Selling the Regency Vegetable

Joanna here:

This is sort of a pictorial posting today . . . Looking at some pictures of what a vegetable market would have looked like in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries.
Old-Covent-Garden-Market,-1825

We can start with this Scharf painting of Covent Garden in 1825.  Covent Garden was the huge central martet of London.  By the Eighteenth Century it was sort of a combination open-air market, red light district, and raffish hang-out, which must have been interesting for everybody concerned. 

Anyhow, glancing at the picture, you'll see if contains all the elements of a fine city vegetable market.

First off, there's protection from the rain, or the occasional sun. Look up at the top of the painting.  These substantial market vendors at Covent Garden have a wooden stall with a fine, permanent substantial roof. Awnings stretch out to shelter their customers. Those are wood frames with cloth stretched across them.Abusivefruitwoman late c18

Here to the right, a simpler shelter covers this fruit seller. She's set up shop under a cloth awning. 

Old-Covent-Garden-Market,-1825 detail table
Display tables are another most desirable market feature. Tables get the goods up off the ground and present them enticingly.  Apples and green beans are where they can be seen and handled.

To the right, our fruit seller has a simple but permanent-looking and useful bench. 

That table in the substantial booth in Covern Garden seems to be long boards set up on a variety of blocks and barrels that probably double as storage.

Old-Covent-Garden-Market,-1825 detail scalesAnother notable event going on at Covent Gardens . . . we got weighing.

See the man on the left, wearing an apron, using scales. He's selling his vegetables by the pound, which is obviously an upscale approach. Notice how the market vendors in these other pictures below aren't weighing the produce. They'll be offering, "Penny for a fine apple. Tuppence for three.' and selling carrots by the bunch.

The tables in the Schraf painting — see up there at the top — serve another purpose.  A line of tables separates the sellers from the buyers. The sellers are on our side of the pictures; the buyers on the other side of that line of tables.  See how the row of long tables gives these prosperous market sellers their own 'space'? A private space.  A child plays in the foreground. A young woman vender sits in a comfortable chair nursing her baby. 
Market by Charles Henry Turner c 1880 detail with bench

When a table separates vendo from buyer and there's a wall behind, the sellers can keep an eye on the merchandise.  They never have to turn their back to a potential customer . . . or a thief.

See to the right here, where a vendor has no stall, but nonetheless, creates a private space for herself with a long bench.

 

This sketch of Swansea MarSketch of Swansea market by E. Hull, 1871 detailket in the last quarter of the Nineteenth Century is a good view of vegetable market basics. No booths or stalls. No tables.

These folks are in the vegetable business with only vegetables and something to sit on, burlap bags for the mangel wuzels, and baskets for the lettuces.

And what baskets — take a look at the beauty and variety of these baskets . . . every one of them purpose-made for the cargo. 
We've lost something, putting everything in plastic bins.

Basket 1
Basket 2
Basket 3

 

 

 

I spent most of my adult life shopping in open-air markets like those of Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century England.  What about you?  Have you ever done exciting shopping out in open air, face to face with the vendor, bargaining …?

Some lucky commentor in the trail will be drawn to take her pick of my books.

165 thoughts on “Selling the Regency Vegetable”

  1. I love open air markets! We have a few here in Montreal, but of course they don’t compare to the noise and abundance and variety you get at a Turkish bazaar. All that hawking and tasting and haggling… I miss it 🙂

    Reply
  2. I love open air markets! We have a few here in Montreal, but of course they don’t compare to the noise and abundance and variety you get at a Turkish bazaar. All that hawking and tasting and haggling… I miss it 🙂

    Reply
  3. I love open air markets! We have a few here in Montreal, but of course they don’t compare to the noise and abundance and variety you get at a Turkish bazaar. All that hawking and tasting and haggling… I miss it 🙂

    Reply
  4. I love open air markets! We have a few here in Montreal, but of course they don’t compare to the noise and abundance and variety you get at a Turkish bazaar. All that hawking and tasting and haggling… I miss it 🙂

    Reply
  5. I love open air markets! We have a few here in Montreal, but of course they don’t compare to the noise and abundance and variety you get at a Turkish bazaar. All that hawking and tasting and haggling… I miss it 🙂

    Reply
  6. I go to various farmer’s markets here in Austin. I like the taste and look of food directly from local farmers. But, the people here do not look nearly as interesting as the Covent Garden people in the picture.

    Reply
  7. I go to various farmer’s markets here in Austin. I like the taste and look of food directly from local farmers. But, the people here do not look nearly as interesting as the Covent Garden people in the picture.

    Reply
  8. I go to various farmer’s markets here in Austin. I like the taste and look of food directly from local farmers. But, the people here do not look nearly as interesting as the Covent Garden people in the picture.

    Reply
  9. I go to various farmer’s markets here in Austin. I like the taste and look of food directly from local farmers. But, the people here do not look nearly as interesting as the Covent Garden people in the picture.

    Reply
  10. I go to various farmer’s markets here in Austin. I like the taste and look of food directly from local farmers. But, the people here do not look nearly as interesting as the Covent Garden people in the picture.

    Reply
  11. Hi Deniz —
    And yet, I’d like to see those markets of Montreal. Fish, vegetables, fruit, flowers. Maybe local produce.
    We have the smallest possible farmers market here in my small town, and I love it.

    Reply
  12. Hi Deniz —
    And yet, I’d like to see those markets of Montreal. Fish, vegetables, fruit, flowers. Maybe local produce.
    We have the smallest possible farmers market here in my small town, and I love it.

    Reply
  13. Hi Deniz —
    And yet, I’d like to see those markets of Montreal. Fish, vegetables, fruit, flowers. Maybe local produce.
    We have the smallest possible farmers market here in my small town, and I love it.

    Reply
  14. Hi Deniz —
    And yet, I’d like to see those markets of Montreal. Fish, vegetables, fruit, flowers. Maybe local produce.
    We have the smallest possible farmers market here in my small town, and I love it.

    Reply
  15. Hi Deniz —
    And yet, I’d like to see those markets of Montreal. Fish, vegetables, fruit, flowers. Maybe local produce.
    We have the smallest possible farmers market here in my small town, and I love it.

    Reply
  16. Hi Annette —
    We have some characters at our local Farmer’s market. This is a last distant holdouts of hippies, so there’s wonderful organic everything. Remarkable cheeses, for one thing. We also have Plain People who sell here. And there’s several folks with baked goods.
    There’s something immensely satisfying to buying food directly from the source. I like to think it’s giving money to the producers instead of to all those middlemen.

    Reply
  17. Hi Annette —
    We have some characters at our local Farmer’s market. This is a last distant holdouts of hippies, so there’s wonderful organic everything. Remarkable cheeses, for one thing. We also have Plain People who sell here. And there’s several folks with baked goods.
    There’s something immensely satisfying to buying food directly from the source. I like to think it’s giving money to the producers instead of to all those middlemen.

    Reply
  18. Hi Annette —
    We have some characters at our local Farmer’s market. This is a last distant holdouts of hippies, so there’s wonderful organic everything. Remarkable cheeses, for one thing. We also have Plain People who sell here. And there’s several folks with baked goods.
    There’s something immensely satisfying to buying food directly from the source. I like to think it’s giving money to the producers instead of to all those middlemen.

    Reply
  19. Hi Annette —
    We have some characters at our local Farmer’s market. This is a last distant holdouts of hippies, so there’s wonderful organic everything. Remarkable cheeses, for one thing. We also have Plain People who sell here. And there’s several folks with baked goods.
    There’s something immensely satisfying to buying food directly from the source. I like to think it’s giving money to the producers instead of to all those middlemen.

    Reply
  20. Hi Annette —
    We have some characters at our local Farmer’s market. This is a last distant holdouts of hippies, so there’s wonderful organic everything. Remarkable cheeses, for one thing. We also have Plain People who sell here. And there’s several folks with baked goods.
    There’s something immensely satisfying to buying food directly from the source. I like to think it’s giving money to the producers instead of to all those middlemen.

    Reply
  21. We run to farm stands rather than farmers markets around here, so for half the year I can have fresh vegetables that haven’t been bred for their ability to stand up to transportation. My favorites are the ones set up by kids on card tables when the family garden produced more zucchini than anyone was willing to eat.

    Reply
  22. We run to farm stands rather than farmers markets around here, so for half the year I can have fresh vegetables that haven’t been bred for their ability to stand up to transportation. My favorites are the ones set up by kids on card tables when the family garden produced more zucchini than anyone was willing to eat.

    Reply
  23. We run to farm stands rather than farmers markets around here, so for half the year I can have fresh vegetables that haven’t been bred for their ability to stand up to transportation. My favorites are the ones set up by kids on card tables when the family garden produced more zucchini than anyone was willing to eat.

    Reply
  24. We run to farm stands rather than farmers markets around here, so for half the year I can have fresh vegetables that haven’t been bred for their ability to stand up to transportation. My favorites are the ones set up by kids on card tables when the family garden produced more zucchini than anyone was willing to eat.

    Reply
  25. We run to farm stands rather than farmers markets around here, so for half the year I can have fresh vegetables that haven’t been bred for their ability to stand up to transportation. My favorites are the ones set up by kids on card tables when the family garden produced more zucchini than anyone was willing to eat.

    Reply
  26. Although there’s no haggling, and they are not nearly as colorful as your examples , I do enjoy a couple of local farmers’ markets in my area. The fruits and vegetables, fresh and home-canned and preserved, are great, and I also enjoy the conversations with some of the down-to-earth characters. (Sorry! I just could not resist writing that last sentence.)

    Reply
  27. Although there’s no haggling, and they are not nearly as colorful as your examples , I do enjoy a couple of local farmers’ markets in my area. The fruits and vegetables, fresh and home-canned and preserved, are great, and I also enjoy the conversations with some of the down-to-earth characters. (Sorry! I just could not resist writing that last sentence.)

    Reply
  28. Although there’s no haggling, and they are not nearly as colorful as your examples , I do enjoy a couple of local farmers’ markets in my area. The fruits and vegetables, fresh and home-canned and preserved, are great, and I also enjoy the conversations with some of the down-to-earth characters. (Sorry! I just could not resist writing that last sentence.)

    Reply
  29. Although there’s no haggling, and they are not nearly as colorful as your examples , I do enjoy a couple of local farmers’ markets in my area. The fruits and vegetables, fresh and home-canned and preserved, are great, and I also enjoy the conversations with some of the down-to-earth characters. (Sorry! I just could not resist writing that last sentence.)

    Reply
  30. Although there’s no haggling, and they are not nearly as colorful as your examples , I do enjoy a couple of local farmers’ markets in my area. The fruits and vegetables, fresh and home-canned and preserved, are great, and I also enjoy the conversations with some of the down-to-earth characters. (Sorry! I just could not resist writing that last sentence.)

    Reply
  31. Hi Lil —
    Ah zucchini. There’s six weeks out of the year when if you absentmindedly pause on a street corner in town, waiting for the light to change, you’ll get buried in drive-by zucchini.
    Folks wait till you leave home and sneak up to drop a grocery sack of zucchini on the porch.

    Reply
  32. Hi Lil —
    Ah zucchini. There’s six weeks out of the year when if you absentmindedly pause on a street corner in town, waiting for the light to change, you’ll get buried in drive-by zucchini.
    Folks wait till you leave home and sneak up to drop a grocery sack of zucchini on the porch.

    Reply
  33. Hi Lil —
    Ah zucchini. There’s six weeks out of the year when if you absentmindedly pause on a street corner in town, waiting for the light to change, you’ll get buried in drive-by zucchini.
    Folks wait till you leave home and sneak up to drop a grocery sack of zucchini on the porch.

    Reply
  34. Hi Lil —
    Ah zucchini. There’s six weeks out of the year when if you absentmindedly pause on a street corner in town, waiting for the light to change, you’ll get buried in drive-by zucchini.
    Folks wait till you leave home and sneak up to drop a grocery sack of zucchini on the porch.

    Reply
  35. Hi Lil —
    Ah zucchini. There’s six weeks out of the year when if you absentmindedly pause on a street corner in town, waiting for the light to change, you’ll get buried in drive-by zucchini.
    Folks wait till you leave home and sneak up to drop a grocery sack of zucchini on the porch.

    Reply
  36. Hi Janga —
    Oh *giggle*.
    And two thumbs up for the pun.
    We have a fair number of folks who grow heirloom tomatoes. I mostly see the difference in shapes and colors and haven’t yet taken in the differences in taste.
    That’s one of my projects for next year.

    Reply
  37. Hi Janga —
    Oh *giggle*.
    And two thumbs up for the pun.
    We have a fair number of folks who grow heirloom tomatoes. I mostly see the difference in shapes and colors and haven’t yet taken in the differences in taste.
    That’s one of my projects for next year.

    Reply
  38. Hi Janga —
    Oh *giggle*.
    And two thumbs up for the pun.
    We have a fair number of folks who grow heirloom tomatoes. I mostly see the difference in shapes and colors and haven’t yet taken in the differences in taste.
    That’s one of my projects for next year.

    Reply
  39. Hi Janga —
    Oh *giggle*.
    And two thumbs up for the pun.
    We have a fair number of folks who grow heirloom tomatoes. I mostly see the difference in shapes and colors and haven’t yet taken in the differences in taste.
    That’s one of my projects for next year.

    Reply
  40. Hi Janga —
    Oh *giggle*.
    And two thumbs up for the pun.
    We have a fair number of folks who grow heirloom tomatoes. I mostly see the difference in shapes and colors and haven’t yet taken in the differences in taste.
    That’s one of my projects for next year.

    Reply
  41. I love open markets – most of the ones we have around are farmers markets – love the veggies, the cheesemakers & there’s often a pickle man. I’ll never forget one I was at on vacation in Salzburg Austria – came back with lots of Christmas presents – they even had a pizza maker that sold wine (it was yummy).

    Reply
  42. I love open markets – most of the ones we have around are farmers markets – love the veggies, the cheesemakers & there’s often a pickle man. I’ll never forget one I was at on vacation in Salzburg Austria – came back with lots of Christmas presents – they even had a pizza maker that sold wine (it was yummy).

    Reply
  43. I love open markets – most of the ones we have around are farmers markets – love the veggies, the cheesemakers & there’s often a pickle man. I’ll never forget one I was at on vacation in Salzburg Austria – came back with lots of Christmas presents – they even had a pizza maker that sold wine (it was yummy).

    Reply
  44. I love open markets – most of the ones we have around are farmers markets – love the veggies, the cheesemakers & there’s often a pickle man. I’ll never forget one I was at on vacation in Salzburg Austria – came back with lots of Christmas presents – they even had a pizza maker that sold wine (it was yummy).

    Reply
  45. I love open markets – most of the ones we have around are farmers markets – love the veggies, the cheesemakers & there’s often a pickle man. I’ll never forget one I was at on vacation in Salzburg Austria – came back with lots of Christmas presents – they even had a pizza maker that sold wine (it was yummy).

    Reply
  46. For the first 18 years of my life, I never thought about markets. If we wanted fresh stuff, we planted it, weeded it, and harvested it. If we wanted it for over the winter, we stored it, froze it, or canned it.
    When I lived in Maadi (a suburb of Cairo), there were two vegetable stands and two fruit stands. (The butcher had an indoor store.) I had to learn about market shopping; my maid would look at my haul and say, ‘How much?’ and her reply would be ‘Too much.’ I got better the longer I was there at haggling over price and quality. It was so nice to get off the train, buy what was for dinner, and cook it fresh.
    The best market, however, was the flower market in Alexandria. They can grow about anything in the Nile Delta, and they did. According to the locals, the European buyers would look at what was on display and then order for florists in Europe.

    Reply
  47. For the first 18 years of my life, I never thought about markets. If we wanted fresh stuff, we planted it, weeded it, and harvested it. If we wanted it for over the winter, we stored it, froze it, or canned it.
    When I lived in Maadi (a suburb of Cairo), there were two vegetable stands and two fruit stands. (The butcher had an indoor store.) I had to learn about market shopping; my maid would look at my haul and say, ‘How much?’ and her reply would be ‘Too much.’ I got better the longer I was there at haggling over price and quality. It was so nice to get off the train, buy what was for dinner, and cook it fresh.
    The best market, however, was the flower market in Alexandria. They can grow about anything in the Nile Delta, and they did. According to the locals, the European buyers would look at what was on display and then order for florists in Europe.

    Reply
  48. For the first 18 years of my life, I never thought about markets. If we wanted fresh stuff, we planted it, weeded it, and harvested it. If we wanted it for over the winter, we stored it, froze it, or canned it.
    When I lived in Maadi (a suburb of Cairo), there were two vegetable stands and two fruit stands. (The butcher had an indoor store.) I had to learn about market shopping; my maid would look at my haul and say, ‘How much?’ and her reply would be ‘Too much.’ I got better the longer I was there at haggling over price and quality. It was so nice to get off the train, buy what was for dinner, and cook it fresh.
    The best market, however, was the flower market in Alexandria. They can grow about anything in the Nile Delta, and they did. According to the locals, the European buyers would look at what was on display and then order for florists in Europe.

    Reply
  49. For the first 18 years of my life, I never thought about markets. If we wanted fresh stuff, we planted it, weeded it, and harvested it. If we wanted it for over the winter, we stored it, froze it, or canned it.
    When I lived in Maadi (a suburb of Cairo), there were two vegetable stands and two fruit stands. (The butcher had an indoor store.) I had to learn about market shopping; my maid would look at my haul and say, ‘How much?’ and her reply would be ‘Too much.’ I got better the longer I was there at haggling over price and quality. It was so nice to get off the train, buy what was for dinner, and cook it fresh.
    The best market, however, was the flower market in Alexandria. They can grow about anything in the Nile Delta, and they did. According to the locals, the European buyers would look at what was on display and then order for florists in Europe.

    Reply
  50. For the first 18 years of my life, I never thought about markets. If we wanted fresh stuff, we planted it, weeded it, and harvested it. If we wanted it for over the winter, we stored it, froze it, or canned it.
    When I lived in Maadi (a suburb of Cairo), there were two vegetable stands and two fruit stands. (The butcher had an indoor store.) I had to learn about market shopping; my maid would look at my haul and say, ‘How much?’ and her reply would be ‘Too much.’ I got better the longer I was there at haggling over price and quality. It was so nice to get off the train, buy what was for dinner, and cook it fresh.
    The best market, however, was the flower market in Alexandria. They can grow about anything in the Nile Delta, and they did. According to the locals, the European buyers would look at what was on display and then order for florists in Europe.

    Reply
  51. Hi Diane —
    The market in Salzburg must have been the famous Kris Kringle market. Wall to wall Christmas stuff, much of it handmade and traditional.
    Beautiful.

    Reply
  52. Hi Diane —
    The market in Salzburg must have been the famous Kris Kringle market. Wall to wall Christmas stuff, much of it handmade and traditional.
    Beautiful.

    Reply
  53. Hi Diane —
    The market in Salzburg must have been the famous Kris Kringle market. Wall to wall Christmas stuff, much of it handmade and traditional.
    Beautiful.

    Reply
  54. Hi Diane —
    The market in Salzburg must have been the famous Kris Kringle market. Wall to wall Christmas stuff, much of it handmade and traditional.
    Beautiful.

    Reply
  55. Hi Diane —
    The market in Salzburg must have been the famous Kris Kringle market. Wall to wall Christmas stuff, much of it handmade and traditional.
    Beautiful.

    Reply
  56. Hi Shannon —
    I can barely imagine what the flower market in Alexandria must be like. All those tropical flowers.
    Just wow.
    As to growing your own and eating local produce …
    I’ve been thinking about this in Regency vegetable markets.
    Most everything sold would be local and seasonal. If you didn’t like these beets or lettuces, you could walk on five feet and then ten feet and there would be more of the same.
    There must have been fierce competition between one fruit seller and the next. Maybe that’s why the market girls selling these vegetables are depicted as so comely. Maybe the sales depended more on a lovely, friendly smile than on the polish on the carrots.

    Reply
  57. Hi Shannon —
    I can barely imagine what the flower market in Alexandria must be like. All those tropical flowers.
    Just wow.
    As to growing your own and eating local produce …
    I’ve been thinking about this in Regency vegetable markets.
    Most everything sold would be local and seasonal. If you didn’t like these beets or lettuces, you could walk on five feet and then ten feet and there would be more of the same.
    There must have been fierce competition between one fruit seller and the next. Maybe that’s why the market girls selling these vegetables are depicted as so comely. Maybe the sales depended more on a lovely, friendly smile than on the polish on the carrots.

    Reply
  58. Hi Shannon —
    I can barely imagine what the flower market in Alexandria must be like. All those tropical flowers.
    Just wow.
    As to growing your own and eating local produce …
    I’ve been thinking about this in Regency vegetable markets.
    Most everything sold would be local and seasonal. If you didn’t like these beets or lettuces, you could walk on five feet and then ten feet and there would be more of the same.
    There must have been fierce competition between one fruit seller and the next. Maybe that’s why the market girls selling these vegetables are depicted as so comely. Maybe the sales depended more on a lovely, friendly smile than on the polish on the carrots.

    Reply
  59. Hi Shannon —
    I can barely imagine what the flower market in Alexandria must be like. All those tropical flowers.
    Just wow.
    As to growing your own and eating local produce …
    I’ve been thinking about this in Regency vegetable markets.
    Most everything sold would be local and seasonal. If you didn’t like these beets or lettuces, you could walk on five feet and then ten feet and there would be more of the same.
    There must have been fierce competition between one fruit seller and the next. Maybe that’s why the market girls selling these vegetables are depicted as so comely. Maybe the sales depended more on a lovely, friendly smile than on the polish on the carrots.

    Reply
  60. Hi Shannon —
    I can barely imagine what the flower market in Alexandria must be like. All those tropical flowers.
    Just wow.
    As to growing your own and eating local produce …
    I’ve been thinking about this in Regency vegetable markets.
    Most everything sold would be local and seasonal. If you didn’t like these beets or lettuces, you could walk on five feet and then ten feet and there would be more of the same.
    There must have been fierce competition between one fruit seller and the next. Maybe that’s why the market girls selling these vegetables are depicted as so comely. Maybe the sales depended more on a lovely, friendly smile than on the polish on the carrots.

    Reply
  61. No haggling but quite a lot of gossip at our local farmers market.Our markets don’t compare to a French market tho.I always find them fun when we are on holiday.I think markets are making a come back over here as most towns now seem to get farmers markets fairly regularily .It might be convenient to shop in the supermarket but wandering around a proper market (quite often in the rain)is definitely more of an adventure.

    Reply
  62. No haggling but quite a lot of gossip at our local farmers market.Our markets don’t compare to a French market tho.I always find them fun when we are on holiday.I think markets are making a come back over here as most towns now seem to get farmers markets fairly regularily .It might be convenient to shop in the supermarket but wandering around a proper market (quite often in the rain)is definitely more of an adventure.

    Reply
  63. No haggling but quite a lot of gossip at our local farmers market.Our markets don’t compare to a French market tho.I always find them fun when we are on holiday.I think markets are making a come back over here as most towns now seem to get farmers markets fairly regularily .It might be convenient to shop in the supermarket but wandering around a proper market (quite often in the rain)is definitely more of an adventure.

    Reply
  64. No haggling but quite a lot of gossip at our local farmers market.Our markets don’t compare to a French market tho.I always find them fun when we are on holiday.I think markets are making a come back over here as most towns now seem to get farmers markets fairly regularily .It might be convenient to shop in the supermarket but wandering around a proper market (quite often in the rain)is definitely more of an adventure.

    Reply
  65. No haggling but quite a lot of gossip at our local farmers market.Our markets don’t compare to a French market tho.I always find them fun when we are on holiday.I think markets are making a come back over here as most towns now seem to get farmers markets fairly regularily .It might be convenient to shop in the supermarket but wandering around a proper market (quite often in the rain)is definitely more of an adventure.

    Reply
  66. I grew up in India and open air markets are still very much in trend. Getting seasonal vegetables and fruits that are locally grown are far more superior and civilized than the stuff we find in the grocery store.Vegetables and fruits taste far superior. As for plastic bins.. we used to store drinking water in earthen ware pots. Water stayed cool and had a lingering taste of clay that was very good. This is something they have not yet discovered in Western world.

    Reply
  67. I grew up in India and open air markets are still very much in trend. Getting seasonal vegetables and fruits that are locally grown are far more superior and civilized than the stuff we find in the grocery store.Vegetables and fruits taste far superior. As for plastic bins.. we used to store drinking water in earthen ware pots. Water stayed cool and had a lingering taste of clay that was very good. This is something they have not yet discovered in Western world.

    Reply
  68. I grew up in India and open air markets are still very much in trend. Getting seasonal vegetables and fruits that are locally grown are far more superior and civilized than the stuff we find in the grocery store.Vegetables and fruits taste far superior. As for plastic bins.. we used to store drinking water in earthen ware pots. Water stayed cool and had a lingering taste of clay that was very good. This is something they have not yet discovered in Western world.

    Reply
  69. I grew up in India and open air markets are still very much in trend. Getting seasonal vegetables and fruits that are locally grown are far more superior and civilized than the stuff we find in the grocery store.Vegetables and fruits taste far superior. As for plastic bins.. we used to store drinking water in earthen ware pots. Water stayed cool and had a lingering taste of clay that was very good. This is something they have not yet discovered in Western world.

    Reply
  70. I grew up in India and open air markets are still very much in trend. Getting seasonal vegetables and fruits that are locally grown are far more superior and civilized than the stuff we find in the grocery store.Vegetables and fruits taste far superior. As for plastic bins.. we used to store drinking water in earthen ware pots. Water stayed cool and had a lingering taste of clay that was very good. This is something they have not yet discovered in Western world.

    Reply
  71. It was very much seasonal at the fruit and vegetable stands. Strawberries for a month. To die for mangos for about a month. Peas for maybe two months. The zucchini, however, did not seem to have a particular season.
    As for sellers, it was always a family business. There would be an old lady, usually missing teeth in the far back part of the stall. There seemed to be a pattern of building relationships. A pre-teen girl who was very cute liked me and would run around, picking up this mango or that basket of green beans, telling me it was very good and very fresh and asking me if her English was good. She would laugh kindly when I asked if my Arabic was good. (It wasn’t.) Usually her mother or father took the money, but I think an uncle was involved, maybe as a farmer. Her teenage brother always offered to deliver to my apartment. Since I was buying for dinner, I rarely took him up on the offer. But when I entertained and had a bunch of packages, it was a nice service. I know maids and footmen carried packages, but I wonder if they had delivery in Regency England?

    Reply
  72. It was very much seasonal at the fruit and vegetable stands. Strawberries for a month. To die for mangos for about a month. Peas for maybe two months. The zucchini, however, did not seem to have a particular season.
    As for sellers, it was always a family business. There would be an old lady, usually missing teeth in the far back part of the stall. There seemed to be a pattern of building relationships. A pre-teen girl who was very cute liked me and would run around, picking up this mango or that basket of green beans, telling me it was very good and very fresh and asking me if her English was good. She would laugh kindly when I asked if my Arabic was good. (It wasn’t.) Usually her mother or father took the money, but I think an uncle was involved, maybe as a farmer. Her teenage brother always offered to deliver to my apartment. Since I was buying for dinner, I rarely took him up on the offer. But when I entertained and had a bunch of packages, it was a nice service. I know maids and footmen carried packages, but I wonder if they had delivery in Regency England?

    Reply
  73. It was very much seasonal at the fruit and vegetable stands. Strawberries for a month. To die for mangos for about a month. Peas for maybe two months. The zucchini, however, did not seem to have a particular season.
    As for sellers, it was always a family business. There would be an old lady, usually missing teeth in the far back part of the stall. There seemed to be a pattern of building relationships. A pre-teen girl who was very cute liked me and would run around, picking up this mango or that basket of green beans, telling me it was very good and very fresh and asking me if her English was good. She would laugh kindly when I asked if my Arabic was good. (It wasn’t.) Usually her mother or father took the money, but I think an uncle was involved, maybe as a farmer. Her teenage brother always offered to deliver to my apartment. Since I was buying for dinner, I rarely took him up on the offer. But when I entertained and had a bunch of packages, it was a nice service. I know maids and footmen carried packages, but I wonder if they had delivery in Regency England?

    Reply
  74. It was very much seasonal at the fruit and vegetable stands. Strawberries for a month. To die for mangos for about a month. Peas for maybe two months. The zucchini, however, did not seem to have a particular season.
    As for sellers, it was always a family business. There would be an old lady, usually missing teeth in the far back part of the stall. There seemed to be a pattern of building relationships. A pre-teen girl who was very cute liked me and would run around, picking up this mango or that basket of green beans, telling me it was very good and very fresh and asking me if her English was good. She would laugh kindly when I asked if my Arabic was good. (It wasn’t.) Usually her mother or father took the money, but I think an uncle was involved, maybe as a farmer. Her teenage brother always offered to deliver to my apartment. Since I was buying for dinner, I rarely took him up on the offer. But when I entertained and had a bunch of packages, it was a nice service. I know maids and footmen carried packages, but I wonder if they had delivery in Regency England?

    Reply
  75. It was very much seasonal at the fruit and vegetable stands. Strawberries for a month. To die for mangos for about a month. Peas for maybe two months. The zucchini, however, did not seem to have a particular season.
    As for sellers, it was always a family business. There would be an old lady, usually missing teeth in the far back part of the stall. There seemed to be a pattern of building relationships. A pre-teen girl who was very cute liked me and would run around, picking up this mango or that basket of green beans, telling me it was very good and very fresh and asking me if her English was good. She would laugh kindly when I asked if my Arabic was good. (It wasn’t.) Usually her mother or father took the money, but I think an uncle was involved, maybe as a farmer. Her teenage brother always offered to deliver to my apartment. Since I was buying for dinner, I rarely took him up on the offer. But when I entertained and had a bunch of packages, it was a nice service. I know maids and footmen carried packages, but I wonder if they had delivery in Regency England?

    Reply
  76. Hi Shannon —
    There’s a lot of stuff having to do with Regency England where I just make guesses and assumptions when I write about it.
    I put a market scene in My Lord and Spymaster where it’s all based on African and Middle East markets.
    These open air markets in the Regency, like open air markets today in the Third World, would have had lots of spare relatives hanging about. Why wouldn’t they deliver, hoping to pick up an extra coin of two? It makes sense.
    And the business of thirty different stalls (or prime spots on the ground,) all lined up next to each other, all selling more or less the same thing, meant that a particular stall had to build a loyal following. So my vegetable man might ask me how soon I was going to serve a melon. Today? Tomorrow? The next day? Then he’d pick one that was ripe now or two days from ripe.
    I miss this in the supermarkets …

    Reply
  77. Hi Shannon —
    There’s a lot of stuff having to do with Regency England where I just make guesses and assumptions when I write about it.
    I put a market scene in My Lord and Spymaster where it’s all based on African and Middle East markets.
    These open air markets in the Regency, like open air markets today in the Third World, would have had lots of spare relatives hanging about. Why wouldn’t they deliver, hoping to pick up an extra coin of two? It makes sense.
    And the business of thirty different stalls (or prime spots on the ground,) all lined up next to each other, all selling more or less the same thing, meant that a particular stall had to build a loyal following. So my vegetable man might ask me how soon I was going to serve a melon. Today? Tomorrow? The next day? Then he’d pick one that was ripe now or two days from ripe.
    I miss this in the supermarkets …

    Reply
  78. Hi Shannon —
    There’s a lot of stuff having to do with Regency England where I just make guesses and assumptions when I write about it.
    I put a market scene in My Lord and Spymaster where it’s all based on African and Middle East markets.
    These open air markets in the Regency, like open air markets today in the Third World, would have had lots of spare relatives hanging about. Why wouldn’t they deliver, hoping to pick up an extra coin of two? It makes sense.
    And the business of thirty different stalls (or prime spots on the ground,) all lined up next to each other, all selling more or less the same thing, meant that a particular stall had to build a loyal following. So my vegetable man might ask me how soon I was going to serve a melon. Today? Tomorrow? The next day? Then he’d pick one that was ripe now or two days from ripe.
    I miss this in the supermarkets …

    Reply
  79. Hi Shannon —
    There’s a lot of stuff having to do with Regency England where I just make guesses and assumptions when I write about it.
    I put a market scene in My Lord and Spymaster where it’s all based on African and Middle East markets.
    These open air markets in the Regency, like open air markets today in the Third World, would have had lots of spare relatives hanging about. Why wouldn’t they deliver, hoping to pick up an extra coin of two? It makes sense.
    And the business of thirty different stalls (or prime spots on the ground,) all lined up next to each other, all selling more or less the same thing, meant that a particular stall had to build a loyal following. So my vegetable man might ask me how soon I was going to serve a melon. Today? Tomorrow? The next day? Then he’d pick one that was ripe now or two days from ripe.
    I miss this in the supermarkets …

    Reply
  80. Hi Shannon —
    There’s a lot of stuff having to do with Regency England where I just make guesses and assumptions when I write about it.
    I put a market scene in My Lord and Spymaster where it’s all based on African and Middle East markets.
    These open air markets in the Regency, like open air markets today in the Third World, would have had lots of spare relatives hanging about. Why wouldn’t they deliver, hoping to pick up an extra coin of two? It makes sense.
    And the business of thirty different stalls (or prime spots on the ground,) all lined up next to each other, all selling more or less the same thing, meant that a particular stall had to build a loyal following. So my vegetable man might ask me how soon I was going to serve a melon. Today? Tomorrow? The next day? Then he’d pick one that was ripe now or two days from ripe.
    I miss this in the supermarkets …

    Reply
  81. Hi Prema —
    You are so right. There’s nothing like the local fresh fruits and veggies.
    In the US, the quality of even locally grown food is under siege. It seems to me local farmers are tempted to buy seed from the giant seed companies — the bland, indestructible, ship-everywhere vegetables they’ve developed.
    I’d like to see more heirloom varieties. More local varieties.

    Reply
  82. Hi Prema —
    You are so right. There’s nothing like the local fresh fruits and veggies.
    In the US, the quality of even locally grown food is under siege. It seems to me local farmers are tempted to buy seed from the giant seed companies — the bland, indestructible, ship-everywhere vegetables they’ve developed.
    I’d like to see more heirloom varieties. More local varieties.

    Reply
  83. Hi Prema —
    You are so right. There’s nothing like the local fresh fruits and veggies.
    In the US, the quality of even locally grown food is under siege. It seems to me local farmers are tempted to buy seed from the giant seed companies — the bland, indestructible, ship-everywhere vegetables they’ve developed.
    I’d like to see more heirloom varieties. More local varieties.

    Reply
  84. Hi Prema —
    You are so right. There’s nothing like the local fresh fruits and veggies.
    In the US, the quality of even locally grown food is under siege. It seems to me local farmers are tempted to buy seed from the giant seed companies — the bland, indestructible, ship-everywhere vegetables they’ve developed.
    I’d like to see more heirloom varieties. More local varieties.

    Reply
  85. Hi Prema —
    You are so right. There’s nothing like the local fresh fruits and veggies.
    In the US, the quality of even locally grown food is under siege. It seems to me local farmers are tempted to buy seed from the giant seed companies — the bland, indestructible, ship-everywhere vegetables they’ve developed.
    I’d like to see more heirloom varieties. More local varieties.

    Reply
  86. Hi Jo —
    It’s another way we connect with the past.
    It’s not just salad greens. It’s salad greens grown in the same spot on the same hill where they grew them when the ground was plowed with a bent stick. Greens sold, often as not, by the many-times great-grandson of a man who hauled greens by donkeyback into town.
    That great great many times great grandfather sold his wares more or less where they’re on sale now out of the back of a pickup truck.
    It’s like, y’know — It’s not eating salad greens. It’s eating history.

    Reply
  87. Hi Jo —
    It’s another way we connect with the past.
    It’s not just salad greens. It’s salad greens grown in the same spot on the same hill where they grew them when the ground was plowed with a bent stick. Greens sold, often as not, by the many-times great-grandson of a man who hauled greens by donkeyback into town.
    That great great many times great grandfather sold his wares more or less where they’re on sale now out of the back of a pickup truck.
    It’s like, y’know — It’s not eating salad greens. It’s eating history.

    Reply
  88. Hi Jo —
    It’s another way we connect with the past.
    It’s not just salad greens. It’s salad greens grown in the same spot on the same hill where they grew them when the ground was plowed with a bent stick. Greens sold, often as not, by the many-times great-grandson of a man who hauled greens by donkeyback into town.
    That great great many times great grandfather sold his wares more or less where they’re on sale now out of the back of a pickup truck.
    It’s like, y’know — It’s not eating salad greens. It’s eating history.

    Reply
  89. Hi Jo —
    It’s another way we connect with the past.
    It’s not just salad greens. It’s salad greens grown in the same spot on the same hill where they grew them when the ground was plowed with a bent stick. Greens sold, often as not, by the many-times great-grandson of a man who hauled greens by donkeyback into town.
    That great great many times great grandfather sold his wares more or less where they’re on sale now out of the back of a pickup truck.
    It’s like, y’know — It’s not eating salad greens. It’s eating history.

    Reply
  90. Hi Jo —
    It’s another way we connect with the past.
    It’s not just salad greens. It’s salad greens grown in the same spot on the same hill where they grew them when the ground was plowed with a bent stick. Greens sold, often as not, by the many-times great-grandson of a man who hauled greens by donkeyback into town.
    That great great many times great grandfather sold his wares more or less where they’re on sale now out of the back of a pickup truck.
    It’s like, y’know — It’s not eating salad greens. It’s eating history.

    Reply
  91. I’ve been to a few open markets usually when out of the US. The only ones where there was much bargaining were in the Bahamas. 🙂
    That said, in my part of Texas Farmer’s markets are making a comeback. They are not flexible on their prices but you can get one on one interaction with the families who raised the produce.

    Reply
  92. I’ve been to a few open markets usually when out of the US. The only ones where there was much bargaining were in the Bahamas. 🙂
    That said, in my part of Texas Farmer’s markets are making a comeback. They are not flexible on their prices but you can get one on one interaction with the families who raised the produce.

    Reply
  93. I’ve been to a few open markets usually when out of the US. The only ones where there was much bargaining were in the Bahamas. 🙂
    That said, in my part of Texas Farmer’s markets are making a comeback. They are not flexible on their prices but you can get one on one interaction with the families who raised the produce.

    Reply
  94. I’ve been to a few open markets usually when out of the US. The only ones where there was much bargaining were in the Bahamas. 🙂
    That said, in my part of Texas Farmer’s markets are making a comeback. They are not flexible on their prices but you can get one on one interaction with the families who raised the produce.

    Reply
  95. I’ve been to a few open markets usually when out of the US. The only ones where there was much bargaining were in the Bahamas. 🙂
    That said, in my part of Texas Farmer’s markets are making a comeback. They are not flexible on their prices but you can get one on one interaction with the families who raised the produce.

    Reply
  96. Hi Glenda —
    Not so much bargaining in US farmer’s markets, I’ve found. As you say, the great thing is the interaction with the folks who grow the food.
    Where I am, there’s a fair amount of cheese and milk products.

    Reply
  97. Hi Glenda —
    Not so much bargaining in US farmer’s markets, I’ve found. As you say, the great thing is the interaction with the folks who grow the food.
    Where I am, there’s a fair amount of cheese and milk products.

    Reply
  98. Hi Glenda —
    Not so much bargaining in US farmer’s markets, I’ve found. As you say, the great thing is the interaction with the folks who grow the food.
    Where I am, there’s a fair amount of cheese and milk products.

    Reply
  99. Hi Glenda —
    Not so much bargaining in US farmer’s markets, I’ve found. As you say, the great thing is the interaction with the folks who grow the food.
    Where I am, there’s a fair amount of cheese and milk products.

    Reply
  100. Hi Glenda —
    Not so much bargaining in US farmer’s markets, I’ve found. As you say, the great thing is the interaction with the folks who grow the food.
    Where I am, there’s a fair amount of cheese and milk products.

    Reply
  101. There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania. Farmers’ markets are popular where farmers and other sell produce. Also craft markets, and mixed markets are also very polular. There is a market in my small town (population 800) every second Sunday which brings people from all over. Not much bargaining though, although I have seen some. I love going to them, especially the second hand ones, with books.
    Nothing better than shopping in a market where you can interact with the seller, and producer.

    Reply
  102. There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania. Farmers’ markets are popular where farmers and other sell produce. Also craft markets, and mixed markets are also very polular. There is a market in my small town (population 800) every second Sunday which brings people from all over. Not much bargaining though, although I have seen some. I love going to them, especially the second hand ones, with books.
    Nothing better than shopping in a market where you can interact with the seller, and producer.

    Reply
  103. There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania. Farmers’ markets are popular where farmers and other sell produce. Also craft markets, and mixed markets are also very polular. There is a market in my small town (population 800) every second Sunday which brings people from all over. Not much bargaining though, although I have seen some. I love going to them, especially the second hand ones, with books.
    Nothing better than shopping in a market where you can interact with the seller, and producer.

    Reply
  104. There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania. Farmers’ markets are popular where farmers and other sell produce. Also craft markets, and mixed markets are also very polular. There is a market in my small town (population 800) every second Sunday which brings people from all over. Not much bargaining though, although I have seen some. I love going to them, especially the second hand ones, with books.
    Nothing better than shopping in a market where you can interact with the seller, and producer.

    Reply
  105. There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania. Farmers’ markets are popular where farmers and other sell produce. Also craft markets, and mixed markets are also very polular. There is a market in my small town (population 800) every second Sunday which brings people from all over. Not much bargaining though, although I have seen some. I love going to them, especially the second hand ones, with books.
    Nothing better than shopping in a market where you can interact with the seller, and producer.

    Reply
  106. Hi Jenny —
    I have never in my wildest dreams thought I would reply to a comment that starts out — “There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania.”
    Thank you for brightening my morning.
    I’m now thinking of the fruits and bright vegetables in India and Alexandria and Tasmania and my heart is full of colors and spicy scents.
    I love second hand markets with books. So wonderful.
    There’s a basic difference between cabbages for sale and books for sale. I do not buy cabbages (or carrots or even apples) I do not need and can barely lug home. The same cannot be said for books.

    Reply
  107. Hi Jenny —
    I have never in my wildest dreams thought I would reply to a comment that starts out — “There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania.”
    Thank you for brightening my morning.
    I’m now thinking of the fruits and bright vegetables in India and Alexandria and Tasmania and my heart is full of colors and spicy scents.
    I love second hand markets with books. So wonderful.
    There’s a basic difference between cabbages for sale and books for sale. I do not buy cabbages (or carrots or even apples) I do not need and can barely lug home. The same cannot be said for books.

    Reply
  108. Hi Jenny —
    I have never in my wildest dreams thought I would reply to a comment that starts out — “There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania.”
    Thank you for brightening my morning.
    I’m now thinking of the fruits and bright vegetables in India and Alexandria and Tasmania and my heart is full of colors and spicy scents.
    I love second hand markets with books. So wonderful.
    There’s a basic difference between cabbages for sale and books for sale. I do not buy cabbages (or carrots or even apples) I do not need and can barely lug home. The same cannot be said for books.

    Reply
  109. Hi Jenny —
    I have never in my wildest dreams thought I would reply to a comment that starts out — “There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania.”
    Thank you for brightening my morning.
    I’m now thinking of the fruits and bright vegetables in India and Alexandria and Tasmania and my heart is full of colors and spicy scents.
    I love second hand markets with books. So wonderful.
    There’s a basic difference between cabbages for sale and books for sale. I do not buy cabbages (or carrots or even apples) I do not need and can barely lug home. The same cannot be said for books.

    Reply
  110. Hi Jenny —
    I have never in my wildest dreams thought I would reply to a comment that starts out — “There are lots of outdoor markets here in Tasmania.”
    Thank you for brightening my morning.
    I’m now thinking of the fruits and bright vegetables in India and Alexandria and Tasmania and my heart is full of colors and spicy scents.
    I love second hand markets with books. So wonderful.
    There’s a basic difference between cabbages for sale and books for sale. I do not buy cabbages (or carrots or even apples) I do not need and can barely lug home. The same cannot be said for books.

    Reply
  111. Hi Shannon : Regarding sellers in the market..my last visit to India a old grandfather-type was at the vegetable stall as his grandson was working the cash box. Seeing me pick certain vegetables he figured out what I was cooking. He later came to me and handed me some green beans and suggested an ideal side dish. I was stunned at his business acumen and agreed to his suggestion. The drama in a single business transaction!!

    Reply
  112. Hi Shannon : Regarding sellers in the market..my last visit to India a old grandfather-type was at the vegetable stall as his grandson was working the cash box. Seeing me pick certain vegetables he figured out what I was cooking. He later came to me and handed me some green beans and suggested an ideal side dish. I was stunned at his business acumen and agreed to his suggestion. The drama in a single business transaction!!

    Reply
  113. Hi Shannon : Regarding sellers in the market..my last visit to India a old grandfather-type was at the vegetable stall as his grandson was working the cash box. Seeing me pick certain vegetables he figured out what I was cooking. He later came to me and handed me some green beans and suggested an ideal side dish. I was stunned at his business acumen and agreed to his suggestion. The drama in a single business transaction!!

    Reply
  114. Hi Shannon : Regarding sellers in the market..my last visit to India a old grandfather-type was at the vegetable stall as his grandson was working the cash box. Seeing me pick certain vegetables he figured out what I was cooking. He later came to me and handed me some green beans and suggested an ideal side dish. I was stunned at his business acumen and agreed to his suggestion. The drama in a single business transaction!!

    Reply
  115. Hi Shannon : Regarding sellers in the market..my last visit to India a old grandfather-type was at the vegetable stall as his grandson was working the cash box. Seeing me pick certain vegetables he figured out what I was cooking. He later came to me and handed me some green beans and suggested an ideal side dish. I was stunned at his business acumen and agreed to his suggestion. The drama in a single business transaction!!

    Reply
  116. Very interesting article. Here in Vancouver we have Saturday market down town through October; and Thursday market north of town. Lots of veggies and fruit and food cooked on the spot along with handcrafted items and strolling DOGS of every size and breed. Such fun! Over the river in Portland, the open air market is open all year, but we like the ones closer to home. There is always live music, a little bit of politicking, and it is something like going to a party. And to think, all this has such a long history!
    Diane

    Reply
  117. Very interesting article. Here in Vancouver we have Saturday market down town through October; and Thursday market north of town. Lots of veggies and fruit and food cooked on the spot along with handcrafted items and strolling DOGS of every size and breed. Such fun! Over the river in Portland, the open air market is open all year, but we like the ones closer to home. There is always live music, a little bit of politicking, and it is something like going to a party. And to think, all this has such a long history!
    Diane

    Reply
  118. Very interesting article. Here in Vancouver we have Saturday market down town through October; and Thursday market north of town. Lots of veggies and fruit and food cooked on the spot along with handcrafted items and strolling DOGS of every size and breed. Such fun! Over the river in Portland, the open air market is open all year, but we like the ones closer to home. There is always live music, a little bit of politicking, and it is something like going to a party. And to think, all this has such a long history!
    Diane

    Reply
  119. Very interesting article. Here in Vancouver we have Saturday market down town through October; and Thursday market north of town. Lots of veggies and fruit and food cooked on the spot along with handcrafted items and strolling DOGS of every size and breed. Such fun! Over the river in Portland, the open air market is open all year, but we like the ones closer to home. There is always live music, a little bit of politicking, and it is something like going to a party. And to think, all this has such a long history!
    Diane

    Reply
  120. Very interesting article. Here in Vancouver we have Saturday market down town through October; and Thursday market north of town. Lots of veggies and fruit and food cooked on the spot along with handcrafted items and strolling DOGS of every size and breed. Such fun! Over the river in Portland, the open air market is open all year, but we like the ones closer to home. There is always live music, a little bit of politicking, and it is something like going to a party. And to think, all this has such a long history!
    Diane

    Reply
  121. Here in Melbourne we also have a choice of many farmers’ markets around the inner and outer suburbs. One of my favourites is at the Collingwood Children’s Farm so we can enjoy seeing the animals as well as buying some great fresh produce. There’s a marvellous outdoor cafe as well so it makes a great morning out.

    Reply
  122. Here in Melbourne we also have a choice of many farmers’ markets around the inner and outer suburbs. One of my favourites is at the Collingwood Children’s Farm so we can enjoy seeing the animals as well as buying some great fresh produce. There’s a marvellous outdoor cafe as well so it makes a great morning out.

    Reply
  123. Here in Melbourne we also have a choice of many farmers’ markets around the inner and outer suburbs. One of my favourites is at the Collingwood Children’s Farm so we can enjoy seeing the animals as well as buying some great fresh produce. There’s a marvellous outdoor cafe as well so it makes a great morning out.

    Reply
  124. Here in Melbourne we also have a choice of many farmers’ markets around the inner and outer suburbs. One of my favourites is at the Collingwood Children’s Farm so we can enjoy seeing the animals as well as buying some great fresh produce. There’s a marvellous outdoor cafe as well so it makes a great morning out.

    Reply
  125. Here in Melbourne we also have a choice of many farmers’ markets around the inner and outer suburbs. One of my favourites is at the Collingwood Children’s Farm so we can enjoy seeing the animals as well as buying some great fresh produce. There’s a marvellous outdoor cafe as well so it makes a great morning out.

    Reply
  126. Hi Beryl —
    We have some farmers markets in parks here too, as well as in the centers of town. There’s something especially satisfying about a day spent at the park and then buying apples and honey to take home.
    For city kids, the whole ‘somebody grew this vegetable and by golly here she is’ can be an exciting new realization.

    Reply
  127. Hi Beryl —
    We have some farmers markets in parks here too, as well as in the centers of town. There’s something especially satisfying about a day spent at the park and then buying apples and honey to take home.
    For city kids, the whole ‘somebody grew this vegetable and by golly here she is’ can be an exciting new realization.

    Reply
  128. Hi Beryl —
    We have some farmers markets in parks here too, as well as in the centers of town. There’s something especially satisfying about a day spent at the park and then buying apples and honey to take home.
    For city kids, the whole ‘somebody grew this vegetable and by golly here she is’ can be an exciting new realization.

    Reply
  129. Hi Beryl —
    We have some farmers markets in parks here too, as well as in the centers of town. There’s something especially satisfying about a day spent at the park and then buying apples and honey to take home.
    For city kids, the whole ‘somebody grew this vegetable and by golly here she is’ can be an exciting new realization.

    Reply
  130. Hi Beryl —
    We have some farmers markets in parks here too, as well as in the centers of town. There’s something especially satisfying about a day spent at the park and then buying apples and honey to take home.
    For city kids, the whole ‘somebody grew this vegetable and by golly here she is’ can be an exciting new realization.

    Reply
  131. Hi Diane —
    You touch on something I love about open air markets. You get to take your dog. I hunger for places to take my dog …
    You’re lucky to have cooked food and live music. That’s a much larger market than I have here. Sounds lovely.

    Reply
  132. Hi Diane —
    You touch on something I love about open air markets. You get to take your dog. I hunger for places to take my dog …
    You’re lucky to have cooked food and live music. That’s a much larger market than I have here. Sounds lovely.

    Reply
  133. Hi Diane —
    You touch on something I love about open air markets. You get to take your dog. I hunger for places to take my dog …
    You’re lucky to have cooked food and live music. That’s a much larger market than I have here. Sounds lovely.

    Reply
  134. Hi Diane —
    You touch on something I love about open air markets. You get to take your dog. I hunger for places to take my dog …
    You’re lucky to have cooked food and live music. That’s a much larger market than I have here. Sounds lovely.

    Reply
  135. Hi Diane —
    You touch on something I love about open air markets. You get to take your dog. I hunger for places to take my dog …
    You’re lucky to have cooked food and live music. That’s a much larger market than I have here. Sounds lovely.

    Reply
  136. We have a huge open air but largely under cover market in Melbourne, called the Queen Victoria Market that’s been in flourishing business since the 1850’s. It has hundreds of stalls and is where I did most of my shopping as a students and later and has most of everything you need –fresh fruit, vegies, meat, fish, cheese, smallgoods and also shoes, clothing etc. There’s not so much haggling though, unless it’s just before closing on Saturday, where the fresh food stallholders offer their last goods for bargain prices. Sunday it’s more of a clothing, shoes and gift market. Wednesday evening is great — it’s a night market, with food and entertainment of all kinds.
    But as Beryl mentioned above, we have a wide variety of markets here in Melbourne. We;’re very lucky, I think.

    Reply
  137. We have a huge open air but largely under cover market in Melbourne, called the Queen Victoria Market that’s been in flourishing business since the 1850’s. It has hundreds of stalls and is where I did most of my shopping as a students and later and has most of everything you need –fresh fruit, vegies, meat, fish, cheese, smallgoods and also shoes, clothing etc. There’s not so much haggling though, unless it’s just before closing on Saturday, where the fresh food stallholders offer their last goods for bargain prices. Sunday it’s more of a clothing, shoes and gift market. Wednesday evening is great — it’s a night market, with food and entertainment of all kinds.
    But as Beryl mentioned above, we have a wide variety of markets here in Melbourne. We;’re very lucky, I think.

    Reply
  138. We have a huge open air but largely under cover market in Melbourne, called the Queen Victoria Market that’s been in flourishing business since the 1850’s. It has hundreds of stalls and is where I did most of my shopping as a students and later and has most of everything you need –fresh fruit, vegies, meat, fish, cheese, smallgoods and also shoes, clothing etc. There’s not so much haggling though, unless it’s just before closing on Saturday, where the fresh food stallholders offer their last goods for bargain prices. Sunday it’s more of a clothing, shoes and gift market. Wednesday evening is great — it’s a night market, with food and entertainment of all kinds.
    But as Beryl mentioned above, we have a wide variety of markets here in Melbourne. We;’re very lucky, I think.

    Reply
  139. We have a huge open air but largely under cover market in Melbourne, called the Queen Victoria Market that’s been in flourishing business since the 1850’s. It has hundreds of stalls and is where I did most of my shopping as a students and later and has most of everything you need –fresh fruit, vegies, meat, fish, cheese, smallgoods and also shoes, clothing etc. There’s not so much haggling though, unless it’s just before closing on Saturday, where the fresh food stallholders offer their last goods for bargain prices. Sunday it’s more of a clothing, shoes and gift market. Wednesday evening is great — it’s a night market, with food and entertainment of all kinds.
    But as Beryl mentioned above, we have a wide variety of markets here in Melbourne. We;’re very lucky, I think.

    Reply
  140. We have a huge open air but largely under cover market in Melbourne, called the Queen Victoria Market that’s been in flourishing business since the 1850’s. It has hundreds of stalls and is where I did most of my shopping as a students and later and has most of everything you need –fresh fruit, vegies, meat, fish, cheese, smallgoods and also shoes, clothing etc. There’s not so much haggling though, unless it’s just before closing on Saturday, where the fresh food stallholders offer their last goods for bargain prices. Sunday it’s more of a clothing, shoes and gift market. Wednesday evening is great — it’s a night market, with food and entertainment of all kinds.
    But as Beryl mentioned above, we have a wide variety of markets here in Melbourne. We;’re very lucky, I think.

    Reply
  141. An 1850s market … that is so cool.
    And I love when markets can be undercover and have booths like those in the Covent Garden picture. You get a huge range of stuff.
    They had night markets in the Regency era. I have some paintings with vegetables and sellers in candlelight.

    Reply
  142. An 1850s market … that is so cool.
    And I love when markets can be undercover and have booths like those in the Covent Garden picture. You get a huge range of stuff.
    They had night markets in the Regency era. I have some paintings with vegetables and sellers in candlelight.

    Reply
  143. An 1850s market … that is so cool.
    And I love when markets can be undercover and have booths like those in the Covent Garden picture. You get a huge range of stuff.
    They had night markets in the Regency era. I have some paintings with vegetables and sellers in candlelight.

    Reply
  144. An 1850s market … that is so cool.
    And I love when markets can be undercover and have booths like those in the Covent Garden picture. You get a huge range of stuff.
    They had night markets in the Regency era. I have some paintings with vegetables and sellers in candlelight.

    Reply
  145. An 1850s market … that is so cool.
    And I love when markets can be undercover and have booths like those in the Covent Garden picture. You get a huge range of stuff.
    They had night markets in the Regency era. I have some paintings with vegetables and sellers in candlelight.

    Reply
  146. Farmer’s markets are making a comeback here in Prague, too. Under the Communists it seemed like everybody had access (in season, at least) to their own or some relative’s country cottage or garden plot. Lots of people still have them, but they tend to have a lot less time to cultivate them, and the older generation is getting past it. So it’s really nice to see the markets.
    Of course you don’t have to go too far outside the city before everyone’s growing their own. And that, of course, is also like the Regency, where most people still had some connection to the land, and the mark of the great landowners was having their own fruits and vegetables sent up to them to London when they were there for the Season.

    Reply
  147. Farmer’s markets are making a comeback here in Prague, too. Under the Communists it seemed like everybody had access (in season, at least) to their own or some relative’s country cottage or garden plot. Lots of people still have them, but they tend to have a lot less time to cultivate them, and the older generation is getting past it. So it’s really nice to see the markets.
    Of course you don’t have to go too far outside the city before everyone’s growing their own. And that, of course, is also like the Regency, where most people still had some connection to the land, and the mark of the great landowners was having their own fruits and vegetables sent up to them to London when they were there for the Season.

    Reply
  148. Farmer’s markets are making a comeback here in Prague, too. Under the Communists it seemed like everybody had access (in season, at least) to their own or some relative’s country cottage or garden plot. Lots of people still have them, but they tend to have a lot less time to cultivate them, and the older generation is getting past it. So it’s really nice to see the markets.
    Of course you don’t have to go too far outside the city before everyone’s growing their own. And that, of course, is also like the Regency, where most people still had some connection to the land, and the mark of the great landowners was having their own fruits and vegetables sent up to them to London when they were there for the Season.

    Reply
  149. Farmer’s markets are making a comeback here in Prague, too. Under the Communists it seemed like everybody had access (in season, at least) to their own or some relative’s country cottage or garden plot. Lots of people still have them, but they tend to have a lot less time to cultivate them, and the older generation is getting past it. So it’s really nice to see the markets.
    Of course you don’t have to go too far outside the city before everyone’s growing their own. And that, of course, is also like the Regency, where most people still had some connection to the land, and the mark of the great landowners was having their own fruits and vegetables sent up to them to London when they were there for the Season.

    Reply
  150. Farmer’s markets are making a comeback here in Prague, too. Under the Communists it seemed like everybody had access (in season, at least) to their own or some relative’s country cottage or garden plot. Lots of people still have them, but they tend to have a lot less time to cultivate them, and the older generation is getting past it. So it’s really nice to see the markets.
    Of course you don’t have to go too far outside the city before everyone’s growing their own. And that, of course, is also like the Regency, where most people still had some connection to the land, and the mark of the great landowners was having their own fruits and vegetables sent up to them to London when they were there for the Season.

    Reply
  151. Hi Sarah —
    One reads a lot about some friend or relative sending game up to town from the estate in the country.
    I don’t think the noble cousin would necessarily send stuff from the home garden. But I’ll bet they sent, (or arrive with on their visit,) grapes or pineapples from the ‘succession houses’.
    I wish folks still did that. I have family in California and I’d love to get their oranges and avocados in neat packages every so often.
    I could send back … hmmm … snow? Misquitoes?

    Reply
  152. Hi Sarah —
    One reads a lot about some friend or relative sending game up to town from the estate in the country.
    I don’t think the noble cousin would necessarily send stuff from the home garden. But I’ll bet they sent, (or arrive with on their visit,) grapes or pineapples from the ‘succession houses’.
    I wish folks still did that. I have family in California and I’d love to get their oranges and avocados in neat packages every so often.
    I could send back … hmmm … snow? Misquitoes?

    Reply
  153. Hi Sarah —
    One reads a lot about some friend or relative sending game up to town from the estate in the country.
    I don’t think the noble cousin would necessarily send stuff from the home garden. But I’ll bet they sent, (or arrive with on their visit,) grapes or pineapples from the ‘succession houses’.
    I wish folks still did that. I have family in California and I’d love to get their oranges and avocados in neat packages every so often.
    I could send back … hmmm … snow? Misquitoes?

    Reply
  154. Hi Sarah —
    One reads a lot about some friend or relative sending game up to town from the estate in the country.
    I don’t think the noble cousin would necessarily send stuff from the home garden. But I’ll bet they sent, (or arrive with on their visit,) grapes or pineapples from the ‘succession houses’.
    I wish folks still did that. I have family in California and I’d love to get their oranges and avocados in neat packages every so often.
    I could send back … hmmm … snow? Misquitoes?

    Reply
  155. Hi Sarah —
    One reads a lot about some friend or relative sending game up to town from the estate in the country.
    I don’t think the noble cousin would necessarily send stuff from the home garden. But I’ll bet they sent, (or arrive with on their visit,) grapes or pineapples from the ‘succession houses’.
    I wish folks still did that. I have family in California and I’d love to get their oranges and avocados in neat packages every so often.
    I could send back … hmmm … snow? Misquitoes?

    Reply

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