Regency Ladies’ Magazines, Part I

CandiceHern Greetings, all!  Candice Hern, here.  Many thanks to the Wenches for inviting me to post here.  Today, and again on Aug. 28 and Sept 23, I am going to be discussing ladies' magazines of the Regency period.  As many of you know, I have long collected fashion prints of the Regency period.  About 10 or 15 years ago, I also managed to find several bound volumes of Ackermann's Repository.  I bought them for the prints, but found them to be such treasure troves of Regency information that I began collecting the complete magazines whenever I could find them and afford them. Like any serious collector, I have done a lot of research on the objects of the collection, and I have found the whole topic of ladies' magazines fascinating.  I thought some of you might find the subject interesting.

Today, I'm going to discuss the magazines in general.  In the two subsequent blogs, I will provide more detailed discussions of the Big Four magazines for women of the Regency:  The Lady's Magazine, The Lady's Monthly Museum, La Belle Assemblée, and Ackermann's Repository.

You may click on any of the images here to see larger versions.

The 18th century saw a blossoming of periodicals for women.  Most of them sought the betterment of women through education, instruction, and rational prose.  Even though most of the editors were men, they espoused a sort of equality of mind for men and women.  There were, of course, the gossipy tattler types of magazines, but most also included a good deal of serious material intended to feed the female intellect.

B Toward the end of the 18th century there was a major shift in attitude brought about by the French Revolution.  The early "feminist" leanings that had been so prevalent in the periodicals were now disparaged as a part of the liberal, republican spirit that had led to the Reign of Terror in France.  Suddenly, even liberal-minded publications like The Lady's Magazine began to concentrate more on domestic education than philosophical or political debate, offering moral wisdom rather than intellectual stimulation.  The Lady's Monthly Museum exhibited the most repressive domestic ideology of all the magazines during the Regency.

BB The intended audiences for the various publications can be inferred from the price and production quality, and sometimes by content bias.  The most expensive of all the publications that targeted a primarily female readership, The Gallery of Fashion, was sold exclusively by subscription at a rate of 3 guineas per year, the equivalent today of almost $200.  That is surely why the circulation numbers amounted to only 450 copies.  Subscribers included the Queen.  La Belle Assemblée sold for 3 shillings 6 pence per monthly issue, the equivalent of a daily wage for the highest-paid skilled workers in London.  Circulation figures for LBA are not known, but they most likely numbered in the neighborhood of 1500-2000 copies.  Ackermann's Repository was of the same high quality as LBA, but had more prints and more pages and more varied content.  Its per-issue price was a bit higher than LBA at 4 shillings per issue.  The circulation was approximately 2000 copies in 1815.  As a comparison, the most popular magazine of the time, the Gentleman's Magazine, had a circulation of approximately 10,000, but it was more cheaply produced than the Repository, and did not include color prints.  It sold for 2 shillings per issue.

Clearly these relatively expensive periodicals for ladies were not frivolous purchases and not aimed at the lower or middle classes.  The focus on fashion, especially at La Belle Assemblée, assumed a level of material privilege.

BBB The Lady's Magazine and the Lady's Monthly Museum were undoubtedly targeted to the middle class woman.  The Lady's Magazine sold for a mere 6 pence for at least its first twenty-five years (1770-1795). Ten years later, by 1805, it had doubled in price to 1 shilling, and by 1828 the cover price had risen to 2 shillings 6 pence.  This was a well-established and very popular publication by the time of the Regency, so its circulation may have been substantial, though probably not as high as the Gentleman's Magazine.  The Lady's Monthly Museum, the most inexpensive of them all at 1 shilling 6 pence, was a compact little magazine, smaller in size than any of the others, but packed with articles and stories.  Its prints were of slightly higher quality than those of The Lady's Magazine, though a great many of them were copied from other publications.  The editor sometimes boasts of its large circulation, but never mentions numbers.  An educated guess would place its circulation at 3000-5000 copies during the Regency.

You might find these circulation numbers shockingly small compared to today's magazines with copies in the millions.  But remember that print production technology was fairly rudimentary compared to today's standards, plus any colored engravings were colored by hand.  So, for example, a single monthly issue of Ackermann's Repository that typically included at least 5 colored prints, with a circulation of 2000 copies, would require 10,000 prints to be hand-painted! Those numbers make the fine quality of the colored prints even more remarkable.

The magazines relied heavily on subscriptions, but the most popular ones C could also be obtained at booksellers, print shops, and even in dressmaker and milliner shops.

Unlike the modern magazine reader who recycles an issue once it has been read, the Regency reader did not casually toss a magazine in the trash.  It is clear that the ladies' magazines of the late 18th and early 19th centuries were intended to be permanently preserved on the bookshelf.  All of them were available in bound volumes.  Notices to binders are sometimes included in magazines, with instruction on where to bind in prints or supplements.  Individual issues could be sent back to the publisher for binding, as noted in this announcement in Ackermann's Repository:

 "The Proprietor begs leave to remind such of his Readers as have imperfect sets of the Repository of the necessity of an early application for the deficiencies, in order to prevent disappointment.  Those who chuse to return their Numbers to the Publisher may have them exchanged for Volumes in a variety of bindings, at the rate of 5s. per Volume."

In my years of collecting I have also run across volumes in which fashion prints, often from multiple publications, have been either tipped onto scrapbook-type pages, or bound as a single volume.  Clearly, the fashion prints were kept and used, even if the rest of the magazine was discarded.

The individual magazines, ie the monthly issues, came in paper covers that were thicker than the inside pages, but still thin enough to suggest something temporary.  The paper used for most of the original covers I've seen is comparable to the construction paper we used to use in school.  (Do kids still use construction paper?)  Some of the covers, like those for La Belle Assemblée, have a distinctive cover design with no more than a title, date, and publishing info.  Others, like the early years of The Lady's Magazine, simply printed the table of contents on the cover. In later years, The Lady's Magazine used a more standard cover.

  CCC CC I own a handful of Regency period magazines in their original covers, but they are very hard to find.  My guess is that few magazines were kept as individual issues, but were either cut up for the prints or bound in sets.

In my next blog on Aug 28, I'll give more details on four of the most popular ladies' magazines of the period.

65 thoughts on “Regency Ladies’ Magazines, Part I”

  1. Fascinating post, Candice! The observation that the French Revolution affected early feminism in England is most intriguing . . .I really look forward to hearing more about the content and slant of the individual magazines in your future posts.
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  2. Fascinating post, Candice! The observation that the French Revolution affected early feminism in England is most intriguing . . .I really look forward to hearing more about the content and slant of the individual magazines in your future posts.
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  3. Fascinating post, Candice! The observation that the French Revolution affected early feminism in England is most intriguing . . .I really look forward to hearing more about the content and slant of the individual magazines in your future posts.
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  4. Fascinating post, Candice! The observation that the French Revolution affected early feminism in England is most intriguing . . .I really look forward to hearing more about the content and slant of the individual magazines in your future posts.
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  5. Fascinating post, Candice! The observation that the French Revolution affected early feminism in England is most intriguing . . .I really look forward to hearing more about the content and slant of the individual magazines in your future posts.
    Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  6. Hi Candice,
    Great post. Love the history of the publications. Just wondering how far afield you need to look to find these old magazines. I wouldn’t think they would be appearing in any of the U.S. antique markets.

    Reply
  7. Hi Candice,
    Great post. Love the history of the publications. Just wondering how far afield you need to look to find these old magazines. I wouldn’t think they would be appearing in any of the U.S. antique markets.

    Reply
  8. Hi Candice,
    Great post. Love the history of the publications. Just wondering how far afield you need to look to find these old magazines. I wouldn’t think they would be appearing in any of the U.S. antique markets.

    Reply
  9. Hi Candice,
    Great post. Love the history of the publications. Just wondering how far afield you need to look to find these old magazines. I wouldn’t think they would be appearing in any of the U.S. antique markets.

    Reply
  10. Hi Candice,
    Great post. Love the history of the publications. Just wondering how far afield you need to look to find these old magazines. I wouldn’t think they would be appearing in any of the U.S. antique markets.

    Reply
  11. Hi Karen. The magazines can be found here and there, but I warn you, they’re not cheap. Most of mine were bought from antiquarian book dealers, either here in the U.S. or in the U.K. I have also found a couple of bound volumes on eBay. Both times, I “made friends” with the sellers and was able to get several more volumes off-line. One of my single issues of THE LADY’S MAGAZINE in its original cover — the blue one from 1794 shown in the blog — was also found on eBay.
    One thing I hate is when a dealer tears apart a bound volume and sells it in pieces. Some will simply cut out the prints and throw away the rest as they can make more money be selling the prints indivually. It makes me shudder to see all that valuable source material so carelessly discarded. I once talked an eBay dealer into selling me a complete volume of La Belle Assemblee instead of tearing it apart and selling the individual monthly segments. She later took me to task for “taking advantage of her” as she made much more money selling the indivual ripped-apart segments. Grrrr….

    Reply
  12. Hi Karen. The magazines can be found here and there, but I warn you, they’re not cheap. Most of mine were bought from antiquarian book dealers, either here in the U.S. or in the U.K. I have also found a couple of bound volumes on eBay. Both times, I “made friends” with the sellers and was able to get several more volumes off-line. One of my single issues of THE LADY’S MAGAZINE in its original cover — the blue one from 1794 shown in the blog — was also found on eBay.
    One thing I hate is when a dealer tears apart a bound volume and sells it in pieces. Some will simply cut out the prints and throw away the rest as they can make more money be selling the prints indivually. It makes me shudder to see all that valuable source material so carelessly discarded. I once talked an eBay dealer into selling me a complete volume of La Belle Assemblee instead of tearing it apart and selling the individual monthly segments. She later took me to task for “taking advantage of her” as she made much more money selling the indivual ripped-apart segments. Grrrr….

    Reply
  13. Hi Karen. The magazines can be found here and there, but I warn you, they’re not cheap. Most of mine were bought from antiquarian book dealers, either here in the U.S. or in the U.K. I have also found a couple of bound volumes on eBay. Both times, I “made friends” with the sellers and was able to get several more volumes off-line. One of my single issues of THE LADY’S MAGAZINE in its original cover — the blue one from 1794 shown in the blog — was also found on eBay.
    One thing I hate is when a dealer tears apart a bound volume and sells it in pieces. Some will simply cut out the prints and throw away the rest as they can make more money be selling the prints indivually. It makes me shudder to see all that valuable source material so carelessly discarded. I once talked an eBay dealer into selling me a complete volume of La Belle Assemblee instead of tearing it apart and selling the individual monthly segments. She later took me to task for “taking advantage of her” as she made much more money selling the indivual ripped-apart segments. Grrrr….

    Reply
  14. Hi Karen. The magazines can be found here and there, but I warn you, they’re not cheap. Most of mine were bought from antiquarian book dealers, either here in the U.S. or in the U.K. I have also found a couple of bound volumes on eBay. Both times, I “made friends” with the sellers and was able to get several more volumes off-line. One of my single issues of THE LADY’S MAGAZINE in its original cover — the blue one from 1794 shown in the blog — was also found on eBay.
    One thing I hate is when a dealer tears apart a bound volume and sells it in pieces. Some will simply cut out the prints and throw away the rest as they can make more money be selling the prints indivually. It makes me shudder to see all that valuable source material so carelessly discarded. I once talked an eBay dealer into selling me a complete volume of La Belle Assemblee instead of tearing it apart and selling the individual monthly segments. She later took me to task for “taking advantage of her” as she made much more money selling the indivual ripped-apart segments. Grrrr….

    Reply
  15. Hi Karen. The magazines can be found here and there, but I warn you, they’re not cheap. Most of mine were bought from antiquarian book dealers, either here in the U.S. or in the U.K. I have also found a couple of bound volumes on eBay. Both times, I “made friends” with the sellers and was able to get several more volumes off-line. One of my single issues of THE LADY’S MAGAZINE in its original cover — the blue one from 1794 shown in the blog — was also found on eBay.
    One thing I hate is when a dealer tears apart a bound volume and sells it in pieces. Some will simply cut out the prints and throw away the rest as they can make more money be selling the prints indivually. It makes me shudder to see all that valuable source material so carelessly discarded. I once talked an eBay dealer into selling me a complete volume of La Belle Assemblee instead of tearing it apart and selling the individual monthly segments. She later took me to task for “taking advantage of her” as she made much more money selling the indivual ripped-apart segments. Grrrr….

    Reply
  16. Oops, that LADY’S MAGAZINE pictured on the blog is from 1790, not 1794. I have copies from both years and assumed I posted the later one. The one pictured was purchased from a UK dealer at an antiquarian book fair. The one from 1794, not pictured, is the one I bought on eBay.

    Reply
  17. Oops, that LADY’S MAGAZINE pictured on the blog is from 1790, not 1794. I have copies from both years and assumed I posted the later one. The one pictured was purchased from a UK dealer at an antiquarian book fair. The one from 1794, not pictured, is the one I bought on eBay.

    Reply
  18. Oops, that LADY’S MAGAZINE pictured on the blog is from 1790, not 1794. I have copies from both years and assumed I posted the later one. The one pictured was purchased from a UK dealer at an antiquarian book fair. The one from 1794, not pictured, is the one I bought on eBay.

    Reply
  19. Oops, that LADY’S MAGAZINE pictured on the blog is from 1790, not 1794. I have copies from both years and assumed I posted the later one. The one pictured was purchased from a UK dealer at an antiquarian book fair. The one from 1794, not pictured, is the one I bought on eBay.

    Reply
  20. Oops, that LADY’S MAGAZINE pictured on the blog is from 1790, not 1794. I have copies from both years and assumed I posted the later one. The one pictured was purchased from a UK dealer at an antiquarian book fair. The one from 1794, not pictured, is the one I bought on eBay.

    Reply
  21. Candice, I adore you! I’m always fascinated in how historical events affect society and the common householder, if only to see how history repeats itself. Reign of Terror equals conservatism… Fascinating.
    And I’ve always wondered about those colored prints. I knew they had to be hand-colored at that period, and the thought of coloring 10,000 pages…! There’s a topic I really need to research. We hear about the milliners and seamstresses, but what about the watercolor artists? I see a poor heroine in the making. “G”

    Reply
  22. Candice, I adore you! I’m always fascinated in how historical events affect society and the common householder, if only to see how history repeats itself. Reign of Terror equals conservatism… Fascinating.
    And I’ve always wondered about those colored prints. I knew they had to be hand-colored at that period, and the thought of coloring 10,000 pages…! There’s a topic I really need to research. We hear about the milliners and seamstresses, but what about the watercolor artists? I see a poor heroine in the making. “G”

    Reply
  23. Candice, I adore you! I’m always fascinated in how historical events affect society and the common householder, if only to see how history repeats itself. Reign of Terror equals conservatism… Fascinating.
    And I’ve always wondered about those colored prints. I knew they had to be hand-colored at that period, and the thought of coloring 10,000 pages…! There’s a topic I really need to research. We hear about the milliners and seamstresses, but what about the watercolor artists? I see a poor heroine in the making. “G”

    Reply
  24. Candice, I adore you! I’m always fascinated in how historical events affect society and the common householder, if only to see how history repeats itself. Reign of Terror equals conservatism… Fascinating.
    And I’ve always wondered about those colored prints. I knew they had to be hand-colored at that period, and the thought of coloring 10,000 pages…! There’s a topic I really need to research. We hear about the milliners and seamstresses, but what about the watercolor artists? I see a poor heroine in the making. “G”

    Reply
  25. Candice, I adore you! I’m always fascinated in how historical events affect society and the common householder, if only to see how history repeats itself. Reign of Terror equals conservatism… Fascinating.
    And I’ve always wondered about those colored prints. I knew they had to be hand-colored at that period, and the thought of coloring 10,000 pages…! There’s a topic I really need to research. We hear about the milliners and seamstresses, but what about the watercolor artists? I see a poor heroine in the making. “G”

    Reply
  26. Yes, Pat, those colorists are an intriguing topic. Niklaus Heideloff, who published the expensive GALLERY OF FASHION, is said to have employed no more than three or four artists for the hand coloring, and that they worked on the premises. Other publications hired out the coloring as piece work, which was done at the home of the colorists, who were often children. Sometimes entire families worked as colorists. At Heideloff’s, one colorist would have specialized in adding the metallic gold and silver accents, which were a unique feature of his prints. It has been speculated that he employed emigré hand-colorists who had fled the Terror in France. The first issue in 1794 named the colorist as Madame Le Beau, but she may have simply been a fashionable invention.
    I explored the idea of who the colorsits might have been in my book ONCE A SCOUNDREL. You can read about my Behind-the-Scenes research here: http://www.candicehern.com/bookshelf/scoundrel_scenes.htm

    Reply
  27. Yes, Pat, those colorists are an intriguing topic. Niklaus Heideloff, who published the expensive GALLERY OF FASHION, is said to have employed no more than three or four artists for the hand coloring, and that they worked on the premises. Other publications hired out the coloring as piece work, which was done at the home of the colorists, who were often children. Sometimes entire families worked as colorists. At Heideloff’s, one colorist would have specialized in adding the metallic gold and silver accents, which were a unique feature of his prints. It has been speculated that he employed emigré hand-colorists who had fled the Terror in France. The first issue in 1794 named the colorist as Madame Le Beau, but she may have simply been a fashionable invention.
    I explored the idea of who the colorsits might have been in my book ONCE A SCOUNDREL. You can read about my Behind-the-Scenes research here: http://www.candicehern.com/bookshelf/scoundrel_scenes.htm

    Reply
  28. Yes, Pat, those colorists are an intriguing topic. Niklaus Heideloff, who published the expensive GALLERY OF FASHION, is said to have employed no more than three or four artists for the hand coloring, and that they worked on the premises. Other publications hired out the coloring as piece work, which was done at the home of the colorists, who were often children. Sometimes entire families worked as colorists. At Heideloff’s, one colorist would have specialized in adding the metallic gold and silver accents, which were a unique feature of his prints. It has been speculated that he employed emigré hand-colorists who had fled the Terror in France. The first issue in 1794 named the colorist as Madame Le Beau, but she may have simply been a fashionable invention.
    I explored the idea of who the colorsits might have been in my book ONCE A SCOUNDREL. You can read about my Behind-the-Scenes research here: http://www.candicehern.com/bookshelf/scoundrel_scenes.htm

    Reply
  29. Yes, Pat, those colorists are an intriguing topic. Niklaus Heideloff, who published the expensive GALLERY OF FASHION, is said to have employed no more than three or four artists for the hand coloring, and that they worked on the premises. Other publications hired out the coloring as piece work, which was done at the home of the colorists, who were often children. Sometimes entire families worked as colorists. At Heideloff’s, one colorist would have specialized in adding the metallic gold and silver accents, which were a unique feature of his prints. It has been speculated that he employed emigré hand-colorists who had fled the Terror in France. The first issue in 1794 named the colorist as Madame Le Beau, but she may have simply been a fashionable invention.
    I explored the idea of who the colorsits might have been in my book ONCE A SCOUNDREL. You can read about my Behind-the-Scenes research here: http://www.candicehern.com/bookshelf/scoundrel_scenes.htm

    Reply
  30. Yes, Pat, those colorists are an intriguing topic. Niklaus Heideloff, who published the expensive GALLERY OF FASHION, is said to have employed no more than three or four artists for the hand coloring, and that they worked on the premises. Other publications hired out the coloring as piece work, which was done at the home of the colorists, who were often children. Sometimes entire families worked as colorists. At Heideloff’s, one colorist would have specialized in adding the metallic gold and silver accents, which were a unique feature of his prints. It has been speculated that he employed emigré hand-colorists who had fled the Terror in France. The first issue in 1794 named the colorist as Madame Le Beau, but she may have simply been a fashionable invention.
    I explored the idea of who the colorsits might have been in my book ONCE A SCOUNDREL. You can read about my Behind-the-Scenes research here: http://www.candicehern.com/bookshelf/scoundrel_scenes.htm

    Reply
  31. What a wonderful collection. You get such an inside view of the life of the period by reading old magazines and books. The first old book I got was a large volume printed in the mid 1800’s on how to be a housewife and mother. I have several Ladies Home Journals from 1917 or 18, during WWI. There are pictures and articles about the troops, the war, home life. I have another book printed in 1878 titled The European In India. It gives advice on medical, social, climate, servants, seasons, etc. Reading these gives such a feeling of time and place.
    I’ll have to keep my eyes open for things older. It would be incredible to find something as early as yours. Cost is such a problem. I’ve been lucky to find mine. Unfortunately many don’t realize what a prize these old volumes are. Many are thrown out or not taken care of. That volume on house husbandry I got as a teenager was in a pile of trash in the attic of an old farmhouse. It was in really good shape, just not wanted. The number of old book etc. I’ve seen destroyed by careless or ignorant people is frustrating.

    Reply
  32. What a wonderful collection. You get such an inside view of the life of the period by reading old magazines and books. The first old book I got was a large volume printed in the mid 1800’s on how to be a housewife and mother. I have several Ladies Home Journals from 1917 or 18, during WWI. There are pictures and articles about the troops, the war, home life. I have another book printed in 1878 titled The European In India. It gives advice on medical, social, climate, servants, seasons, etc. Reading these gives such a feeling of time and place.
    I’ll have to keep my eyes open for things older. It would be incredible to find something as early as yours. Cost is such a problem. I’ve been lucky to find mine. Unfortunately many don’t realize what a prize these old volumes are. Many are thrown out or not taken care of. That volume on house husbandry I got as a teenager was in a pile of trash in the attic of an old farmhouse. It was in really good shape, just not wanted. The number of old book etc. I’ve seen destroyed by careless or ignorant people is frustrating.

    Reply
  33. What a wonderful collection. You get such an inside view of the life of the period by reading old magazines and books. The first old book I got was a large volume printed in the mid 1800’s on how to be a housewife and mother. I have several Ladies Home Journals from 1917 or 18, during WWI. There are pictures and articles about the troops, the war, home life. I have another book printed in 1878 titled The European In India. It gives advice on medical, social, climate, servants, seasons, etc. Reading these gives such a feeling of time and place.
    I’ll have to keep my eyes open for things older. It would be incredible to find something as early as yours. Cost is such a problem. I’ve been lucky to find mine. Unfortunately many don’t realize what a prize these old volumes are. Many are thrown out or not taken care of. That volume on house husbandry I got as a teenager was in a pile of trash in the attic of an old farmhouse. It was in really good shape, just not wanted. The number of old book etc. I’ve seen destroyed by careless or ignorant people is frustrating.

    Reply
  34. What a wonderful collection. You get such an inside view of the life of the period by reading old magazines and books. The first old book I got was a large volume printed in the mid 1800’s on how to be a housewife and mother. I have several Ladies Home Journals from 1917 or 18, during WWI. There are pictures and articles about the troops, the war, home life. I have another book printed in 1878 titled The European In India. It gives advice on medical, social, climate, servants, seasons, etc. Reading these gives such a feeling of time and place.
    I’ll have to keep my eyes open for things older. It would be incredible to find something as early as yours. Cost is such a problem. I’ve been lucky to find mine. Unfortunately many don’t realize what a prize these old volumes are. Many are thrown out or not taken care of. That volume on house husbandry I got as a teenager was in a pile of trash in the attic of an old farmhouse. It was in really good shape, just not wanted. The number of old book etc. I’ve seen destroyed by careless or ignorant people is frustrating.

    Reply
  35. What a wonderful collection. You get such an inside view of the life of the period by reading old magazines and books. The first old book I got was a large volume printed in the mid 1800’s on how to be a housewife and mother. I have several Ladies Home Journals from 1917 or 18, during WWI. There are pictures and articles about the troops, the war, home life. I have another book printed in 1878 titled The European In India. It gives advice on medical, social, climate, servants, seasons, etc. Reading these gives such a feeling of time and place.
    I’ll have to keep my eyes open for things older. It would be incredible to find something as early as yours. Cost is such a problem. I’ve been lucky to find mine. Unfortunately many don’t realize what a prize these old volumes are. Many are thrown out or not taken care of. That volume on house husbandry I got as a teenager was in a pile of trash in the attic of an old farmhouse. It was in really good shape, just not wanted. The number of old book etc. I’ve seen destroyed by careless or ignorant people is frustrating.

    Reply
  36. Candice, I share your dismay at modern dealers who cut up the whole magazines to sell the prints one by one. It’s a big problem with antiquarian booksellers, who do the same thing with illustrated books, especially botanical and bird/animal volumes. I just hate to see treasures shredded like that. Sigh.

    Reply
  37. Candice, I share your dismay at modern dealers who cut up the whole magazines to sell the prints one by one. It’s a big problem with antiquarian booksellers, who do the same thing with illustrated books, especially botanical and bird/animal volumes. I just hate to see treasures shredded like that. Sigh.

    Reply
  38. Candice, I share your dismay at modern dealers who cut up the whole magazines to sell the prints one by one. It’s a big problem with antiquarian booksellers, who do the same thing with illustrated books, especially botanical and bird/animal volumes. I just hate to see treasures shredded like that. Sigh.

    Reply
  39. Candice, I share your dismay at modern dealers who cut up the whole magazines to sell the prints one by one. It’s a big problem with antiquarian booksellers, who do the same thing with illustrated books, especially botanical and bird/animal volumes. I just hate to see treasures shredded like that. Sigh.

    Reply
  40. Candice, I share your dismay at modern dealers who cut up the whole magazines to sell the prints one by one. It’s a big problem with antiquarian booksellers, who do the same thing with illustrated books, especially botanical and bird/animal volumes. I just hate to see treasures shredded like that. Sigh.

    Reply
  41. Candice, as always I bow to your dedication and knowledge of the Regency period.One of my most treasured possessions is a print I won on your bulletin board. I loved it before, but have a new-found respect for it. I find even magazines from the 20th century absolutely fascinating—quick slices of life. Thanks for the wonderful post!

    Reply
  42. Candice, as always I bow to your dedication and knowledge of the Regency period.One of my most treasured possessions is a print I won on your bulletin board. I loved it before, but have a new-found respect for it. I find even magazines from the 20th century absolutely fascinating—quick slices of life. Thanks for the wonderful post!

    Reply
  43. Candice, as always I bow to your dedication and knowledge of the Regency period.One of my most treasured possessions is a print I won on your bulletin board. I loved it before, but have a new-found respect for it. I find even magazines from the 20th century absolutely fascinating—quick slices of life. Thanks for the wonderful post!

    Reply
  44. Candice, as always I bow to your dedication and knowledge of the Regency period.One of my most treasured possessions is a print I won on your bulletin board. I loved it before, but have a new-found respect for it. I find even magazines from the 20th century absolutely fascinating—quick slices of life. Thanks for the wonderful post!

    Reply
  45. Candice, as always I bow to your dedication and knowledge of the Regency period.One of my most treasured possessions is a print I won on your bulletin board. I loved it before, but have a new-found respect for it. I find even magazines from the 20th century absolutely fascinating—quick slices of life. Thanks for the wonderful post!

    Reply

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