or tavern, feared the mob.

    Reply
  39. Good point, Isobel. I wasn’t so much talking about Peterloo, which I think horrified nearly everyone, but the general trend post war to limit the size of gatherings and, if a body of people didn’t disperse, read the Riot Act and bring in the military.
    There were ardent reformers in the upper class, and I suspect nearly all property owners, even if only a small shop or tavern, feared the mob.

    Reply
  40. Good point, Isobel. I wasn’t so much talking about Peterloo, which I think horrified nearly everyone, but the general trend post war to limit the size of gatherings and, if a body of people didn’t disperse, read the Riot Act and bring in the military.
    There were ardent reformers in the upper class, and I suspect nearly all property owners, even if only a small shop or tavern, feared the mob.

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Sharon. Sometimes it’s tricky for me to guess what people will and won’t know without explanation. For example, this social unrest, and especially Peterloo, are well known to most British people, but not, I assume, to Americans.
    There don’t seem to be as many new historical Christmas anthologies, do there. If you go on Amazon and search for something like historical christmas novellas, you might find something. You don’t have to buy from there, but it’s a place to search.

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Sharon. Sometimes it’s tricky for me to guess what people will and won’t know without explanation. For example, this social unrest, and especially Peterloo, are well known to most British people, but not, I assume, to Americans.
    There don’t seem to be as many new historical Christmas anthologies, do there. If you go on Amazon and search for something like historical christmas novellas, you might find something. You don’t have to buy from there, but it’s a place to search.

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Sharon. Sometimes it’s tricky for me to guess what people will and won’t know without explanation. For example, this social unrest, and especially Peterloo, are well known to most British people, but not, I assume, to Americans.
    There don’t seem to be as many new historical Christmas anthologies, do there. If you go on Amazon and search for something like historical christmas novellas, you might find something. You don’t have to buy from there, but it’s a place to search.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Sharon. Sometimes it’s tricky for me to guess what people will and won’t know without explanation. For example, this social unrest, and especially Peterloo, are well known to most British people, but not, I assume, to Americans.
    There don’t seem to be as many new historical Christmas anthologies, do there. If you go on Amazon and search for something like historical christmas novellas, you might find something. You don’t have to buy from there, but it’s a place to search.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Sharon. Sometimes it’s tricky for me to guess what people will and won’t know without explanation. For example, this social unrest, and especially Peterloo, are well known to most British people, but not, I assume, to Americans.
    There don’t seem to be as many new historical Christmas anthologies, do there. If you go on Amazon and search for something like historical christmas novellas, you might find something. You don’t have to buy from there, but it’s a place to search.

    Reply
  46. I enjoyed Christmas Angel, and I would love to reread it! I don’t need to know the exact time period of a “light” Regency novel, but if the characters are involved at all in the military or politics, or travel outside England during the story, then a timeline really does become necessary. I like both kinds of books, depending on what mood I’m in. I hope if I lived in that era, and was wealthy enough, I would have been involved in charitable works. But how much scope did a woman really have, without property rights, or the vote, or the ability to hold political office, or enter most professions or to even publish articles in the newspaper under their own names? By the way, I just saw a review in the Guardian of “Britain Against Napoleon”, it sounds like a great book(and sort of on topic for this post). http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/dec/14/britain-against-napoleon-roger-knight-review

    Reply
  47. I enjoyed Christmas Angel, and I would love to reread it! I don’t need to know the exact time period of a “light” Regency novel, but if the characters are involved at all in the military or politics, or travel outside England during the story, then a timeline really does become necessary. I like both kinds of books, depending on what mood I’m in. I hope if I lived in that era, and was wealthy enough, I would have been involved in charitable works. But how much scope did a woman really have, without property rights, or the vote, or the ability to hold political office, or enter most professions or to even publish articles in the newspaper under their own names? By the way, I just saw a review in the Guardian of “Britain Against Napoleon”, it sounds like a great book(and sort of on topic for this post). http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/dec/14/britain-against-napoleon-roger-knight-review

    Reply
  48. I enjoyed Christmas Angel, and I would love to reread it! I don’t need to know the exact time period of a “light” Regency novel, but if the characters are involved at all in the military or politics, or travel outside England during the story, then a timeline really does become necessary. I like both kinds of books, depending on what mood I’m in. I hope if I lived in that era, and was wealthy enough, I would have been involved in charitable works. But how much scope did a woman really have, without property rights, or the vote, or the ability to hold political office, or enter most professions or to even publish articles in the newspaper under their own names? By the way, I just saw a review in the Guardian of “Britain Against Napoleon”, it sounds like a great book(and sort of on topic for this post). http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/dec/14/britain-against-napoleon-roger-knight-review

    Reply
  49. I enjoyed Christmas Angel, and I would love to reread it! I don’t need to know the exact time period of a “light” Regency novel, but if the characters are involved at all in the military or politics, or travel outside England during the story, then a timeline really does become necessary. I like both kinds of books, depending on what mood I’m in. I hope if I lived in that era, and was wealthy enough, I would have been involved in charitable works. But how much scope did a woman really have, without property rights, or the vote, or the ability to hold political office, or enter most professions or to even publish articles in the newspaper under their own names? By the way, I just saw a review in the Guardian of “Britain Against Napoleon”, it sounds like a great book(and sort of on topic for this post). http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/dec/14/britain-against-napoleon-roger-knight-review

    Reply
  50. I enjoyed Christmas Angel, and I would love to reread it! I don’t need to know the exact time period of a “light” Regency novel, but if the characters are involved at all in the military or politics, or travel outside England during the story, then a timeline really does become necessary. I like both kinds of books, depending on what mood I’m in. I hope if I lived in that era, and was wealthy enough, I would have been involved in charitable works. But how much scope did a woman really have, without property rights, or the vote, or the ability to hold political office, or enter most professions or to even publish articles in the newspaper under their own names? By the way, I just saw a review in the Guardian of “Britain Against Napoleon”, it sounds like a great book(and sort of on topic for this post). http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/dec/14/britain-against-napoleon-roger-knight-review

    Reply
  51. I love history in my historical novels, and I adore author notes. Peterloo is one of those events that I have bought into the positive social history–that demonstrators were seeking redress against the pocket boroughs of the time. The thing about any social movement is that it has at least two factions, those that seek peaceful change and appeal to reason and justice and those that seek to topple the system with violence. Martin Luther King looked more moderate when compared to Malcolm X, but both sought to radically alter the status quo.
    My own experience with demonstrations was driving though a Bahraini village after a religious leader was released. The crowd was joyful, but there was an edge to the celebration. Youths picked up rocks to throw at our fancy car; elders made them put them down. I hid my camera under the seat, and pulled out my scarf for visiting religious sites. We passed safely.

    Reply
  52. I love history in my historical novels, and I adore author notes. Peterloo is one of those events that I have bought into the positive social history–that demonstrators were seeking redress against the pocket boroughs of the time. The thing about any social movement is that it has at least two factions, those that seek peaceful change and appeal to reason and justice and those that seek to topple the system with violence. Martin Luther King looked more moderate when compared to Malcolm X, but both sought to radically alter the status quo.
    My own experience with demonstrations was driving though a Bahraini village after a religious leader was released. The crowd was joyful, but there was an edge to the celebration. Youths picked up rocks to throw at our fancy car; elders made them put them down. I hid my camera under the seat, and pulled out my scarf for visiting religious sites. We passed safely.

    Reply
  53. I love history in my historical novels, and I adore author notes. Peterloo is one of those events that I have bought into the positive social history–that demonstrators were seeking redress against the pocket boroughs of the time. The thing about any social movement is that it has at least two factions, those that seek peaceful change and appeal to reason and justice and those that seek to topple the system with violence. Martin Luther King looked more moderate when compared to Malcolm X, but both sought to radically alter the status quo.
    My own experience with demonstrations was driving though a Bahraini village after a religious leader was released. The crowd was joyful, but there was an edge to the celebration. Youths picked up rocks to throw at our fancy car; elders made them put them down. I hid my camera under the seat, and pulled out my scarf for visiting religious sites. We passed safely.

    Reply
  54. I love history in my historical novels, and I adore author notes. Peterloo is one of those events that I have bought into the positive social history–that demonstrators were seeking redress against the pocket boroughs of the time. The thing about any social movement is that it has at least two factions, those that seek peaceful change and appeal to reason and justice and those that seek to topple the system with violence. Martin Luther King looked more moderate when compared to Malcolm X, but both sought to radically alter the status quo.
    My own experience with demonstrations was driving though a Bahraini village after a religious leader was released. The crowd was joyful, but there was an edge to the celebration. Youths picked up rocks to throw at our fancy car; elders made them put them down. I hid my camera under the seat, and pulled out my scarf for visiting religious sites. We passed safely.

    Reply
  55. I love history in my historical novels, and I adore author notes. Peterloo is one of those events that I have bought into the positive social history–that demonstrators were seeking redress against the pocket boroughs of the time. The thing about any social movement is that it has at least two factions, those that seek peaceful change and appeal to reason and justice and those that seek to topple the system with violence. Martin Luther King looked more moderate when compared to Malcolm X, but both sought to radically alter the status quo.
    My own experience with demonstrations was driving though a Bahraini village after a religious leader was released. The crowd was joyful, but there was an edge to the celebration. Youths picked up rocks to throw at our fancy car; elders made them put them down. I hid my camera under the seat, and pulled out my scarf for visiting religious sites. We passed safely.

    Reply
  56. I do like historical romances that involve real political and military events. Many times I have gone on to read a biography of a person that was mentioned in a historical romance.

    Reply
  57. I do like historical romances that involve real political and military events. Many times I have gone on to read a biography of a person that was mentioned in a historical romance.

    Reply
  58. I do like historical romances that involve real political and military events. Many times I have gone on to read a biography of a person that was mentioned in a historical romance.

    Reply
  59. I do like historical romances that involve real political and military events. Many times I have gone on to read a biography of a person that was mentioned in a historical romance.

    Reply
  60. I do like historical romances that involve real political and military events. Many times I have gone on to read a biography of a person that was mentioned in a historical romance.

    Reply
  61. Karin, thanks for pointing to that review. I want to read that book. I always thought the “backroom boys” were overlooked, which is why I made Hawk in The Devil’s Heiress part of the Quartermaster’s Division.

    Reply
  62. Karin, thanks for pointing to that review. I want to read that book. I always thought the “backroom boys” were overlooked, which is why I made Hawk in The Devil’s Heiress part of the Quartermaster’s Division.

    Reply
  63. Karin, thanks for pointing to that review. I want to read that book. I always thought the “backroom boys” were overlooked, which is why I made Hawk in The Devil’s Heiress part of the Quartermaster’s Division.

    Reply
  64. Karin, thanks for pointing to that review. I want to read that book. I always thought the “backroom boys” were overlooked, which is why I made Hawk in The Devil’s Heiress part of the Quartermaster’s Division.

    Reply
  65. Karin, thanks for pointing to that review. I want to read that book. I always thought the “backroom boys” were overlooked, which is why I made Hawk in The Devil’s Heiress part of the Quartermaster’s Division.

    Reply
  66. Shannon, that’s the thing. Legitimate unrest can so easily turn into a mob, and then things can go very badly. Sometimes it’s justified anger boiling up, but there are always those who want to exploit it, or simply revel in violence and destruction.
    A tricky line for those in power to walk, even the best intentioned.

    Reply
  67. Shannon, that’s the thing. Legitimate unrest can so easily turn into a mob, and then things can go very badly. Sometimes it’s justified anger boiling up, but there are always those who want to exploit it, or simply revel in violence and destruction.
    A tricky line for those in power to walk, even the best intentioned.

    Reply
  68. Shannon, that’s the thing. Legitimate unrest can so easily turn into a mob, and then things can go very badly. Sometimes it’s justified anger boiling up, but there are always those who want to exploit it, or simply revel in violence and destruction.
    A tricky line for those in power to walk, even the best intentioned.

    Reply
  69. Shannon, that’s the thing. Legitimate unrest can so easily turn into a mob, and then things can go very badly. Sometimes it’s justified anger boiling up, but there are always those who want to exploit it, or simply revel in violence and destruction.
    A tricky line for those in power to walk, even the best intentioned.

    Reply
  70. Shannon, that’s the thing. Legitimate unrest can so easily turn into a mob, and then things can go very badly. Sometimes it’s justified anger boiling up, but there are always those who want to exploit it, or simply revel in violence and destruction.
    A tricky line for those in power to walk, even the best intentioned.

    Reply
  71. Hi Jo,
    I do love when historical events are included in books as long as the events fit with with story and everything flows. I dislike when ‘current’ events seem forced into the story. That said you do a great job making the events work with the story (or the story work with the events – how ever you want to look at it 😉 )
    With the distance of time it’s easy to see both sides of a situation, and difficult to predict which side I would be on. It would depend entirely upon where I was born on the socieo-economic ladder because my perspective would be entirely different. 🙂

    Reply
  72. Hi Jo,
    I do love when historical events are included in books as long as the events fit with with story and everything flows. I dislike when ‘current’ events seem forced into the story. That said you do a great job making the events work with the story (or the story work with the events – how ever you want to look at it 😉 )
    With the distance of time it’s easy to see both sides of a situation, and difficult to predict which side I would be on. It would depend entirely upon where I was born on the socieo-economic ladder because my perspective would be entirely different. 🙂

    Reply
  73. Hi Jo,
    I do love when historical events are included in books as long as the events fit with with story and everything flows. I dislike when ‘current’ events seem forced into the story. That said you do a great job making the events work with the story (or the story work with the events – how ever you want to look at it 😉 )
    With the distance of time it’s easy to see both sides of a situation, and difficult to predict which side I would be on. It would depend entirely upon where I was born on the socieo-economic ladder because my perspective would be entirely different. 🙂

    Reply
  74. Hi Jo,
    I do love when historical events are included in books as long as the events fit with with story and everything flows. I dislike when ‘current’ events seem forced into the story. That said you do a great job making the events work with the story (or the story work with the events – how ever you want to look at it 😉 )
    With the distance of time it’s easy to see both sides of a situation, and difficult to predict which side I would be on. It would depend entirely upon where I was born on the socieo-economic ladder because my perspective would be entirely different. 🙂

    Reply
  75. Hi Jo,
    I do love when historical events are included in books as long as the events fit with with story and everything flows. I dislike when ‘current’ events seem forced into the story. That said you do a great job making the events work with the story (or the story work with the events – how ever you want to look at it 😉 )
    With the distance of time it’s easy to see both sides of a situation, and difficult to predict which side I would be on. It would depend entirely upon where I was born on the socieo-economic ladder because my perspective would be entirely different. 🙂

    Reply
  76. I have loved Regencies since discovering Austen and Heyer – and developed a tradition of buying each new Georgette Heyer novel for reading on Christmas day (very early in the AM!) I learned far more about history from historical novels than I did from taking it in university – especially the stories which connected the dots of politics, economics, social and cultural threads. So yes- I really like novels which are set in a specific time/event. That said – a good regency, true to the tradition of wit and comedy of manners is preferable to a pedestrian story set in a specific time-frame. What I also loved about Heyer’s stories is that I can follow the travels on the map (a Super Scale OS for the UK).
    A couple of decades ago, I lost all but 2 of my immediate family (aunts, uncles, cousins) within a 5 year period and needed to develop my own traditions – so reading and re-reading the Regency Christmas stories from Advent to Epiphany became one; I am in the middle of Christmas Angel right now.I have missed new ones this year, and every year I miss the completion of Edith Layton’s stories about the Hounds of Heaven/Dogstar – only half of those stories were told; I keep hoping someone else will take them up.
    One other disappointment is that we have travelled through the bi-centennial of the Napoleonic Wars with no special set of stories; I would love, by June 2015 to see a collected set of stories carrying through the major events, new Regency romances by the best authors, from the start of the French Revolution to Waterloo.

    Reply
  77. I have loved Regencies since discovering Austen and Heyer – and developed a tradition of buying each new Georgette Heyer novel for reading on Christmas day (very early in the AM!) I learned far more about history from historical novels than I did from taking it in university – especially the stories which connected the dots of politics, economics, social and cultural threads. So yes- I really like novels which are set in a specific time/event. That said – a good regency, true to the tradition of wit and comedy of manners is preferable to a pedestrian story set in a specific time-frame. What I also loved about Heyer’s stories is that I can follow the travels on the map (a Super Scale OS for the UK).
    A couple of decades ago, I lost all but 2 of my immediate family (aunts, uncles, cousins) within a 5 year period and needed to develop my own traditions – so reading and re-reading the Regency Christmas stories from Advent to Epiphany became one; I am in the middle of Christmas Angel right now.I have missed new ones this year, and every year I miss the completion of Edith Layton’s stories about the Hounds of Heaven/Dogstar – only half of those stories were told; I keep hoping someone else will take them up.
    One other disappointment is that we have travelled through the bi-centennial of the Napoleonic Wars with no special set of stories; I would love, by June 2015 to see a collected set of stories carrying through the major events, new Regency romances by the best authors, from the start of the French Revolution to Waterloo.

    Reply
  78. I have loved Regencies since discovering Austen and Heyer – and developed a tradition of buying each new Georgette Heyer novel for reading on Christmas day (very early in the AM!) I learned far more about history from historical novels than I did from taking it in university – especially the stories which connected the dots of politics, economics, social and cultural threads. So yes- I really like novels which are set in a specific time/event. That said – a good regency, true to the tradition of wit and comedy of manners is preferable to a pedestrian story set in a specific time-frame. What I also loved about Heyer’s stories is that I can follow the travels on the map (a Super Scale OS for the UK).
    A couple of decades ago, I lost all but 2 of my immediate family (aunts, uncles, cousins) within a 5 year period and needed to develop my own traditions – so reading and re-reading the Regency Christmas stories from Advent to Epiphany became one; I am in the middle of Christmas Angel right now.I have missed new ones this year, and every year I miss the completion of Edith Layton’s stories about the Hounds of Heaven/Dogstar – only half of those stories were told; I keep hoping someone else will take them up.
    One other disappointment is that we have travelled through the bi-centennial of the Napoleonic Wars with no special set of stories; I would love, by June 2015 to see a collected set of stories carrying through the major events, new Regency romances by the best authors, from the start of the French Revolution to Waterloo.

    Reply
  79. I have loved Regencies since discovering Austen and Heyer – and developed a tradition of buying each new Georgette Heyer novel for reading on Christmas day (very early in the AM!) I learned far more about history from historical novels than I did from taking it in university – especially the stories which connected the dots of politics, economics, social and cultural threads. So yes- I really like novels which are set in a specific time/event. That said – a good regency, true to the tradition of wit and comedy of manners is preferable to a pedestrian story set in a specific time-frame. What I also loved about Heyer’s stories is that I can follow the travels on the map (a Super Scale OS for the UK).
    A couple of decades ago, I lost all but 2 of my immediate family (aunts, uncles, cousins) within a 5 year period and needed to develop my own traditions – so reading and re-reading the Regency Christmas stories from Advent to Epiphany became one; I am in the middle of Christmas Angel right now.I have missed new ones this year, and every year I miss the completion of Edith Layton’s stories about the Hounds of Heaven/Dogstar – only half of those stories were told; I keep hoping someone else will take them up.
    One other disappointment is that we have travelled through the bi-centennial of the Napoleonic Wars with no special set of stories; I would love, by June 2015 to see a collected set of stories carrying through the major events, new Regency romances by the best authors, from the start of the French Revolution to Waterloo.

    Reply
  80. I have loved Regencies since discovering Austen and Heyer – and developed a tradition of buying each new Georgette Heyer novel for reading on Christmas day (very early in the AM!) I learned far more about history from historical novels than I did from taking it in university – especially the stories which connected the dots of politics, economics, social and cultural threads. So yes- I really like novels which are set in a specific time/event. That said – a good regency, true to the tradition of wit and comedy of manners is preferable to a pedestrian story set in a specific time-frame. What I also loved about Heyer’s stories is that I can follow the travels on the map (a Super Scale OS for the UK).
    A couple of decades ago, I lost all but 2 of my immediate family (aunts, uncles, cousins) within a 5 year period and needed to develop my own traditions – so reading and re-reading the Regency Christmas stories from Advent to Epiphany became one; I am in the middle of Christmas Angel right now.I have missed new ones this year, and every year I miss the completion of Edith Layton’s stories about the Hounds of Heaven/Dogstar – only half of those stories were told; I keep hoping someone else will take them up.
    One other disappointment is that we have travelled through the bi-centennial of the Napoleonic Wars with no special set of stories; I would love, by June 2015 to see a collected set of stories carrying through the major events, new Regency romances by the best authors, from the start of the French Revolution to Waterloo.

    Reply

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