Riffing from comments

Without a word to my fellow Wonder Wenches, I’m trying something a little different — responding to comments as a principal post. Let me know if this is a Good Thing or a Bad Thing. And if you think that’s a Martha Stewart reference, no, it’s 1066 AND ALL THAT. If you haven’t read it, hunt down a copy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1066_and_All_That

I quote from the above.
“Although the subtitle states that the book comprises “103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates”, the book’s preface (which is compulsory) mentions that originally four dates were planned, but last-minute research revealed that two of them were not memorable. The two dates that are self-referenced in the book are 1066, the Battle of Hastings and the Norman invasion of Britain, and 55 BC, the first Roman invasion of Britain under Julius Caesar. However, when the date of the Roman invasion is given it is immediately followed by mention of the fact that Caesar was “compelled to invade again the following year (54 BC, not 56, owing to the peculiar Roman method of counting)”, thereby adding the extra two dates that clearly are not memorable.

A joke typifying the humour is listing Shakespearean histories as kings of England, such as Kings Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2. Famous phrases from the book include “This was a Good Thing”; “This was a Bad Thing”; “Wave of saints”; and “Do you consider yourself a Good King or a Bad King?”. It also contains several joke test papers interspersed among the chapters, which contain nonsense instructions including the famous “On no account attempt to write on both sides of the paper at once” and “Do not attempt to answer more than one question at a time”.”

Is it a wonder that I ended up weird when raised on that, the Goons, I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again, and Monty Python.

However, to comment on comments, yes, Wylene, the MIP is about Dare’s sister and the man who hates the Rogues. Wouldn’t that make a neat title? THE MAN WHO HATES THE ROGUES. No one in NY would go for it. Let’s not get started on titles. BTW, though, it’ll almost certainly appear on many shelves a week or so early,so late August, just as LORD OF MIDNIGHT will probably appear in a couple of weeks. Ack!

Starting to read the Rogues. It really is best to read them in order if you can because some threads do run through. An Arranged Marriage has just been reprinted, so even if it isn’t on shelves, you should be able to order it. If not, let me know. The order from there is on my website.
http://www.jobev.com/booklist.html

Truth. Dare is the last of the Rogues to be settled and I knew that was significant. I was half way through the book, however, before I realized that it is the true end of a long story arc of 14 books written between 1990 and now. (That’s not considering that I wrote the first draft of the first book in 1977.) Incidents in the first book have set up ripple effects that won’t be over until Dare is fully healed and happy.

This does not mean that a reader has to have read them all to enjoy it. I’m not just saying that. The story itself stands on its own. It’s that there are little touches here and there that those familiar with the books will appreciate, an underpattern, perhaps. Not necessary to understanding the story, but pretty neat. I say that as someone who had no clue until characters mentioned it.

I’m off to See-see the dragon, Ruar of the Dragon’s Womb, and the pissed-off Princess — “No one said I actually had to do the virgin sacrifice thing!” — Rozlinda.

Jo šŸ™‚

39 thoughts on “Riffing from comments”

  1. Process is a topic most fascinating to other writers. Jo, I greatly admire your “flying into the mist” bravery–and the certitude that it will all work out in the end.
    I like having it both ways–planning an overarching and plot, largely character-driven, but marching thru the mist when actually writing any given chapter.
    Thus, when sister authors come down firmly on one side or ‘tother of the process question, I claim kinship with everyone.

    Reply
  2. Process is a topic most fascinating to other writers. Jo, I greatly admire your “flying into the mist” bravery–and the certitude that it will all work out in the end.
    I like having it both ways–planning an overarching and plot, largely character-driven, but marching thru the mist when actually writing any given chapter.
    Thus, when sister authors come down firmly on one side or ‘tother of the process question, I claim kinship with everyone.

    Reply
  3. Process is a topic most fascinating to other writers. Jo, I greatly admire your “flying into the mist” bravery–and the certitude that it will all work out in the end.
    I like having it both ways–planning an overarching and plot, largely character-driven, but marching thru the mist when actually writing any given chapter.
    Thus, when sister authors come down firmly on one side or ‘tother of the process question, I claim kinship with everyone.

    Reply
  4. Hi Jo —
    Just got off your site, after reading some excerpts. Wow! Secrets of the Night — your writer’s pen was firmly planted in my imagination. I’m on my way to amazon.com.
    As to the “underpattern” — I think this is a mark of a great writer. One that’s willing to dig deep into one’s soul and write out of the subconscious, the birthplace of life changing epiphanies. Iā€™m looking forward to discovering yours.
    Nina

    Reply
  5. Hi Jo —
    Just got off your site, after reading some excerpts. Wow! Secrets of the Night — your writer’s pen was firmly planted in my imagination. I’m on my way to amazon.com.
    As to the “underpattern” — I think this is a mark of a great writer. One that’s willing to dig deep into one’s soul and write out of the subconscious, the birthplace of life changing epiphanies. Iā€™m looking forward to discovering yours.
    Nina

    Reply
  6. Hi Jo —
    Just got off your site, after reading some excerpts. Wow! Secrets of the Night — your writer’s pen was firmly planted in my imagination. I’m on my way to amazon.com.
    As to the “underpattern” — I think this is a mark of a great writer. One that’s willing to dig deep into one’s soul and write out of the subconscious, the birthplace of life changing epiphanies. Iā€™m looking forward to discovering yours.
    Nina

    Reply
  7. I love these multi-book series but the problem really is that you have to reread the books every once in a while in order to keep the important bits and characters in mind for the books that are still to come. And that’s hard. One of the few authors that I have kept up with is Suzanne Brockmann in her SEAL “big books”. She does make it easier for her readers because she always has a count-down to the new book in which she has quizzes, etc. to help us remember what role the main character or characters–mostly, of course it’s the male–have been up to. This time she won’t do this. She’s got something else in mind. Wonder what it is.
    But I frankly admit that though I’ve read a number of your books, Jo, I haven’t read any of the Rogue books as far as I can remember. I want to read them one after the other. The same goes for Diana Gabaldon’s books. I listened to her abridged tapes but I think I should have done it the other way around and read the books as they came out and listened to the tapes as the next book appears. I just read too many authors. I guess I should be more picky. But then, I’ve been collecting authors and books for almost 50 years and that does go back a long way and more into historical novels than outright romances. I learned a lot about history this way.
    So it will certainly be time to read your Rogues, Jo. Must make room on my reading program–if I can just keep from falling asleep all the time.
    I definitely prefer historical to contemporary as long as I don’t find too many anachronisms in word usage or other things like that. I keep meaning to post more in the group but I just can’t seem to get my thoughts together at the appropriate time. I have commented a few times.
    I love “1066 and All That” such a wonderful humorous book. Have you ever read “And Now All This” by the same authors? I haven’t read that yet and suspect that it’s not quite up to the standards of the first since I only came across it by chance. I had no idea that they were written in 1930 and 1932 respectively. And right now, I’m not sure at all where they are in storage: in the basement here or in my unit in the storage building. I’ve got *way* too many books although the storage areas both contain more than that.

    Reply
  8. I love these multi-book series but the problem really is that you have to reread the books every once in a while in order to keep the important bits and characters in mind for the books that are still to come. And that’s hard. One of the few authors that I have kept up with is Suzanne Brockmann in her SEAL “big books”. She does make it easier for her readers because she always has a count-down to the new book in which she has quizzes, etc. to help us remember what role the main character or characters–mostly, of course it’s the male–have been up to. This time she won’t do this. She’s got something else in mind. Wonder what it is.
    But I frankly admit that though I’ve read a number of your books, Jo, I haven’t read any of the Rogue books as far as I can remember. I want to read them one after the other. The same goes for Diana Gabaldon’s books. I listened to her abridged tapes but I think I should have done it the other way around and read the books as they came out and listened to the tapes as the next book appears. I just read too many authors. I guess I should be more picky. But then, I’ve been collecting authors and books for almost 50 years and that does go back a long way and more into historical novels than outright romances. I learned a lot about history this way.
    So it will certainly be time to read your Rogues, Jo. Must make room on my reading program–if I can just keep from falling asleep all the time.
    I definitely prefer historical to contemporary as long as I don’t find too many anachronisms in word usage or other things like that. I keep meaning to post more in the group but I just can’t seem to get my thoughts together at the appropriate time. I have commented a few times.
    I love “1066 and All That” such a wonderful humorous book. Have you ever read “And Now All This” by the same authors? I haven’t read that yet and suspect that it’s not quite up to the standards of the first since I only came across it by chance. I had no idea that they were written in 1930 and 1932 respectively. And right now, I’m not sure at all where they are in storage: in the basement here or in my unit in the storage building. I’ve got *way* too many books although the storage areas both contain more than that.

    Reply
  9. I love these multi-book series but the problem really is that you have to reread the books every once in a while in order to keep the important bits and characters in mind for the books that are still to come. And that’s hard. One of the few authors that I have kept up with is Suzanne Brockmann in her SEAL “big books”. She does make it easier for her readers because she always has a count-down to the new book in which she has quizzes, etc. to help us remember what role the main character or characters–mostly, of course it’s the male–have been up to. This time she won’t do this. She’s got something else in mind. Wonder what it is.
    But I frankly admit that though I’ve read a number of your books, Jo, I haven’t read any of the Rogue books as far as I can remember. I want to read them one after the other. The same goes for Diana Gabaldon’s books. I listened to her abridged tapes but I think I should have done it the other way around and read the books as they came out and listened to the tapes as the next book appears. I just read too many authors. I guess I should be more picky. But then, I’ve been collecting authors and books for almost 50 years and that does go back a long way and more into historical novels than outright romances. I learned a lot about history this way.
    So it will certainly be time to read your Rogues, Jo. Must make room on my reading program–if I can just keep from falling asleep all the time.
    I definitely prefer historical to contemporary as long as I don’t find too many anachronisms in word usage or other things like that. I keep meaning to post more in the group but I just can’t seem to get my thoughts together at the appropriate time. I have commented a few times.
    I love “1066 and All That” such a wonderful humorous book. Have you ever read “And Now All This” by the same authors? I haven’t read that yet and suspect that it’s not quite up to the standards of the first since I only came across it by chance. I had no idea that they were written in 1930 and 1932 respectively. And right now, I’m not sure at all where they are in storage: in the basement here or in my unit in the storage building. I’ve got *way* too many books although the storage areas both contain more than that.

    Reply
  10. tal sez:
    “Are you Roger Mortimer? If not, have you got him?”
    “Are you prepared to marry either Isabella of Hainault or Marguerite of Angouleme? Candidates are advised not to attempt both ladies at the same time.”
    “Who is your mother? If nun, write NONE.”
    Do I know my Sellars & Yeatman, or what?
    I’m particularly fond of the “review” quoted in the front: “We look forward eagerly to their last book.”
    So, have you read FROM BEOWULF TO VIRGINIA WOOLF or THE OVERWROUGHT URN, or THE SWEENIAD or TOYNBEE IN ELYSIUM?

    Reply
  11. tal sez:
    “Are you Roger Mortimer? If not, have you got him?”
    “Are you prepared to marry either Isabella of Hainault or Marguerite of Angouleme? Candidates are advised not to attempt both ladies at the same time.”
    “Who is your mother? If nun, write NONE.”
    Do I know my Sellars & Yeatman, or what?
    I’m particularly fond of the “review” quoted in the front: “We look forward eagerly to their last book.”
    So, have you read FROM BEOWULF TO VIRGINIA WOOLF or THE OVERWROUGHT URN, or THE SWEENIAD or TOYNBEE IN ELYSIUM?

    Reply
  12. tal sez:
    “Are you Roger Mortimer? If not, have you got him?”
    “Are you prepared to marry either Isabella of Hainault or Marguerite of Angouleme? Candidates are advised not to attempt both ladies at the same time.”
    “Who is your mother? If nun, write NONE.”
    Do I know my Sellars & Yeatman, or what?
    I’m particularly fond of the “review” quoted in the front: “We look forward eagerly to their last book.”
    So, have you read FROM BEOWULF TO VIRGINIA WOOLF or THE OVERWROUGHT URN, or THE SWEENIAD or TOYNBEE IN ELYSIUM?

    Reply
  13. I have to admit I’m a re-reader by nature- if I find books I like, I like to live there. I was excited when I found this blog because I am already addicted to re-reading Jo Beverly and Mary Jo Putney. So, if you haven’t recently re-read (or never read) the Jo Beverly rogues books-(re: a previous comment) what a treat you can look forward to.
    Jo- I am looking forward to Dare’s recovery.
    Merry

    Reply
  14. I have to admit I’m a re-reader by nature- if I find books I like, I like to live there. I was excited when I found this blog because I am already addicted to re-reading Jo Beverly and Mary Jo Putney. So, if you haven’t recently re-read (or never read) the Jo Beverly rogues books-(re: a previous comment) what a treat you can look forward to.
    Jo- I am looking forward to Dare’s recovery.
    Merry

    Reply
  15. I have to admit I’m a re-reader by nature- if I find books I like, I like to live there. I was excited when I found this blog because I am already addicted to re-reading Jo Beverly and Mary Jo Putney. So, if you haven’t recently re-read (or never read) the Jo Beverly rogues books-(re: a previous comment) what a treat you can look forward to.
    Jo- I am looking forward to Dare’s recovery.
    Merry

    Reply
  16. It would be interesting to come up with a pop quiz about the Rogues. I’ll have to think about that.
    No, I haven’t read those others, Tal. They look interesting.Though I can’t say literary parodies often hit the spot with me.
    It’s like alternate history. Adding something is fine, but changing is another. Like Mary Jo using magic to summon the Armada storm.Excellent. But if she’d made Mary Tudor have an heir so Elizabeth never reigned, I’d have frowned.
    OTOH, Katy Cooper’s Prince of Hearts, in which Henry VI’s eldest son didn’t die was great.
    So I’m not consistent, but even so, alternate history usually frets me.
    Jo

    Reply
  17. It would be interesting to come up with a pop quiz about the Rogues. I’ll have to think about that.
    No, I haven’t read those others, Tal. They look interesting.Though I can’t say literary parodies often hit the spot with me.
    It’s like alternate history. Adding something is fine, but changing is another. Like Mary Jo using magic to summon the Armada storm.Excellent. But if she’d made Mary Tudor have an heir so Elizabeth never reigned, I’d have frowned.
    OTOH, Katy Cooper’s Prince of Hearts, in which Henry VI’s eldest son didn’t die was great.
    So I’m not consistent, but even so, alternate history usually frets me.
    Jo

    Reply
  18. It would be interesting to come up with a pop quiz about the Rogues. I’ll have to think about that.
    No, I haven’t read those others, Tal. They look interesting.Though I can’t say literary parodies often hit the spot with me.
    It’s like alternate history. Adding something is fine, but changing is another. Like Mary Jo using magic to summon the Armada storm.Excellent. But if she’d made Mary Tudor have an heir so Elizabeth never reigned, I’d have frowned.
    OTOH, Katy Cooper’s Prince of Hearts, in which Henry VI’s eldest son didn’t die was great.
    So I’m not consistent, but even so, alternate history usually frets me.
    Jo

    Reply
  19. Merry, I am a rereader too, and I have lost count of how often I have reread the stories of Jo’s Rogues and Mary Jo’s Fallen Angels. Rereading books I love is like visiting with old friends; there is comfort in the familiarity and delight in ever unfolding discoveries.

    Reply
  20. Merry, I am a rereader too, and I have lost count of how often I have reread the stories of Jo’s Rogues and Mary Jo’s Fallen Angels. Rereading books I love is like visiting with old friends; there is comfort in the familiarity and delight in ever unfolding discoveries.

    Reply
  21. Merry, I am a rereader too, and I have lost count of how often I have reread the stories of Jo’s Rogues and Mary Jo’s Fallen Angels. Rereading books I love is like visiting with old friends; there is comfort in the familiarity and delight in ever unfolding discoveries.

    Reply
  22. One of the things I do to comfort myself in (thankfully rare) extreme stress is reread Carla Kelly’s old regencies – particularly Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand. It works for me.
    And sometimes you just can’t find anything to read that is even half as good as old favorites. I believe I’ve reread many books by several of the Word Wenches.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  23. One of the things I do to comfort myself in (thankfully rare) extreme stress is reread Carla Kelly’s old regencies – particularly Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand. It works for me.
    And sometimes you just can’t find anything to read that is even half as good as old favorites. I believe I’ve reread many books by several of the Word Wenches.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  24. One of the things I do to comfort myself in (thankfully rare) extreme stress is reread Carla Kelly’s old regencies – particularly Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand. It works for me.
    And sometimes you just can’t find anything to read that is even half as good as old favorites. I believe I’ve reread many books by several of the Word Wenches.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  25. p.s.
    AND, I love that the experience can be very different the second or third time through – I’ll notice things I missed before – or something will just strike me differently the second time through. For instance, the first time in a series I might have preferred book 3 but the second time through I’ll be wowed by book 4.
    Some of these books are just so wonderful that they deserve more than one read.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  26. p.s.
    AND, I love that the experience can be very different the second or third time through – I’ll notice things I missed before – or something will just strike me differently the second time through. For instance, the first time in a series I might have preferred book 3 but the second time through I’ll be wowed by book 4.
    Some of these books are just so wonderful that they deserve more than one read.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  27. p.s.
    AND, I love that the experience can be very different the second or third time through – I’ll notice things I missed before – or something will just strike me differently the second time through. For instance, the first time in a series I might have preferred book 3 but the second time through I’ll be wowed by book 4.
    Some of these books are just so wonderful that they deserve more than one read.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  28. A good follow-up to 1066 and All That are Richard Armour’s books… _It All Started With Eve_ and _Twisted Tales from Shakespeare_ are my favorites.
    I’ve only heard one episode of “I’m Sorry, I’ll Read that Again,” on a record album, but it remains one of my favorite memories.
    “What’s that?”
    “That’s Morris Dancing.”
    “Yeees, we’re a little worried about Morris.”

    Reply
  29. A good follow-up to 1066 and All That are Richard Armour’s books… _It All Started With Eve_ and _Twisted Tales from Shakespeare_ are my favorites.
    I’ve only heard one episode of “I’m Sorry, I’ll Read that Again,” on a record album, but it remains one of my favorite memories.
    “What’s that?”
    “That’s Morris Dancing.”
    “Yeees, we’re a little worried about Morris.”

    Reply
  30. A good follow-up to 1066 and All That are Richard Armour’s books… _It All Started With Eve_ and _Twisted Tales from Shakespeare_ are my favorites.
    I’ve only heard one episode of “I’m Sorry, I’ll Read that Again,” on a record album, but it remains one of my favorite memories.
    “What’s that?”
    “That’s Morris Dancing.”
    “Yeees, we’re a little worried about Morris.”

    Reply
  31. From Pat Rice:
    I love the idea of “understories” that carry through a series. Unfortunately, with a memory like mine, I can’t remember the bits from one book to the next, even when I’m writing them. so even if I read ever Rogue in order, all I’m getting out of them is the lovely characters and current story. Anyone have a good brain I could borrow? It’s another reason I can’t totally fly into the mist as well–I’d forget where the mountain is and crash right into it.
    Love these quotes, and yes, Jo, I can see why you’re twisted.

    Reply
  32. From Pat Rice:
    I love the idea of “understories” that carry through a series. Unfortunately, with a memory like mine, I can’t remember the bits from one book to the next, even when I’m writing them. so even if I read ever Rogue in order, all I’m getting out of them is the lovely characters and current story. Anyone have a good brain I could borrow? It’s another reason I can’t totally fly into the mist as well–I’d forget where the mountain is and crash right into it.
    Love these quotes, and yes, Jo, I can see why you’re twisted.

    Reply
  33. From Pat Rice:
    I love the idea of “understories” that carry through a series. Unfortunately, with a memory like mine, I can’t remember the bits from one book to the next, even when I’m writing them. so even if I read ever Rogue in order, all I’m getting out of them is the lovely characters and current story. Anyone have a good brain I could borrow? It’s another reason I can’t totally fly into the mist as well–I’d forget where the mountain is and crash right into it.
    Love these quotes, and yes, Jo, I can see why you’re twisted.

    Reply
  34. Hello Jo,
    I have read all the Rogues books. In fact I loved them so much I had to own them all and I also love and own the medieval series.I’m sitting on pins and needles waiting to get Dares story in my hands and sad that its the last. While I’m waiting I’m keeping myself busy reading the Rosecliffe series by Rexanne Becnel. I also would enjoy a pop quiz on the Rogues. I think I have read them enough times to do very well on it.

    Reply
  35. Hello Jo,
    I have read all the Rogues books. In fact I loved them so much I had to own them all and I also love and own the medieval series.I’m sitting on pins and needles waiting to get Dares story in my hands and sad that its the last. While I’m waiting I’m keeping myself busy reading the Rosecliffe series by Rexanne Becnel. I also would enjoy a pop quiz on the Rogues. I think I have read them enough times to do very well on it.

    Reply
  36. Hello Jo,
    I have read all the Rogues books. In fact I loved them so much I had to own them all and I also love and own the medieval series.I’m sitting on pins and needles waiting to get Dares story in my hands and sad that its the last. While I’m waiting I’m keeping myself busy reading the Rosecliffe series by Rexanne Becnel. I also would enjoy a pop quiz on the Rogues. I think I have read them enough times to do very well on it.

    Reply

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