Research from my bed

Anne here, and that's a slightly misleading heading — I'm not bedridden or about to talk about naughty things or anything, I just research from my bed, using my laptop, quite often. It could just as easily take place in my writing room on the main computer. But right now I'm writing this post from my bed, so . . . 

And I'm answering a question someone sent me privately, about doing research from the other side of the world.

Lock&CoHatters

I have huge envy of the wenches who can hop in a car and visit potential settings, or even those who can hop on a plane. I could hop on a plane, too, of course (though not currently with our CoVid restrictions), and have, often — the photo on the right is mine from my last UK trip. But a round trip to the UK costs me several thousand dollars, and believe me, sitting in a plane for 23 hours (one way) is no fun — and that's just to get there. In any case, with CoVid, travel is a whole other set of problems, not the least of which is the requirement to be quarantined for 10 days on arrival in the UK, and 2 weeks of quarantine on returning home.

Before I became a writer, I'd travelled quite a bit—in fact I was traveling in North America, the UK, Europe and Asia when I first decided to try to write for a living. And I'd visited the UK several times and lived in Scotland for a year as a child. 

But I was absorbing the sights and sounds and smells as a traveller, not a writer.  I toured museums and fabulous old houses for the love of history and fine old houses, not with a view to setting a scene in one of them, or having a character live in them. I wrote plenty of letters, but took no writerly notes.

So for me, most of the time, it has to be virtual research.

When I first started writing fiction, most of my research came from books. I grew up reading fiction, like Austen and Heyer and others who gave me a feeling for the times. But for settings and historical background and so on, it was mostly books from my local library. When I started writing the internet was in its infancy.

State_Library_of_Victoria_3009eStill my library was pretty good, and I was able to borrow detailed military histories, and the history of underclothes, and other excellent histories. But my favorites were often published diaries — some of which I borrowed on inter-library loan from my State Library — that's it in the photo above left. 

Screen Shot 2021-10-22 at 5.51.04 PMI loved reading primary sources — travelers' diaries, or collections of letters, in which the writer gave their impressions, not just of the localities they were visiting, but also their views of the local culture, and the people they met, or sometimes it was just a recounting of their day-to-day life and their concerns. All of which was wonderful source material for a writer.

These days these letters and diaries and many more are available on-line, which is such a boon to researchers and writers. I was able to access quite a few on-line diaries for my book set partly in Egypt. The same with my book set in post-Napoleonic Spain, though some I used were written during the war. And I accessed blogs on traditional local foods and so on as well.

Screen Shot 2021-10-22 at 5.50.50 PMI also collect maps of localities, and scour the internet for photos of the places I want my characters to be, paying particular attention to photos or paintings with the atmosphere I'm after. I invent houses for my characters based on a combination of houses I found on the web. 

Then again, not all research has to be in "hard copy". Sometimes, I will lie down on my bed, close my eyes and simply imagine myself into a scene or a place, trying to imagine the sounds and the smells. If I want to set a scene in a maze, for instance, I can close my eyes and recall the tall, dense hedges that I played in and around as a child. Or I'll pick a sprig of yew or cypress and the smell will take me right back.

If I want a snow scene, I'll recall my time in the mountains of Greece in winter, and the squeaking sound my shoes made in the snow, and how the smell of the vegetation beneath the snow came up so fresh and bearing the scent of summer. And of how a clear animal print outline in the snow meant it was relatively old, whereas a crumbly one was really fresh. (One day I'll tell you the story of how we slid down a steep mountainside on our bums after we saw really fresh bear prints and saw (and heard) the bear above us.)

And eventually all of these various scraps and snippets and random threads come together in the crucible of the imagination and voila, a story world emerges. And that, dear readers, is how research can be done from almost anywhere.

Did any of this surprise you? If you could travel anywhere for research or just for fun, where would you go?

200 thoughts on “Research from my bed”

  1. “Sometimes, I will lie down on my bed, close my eyes and simply imagine myself into a scene or a place”
    I have an electric bed (purchased long ago to help with back problems). Both top and bottom can be raised, so it’s perfect for sitting up in bed with a laptop. It also has a vibro-massage button for easing away those aches and pains. When suffering from writer’s block I think raising the legs, tilting the back a little to gaze at the ceiling ( Have a nice Picasso in place) and touching the vibro, may help induce exotic images or plot themes (replace x with r if r-rated is required ). I seem to remember a film, maybe Bond, where a bed retracts into the wall after a button is accidentally touched!
    Anyway, I think an electric bed could be the perfect companion for a sleepy imaginative author.
    If writing contemporaries, it could also feature in the plot!
    If I could travel anywhere I rather fancy a submarine trip to the deepest parts of the ocean to search for monsters …. or maybe Loch Ness in Scotland would do!

    Reply
  2. “Sometimes, I will lie down on my bed, close my eyes and simply imagine myself into a scene or a place”
    I have an electric bed (purchased long ago to help with back problems). Both top and bottom can be raised, so it’s perfect for sitting up in bed with a laptop. It also has a vibro-massage button for easing away those aches and pains. When suffering from writer’s block I think raising the legs, tilting the back a little to gaze at the ceiling ( Have a nice Picasso in place) and touching the vibro, may help induce exotic images or plot themes (replace x with r if r-rated is required ). I seem to remember a film, maybe Bond, where a bed retracts into the wall after a button is accidentally touched!
    Anyway, I think an electric bed could be the perfect companion for a sleepy imaginative author.
    If writing contemporaries, it could also feature in the plot!
    If I could travel anywhere I rather fancy a submarine trip to the deepest parts of the ocean to search for monsters …. or maybe Loch Ness in Scotland would do!

    Reply
  3. “Sometimes, I will lie down on my bed, close my eyes and simply imagine myself into a scene or a place”
    I have an electric bed (purchased long ago to help with back problems). Both top and bottom can be raised, so it’s perfect for sitting up in bed with a laptop. It also has a vibro-massage button for easing away those aches and pains. When suffering from writer’s block I think raising the legs, tilting the back a little to gaze at the ceiling ( Have a nice Picasso in place) and touching the vibro, may help induce exotic images or plot themes (replace x with r if r-rated is required ). I seem to remember a film, maybe Bond, where a bed retracts into the wall after a button is accidentally touched!
    Anyway, I think an electric bed could be the perfect companion for a sleepy imaginative author.
    If writing contemporaries, it could also feature in the plot!
    If I could travel anywhere I rather fancy a submarine trip to the deepest parts of the ocean to search for monsters …. or maybe Loch Ness in Scotland would do!

    Reply
  4. “Sometimes, I will lie down on my bed, close my eyes and simply imagine myself into a scene or a place”
    I have an electric bed (purchased long ago to help with back problems). Both top and bottom can be raised, so it’s perfect for sitting up in bed with a laptop. It also has a vibro-massage button for easing away those aches and pains. When suffering from writer’s block I think raising the legs, tilting the back a little to gaze at the ceiling ( Have a nice Picasso in place) and touching the vibro, may help induce exotic images or plot themes (replace x with r if r-rated is required ). I seem to remember a film, maybe Bond, where a bed retracts into the wall after a button is accidentally touched!
    Anyway, I think an electric bed could be the perfect companion for a sleepy imaginative author.
    If writing contemporaries, it could also feature in the plot!
    If I could travel anywhere I rather fancy a submarine trip to the deepest parts of the ocean to search for monsters …. or maybe Loch Ness in Scotland would do!

    Reply
  5. “Sometimes, I will lie down on my bed, close my eyes and simply imagine myself into a scene or a place”
    I have an electric bed (purchased long ago to help with back problems). Both top and bottom can be raised, so it’s perfect for sitting up in bed with a laptop. It also has a vibro-massage button for easing away those aches and pains. When suffering from writer’s block I think raising the legs, tilting the back a little to gaze at the ceiling ( Have a nice Picasso in place) and touching the vibro, may help induce exotic images or plot themes (replace x with r if r-rated is required ). I seem to remember a film, maybe Bond, where a bed retracts into the wall after a button is accidentally touched!
    Anyway, I think an electric bed could be the perfect companion for a sleepy imaginative author.
    If writing contemporaries, it could also feature in the plot!
    If I could travel anywhere I rather fancy a submarine trip to the deepest parts of the ocean to search for monsters …. or maybe Loch Ness in Scotland would do!

    Reply
  6. I do not have fond memories of exploring in bed; although, like many another reader, I did read with a flashlight under the covers — and burned the mattriess with the flashlight. I’m not sure that memory would be a good one for a writer to follow through with.

    Reply
  7. I do not have fond memories of exploring in bed; although, like many another reader, I did read with a flashlight under the covers — and burned the mattriess with the flashlight. I’m not sure that memory would be a good one for a writer to follow through with.

    Reply
  8. I do not have fond memories of exploring in bed; although, like many another reader, I did read with a flashlight under the covers — and burned the mattriess with the flashlight. I’m not sure that memory would be a good one for a writer to follow through with.

    Reply
  9. I do not have fond memories of exploring in bed; although, like many another reader, I did read with a flashlight under the covers — and burned the mattriess with the flashlight. I’m not sure that memory would be a good one for a writer to follow through with.

    Reply
  10. I do not have fond memories of exploring in bed; although, like many another reader, I did read with a flashlight under the covers — and burned the mattriess with the flashlight. I’m not sure that memory would be a good one for a writer to follow through with.

    Reply
  11. I was another who read with a flashlight under the covers, which probably did my eyes no good, but at least I never burned the mattress!
    Anne, you’ve just given a wonderful outline of how a historical writer does her research! The internet has made research MUCH easier!
    Also useful when writing exotic locations is finding someone with lived experience in the area. The information might not be historical, but one can learn the scents and light and textures.

    Reply
  12. I was another who read with a flashlight under the covers, which probably did my eyes no good, but at least I never burned the mattress!
    Anne, you’ve just given a wonderful outline of how a historical writer does her research! The internet has made research MUCH easier!
    Also useful when writing exotic locations is finding someone with lived experience in the area. The information might not be historical, but one can learn the scents and light and textures.

    Reply
  13. I was another who read with a flashlight under the covers, which probably did my eyes no good, but at least I never burned the mattress!
    Anne, you’ve just given a wonderful outline of how a historical writer does her research! The internet has made research MUCH easier!
    Also useful when writing exotic locations is finding someone with lived experience in the area. The information might not be historical, but one can learn the scents and light and textures.

    Reply
  14. I was another who read with a flashlight under the covers, which probably did my eyes no good, but at least I never burned the mattress!
    Anne, you’ve just given a wonderful outline of how a historical writer does her research! The internet has made research MUCH easier!
    Also useful when writing exotic locations is finding someone with lived experience in the area. The information might not be historical, but one can learn the scents and light and textures.

    Reply
  15. I was another who read with a flashlight under the covers, which probably did my eyes no good, but at least I never burned the mattress!
    Anne, you’ve just given a wonderful outline of how a historical writer does her research! The internet has made research MUCH easier!
    Also useful when writing exotic locations is finding someone with lived experience in the area. The information might not be historical, but one can learn the scents and light and textures.

    Reply
  16. Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.
    I sympathize with you on the long travel times when flying to the UK; that was about how long it took for our daughter recently to go from our door to hers recently on her return to South Korea. My mother told stories of when she emigrated from the Netherlands to New Zealand in the 1950s; that trip took six weeks by boat which makes one day seem positively paltry!

    Reply
  17. Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.
    I sympathize with you on the long travel times when flying to the UK; that was about how long it took for our daughter recently to go from our door to hers recently on her return to South Korea. My mother told stories of when she emigrated from the Netherlands to New Zealand in the 1950s; that trip took six weeks by boat which makes one day seem positively paltry!

    Reply
  18. Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.
    I sympathize with you on the long travel times when flying to the UK; that was about how long it took for our daughter recently to go from our door to hers recently on her return to South Korea. My mother told stories of when she emigrated from the Netherlands to New Zealand in the 1950s; that trip took six weeks by boat which makes one day seem positively paltry!

    Reply
  19. Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.
    I sympathize with you on the long travel times when flying to the UK; that was about how long it took for our daughter recently to go from our door to hers recently on her return to South Korea. My mother told stories of when she emigrated from the Netherlands to New Zealand in the 1950s; that trip took six weeks by boat which makes one day seem positively paltry!

    Reply
  20. Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.
    I sympathize with you on the long travel times when flying to the UK; that was about how long it took for our daughter recently to go from our door to hers recently on her return to South Korea. My mother told stories of when she emigrated from the Netherlands to New Zealand in the 1950s; that trip took six weeks by boat which makes one day seem positively paltry!

    Reply
  21. Quantum, that electric bed sounds amazing. My cousin had one of those that tilted differently for her and her husband. I’m lucky in that my bed looks out through a large bow window into the front garden — if I want to look out, that is. But sleepiness is not the aim — what I described was intentional day-dreaming, and I usually do it with a pen and notepad at hand.
    And I’m not always in bed, but am often on bed, depending on the weather. Today it’s a misty moisty morning and my feet are under the covers.
    As for going on a submarine trip — you’re very welcome to it. All those creepy submarine TV shows and movies when I was a kid made me feel frightfully claustrophobic about submarines.

    Reply
  22. Quantum, that electric bed sounds amazing. My cousin had one of those that tilted differently for her and her husband. I’m lucky in that my bed looks out through a large bow window into the front garden — if I want to look out, that is. But sleepiness is not the aim — what I described was intentional day-dreaming, and I usually do it with a pen and notepad at hand.
    And I’m not always in bed, but am often on bed, depending on the weather. Today it’s a misty moisty morning and my feet are under the covers.
    As for going on a submarine trip — you’re very welcome to it. All those creepy submarine TV shows and movies when I was a kid made me feel frightfully claustrophobic about submarines.

    Reply
  23. Quantum, that electric bed sounds amazing. My cousin had one of those that tilted differently for her and her husband. I’m lucky in that my bed looks out through a large bow window into the front garden — if I want to look out, that is. But sleepiness is not the aim — what I described was intentional day-dreaming, and I usually do it with a pen and notepad at hand.
    And I’m not always in bed, but am often on bed, depending on the weather. Today it’s a misty moisty morning and my feet are under the covers.
    As for going on a submarine trip — you’re very welcome to it. All those creepy submarine TV shows and movies when I was a kid made me feel frightfully claustrophobic about submarines.

    Reply
  24. Quantum, that electric bed sounds amazing. My cousin had one of those that tilted differently for her and her husband. I’m lucky in that my bed looks out through a large bow window into the front garden — if I want to look out, that is. But sleepiness is not the aim — what I described was intentional day-dreaming, and I usually do it with a pen and notepad at hand.
    And I’m not always in bed, but am often on bed, depending on the weather. Today it’s a misty moisty morning and my feet are under the covers.
    As for going on a submarine trip — you’re very welcome to it. All those creepy submarine TV shows and movies when I was a kid made me feel frightfully claustrophobic about submarines.

    Reply
  25. Quantum, that electric bed sounds amazing. My cousin had one of those that tilted differently for her and her husband. I’m lucky in that my bed looks out through a large bow window into the front garden — if I want to look out, that is. But sleepiness is not the aim — what I described was intentional day-dreaming, and I usually do it with a pen and notepad at hand.
    And I’m not always in bed, but am often on bed, depending on the weather. Today it’s a misty moisty morning and my feet are under the covers.
    As for going on a submarine trip — you’re very welcome to it. All those creepy submarine TV shows and movies when I was a kid made me feel frightfully claustrophobic about submarines.

    Reply
  26. Wow, Sue, burning the mattress is a kind of adventure, I guess. LOL. I never did read under the covers with a flashlight — probably because I didn’t have a flashlight of my own.

    Reply
  27. Wow, Sue, burning the mattress is a kind of adventure, I guess. LOL. I never did read under the covers with a flashlight — probably because I didn’t have a flashlight of my own.

    Reply
  28. Wow, Sue, burning the mattress is a kind of adventure, I guess. LOL. I never did read under the covers with a flashlight — probably because I didn’t have a flashlight of my own.

    Reply
  29. Wow, Sue, burning the mattress is a kind of adventure, I guess. LOL. I never did read under the covers with a flashlight — probably because I didn’t have a flashlight of my own.

    Reply
  30. Wow, Sue, burning the mattress is a kind of adventure, I guess. LOL. I never did read under the covers with a flashlight — probably because I didn’t have a flashlight of my own.

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Mary Jo — yes, I should have added that into the blog — that I have a couple of friends in the UK (as well as the UK wenches) whose brains I will pick on a regular basis. Usually it’s to check whether something is right or at least plausible — and the times I haven’t checked are the times when I’ve made a dumb mistake.

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Mary Jo — yes, I should have added that into the blog — that I have a couple of friends in the UK (as well as the UK wenches) whose brains I will pick on a regular basis. Usually it’s to check whether something is right or at least plausible — and the times I haven’t checked are the times when I’ve made a dumb mistake.

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Mary Jo — yes, I should have added that into the blog — that I have a couple of friends in the UK (as well as the UK wenches) whose brains I will pick on a regular basis. Usually it’s to check whether something is right or at least plausible — and the times I haven’t checked are the times when I’ve made a dumb mistake.

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Mary Jo — yes, I should have added that into the blog — that I have a couple of friends in the UK (as well as the UK wenches) whose brains I will pick on a regular basis. Usually it’s to check whether something is right or at least plausible — and the times I haven’t checked are the times when I’ve made a dumb mistake.

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Mary Jo — yes, I should have added that into the blog — that I have a couple of friends in the UK (as well as the UK wenches) whose brains I will pick on a regular basis. Usually it’s to check whether something is right or at least plausible — and the times I haven’t checked are the times when I’ve made a dumb mistake.

    Reply
  36. Kareni, when I was a kid and we went to live in Scotland for a year, we travelled from Australia to Southampton by ship — mainly because my dad had a good friend who was the manager of a shipping line. It took us a month, but it was wonderful — we kids had more or less the run of the ship, and for my mother it was a blissful holiday. It doesn’t compare with sitting squashed in with a plane full of people, barely able to move for 23 hours. As your daughter will no doubt agree.

    Reply
  37. Kareni, when I was a kid and we went to live in Scotland for a year, we travelled from Australia to Southampton by ship — mainly because my dad had a good friend who was the manager of a shipping line. It took us a month, but it was wonderful — we kids had more or less the run of the ship, and for my mother it was a blissful holiday. It doesn’t compare with sitting squashed in with a plane full of people, barely able to move for 23 hours. As your daughter will no doubt agree.

    Reply
  38. Kareni, when I was a kid and we went to live in Scotland for a year, we travelled from Australia to Southampton by ship — mainly because my dad had a good friend who was the manager of a shipping line. It took us a month, but it was wonderful — we kids had more or less the run of the ship, and for my mother it was a blissful holiday. It doesn’t compare with sitting squashed in with a plane full of people, barely able to move for 23 hours. As your daughter will no doubt agree.

    Reply
  39. Kareni, when I was a kid and we went to live in Scotland for a year, we travelled from Australia to Southampton by ship — mainly because my dad had a good friend who was the manager of a shipping line. It took us a month, but it was wonderful — we kids had more or less the run of the ship, and for my mother it was a blissful holiday. It doesn’t compare with sitting squashed in with a plane full of people, barely able to move for 23 hours. As your daughter will no doubt agree.

    Reply
  40. Kareni, when I was a kid and we went to live in Scotland for a year, we travelled from Australia to Southampton by ship — mainly because my dad had a good friend who was the manager of a shipping line. It took us a month, but it was wonderful — we kids had more or less the run of the ship, and for my mother it was a blissful holiday. It doesn’t compare with sitting squashed in with a plane full of people, barely able to move for 23 hours. As your daughter will no doubt agree.

    Reply
  41. So interesting Anne! I’m not sure how much I enjoy traveling – especially now. Such a hassle. I’ll read your books & travel that way.

    Reply
  42. So interesting Anne! I’m not sure how much I enjoy traveling – especially now. Such a hassle. I’ll read your books & travel that way.

    Reply
  43. So interesting Anne! I’m not sure how much I enjoy traveling – especially now. Such a hassle. I’ll read your books & travel that way.

    Reply
  44. So interesting Anne! I’m not sure how much I enjoy traveling – especially now. Such a hassle. I’ll read your books & travel that way.

    Reply
  45. So interesting Anne! I’m not sure how much I enjoy traveling – especially now. Such a hassle. I’ll read your books & travel that way.

    Reply
  46. I hear you about ship travel versus air, Anne. We traveled from Australia to Guam by ship in the early seventies; it took about ten days or so, I think. It was fun… once I got past the seasickness. I seem to recall that my sister and I befriended a girl whose father had something to do with Cadbury (goodies!); there was also a ceremony when we crossed the equator with someone crowned as Poseidon.
    To be fair, air travel at that time was also vastly different. We would dress to travel, and the food was on plates with metal cutlery. I recall the stewardesses recruiting my sister and I to pass out candies (lollies) to the passengers when we flew unattended between Australia and New Zealand to stay with our grandmother for the Christmas holiday.

    Reply
  47. I hear you about ship travel versus air, Anne. We traveled from Australia to Guam by ship in the early seventies; it took about ten days or so, I think. It was fun… once I got past the seasickness. I seem to recall that my sister and I befriended a girl whose father had something to do with Cadbury (goodies!); there was also a ceremony when we crossed the equator with someone crowned as Poseidon.
    To be fair, air travel at that time was also vastly different. We would dress to travel, and the food was on plates with metal cutlery. I recall the stewardesses recruiting my sister and I to pass out candies (lollies) to the passengers when we flew unattended between Australia and New Zealand to stay with our grandmother for the Christmas holiday.

    Reply
  48. I hear you about ship travel versus air, Anne. We traveled from Australia to Guam by ship in the early seventies; it took about ten days or so, I think. It was fun… once I got past the seasickness. I seem to recall that my sister and I befriended a girl whose father had something to do with Cadbury (goodies!); there was also a ceremony when we crossed the equator with someone crowned as Poseidon.
    To be fair, air travel at that time was also vastly different. We would dress to travel, and the food was on plates with metal cutlery. I recall the stewardesses recruiting my sister and I to pass out candies (lollies) to the passengers when we flew unattended between Australia and New Zealand to stay with our grandmother for the Christmas holiday.

    Reply
  49. I hear you about ship travel versus air, Anne. We traveled from Australia to Guam by ship in the early seventies; it took about ten days or so, I think. It was fun… once I got past the seasickness. I seem to recall that my sister and I befriended a girl whose father had something to do with Cadbury (goodies!); there was also a ceremony when we crossed the equator with someone crowned as Poseidon.
    To be fair, air travel at that time was also vastly different. We would dress to travel, and the food was on plates with metal cutlery. I recall the stewardesses recruiting my sister and I to pass out candies (lollies) to the passengers when we flew unattended between Australia and New Zealand to stay with our grandmother for the Christmas holiday.

    Reply
  50. I hear you about ship travel versus air, Anne. We traveled from Australia to Guam by ship in the early seventies; it took about ten days or so, I think. It was fun… once I got past the seasickness. I seem to recall that my sister and I befriended a girl whose father had something to do with Cadbury (goodies!); there was also a ceremony when we crossed the equator with someone crowned as Poseidon.
    To be fair, air travel at that time was also vastly different. We would dress to travel, and the food was on plates with metal cutlery. I recall the stewardesses recruiting my sister and I to pass out candies (lollies) to the passengers when we flew unattended between Australia and New Zealand to stay with our grandmother for the Christmas holiday.

    Reply
  51. One of the reasons my husband and I have separate rooms is my nighttime reading and/or research. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night to explore an idea. Never mind the we happen to work on different schedules, it’s easier to spread the computer, books and paper across the bed without him. The cat grumbles and snuggles in a spot that is right in the middle of the chaos.

    Reply
  52. One of the reasons my husband and I have separate rooms is my nighttime reading and/or research. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night to explore an idea. Never mind the we happen to work on different schedules, it’s easier to spread the computer, books and paper across the bed without him. The cat grumbles and snuggles in a spot that is right in the middle of the chaos.

    Reply
  53. One of the reasons my husband and I have separate rooms is my nighttime reading and/or research. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night to explore an idea. Never mind the we happen to work on different schedules, it’s easier to spread the computer, books and paper across the bed without him. The cat grumbles and snuggles in a spot that is right in the middle of the chaos.

    Reply
  54. One of the reasons my husband and I have separate rooms is my nighttime reading and/or research. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night to explore an idea. Never mind the we happen to work on different schedules, it’s easier to spread the computer, books and paper across the bed without him. The cat grumbles and snuggles in a spot that is right in the middle of the chaos.

    Reply
  55. One of the reasons my husband and I have separate rooms is my nighttime reading and/or research. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night to explore an idea. Never mind the we happen to work on different schedules, it’s easier to spread the computer, books and paper across the bed without him. The cat grumbles and snuggles in a spot that is right in the middle of the chaos.

    Reply
  56. Thanks, Kareni — Oh, yes, I’d forgotten the ceremony when the ship crossed the equator— I seem to recall we had Neptune, rather than Poseidon, but then we were travelling on an Italian shipping line. *g* I do remember it was lots of fun. I also recall that the food, being Italian, was pretty yummy.
    I don’t remember what we ate on the plane when I was 12 or how we dressed — I think that was my first plane trip and it was to NZ too, though with the whole family. Sounds like you and your sister had a lot of fun distributing lollies to passengers.

    Reply
  57. Thanks, Kareni — Oh, yes, I’d forgotten the ceremony when the ship crossed the equator— I seem to recall we had Neptune, rather than Poseidon, but then we were travelling on an Italian shipping line. *g* I do remember it was lots of fun. I also recall that the food, being Italian, was pretty yummy.
    I don’t remember what we ate on the plane when I was 12 or how we dressed — I think that was my first plane trip and it was to NZ too, though with the whole family. Sounds like you and your sister had a lot of fun distributing lollies to passengers.

    Reply
  58. Thanks, Kareni — Oh, yes, I’d forgotten the ceremony when the ship crossed the equator— I seem to recall we had Neptune, rather than Poseidon, but then we were travelling on an Italian shipping line. *g* I do remember it was lots of fun. I also recall that the food, being Italian, was pretty yummy.
    I don’t remember what we ate on the plane when I was 12 or how we dressed — I think that was my first plane trip and it was to NZ too, though with the whole family. Sounds like you and your sister had a lot of fun distributing lollies to passengers.

    Reply
  59. Thanks, Kareni — Oh, yes, I’d forgotten the ceremony when the ship crossed the equator— I seem to recall we had Neptune, rather than Poseidon, but then we were travelling on an Italian shipping line. *g* I do remember it was lots of fun. I also recall that the food, being Italian, was pretty yummy.
    I don’t remember what we ate on the plane when I was 12 or how we dressed — I think that was my first plane trip and it was to NZ too, though with the whole family. Sounds like you and your sister had a lot of fun distributing lollies to passengers.

    Reply
  60. Thanks, Kareni — Oh, yes, I’d forgotten the ceremony when the ship crossed the equator— I seem to recall we had Neptune, rather than Poseidon, but then we were travelling on an Italian shipping line. *g* I do remember it was lots of fun. I also recall that the food, being Italian, was pretty yummy.
    I don’t remember what we ate on the plane when I was 12 or how we dressed — I think that was my first plane trip and it was to NZ too, though with the whole family. Sounds like you and your sister had a lot of fun distributing lollies to passengers.

    Reply
  61. Jeanne, the big plane trips to the UK, USA or Europe are simple endurance. I envy people who can take a pill or whatever and sleep the whole way. And I think the future for me is going to be more virtual than actual travel. We are so lucky to have the technology that breaks down the isolation.

    Reply
  62. Jeanne, the big plane trips to the UK, USA or Europe are simple endurance. I envy people who can take a pill or whatever and sleep the whole way. And I think the future for me is going to be more virtual than actual travel. We are so lucky to have the technology that breaks down the isolation.

    Reply
  63. Jeanne, the big plane trips to the UK, USA or Europe are simple endurance. I envy people who can take a pill or whatever and sleep the whole way. And I think the future for me is going to be more virtual than actual travel. We are so lucky to have the technology that breaks down the isolation.

    Reply
  64. Jeanne, the big plane trips to the UK, USA or Europe are simple endurance. I envy people who can take a pill or whatever and sleep the whole way. And I think the future for me is going to be more virtual than actual travel. We are so lucky to have the technology that breaks down the isolation.

    Reply
  65. Jeanne, the big plane trips to the UK, USA or Europe are simple endurance. I envy people who can take a pill or whatever and sleep the whole way. And I think the future for me is going to be more virtual than actual travel. We are so lucky to have the technology that breaks down the isolation.

    Reply
  66. My dog Milly keeps me company though she knows better than to mess with papers on the bed. She has her own corner on the end of the bed where she supervises the world (while pretending to snooze) while I work. That way she can also keep an eye on anyone (especially any dog) in the street.
    Cats are notorious for sitting on work — and occasionally keyboards, aren’t they? My old Harrie-cat used to be very firm about where my attention should be directed — and it wasn’t toward my work. But only when she wanted it.

    Reply
  67. My dog Milly keeps me company though she knows better than to mess with papers on the bed. She has her own corner on the end of the bed where she supervises the world (while pretending to snooze) while I work. That way she can also keep an eye on anyone (especially any dog) in the street.
    Cats are notorious for sitting on work — and occasionally keyboards, aren’t they? My old Harrie-cat used to be very firm about where my attention should be directed — and it wasn’t toward my work. But only when she wanted it.

    Reply
  68. My dog Milly keeps me company though she knows better than to mess with papers on the bed. She has her own corner on the end of the bed where she supervises the world (while pretending to snooze) while I work. That way she can also keep an eye on anyone (especially any dog) in the street.
    Cats are notorious for sitting on work — and occasionally keyboards, aren’t they? My old Harrie-cat used to be very firm about where my attention should be directed — and it wasn’t toward my work. But only when she wanted it.

    Reply
  69. My dog Milly keeps me company though she knows better than to mess with papers on the bed. She has her own corner on the end of the bed where she supervises the world (while pretending to snooze) while I work. That way she can also keep an eye on anyone (especially any dog) in the street.
    Cats are notorious for sitting on work — and occasionally keyboards, aren’t they? My old Harrie-cat used to be very firm about where my attention should be directed — and it wasn’t toward my work. But only when she wanted it.

    Reply
  70. My dog Milly keeps me company though she knows better than to mess with papers on the bed. She has her own corner on the end of the bed where she supervises the world (while pretending to snooze) while I work. That way she can also keep an eye on anyone (especially any dog) in the street.
    Cats are notorious for sitting on work — and occasionally keyboards, aren’t they? My old Harrie-cat used to be very firm about where my attention should be directed — and it wasn’t toward my work. But only when she wanted it.

    Reply
  71. I spend a lot of time on my bed too, Anne, it’s the perfect place for writing and daydreaming! And your photo of Lock & Co brought back a lovely memory. I went there once on an outing arranged by the Romantic Novelists’ Association and we were allowed to try on some of their hats. I fell in love with a scarlet top hat that had a small veil – it was simply gorgeous! Sadly a bit out of my price range but still …

    Reply
  72. I spend a lot of time on my bed too, Anne, it’s the perfect place for writing and daydreaming! And your photo of Lock & Co brought back a lovely memory. I went there once on an outing arranged by the Romantic Novelists’ Association and we were allowed to try on some of their hats. I fell in love with a scarlet top hat that had a small veil – it was simply gorgeous! Sadly a bit out of my price range but still …

    Reply
  73. I spend a lot of time on my bed too, Anne, it’s the perfect place for writing and daydreaming! And your photo of Lock & Co brought back a lovely memory. I went there once on an outing arranged by the Romantic Novelists’ Association and we were allowed to try on some of their hats. I fell in love with a scarlet top hat that had a small veil – it was simply gorgeous! Sadly a bit out of my price range but still …

    Reply
  74. I spend a lot of time on my bed too, Anne, it’s the perfect place for writing and daydreaming! And your photo of Lock & Co brought back a lovely memory. I went there once on an outing arranged by the Romantic Novelists’ Association and we were allowed to try on some of their hats. I fell in love with a scarlet top hat that had a small veil – it was simply gorgeous! Sadly a bit out of my price range but still …

    Reply
  75. I spend a lot of time on my bed too, Anne, it’s the perfect place for writing and daydreaming! And your photo of Lock & Co brought back a lovely memory. I went there once on an outing arranged by the Romantic Novelists’ Association and we were allowed to try on some of their hats. I fell in love with a scarlet top hat that had a small veil – it was simply gorgeous! Sadly a bit out of my price range but still …

    Reply
  76. They say it’s bad for your sleep habits to do things like eat and read in the bedroom, but I love to read in bed.
    And I would love to travel to Australia and New Zealand, but the long flight time really is a deterrent. And of course, now COVID has made it almost impossible anyway. I plan to keep avoiding planes for the time being. I also would love to take a long sea voyage, to anywhere, really! I’ve got itchy feet after a year and a half of being mostly at home.

    Reply
  77. They say it’s bad for your sleep habits to do things like eat and read in the bedroom, but I love to read in bed.
    And I would love to travel to Australia and New Zealand, but the long flight time really is a deterrent. And of course, now COVID has made it almost impossible anyway. I plan to keep avoiding planes for the time being. I also would love to take a long sea voyage, to anywhere, really! I’ve got itchy feet after a year and a half of being mostly at home.

    Reply
  78. They say it’s bad for your sleep habits to do things like eat and read in the bedroom, but I love to read in bed.
    And I would love to travel to Australia and New Zealand, but the long flight time really is a deterrent. And of course, now COVID has made it almost impossible anyway. I plan to keep avoiding planes for the time being. I also would love to take a long sea voyage, to anywhere, really! I’ve got itchy feet after a year and a half of being mostly at home.

    Reply
  79. They say it’s bad for your sleep habits to do things like eat and read in the bedroom, but I love to read in bed.
    And I would love to travel to Australia and New Zealand, but the long flight time really is a deterrent. And of course, now COVID has made it almost impossible anyway. I plan to keep avoiding planes for the time being. I also would love to take a long sea voyage, to anywhere, really! I’ve got itchy feet after a year and a half of being mostly at home.

    Reply
  80. They say it’s bad for your sleep habits to do things like eat and read in the bedroom, but I love to read in bed.
    And I would love to travel to Australia and New Zealand, but the long flight time really is a deterrent. And of course, now COVID has made it almost impossible anyway. I plan to keep avoiding planes for the time being. I also would love to take a long sea voyage, to anywhere, really! I’ve got itchy feet after a year and a half of being mostly at home.

    Reply
  81. The Wench posts that describe parts of the writing process are my favorites, Anne, so thank you very much for this! Due to back issues, reading in bed has given way to a chair and ottoman by the bedroom window which gives me a suburban view of a garden and a lovely old church. And I am lucky to have a wonderful old rolling table, designed like those used in hospitals, so that the base rolls under my chair, while the top is at whatever level I need. My atlas of Great Britain, another of Europe, my laptop, pens, pads, and far too many postcards of places I’ve been, are therefore always close at hand when I’m reading or writing. It gives me room to “travel” at any time, and I must admit I’d never known how many travel videos were available online until the last year! Alas, it is not the same, is it? Given my druthers, I’d be in Scotland now, driving through the Grampians, taking tea in Edinburgh, wandering through the gardens at Castle Culzean, or eating fish and chips on a bench by the harbor in Kirkcudbright (probably in the rain). Til that’s possible again, I’ll put my feet up and let Wench books, my atlas, and my laptop take me away.

    Reply
  82. The Wench posts that describe parts of the writing process are my favorites, Anne, so thank you very much for this! Due to back issues, reading in bed has given way to a chair and ottoman by the bedroom window which gives me a suburban view of a garden and a lovely old church. And I am lucky to have a wonderful old rolling table, designed like those used in hospitals, so that the base rolls under my chair, while the top is at whatever level I need. My atlas of Great Britain, another of Europe, my laptop, pens, pads, and far too many postcards of places I’ve been, are therefore always close at hand when I’m reading or writing. It gives me room to “travel” at any time, and I must admit I’d never known how many travel videos were available online until the last year! Alas, it is not the same, is it? Given my druthers, I’d be in Scotland now, driving through the Grampians, taking tea in Edinburgh, wandering through the gardens at Castle Culzean, or eating fish and chips on a bench by the harbor in Kirkcudbright (probably in the rain). Til that’s possible again, I’ll put my feet up and let Wench books, my atlas, and my laptop take me away.

    Reply
  83. The Wench posts that describe parts of the writing process are my favorites, Anne, so thank you very much for this! Due to back issues, reading in bed has given way to a chair and ottoman by the bedroom window which gives me a suburban view of a garden and a lovely old church. And I am lucky to have a wonderful old rolling table, designed like those used in hospitals, so that the base rolls under my chair, while the top is at whatever level I need. My atlas of Great Britain, another of Europe, my laptop, pens, pads, and far too many postcards of places I’ve been, are therefore always close at hand when I’m reading or writing. It gives me room to “travel” at any time, and I must admit I’d never known how many travel videos were available online until the last year! Alas, it is not the same, is it? Given my druthers, I’d be in Scotland now, driving through the Grampians, taking tea in Edinburgh, wandering through the gardens at Castle Culzean, or eating fish and chips on a bench by the harbor in Kirkcudbright (probably in the rain). Til that’s possible again, I’ll put my feet up and let Wench books, my atlas, and my laptop take me away.

    Reply
  84. The Wench posts that describe parts of the writing process are my favorites, Anne, so thank you very much for this! Due to back issues, reading in bed has given way to a chair and ottoman by the bedroom window which gives me a suburban view of a garden and a lovely old church. And I am lucky to have a wonderful old rolling table, designed like those used in hospitals, so that the base rolls under my chair, while the top is at whatever level I need. My atlas of Great Britain, another of Europe, my laptop, pens, pads, and far too many postcards of places I’ve been, are therefore always close at hand when I’m reading or writing. It gives me room to “travel” at any time, and I must admit I’d never known how many travel videos were available online until the last year! Alas, it is not the same, is it? Given my druthers, I’d be in Scotland now, driving through the Grampians, taking tea in Edinburgh, wandering through the gardens at Castle Culzean, or eating fish and chips on a bench by the harbor in Kirkcudbright (probably in the rain). Til that’s possible again, I’ll put my feet up and let Wench books, my atlas, and my laptop take me away.

    Reply
  85. The Wench posts that describe parts of the writing process are my favorites, Anne, so thank you very much for this! Due to back issues, reading in bed has given way to a chair and ottoman by the bedroom window which gives me a suburban view of a garden and a lovely old church. And I am lucky to have a wonderful old rolling table, designed like those used in hospitals, so that the base rolls under my chair, while the top is at whatever level I need. My atlas of Great Britain, another of Europe, my laptop, pens, pads, and far too many postcards of places I’ve been, are therefore always close at hand when I’m reading or writing. It gives me room to “travel” at any time, and I must admit I’d never known how many travel videos were available online until the last year! Alas, it is not the same, is it? Given my druthers, I’d be in Scotland now, driving through the Grampians, taking tea in Edinburgh, wandering through the gardens at Castle Culzean, or eating fish and chips on a bench by the harbor in Kirkcudbright (probably in the rain). Til that’s possible again, I’ll put my feet up and let Wench books, my atlas, and my laptop take me away.

    Reply
  86. A lovely post, Anne. Thank you. One thought that sprang to mind while reading your words and looking at the images you included: how happy I always am to find historical memoirs, diary entries, etc., typed up for modern consumption! Sometime just looking at an old letter or diary’s spidery handwriting, even when it’s in English–let alone another language, is enough to make me turn away in exhaustion. So far I’ve pretty much only written about places I’ve visited, though I do use the internet to check my fuzzy memory and nail down specific details.
    And while my husband and I separate for business travel far less frequently now than we used to (before both Covid and old age!), whenever he’s away my books and papers end up spread all over his side of the bed!

    Reply
  87. A lovely post, Anne. Thank you. One thought that sprang to mind while reading your words and looking at the images you included: how happy I always am to find historical memoirs, diary entries, etc., typed up for modern consumption! Sometime just looking at an old letter or diary’s spidery handwriting, even when it’s in English–let alone another language, is enough to make me turn away in exhaustion. So far I’ve pretty much only written about places I’ve visited, though I do use the internet to check my fuzzy memory and nail down specific details.
    And while my husband and I separate for business travel far less frequently now than we used to (before both Covid and old age!), whenever he’s away my books and papers end up spread all over his side of the bed!

    Reply
  88. A lovely post, Anne. Thank you. One thought that sprang to mind while reading your words and looking at the images you included: how happy I always am to find historical memoirs, diary entries, etc., typed up for modern consumption! Sometime just looking at an old letter or diary’s spidery handwriting, even when it’s in English–let alone another language, is enough to make me turn away in exhaustion. So far I’ve pretty much only written about places I’ve visited, though I do use the internet to check my fuzzy memory and nail down specific details.
    And while my husband and I separate for business travel far less frequently now than we used to (before both Covid and old age!), whenever he’s away my books and papers end up spread all over his side of the bed!

    Reply
  89. A lovely post, Anne. Thank you. One thought that sprang to mind while reading your words and looking at the images you included: how happy I always am to find historical memoirs, diary entries, etc., typed up for modern consumption! Sometime just looking at an old letter or diary’s spidery handwriting, even when it’s in English–let alone another language, is enough to make me turn away in exhaustion. So far I’ve pretty much only written about places I’ve visited, though I do use the internet to check my fuzzy memory and nail down specific details.
    And while my husband and I separate for business travel far less frequently now than we used to (before both Covid and old age!), whenever he’s away my books and papers end up spread all over his side of the bed!

    Reply
  90. A lovely post, Anne. Thank you. One thought that sprang to mind while reading your words and looking at the images you included: how happy I always am to find historical memoirs, diary entries, etc., typed up for modern consumption! Sometime just looking at an old letter or diary’s spidery handwriting, even when it’s in English–let alone another language, is enough to make me turn away in exhaustion. So far I’ve pretty much only written about places I’ve visited, though I do use the internet to check my fuzzy memory and nail down specific details.
    And while my husband and I separate for business travel far less frequently now than we used to (before both Covid and old age!), whenever he’s away my books and papers end up spread all over his side of the bed!

    Reply
  91. I would like to travel again to England– with a group of others interested in early 19th century England. I can’t research in bed. I do read in bed. I do prefer regular books there because it is hard on the Kindle to be dropped on the floor when I fall asleep. Today there is much information and copies of period books on the web that it is easier to research but I still prefer books. Though I do like memoirs, diaries, and letters they are harder to do research in because they often don’t have an index. Also, some editors say they have left out domestic affairs– which is often what I want. I enjoy many of the Wenches blogs.

    Reply
  92. I would like to travel again to England– with a group of others interested in early 19th century England. I can’t research in bed. I do read in bed. I do prefer regular books there because it is hard on the Kindle to be dropped on the floor when I fall asleep. Today there is much information and copies of period books on the web that it is easier to research but I still prefer books. Though I do like memoirs, diaries, and letters they are harder to do research in because they often don’t have an index. Also, some editors say they have left out domestic affairs– which is often what I want. I enjoy many of the Wenches blogs.

    Reply
  93. I would like to travel again to England– with a group of others interested in early 19th century England. I can’t research in bed. I do read in bed. I do prefer regular books there because it is hard on the Kindle to be dropped on the floor when I fall asleep. Today there is much information and copies of period books on the web that it is easier to research but I still prefer books. Though I do like memoirs, diaries, and letters they are harder to do research in because they often don’t have an index. Also, some editors say they have left out domestic affairs– which is often what I want. I enjoy many of the Wenches blogs.

    Reply
  94. I would like to travel again to England– with a group of others interested in early 19th century England. I can’t research in bed. I do read in bed. I do prefer regular books there because it is hard on the Kindle to be dropped on the floor when I fall asleep. Today there is much information and copies of period books on the web that it is easier to research but I still prefer books. Though I do like memoirs, diaries, and letters they are harder to do research in because they often don’t have an index. Also, some editors say they have left out domestic affairs– which is often what I want. I enjoy many of the Wenches blogs.

    Reply
  95. I would like to travel again to England– with a group of others interested in early 19th century England. I can’t research in bed. I do read in bed. I do prefer regular books there because it is hard on the Kindle to be dropped on the floor when I fall asleep. Today there is much information and copies of period books on the web that it is easier to research but I still prefer books. Though I do like memoirs, diaries, and letters they are harder to do research in because they often don’t have an index. Also, some editors say they have left out domestic affairs– which is often what I want. I enjoy many of the Wenches blogs.

    Reply
  96. Thank you for a wonderful post. I think you have made me understand the hard work you authors put into a work of art. I always thought y’all just sat down and wonderful things came out of your pen, pencil, typewriter or word processor. Shoot fire, I believe it sounds just like work.
    Seriously, it is wonderful that the world allows writers, or anyone, to look at treasures that at one time were unavailable. I am sure it is a double edged sword. Seeing treasures and wishing that there were even more.
    Thanks very much for this post. I now realize that if I were ever blessed enough to travel to Australia, it would have to be on a ship. All those hours confined on a plane would make me want to sit on the wing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  97. Thank you for a wonderful post. I think you have made me understand the hard work you authors put into a work of art. I always thought y’all just sat down and wonderful things came out of your pen, pencil, typewriter or word processor. Shoot fire, I believe it sounds just like work.
    Seriously, it is wonderful that the world allows writers, or anyone, to look at treasures that at one time were unavailable. I am sure it is a double edged sword. Seeing treasures and wishing that there were even more.
    Thanks very much for this post. I now realize that if I were ever blessed enough to travel to Australia, it would have to be on a ship. All those hours confined on a plane would make me want to sit on the wing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  98. Thank you for a wonderful post. I think you have made me understand the hard work you authors put into a work of art. I always thought y’all just sat down and wonderful things came out of your pen, pencil, typewriter or word processor. Shoot fire, I believe it sounds just like work.
    Seriously, it is wonderful that the world allows writers, or anyone, to look at treasures that at one time were unavailable. I am sure it is a double edged sword. Seeing treasures and wishing that there were even more.
    Thanks very much for this post. I now realize that if I were ever blessed enough to travel to Australia, it would have to be on a ship. All those hours confined on a plane would make me want to sit on the wing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  99. Thank you for a wonderful post. I think you have made me understand the hard work you authors put into a work of art. I always thought y’all just sat down and wonderful things came out of your pen, pencil, typewriter or word processor. Shoot fire, I believe it sounds just like work.
    Seriously, it is wonderful that the world allows writers, or anyone, to look at treasures that at one time were unavailable. I am sure it is a double edged sword. Seeing treasures and wishing that there were even more.
    Thanks very much for this post. I now realize that if I were ever blessed enough to travel to Australia, it would have to be on a ship. All those hours confined on a plane would make me want to sit on the wing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  100. Thank you for a wonderful post. I think you have made me understand the hard work you authors put into a work of art. I always thought y’all just sat down and wonderful things came out of your pen, pencil, typewriter or word processor. Shoot fire, I believe it sounds just like work.
    Seriously, it is wonderful that the world allows writers, or anyone, to look at treasures that at one time were unavailable. I am sure it is a double edged sword. Seeing treasures and wishing that there were even more.
    Thanks very much for this post. I now realize that if I were ever blessed enough to travel to Australia, it would have to be on a ship. All those hours confined on a plane would make me want to sit on the wing.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  101. PS I sympathize about the long journey from Australia. I have never been there, but did have to endure about 20 hours on an airplane to the Philippines after a trip to Calif. from Georgia with a 2 year old. Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?

    Reply
  102. PS I sympathize about the long journey from Australia. I have never been there, but did have to endure about 20 hours on an airplane to the Philippines after a trip to Calif. from Georgia with a 2 year old. Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?

    Reply
  103. PS I sympathize about the long journey from Australia. I have never been there, but did have to endure about 20 hours on an airplane to the Philippines after a trip to Calif. from Georgia with a 2 year old. Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?

    Reply
  104. PS I sympathize about the long journey from Australia. I have never been there, but did have to endure about 20 hours on an airplane to the Philippines after a trip to Calif. from Georgia with a 2 year old. Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?

    Reply
  105. PS I sympathize about the long journey from Australia. I have never been there, but did have to endure about 20 hours on an airplane to the Philippines after a trip to Calif. from Georgia with a 2 year old. Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?

    Reply
  106. Oh, how lucky you were, Christina — when I was there it was (I think) a Sunday and the shop was closed.
    I love hats — but I never wear them out. For some reason it feels a bit like dressing up in costume. *g*

    Reply
  107. Oh, how lucky you were, Christina — when I was there it was (I think) a Sunday and the shop was closed.
    I love hats — but I never wear them out. For some reason it feels a bit like dressing up in costume. *g*

    Reply
  108. Oh, how lucky you were, Christina — when I was there it was (I think) a Sunday and the shop was closed.
    I love hats — but I never wear them out. For some reason it feels a bit like dressing up in costume. *g*

    Reply
  109. Oh, how lucky you were, Christina — when I was there it was (I think) a Sunday and the shop was closed.
    I love hats — but I never wear them out. For some reason it feels a bit like dressing up in costume. *g*

    Reply
  110. Oh, how lucky you were, Christina — when I was there it was (I think) a Sunday and the shop was closed.
    I love hats — but I never wear them out. For some reason it feels a bit like dressing up in costume. *g*

    Reply
  111. Karin, I think I’ve always read lying down. As a kid I was usually sprawled out on the carpet in front of the fire, or in summer on a cool floor somewhere. And these days almost all my reading happens in bed.
    I too have itchy feet, but we’re still pretty much home-bound at the moment. One day, maybe . . .

    Reply
  112. Karin, I think I’ve always read lying down. As a kid I was usually sprawled out on the carpet in front of the fire, or in summer on a cool floor somewhere. And these days almost all my reading happens in bed.
    I too have itchy feet, but we’re still pretty much home-bound at the moment. One day, maybe . . .

    Reply
  113. Karin, I think I’ve always read lying down. As a kid I was usually sprawled out on the carpet in front of the fire, or in summer on a cool floor somewhere. And these days almost all my reading happens in bed.
    I too have itchy feet, but we’re still pretty much home-bound at the moment. One day, maybe . . .

    Reply
  114. Karin, I think I’ve always read lying down. As a kid I was usually sprawled out on the carpet in front of the fire, or in summer on a cool floor somewhere. And these days almost all my reading happens in bed.
    I too have itchy feet, but we’re still pretty much home-bound at the moment. One day, maybe . . .

    Reply
  115. Karin, I think I’ve always read lying down. As a kid I was usually sprawled out on the carpet in front of the fire, or in summer on a cool floor somewhere. And these days almost all my reading happens in bed.
    I too have itchy feet, but we’re still pretty much home-bound at the moment. One day, maybe . . .

    Reply
  116. Thanks, Meg — yes it’s wonderful that people type up and digitize old letters and diaries so that they’re widely available — free too. Spidery, old-fashioned writing in faded ink is so hard to read, I agree.
    The page of typing I showed in my post was from a book — a collection of letters written by Catherine Wilmott to her brother back in Ireland while she was in Europe doing the Grand Tour during the short-lived Peace of Amiens (1802-3) . She was a lovely writer — very lively and expressive — and for some reason in 1940 someone decided to publish her letters. I was able to borrow that book on inter-library loan from the rare book collection in the State Library, but some years later I found a copy for sale on line in Ireland and I bought it and now have it and several other similar collections on my own bookshelves.

    Reply
  117. Thanks, Meg — yes it’s wonderful that people type up and digitize old letters and diaries so that they’re widely available — free too. Spidery, old-fashioned writing in faded ink is so hard to read, I agree.
    The page of typing I showed in my post was from a book — a collection of letters written by Catherine Wilmott to her brother back in Ireland while she was in Europe doing the Grand Tour during the short-lived Peace of Amiens (1802-3) . She was a lovely writer — very lively and expressive — and for some reason in 1940 someone decided to publish her letters. I was able to borrow that book on inter-library loan from the rare book collection in the State Library, but some years later I found a copy for sale on line in Ireland and I bought it and now have it and several other similar collections on my own bookshelves.

    Reply
  118. Thanks, Meg — yes it’s wonderful that people type up and digitize old letters and diaries so that they’re widely available — free too. Spidery, old-fashioned writing in faded ink is so hard to read, I agree.
    The page of typing I showed in my post was from a book — a collection of letters written by Catherine Wilmott to her brother back in Ireland while she was in Europe doing the Grand Tour during the short-lived Peace of Amiens (1802-3) . She was a lovely writer — very lively and expressive — and for some reason in 1940 someone decided to publish her letters. I was able to borrow that book on inter-library loan from the rare book collection in the State Library, but some years later I found a copy for sale on line in Ireland and I bought it and now have it and several other similar collections on my own bookshelves.

    Reply
  119. Thanks, Meg — yes it’s wonderful that people type up and digitize old letters and diaries so that they’re widely available — free too. Spidery, old-fashioned writing in faded ink is so hard to read, I agree.
    The page of typing I showed in my post was from a book — a collection of letters written by Catherine Wilmott to her brother back in Ireland while she was in Europe doing the Grand Tour during the short-lived Peace of Amiens (1802-3) . She was a lovely writer — very lively and expressive — and for some reason in 1940 someone decided to publish her letters. I was able to borrow that book on inter-library loan from the rare book collection in the State Library, but some years later I found a copy for sale on line in Ireland and I bought it and now have it and several other similar collections on my own bookshelves.

    Reply
  120. Thanks, Meg — yes it’s wonderful that people type up and digitize old letters and diaries so that they’re widely available — free too. Spidery, old-fashioned writing in faded ink is so hard to read, I agree.
    The page of typing I showed in my post was from a book — a collection of letters written by Catherine Wilmott to her brother back in Ireland while she was in Europe doing the Grand Tour during the short-lived Peace of Amiens (1802-3) . She was a lovely writer — very lively and expressive — and for some reason in 1940 someone decided to publish her letters. I was able to borrow that book on inter-library loan from the rare book collection in the State Library, but some years later I found a copy for sale on line in Ireland and I bought it and now have it and several other similar collections on my own bookshelves.

    Reply
  121. Nancy, I hear you on the removal of “domestic affairs” from some documents. So annoying.
    I also prefer real books for research — it’s so much easier to find the information I want. But often the information I want is in a file on line and not in a printed book, and then I download it onto my computer — not my kindle. Easier to search for particular info on the computer.

    Reply
  122. Nancy, I hear you on the removal of “domestic affairs” from some documents. So annoying.
    I also prefer real books for research — it’s so much easier to find the information I want. But often the information I want is in a file on line and not in a printed book, and then I download it onto my computer — not my kindle. Easier to search for particular info on the computer.

    Reply
  123. Nancy, I hear you on the removal of “domestic affairs” from some documents. So annoying.
    I also prefer real books for research — it’s so much easier to find the information I want. But often the information I want is in a file on line and not in a printed book, and then I download it onto my computer — not my kindle. Easier to search for particular info on the computer.

    Reply
  124. Nancy, I hear you on the removal of “domestic affairs” from some documents. So annoying.
    I also prefer real books for research — it’s so much easier to find the information I want. But often the information I want is in a file on line and not in a printed book, and then I download it onto my computer — not my kindle. Easier to search for particular info on the computer.

    Reply
  125. Nancy, I hear you on the removal of “domestic affairs” from some documents. So annoying.
    I also prefer real books for research — it’s so much easier to find the information I want. But often the information I want is in a file on line and not in a printed book, and then I download it onto my computer — not my kindle. Easier to search for particular info on the computer.

    Reply
  126. LOL Annette — the thing about historical romance writers is the research is also fun — yes it’s work, but it’s also fascinating.
    And you’re right about the double-edged sword and wanting more…
    I’m thinking it might be fun to have a leisurely wenchly cruise, where we talk books and so on and read on the deck and some of us will write, and simply enjoy ourselves while we’re on our way to one place or another,

    Reply
  127. LOL Annette — the thing about historical romance writers is the research is also fun — yes it’s work, but it’s also fascinating.
    And you’re right about the double-edged sword and wanting more…
    I’m thinking it might be fun to have a leisurely wenchly cruise, where we talk books and so on and read on the deck and some of us will write, and simply enjoy ourselves while we’re on our way to one place or another,

    Reply
  128. LOL Annette — the thing about historical romance writers is the research is also fun — yes it’s work, but it’s also fascinating.
    And you’re right about the double-edged sword and wanting more…
    I’m thinking it might be fun to have a leisurely wenchly cruise, where we talk books and so on and read on the deck and some of us will write, and simply enjoy ourselves while we’re on our way to one place or another,

    Reply
  129. LOL Annette — the thing about historical romance writers is the research is also fun — yes it’s work, but it’s also fascinating.
    And you’re right about the double-edged sword and wanting more…
    I’m thinking it might be fun to have a leisurely wenchly cruise, where we talk books and so on and read on the deck and some of us will write, and simply enjoy ourselves while we’re on our way to one place or another,

    Reply
  130. LOL Annette — the thing about historical romance writers is the research is also fun — yes it’s work, but it’s also fascinating.
    And you’re right about the double-edged sword and wanting more…
    I’m thinking it might be fun to have a leisurely wenchly cruise, where we talk books and so on and read on the deck and some of us will write, and simply enjoy ourselves while we’re on our way to one place or another,

    Reply
  131. Yes, Nancy, it’s a long journey, and 20 hours on a plane after a long flight with a two-year-old sounds exhausting.
    “Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?”
    Do you mean life in Australia?
    There are, but the Regency happened in the earliest days of European colonization, when most of the colonies (NSW, Queensland, Western Australia, Tasmania) were penal colonies still, and run by the military. The “free settled” states, like Victoria (my state) and South Australia (settled by people seeking religious and other freedoms) came later. European settlers first came to Victoria, for instance , in the early 1830’s — and as you can tell by the place names, it was very much the Victorian Era. Melbourne, the state capital, was named after Queen Victoria’s Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne.

    Reply
  132. Yes, Nancy, it’s a long journey, and 20 hours on a plane after a long flight with a two-year-old sounds exhausting.
    “Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?”
    Do you mean life in Australia?
    There are, but the Regency happened in the earliest days of European colonization, when most of the colonies (NSW, Queensland, Western Australia, Tasmania) were penal colonies still, and run by the military. The “free settled” states, like Victoria (my state) and South Australia (settled by people seeking religious and other freedoms) came later. European settlers first came to Victoria, for instance , in the early 1830’s — and as you can tell by the place names, it was very much the Victorian Era. Melbourne, the state capital, was named after Queen Victoria’s Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne.

    Reply
  133. Yes, Nancy, it’s a long journey, and 20 hours on a plane after a long flight with a two-year-old sounds exhausting.
    “Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?”
    Do you mean life in Australia?
    There are, but the Regency happened in the earliest days of European colonization, when most of the colonies (NSW, Queensland, Western Australia, Tasmania) were penal colonies still, and run by the military. The “free settled” states, like Victoria (my state) and South Australia (settled by people seeking religious and other freedoms) came later. European settlers first came to Victoria, for instance , in the early 1830’s — and as you can tell by the place names, it was very much the Victorian Era. Melbourne, the state capital, was named after Queen Victoria’s Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne.

    Reply
  134. Yes, Nancy, it’s a long journey, and 20 hours on a plane after a long flight with a two-year-old sounds exhausting.
    “Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?”
    Do you mean life in Australia?
    There are, but the Regency happened in the earliest days of European colonization, when most of the colonies (NSW, Queensland, Western Australia, Tasmania) were penal colonies still, and run by the military. The “free settled” states, like Victoria (my state) and South Australia (settled by people seeking religious and other freedoms) came later. European settlers first came to Victoria, for instance , in the early 1830’s — and as you can tell by the place names, it was very much the Victorian Era. Melbourne, the state capital, was named after Queen Victoria’s Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne.

    Reply
  135. Yes, Nancy, it’s a long journey, and 20 hours on a plane after a long flight with a two-year-old sounds exhausting.
    “Are there some good references about life there during the Regency?”
    Do you mean life in Australia?
    There are, but the Regency happened in the earliest days of European colonization, when most of the colonies (NSW, Queensland, Western Australia, Tasmania) were penal colonies still, and run by the military. The “free settled” states, like Victoria (my state) and South Australia (settled by people seeking religious and other freedoms) came later. European settlers first came to Victoria, for instance , in the early 1830’s — and as you can tell by the place names, it was very much the Victorian Era. Melbourne, the state capital, was named after Queen Victoria’s Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne.

    Reply
  136. All “scenes of Scotland” always appreciated, Anne! Your post made me so nostalgic that I watched “Local Hero” this afternoon, for probably the 25th time – and that sent me to pull out my copy of “Wainwright in Scotland”. See what you’ve done: all my Saturday chores abandoned!

    Reply
  137. All “scenes of Scotland” always appreciated, Anne! Your post made me so nostalgic that I watched “Local Hero” this afternoon, for probably the 25th time – and that sent me to pull out my copy of “Wainwright in Scotland”. See what you’ve done: all my Saturday chores abandoned!

    Reply
  138. All “scenes of Scotland” always appreciated, Anne! Your post made me so nostalgic that I watched “Local Hero” this afternoon, for probably the 25th time – and that sent me to pull out my copy of “Wainwright in Scotland”. See what you’ve done: all my Saturday chores abandoned!

    Reply
  139. All “scenes of Scotland” always appreciated, Anne! Your post made me so nostalgic that I watched “Local Hero” this afternoon, for probably the 25th time – and that sent me to pull out my copy of “Wainwright in Scotland”. See what you’ve done: all my Saturday chores abandoned!

    Reply
  140. All “scenes of Scotland” always appreciated, Anne! Your post made me so nostalgic that I watched “Local Hero” this afternoon, for probably the 25th time – and that sent me to pull out my copy of “Wainwright in Scotland”. See what you’ve done: all my Saturday chores abandoned!

    Reply
  141. Oh Constance, Local Hero was such a lovely film. I haven’t seen it for ages. Must track it down. And I know nothing about Wainwright in Scotland, so that’s a rabbithole waiting for me. Thank you.

    Reply
  142. Oh Constance, Local Hero was such a lovely film. I haven’t seen it for ages. Must track it down. And I know nothing about Wainwright in Scotland, so that’s a rabbithole waiting for me. Thank you.

    Reply
  143. Oh Constance, Local Hero was such a lovely film. I haven’t seen it for ages. Must track it down. And I know nothing about Wainwright in Scotland, so that’s a rabbithole waiting for me. Thank you.

    Reply
  144. Oh Constance, Local Hero was such a lovely film. I haven’t seen it for ages. Must track it down. And I know nothing about Wainwright in Scotland, so that’s a rabbithole waiting for me. Thank you.

    Reply
  145. Oh Constance, Local Hero was such a lovely film. I haven’t seen it for ages. Must track it down. And I know nothing about Wainwright in Scotland, so that’s a rabbithole waiting for me. Thank you.

    Reply
  146. I’m with you on the system of researching while in bed. On cold mornings [we get a lot of them in England] it’s the cosiest place to be. Whether with books or nowadays, the tablet, one can travel anywhere, or find out details of what’s wanted for the WIP. I love getting up for breakfast after a an hour or so on a trip to Constantinople or riding along up the Danube, or perhaps walking along the Steyne in Brighton, or to the Pump Room in Bath.

    Reply
  147. I’m with you on the system of researching while in bed. On cold mornings [we get a lot of them in England] it’s the cosiest place to be. Whether with books or nowadays, the tablet, one can travel anywhere, or find out details of what’s wanted for the WIP. I love getting up for breakfast after a an hour or so on a trip to Constantinople or riding along up the Danube, or perhaps walking along the Steyne in Brighton, or to the Pump Room in Bath.

    Reply
  148. I’m with you on the system of researching while in bed. On cold mornings [we get a lot of them in England] it’s the cosiest place to be. Whether with books or nowadays, the tablet, one can travel anywhere, or find out details of what’s wanted for the WIP. I love getting up for breakfast after a an hour or so on a trip to Constantinople or riding along up the Danube, or perhaps walking along the Steyne in Brighton, or to the Pump Room in Bath.

    Reply
  149. I’m with you on the system of researching while in bed. On cold mornings [we get a lot of them in England] it’s the cosiest place to be. Whether with books or nowadays, the tablet, one can travel anywhere, or find out details of what’s wanted for the WIP. I love getting up for breakfast after a an hour or so on a trip to Constantinople or riding along up the Danube, or perhaps walking along the Steyne in Brighton, or to the Pump Room in Bath.

    Reply
  150. I’m with you on the system of researching while in bed. On cold mornings [we get a lot of them in England] it’s the cosiest place to be. Whether with books or nowadays, the tablet, one can travel anywhere, or find out details of what’s wanted for the WIP. I love getting up for breakfast after a an hour or so on a trip to Constantinople or riding along up the Danube, or perhaps walking along the Steyne in Brighton, or to the Pump Room in Bath.

    Reply
  151. Anne, It sounds as though a comfy armchair …. electric recliners are fabulous …. would serve as well as the bed. I find that if I close my eyes when resting, thinking through some problem or other, if I can’t solve it I tend to doze off. The subconscious then takes over and it is amazing how issues can become clearer on waking. Day dreaming merges with deep dreaming. I expect Freud and Jung will have expressed a view on this! Virtual travel on a laptop is clearly a fantastic resource but your traveling years will have served you well by providing ‘atmosphere’ and experience. Several Wenches have commented that they like to visit the locations they write about, but in present circumstance memories must be an invaluable aid to writing. Thanks for another fascinating blog.

    Reply
  152. Anne, It sounds as though a comfy armchair …. electric recliners are fabulous …. would serve as well as the bed. I find that if I close my eyes when resting, thinking through some problem or other, if I can’t solve it I tend to doze off. The subconscious then takes over and it is amazing how issues can become clearer on waking. Day dreaming merges with deep dreaming. I expect Freud and Jung will have expressed a view on this! Virtual travel on a laptop is clearly a fantastic resource but your traveling years will have served you well by providing ‘atmosphere’ and experience. Several Wenches have commented that they like to visit the locations they write about, but in present circumstance memories must be an invaluable aid to writing. Thanks for another fascinating blog.

    Reply
  153. Anne, It sounds as though a comfy armchair …. electric recliners are fabulous …. would serve as well as the bed. I find that if I close my eyes when resting, thinking through some problem or other, if I can’t solve it I tend to doze off. The subconscious then takes over and it is amazing how issues can become clearer on waking. Day dreaming merges with deep dreaming. I expect Freud and Jung will have expressed a view on this! Virtual travel on a laptop is clearly a fantastic resource but your traveling years will have served you well by providing ‘atmosphere’ and experience. Several Wenches have commented that they like to visit the locations they write about, but in present circumstance memories must be an invaluable aid to writing. Thanks for another fascinating blog.

    Reply
  154. Anne, It sounds as though a comfy armchair …. electric recliners are fabulous …. would serve as well as the bed. I find that if I close my eyes when resting, thinking through some problem or other, if I can’t solve it I tend to doze off. The subconscious then takes over and it is amazing how issues can become clearer on waking. Day dreaming merges with deep dreaming. I expect Freud and Jung will have expressed a view on this! Virtual travel on a laptop is clearly a fantastic resource but your traveling years will have served you well by providing ‘atmosphere’ and experience. Several Wenches have commented that they like to visit the locations they write about, but in present circumstance memories must be an invaluable aid to writing. Thanks for another fascinating blog.

    Reply
  155. Anne, It sounds as though a comfy armchair …. electric recliners are fabulous …. would serve as well as the bed. I find that if I close my eyes when resting, thinking through some problem or other, if I can’t solve it I tend to doze off. The subconscious then takes over and it is amazing how issues can become clearer on waking. Day dreaming merges with deep dreaming. I expect Freud and Jung will have expressed a view on this! Virtual travel on a laptop is clearly a fantastic resource but your traveling years will have served you well by providing ‘atmosphere’ and experience. Several Wenches have commented that they like to visit the locations they write about, but in present circumstance memories must be an invaluable aid to writing. Thanks for another fascinating blog.

    Reply
  156. Thanks, Beth — that’s very much what I do, too. It’s a lovely way to go exploring. I get my morning cup of coffee and deal with email, and read blogs, and do some virtual traveling and then, I go off and get some breakfast, and my working day begins.

    Reply
  157. Thanks, Beth — that’s very much what I do, too. It’s a lovely way to go exploring. I get my morning cup of coffee and deal with email, and read blogs, and do some virtual traveling and then, I go off and get some breakfast, and my working day begins.

    Reply
  158. Thanks, Beth — that’s very much what I do, too. It’s a lovely way to go exploring. I get my morning cup of coffee and deal with email, and read blogs, and do some virtual traveling and then, I go off and get some breakfast, and my working day begins.

    Reply
  159. Thanks, Beth — that’s very much what I do, too. It’s a lovely way to go exploring. I get my morning cup of coffee and deal with email, and read blogs, and do some virtual traveling and then, I go off and get some breakfast, and my working day begins.

    Reply
  160. Thanks, Beth — that’s very much what I do, too. It’s a lovely way to go exploring. I get my morning cup of coffee and deal with email, and read blogs, and do some virtual traveling and then, I go off and get some breakfast, and my working day begins.

    Reply
  161. Quantum, I’ve never tried an electric recliner and I’m sure it would be addictive. But the placement of my bed is also a factor. It faces a northerly bow window—the only north-facing window in the house — and in this hemisphere, it means all winter I get sun shining in it from first thing in the morning until sunset — assuming, of course, it’s a sunny day. And believe me, in winter that’s a huge bonus. The window also looks out onto my small front garden, and a more distant vista of trees, and there’s a lot of birdlife, so it also gives me bird-music to write by.

    Reply
  162. Quantum, I’ve never tried an electric recliner and I’m sure it would be addictive. But the placement of my bed is also a factor. It faces a northerly bow window—the only north-facing window in the house — and in this hemisphere, it means all winter I get sun shining in it from first thing in the morning until sunset — assuming, of course, it’s a sunny day. And believe me, in winter that’s a huge bonus. The window also looks out onto my small front garden, and a more distant vista of trees, and there’s a lot of birdlife, so it also gives me bird-music to write by.

    Reply
  163. Quantum, I’ve never tried an electric recliner and I’m sure it would be addictive. But the placement of my bed is also a factor. It faces a northerly bow window—the only north-facing window in the house — and in this hemisphere, it means all winter I get sun shining in it from first thing in the morning until sunset — assuming, of course, it’s a sunny day. And believe me, in winter that’s a huge bonus. The window also looks out onto my small front garden, and a more distant vista of trees, and there’s a lot of birdlife, so it also gives me bird-music to write by.

    Reply
  164. Quantum, I’ve never tried an electric recliner and I’m sure it would be addictive. But the placement of my bed is also a factor. It faces a northerly bow window—the only north-facing window in the house — and in this hemisphere, it means all winter I get sun shining in it from first thing in the morning until sunset — assuming, of course, it’s a sunny day. And believe me, in winter that’s a huge bonus. The window also looks out onto my small front garden, and a more distant vista of trees, and there’s a lot of birdlife, so it also gives me bird-music to write by.

    Reply
  165. Quantum, I’ve never tried an electric recliner and I’m sure it would be addictive. But the placement of my bed is also a factor. It faces a northerly bow window—the only north-facing window in the house — and in this hemisphere, it means all winter I get sun shining in it from first thing in the morning until sunset — assuming, of course, it’s a sunny day. And believe me, in winter that’s a huge bonus. The window also looks out onto my small front garden, and a more distant vista of trees, and there’s a lot of birdlife, so it also gives me bird-music to write by.

    Reply
  166. Thanks so much for this, Anne! I thought I was subscribed to your blog, but realize I’ve never received a post – slap hand to forehead. I have now signed up for it, and look forward to hearing even more from you on a regular basis. I love the story about the rain, and you were correct that that could probably never happen today. (I have a favorite apron I purchased off the woman wearing it at the farmers’ market in Pitlochry, Scotland in 2017. She wanted to take it home and wash it first, but I told her I had to have it. On the front, it says, “Dinna fash y’self, hin – ha’ a carry oot!” So far, not one American who’s seen it can translate it!) And that house looks like a young girl’s dream, even without a secret stare to the attic! I always find it interesting that the Scots would refer to that as a cottage, while a “cottage“ to me is two rooms and a porch on a beach somewhere!

    Reply
  167. Thanks so much for this, Anne! I thought I was subscribed to your blog, but realize I’ve never received a post – slap hand to forehead. I have now signed up for it, and look forward to hearing even more from you on a regular basis. I love the story about the rain, and you were correct that that could probably never happen today. (I have a favorite apron I purchased off the woman wearing it at the farmers’ market in Pitlochry, Scotland in 2017. She wanted to take it home and wash it first, but I told her I had to have it. On the front, it says, “Dinna fash y’self, hin – ha’ a carry oot!” So far, not one American who’s seen it can translate it!) And that house looks like a young girl’s dream, even without a secret stare to the attic! I always find it interesting that the Scots would refer to that as a cottage, while a “cottage“ to me is two rooms and a porch on a beach somewhere!

    Reply
  168. Thanks so much for this, Anne! I thought I was subscribed to your blog, but realize I’ve never received a post – slap hand to forehead. I have now signed up for it, and look forward to hearing even more from you on a regular basis. I love the story about the rain, and you were correct that that could probably never happen today. (I have a favorite apron I purchased off the woman wearing it at the farmers’ market in Pitlochry, Scotland in 2017. She wanted to take it home and wash it first, but I told her I had to have it. On the front, it says, “Dinna fash y’self, hin – ha’ a carry oot!” So far, not one American who’s seen it can translate it!) And that house looks like a young girl’s dream, even without a secret stare to the attic! I always find it interesting that the Scots would refer to that as a cottage, while a “cottage“ to me is two rooms and a porch on a beach somewhere!

    Reply
  169. Thanks so much for this, Anne! I thought I was subscribed to your blog, but realize I’ve never received a post – slap hand to forehead. I have now signed up for it, and look forward to hearing even more from you on a regular basis. I love the story about the rain, and you were correct that that could probably never happen today. (I have a favorite apron I purchased off the woman wearing it at the farmers’ market in Pitlochry, Scotland in 2017. She wanted to take it home and wash it first, but I told her I had to have it. On the front, it says, “Dinna fash y’self, hin – ha’ a carry oot!” So far, not one American who’s seen it can translate it!) And that house looks like a young girl’s dream, even without a secret stare to the attic! I always find it interesting that the Scots would refer to that as a cottage, while a “cottage“ to me is two rooms and a porch on a beach somewhere!

    Reply
  170. Thanks so much for this, Anne! I thought I was subscribed to your blog, but realize I’ve never received a post – slap hand to forehead. I have now signed up for it, and look forward to hearing even more from you on a regular basis. I love the story about the rain, and you were correct that that could probably never happen today. (I have a favorite apron I purchased off the woman wearing it at the farmers’ market in Pitlochry, Scotland in 2017. She wanted to take it home and wash it first, but I told her I had to have it. On the front, it says, “Dinna fash y’self, hin – ha’ a carry oot!” So far, not one American who’s seen it can translate it!) And that house looks like a young girl’s dream, even without a secret stare to the attic! I always find it interesting that the Scots would refer to that as a cottage, while a “cottage“ to me is two rooms and a porch on a beach somewhere!

    Reply
  171. Love the sound of that apron, Constance. And I’ve seen some ginormous houses in the US called “a cottage” too — don’t understand it myself. As for the house I lived in in Scotland, I just looked it up and it’s for sale. So tempting. *g*

    Reply
  172. Love the sound of that apron, Constance. And I’ve seen some ginormous houses in the US called “a cottage” too — don’t understand it myself. As for the house I lived in in Scotland, I just looked it up and it’s for sale. So tempting. *g*

    Reply
  173. Love the sound of that apron, Constance. And I’ve seen some ginormous houses in the US called “a cottage” too — don’t understand it myself. As for the house I lived in in Scotland, I just looked it up and it’s for sale. So tempting. *g*

    Reply
  174. Love the sound of that apron, Constance. And I’ve seen some ginormous houses in the US called “a cottage” too — don’t understand it myself. As for the house I lived in in Scotland, I just looked it up and it’s for sale. So tempting. *g*

    Reply
  175. Love the sound of that apron, Constance. And I’ve seen some ginormous houses in the US called “a cottage” too — don’t understand it myself. As for the house I lived in in Scotland, I just looked it up and it’s for sale. So tempting. *g*

    Reply
  176. I am thankful for yourself and other bloggers who share their research, providing me with Recency information to add verisimilitude to my writing (which I do in bed).

    Reply
  177. I am thankful for yourself and other bloggers who share their research, providing me with Recency information to add verisimilitude to my writing (which I do in bed).

    Reply
  178. I am thankful for yourself and other bloggers who share their research, providing me with Recency information to add verisimilitude to my writing (which I do in bed).

    Reply
  179. I am thankful for yourself and other bloggers who share their research, providing me with Recency information to add verisimilitude to my writing (which I do in bed).

    Reply
  180. I am thankful for yourself and other bloggers who share their research, providing me with Recency information to add verisimilitude to my writing (which I do in bed).

    Reply

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