Responding re Gothics

I composed a post which then disappeared in a flash. Very strange.

Continuing to respond to posts as a main post. Let me know what you all think.

Tal, glad my post hit the spot for you, and thank you for the follow up. I had most of that, I think from the same site, but yes, Husband Hunters!!! doesn’t seem to be easily available anywhere.

Pat said: used to devour 20th century gothics but I’ll have to admit I never got into the older versions where Snidely Dolash tied the innocent maiden to the camel or horse or railroad tracks. I have always been a fan of women who kicked the villains where they hurt, and these never did.

Are you certain the author of RAVENSWORTH was a man? So many authors wrote under pseudonyms back then. And I have to wonder if Rosalvo’s author wasn’t really named Rose and enjoyed being the hero as well as the heroine.

I rapidly tired of the gothics in the ’80s, when for a while there was nothing else but there’s something fresh and over the top about the old ones.

I’m pretty sure that the author, George Brewer, was male, because there are articles about him. He seems to have also written in the style of Fielding and Smollett.

As for heroines, I prefer your version to kick-ass. Not good to kick people from behind, you know.

The heroines in these book do tend to faint rather than fight, but then the heroes are inclined to sigh and burst into tears, so it’s pretty equal.

Jo 🙂

12 thoughts on “Responding re Gothics”

  1. Your original post came back.
    When I was a freshman in college, I did my term paper on the horror story as a literary form, and read quite a bit about the Minerva Press Gothics. There was another book written then that was, like NORTHANGER ABBEY, a satire on Gothic romances, but I can’t remember the title or author. This was when I was still at college, and I couldn’t find a copy of the book itself. And I’d forgotten about it by the time I had access to the resources of the UC Berkeley Library.

    Reply
  2. Your original post came back.
    When I was a freshman in college, I did my term paper on the horror story as a literary form, and read quite a bit about the Minerva Press Gothics. There was another book written then that was, like NORTHANGER ABBEY, a satire on Gothic romances, but I can’t remember the title or author. This was when I was still at college, and I couldn’t find a copy of the book itself. And I’d forgotten about it by the time I had access to the resources of the UC Berkeley Library.

    Reply
  3. Your original post came back.
    When I was a freshman in college, I did my term paper on the horror story as a literary form, and read quite a bit about the Minerva Press Gothics. There was another book written then that was, like NORTHANGER ABBEY, a satire on Gothic romances, but I can’t remember the title or author. This was when I was still at college, and I couldn’t find a copy of the book itself. And I’d forgotten about it by the time I had access to the resources of the UC Berkeley Library.

    Reply
  4. Jo, I love those older novels, and have read a few of them. It’s very good to know about Valancourt Books, and more power to them. There are a lot of books out there in need of reprint rescue. What beautiful covers they are doing, too! Wow!
    One of my personal faves by Ann Radcliffe is The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne, in which there are fiery Highland oaths, a hero bent on revenge, and a heroine easily spooked by anything that moves. Though it’s an adventure, seemed to me the main characters did an inordinate amount of sittin’ around the castle (or alternatively, the dungeon), moaning and complaining. All in good fun, of course; for its time it was probably a real nail-biter.
    And for our time, these books can give us terrific insights into the culture and mindset of characters in our own novels.
    thanks for bringing up a fascinating subject!
    ~Susan

    Reply
  5. Jo, I love those older novels, and have read a few of them. It’s very good to know about Valancourt Books, and more power to them. There are a lot of books out there in need of reprint rescue. What beautiful covers they are doing, too! Wow!
    One of my personal faves by Ann Radcliffe is The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne, in which there are fiery Highland oaths, a hero bent on revenge, and a heroine easily spooked by anything that moves. Though it’s an adventure, seemed to me the main characters did an inordinate amount of sittin’ around the castle (or alternatively, the dungeon), moaning and complaining. All in good fun, of course; for its time it was probably a real nail-biter.
    And for our time, these books can give us terrific insights into the culture and mindset of characters in our own novels.
    thanks for bringing up a fascinating subject!
    ~Susan

    Reply
  6. Jo, I love those older novels, and have read a few of them. It’s very good to know about Valancourt Books, and more power to them. There are a lot of books out there in need of reprint rescue. What beautiful covers they are doing, too! Wow!
    One of my personal faves by Ann Radcliffe is The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne, in which there are fiery Highland oaths, a hero bent on revenge, and a heroine easily spooked by anything that moves. Though it’s an adventure, seemed to me the main characters did an inordinate amount of sittin’ around the castle (or alternatively, the dungeon), moaning and complaining. All in good fun, of course; for its time it was probably a real nail-biter.
    And for our time, these books can give us terrific insights into the culture and mindset of characters in our own novels.
    thanks for bringing up a fascinating subject!
    ~Susan

    Reply
  7. LOL! Heroes who burst into tears! Maybe they were afraid of the heroines kicking them where it hurt. And definitely, frontal violence is the only fair way to go.
    Pat, laughing

    Reply
  8. LOL! Heroes who burst into tears! Maybe they were afraid of the heroines kicking them where it hurt. And definitely, frontal violence is the only fair way to go.
    Pat, laughing

    Reply
  9. LOL! Heroes who burst into tears! Maybe they were afraid of the heroines kicking them where it hurt. And definitely, frontal violence is the only fair way to go.
    Pat, laughing

    Reply

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