Looking at the World Through Regency Glasses

Joanna here, talking about eyeglasses in the Regency period. Franklin6

The idea of eyeglasses isn't new.  Dipping into wayback history, folks were getting a close look at small stuff with a clear, curving crystal in ancient times.

Nimrud_2lens_British_MuseumHere's the Nimrud Stone, a piece of ground, polished rock crystal found in the excavation of a 3000-year-old Assyrian palace.  Lenses like this have turned up in Greek burial sites that are even older. 

These first magnifying glasses gave the users up to 10X enlargement, which is to say they compare favorably with the magnifying glass you have in your desk right now and use for reading the print in your OED or threading needles or staring in bemused enjoyment at the whorls and ridges of your thumbprint. 

Scholars figure these very early lenses were used by Greek and Sumerian craftsmen to produce the unbelievably fine detail in some of their art work.  Or gazing at the rings of Saturn.  Or, y'know, looking at their thumb.

What limited the number and quality of these first lenses — the reason Cleopatra didn't wear eyeglasses — Pectoral_of_Senusret_II_cc attrib John_Campanawas they hadn't got around to making cheap and clear glass yet.  High quality glass was precious. That's why Tutankhamun's hoard of jewels is made of gold, ivory, lapis lazuli, carnelian, turquoise, and . . . glass.  This must have come as a disappointment to the Victorian treasure-seekers in the Nile valley.  They'd open a tomb and pull out a fancy pectoral or amulet and it was brilliant, colorful glass, instead of, say, brilliant colorful emeralds.


Folks finally made reliably clear glass on a large scale in Italy. 

Thirteenth Century Italy was the hotbed of glass technHugh_specsology for its day.  Venice — the Medieval Silicon Valley of glasswork — turned out round, hand-held magnifiers on a regular basis.  About 1280 some bright lad, his name forever lost to history, mounted two of these glass disks in round frames and joined them together.  Presto.  Eyeglasses. 

And, lickety-split, as historical innovation goes, we get portraits of people with spectacles.  This 1352 portrait to the left may be the earliest representation of eyeglasses.


Friedrich_Herlin,_Reading_Saint_Peter_(1466)
Spectacle and spectacle case c mother or pearl painted totoiseshell silver glass 1700 vandAThere were two kinds.  Perch-on-the-nose glasses, for one.  Pince-nez we'd call them now.  That's a circa 1700 example on the left.  This picture to the right is from 1466.

Lorgnette the met We also get a scissors-type eyeglasses that joined together at a hinge and could be adjusted to fit.  This kind of glasses could be held up as we see to the left, or held up from below.  The scissors glasses seem awkward, but they appear in portraits right along to the Regency so they must have had hidden charm and utility.

Conrad_von_Soest,_'Brillenapostel'_(1403)
You can see the difficulty with both kinds.  They were always ready to fall off.  You had to tie a ribbon around your head or keep one hand on your glasses.  Tedious, to say the least. They'd be for reading and close work only.

In the early 1700s a London spectacles maker, Edward Scarlett, advertised a clever solution.  His glasses had folding hinged struts on the sides and two arms to hold the optics onto the head.  There were even loops, sometimes, to tie the glasses on.  Made in china before 1846 after C17 3rd quart british museum attribNow your spectacles didn't fall off every time you incautiously reached for a new sheet of paper. 

It became practical to walk around wearing the things.  All this improvement in eyeglass technology meant people could pay intelligent attention to where they were going. This lasted till the invention of the ipod.
Crome 1817 detail 2Benjamin Franklin, one of my favorite people — he's up at the top of the page — invented bifocals in 1784.
It was also in the Eighteenth Century that glasses met the masses.  They were no longer for scholars and artists.  This traveling glasses pedlar on the left argues that glasses were cheap enough that a country woman in a cottage was likely to buy a pair. This ragged tailor on the right can afford glasses to pursue his trade. Crussens mid c17
 
I haven't found examples of these Georgian and Regency glasses with a curve to fit neatly around the ear.  They seem to have hugged the head in a steely embrace, doubtless leading to many a Regency headache.  Some, intended to tuck intMusvisattrib 1750 wig spectacles spearshaped tipso the fashionable wigs of the time, had fierce and sharpish-looking points.

Now, with all this development of practical eyeglasses that gripped the head and stayed on and didn't require constant fidgeting, you'd think the old, precarious sort without side pieces would disappear. 
Not so much.  As the new utilitarian eyeglasses spread through the hoi polloi, the inconvenient older optics were now considered spiffy and upper-crust.

Quizzing glass closeup Quizzing glass 1820 britinsh museum attrib detail 2So, you had your quizzing glass. 
This was a single, hand-held lens, like a magnifying glass. 

Single lenses that you held had long since been replaced by spectacles for everyday use.  Round about 1790 the French, as the French will, turned this passe object into a fashion accessory.  If you needed glasses, or even if you didn't, you could walk around with a quizzing glass handy, maybe hanging it on a long chain worn around the neck. The you whipped it out to inspect something.
Fashionably.

 
The double-barreled version of the quizzing glass was the lorgnette, which is sort of glasses-on-a-stick.  Lorgnette after 1700 the met Like the quizzing glass, the lorgnette was a decorative social prop, capable of depressing pretension all the way across the ballroom. 

Quizzing glass 1801The word lorgnette, you will be pleased to know, comes from the French lorgner, 'to peer at', from Middle French lorgne, 'squint'.  The French, being contrary, call this instrument a face-a-main — a 'face-to-hand' — and then use the French word lorgnette to mean, not that, but a quizzing glass or small telescope.
The word English word 'lorgnette' appears in 1803 so you should probably not have your character raise her lorgnette to intimidate an encroaching mushroom before that.  Unless she is French.  In which case she is talking about a quizzing glass. 
Life is complex.

One thing you notice, when you're looking at paintings of Georgian and Regency crowd scenes, is how few people are wearing glasses.  When you do see glasses in a crowd, they're generally perched on the nose of a plump parson or peering, bent old woman.  I set aside the possibilities of Eighteenth Century Lasik surgery, contact lenses, and a general eagle-eyed-ness in the population and ask myself why.


Regency Romances portray glasses as a bit fuddy-duddy.  Our Regency heroines hide their spectacles in their reticules (and our Regency heroes have better eyesight than the average squad of fighter pilots.)  This is a Regency Romance convention that seems to have good evidence on its side. 

Nimrud stone and quizzling glass attrib British Museum. Scissor glasses and lorgnette attrib The Met. Pectoral of Senusret cc attrib John Compana. Glasses with wig points and glasses with loops Museum of Vision by permission. Spectacles and caseBlack Hawk attrib V&A.
 
 
So.  Thinking about the impact of eyeglasses on the world . . .  Imagine a life with no eyeglasses, and you with not-so-good eyes.  What would you miss most?
One lucky commenter will win a still-fairly-hot-off-the-presses copy of Black Hawk.

325 thoughts on “Looking at the World Through Regency Glasses”

  1. I didn’t realize that glassed went thay far back. I couldn’t imagine hiding my glasses and going without them. My son can’t see anything without his glasses he needs lasik surgery. I just wish it was more afordable.

    Reply
  2. I didn’t realize that glassed went thay far back. I couldn’t imagine hiding my glasses and going without them. My son can’t see anything without his glasses he needs lasik surgery. I just wish it was more afordable.

    Reply
  3. I didn’t realize that glassed went thay far back. I couldn’t imagine hiding my glasses and going without them. My son can’t see anything without his glasses he needs lasik surgery. I just wish it was more afordable.

    Reply
  4. I didn’t realize that glassed went thay far back. I couldn’t imagine hiding my glasses and going without them. My son can’t see anything without his glasses he needs lasik surgery. I just wish it was more afordable.

    Reply
  5. I didn’t realize that glassed went thay far back. I couldn’t imagine hiding my glasses and going without them. My son can’t see anything without his glasses he needs lasik surgery. I just wish it was more afordable.

    Reply
  6. I would definitely miss reading and some of the handwork I still do occasionally. I am not a big audiobook fan so I would not enjoy having to depend on someone to read to me. Luckily we do have glasses since I recently had to start using the readers after a long day.

    Reply
  7. I would definitely miss reading and some of the handwork I still do occasionally. I am not a big audiobook fan so I would not enjoy having to depend on someone to read to me. Luckily we do have glasses since I recently had to start using the readers after a long day.

    Reply
  8. I would definitely miss reading and some of the handwork I still do occasionally. I am not a big audiobook fan so I would not enjoy having to depend on someone to read to me. Luckily we do have glasses since I recently had to start using the readers after a long day.

    Reply
  9. I would definitely miss reading and some of the handwork I still do occasionally. I am not a big audiobook fan so I would not enjoy having to depend on someone to read to me. Luckily we do have glasses since I recently had to start using the readers after a long day.

    Reply
  10. I would definitely miss reading and some of the handwork I still do occasionally. I am not a big audiobook fan so I would not enjoy having to depend on someone to read to me. Luckily we do have glasses since I recently had to start using the readers after a long day.

    Reply
  11. As a kid, I was told I didn’t have to wear my glasses all the time, so of course I didn’t. The problem is that I have one near-sighted eye and one far-sighted eye and astigmatism in both. So stereo vision? Necessary for climbing stairs, catching balls, judging distances in general? It was later that I learned that at least some of my clumsiness was because I was basically seeing with one eye at a time.
    I wrote a heroine a while ago with extreme near-sightedness who was not allowed to use her quizzing glass in public and therefore didn’t know what was going on most of the time.
    And I just remembered this charming story:
    https://www.uncialpress.com/lost-in-almacks.html

    Reply
  12. As a kid, I was told I didn’t have to wear my glasses all the time, so of course I didn’t. The problem is that I have one near-sighted eye and one far-sighted eye and astigmatism in both. So stereo vision? Necessary for climbing stairs, catching balls, judging distances in general? It was later that I learned that at least some of my clumsiness was because I was basically seeing with one eye at a time.
    I wrote a heroine a while ago with extreme near-sightedness who was not allowed to use her quizzing glass in public and therefore didn’t know what was going on most of the time.
    And I just remembered this charming story:
    https://www.uncialpress.com/lost-in-almacks.html

    Reply
  13. As a kid, I was told I didn’t have to wear my glasses all the time, so of course I didn’t. The problem is that I have one near-sighted eye and one far-sighted eye and astigmatism in both. So stereo vision? Necessary for climbing stairs, catching balls, judging distances in general? It was later that I learned that at least some of my clumsiness was because I was basically seeing with one eye at a time.
    I wrote a heroine a while ago with extreme near-sightedness who was not allowed to use her quizzing glass in public and therefore didn’t know what was going on most of the time.
    And I just remembered this charming story:
    https://www.uncialpress.com/lost-in-almacks.html

    Reply
  14. As a kid, I was told I didn’t have to wear my glasses all the time, so of course I didn’t. The problem is that I have one near-sighted eye and one far-sighted eye and astigmatism in both. So stereo vision? Necessary for climbing stairs, catching balls, judging distances in general? It was later that I learned that at least some of my clumsiness was because I was basically seeing with one eye at a time.
    I wrote a heroine a while ago with extreme near-sightedness who was not allowed to use her quizzing glass in public and therefore didn’t know what was going on most of the time.
    And I just remembered this charming story:
    https://www.uncialpress.com/lost-in-almacks.html

    Reply
  15. As a kid, I was told I didn’t have to wear my glasses all the time, so of course I didn’t. The problem is that I have one near-sighted eye and one far-sighted eye and astigmatism in both. So stereo vision? Necessary for climbing stairs, catching balls, judging distances in general? It was later that I learned that at least some of my clumsiness was because I was basically seeing with one eye at a time.
    I wrote a heroine a while ago with extreme near-sightedness who was not allowed to use her quizzing glass in public and therefore didn’t know what was going on most of the time.
    And I just remembered this charming story:
    https://www.uncialpress.com/lost-in-almacks.html

    Reply
  16. I’d have real problems without my glasses. The entire world would look fuzzy, and I’d miss all the great scenery down here in New Zealand. I’d have a sore neck from peering all the time!

    Reply
  17. I’d have real problems without my glasses. The entire world would look fuzzy, and I’d miss all the great scenery down here in New Zealand. I’d have a sore neck from peering all the time!

    Reply
  18. I’d have real problems without my glasses. The entire world would look fuzzy, and I’d miss all the great scenery down here in New Zealand. I’d have a sore neck from peering all the time!

    Reply
  19. I’d have real problems without my glasses. The entire world would look fuzzy, and I’d miss all the great scenery down here in New Zealand. I’d have a sore neck from peering all the time!

    Reply
  20. I’d have real problems without my glasses. The entire world would look fuzzy, and I’d miss all the great scenery down here in New Zealand. I’d have a sore neck from peering all the time!

    Reply
  21. Since my eyesight is very bad, I’d miss being able to see to walk around town, I would be afraid to walk without someone to guide me. I could still read because I’m very near sighted, so I can see things up close pretty well.

    Reply
  22. Since my eyesight is very bad, I’d miss being able to see to walk around town, I would be afraid to walk without someone to guide me. I could still read because I’m very near sighted, so I can see things up close pretty well.

    Reply
  23. Since my eyesight is very bad, I’d miss being able to see to walk around town, I would be afraid to walk without someone to guide me. I could still read because I’m very near sighted, so I can see things up close pretty well.

    Reply
  24. Since my eyesight is very bad, I’d miss being able to see to walk around town, I would be afraid to walk without someone to guide me. I could still read because I’m very near sighted, so I can see things up close pretty well.

    Reply
  25. Since my eyesight is very bad, I’d miss being able to see to walk around town, I would be afraid to walk without someone to guide me. I could still read because I’m very near sighted, so I can see things up close pretty well.

    Reply
  26. I would miss seeing people’s faces and being able to watch a movie. Thank goodness we have so many ways to improve our vision now. I agree with Quilt Lady, it would be great if lasik was more affordable so everyone could get it.
    Thanks for the interesting post Joanna

    Reply
  27. I would miss seeing people’s faces and being able to watch a movie. Thank goodness we have so many ways to improve our vision now. I agree with Quilt Lady, it would be great if lasik was more affordable so everyone could get it.
    Thanks for the interesting post Joanna

    Reply
  28. I would miss seeing people’s faces and being able to watch a movie. Thank goodness we have so many ways to improve our vision now. I agree with Quilt Lady, it would be great if lasik was more affordable so everyone could get it.
    Thanks for the interesting post Joanna

    Reply
  29. I would miss seeing people’s faces and being able to watch a movie. Thank goodness we have so many ways to improve our vision now. I agree with Quilt Lady, it would be great if lasik was more affordable so everyone could get it.
    Thanks for the interesting post Joanna

    Reply
  30. I would miss seeing people’s faces and being able to watch a movie. Thank goodness we have so many ways to improve our vision now. I agree with Quilt Lady, it would be great if lasik was more affordable so everyone could get it.
    Thanks for the interesting post Joanna

    Reply
  31. The world would definitely be a little less brighter. It’s so easy to take for granted eyesight especailly in a world with laser eye surgery and eyeglasses custom made just for your eyes. The perch-on-the-nose glasses and those you whip around do look quite fashionable, though for the one perching on the nose would be quite uncomfortable when reading for long periods of time. Thank you for such an interesting post.

    Reply
  32. The world would definitely be a little less brighter. It’s so easy to take for granted eyesight especailly in a world with laser eye surgery and eyeglasses custom made just for your eyes. The perch-on-the-nose glasses and those you whip around do look quite fashionable, though for the one perching on the nose would be quite uncomfortable when reading for long periods of time. Thank you for such an interesting post.

    Reply
  33. The world would definitely be a little less brighter. It’s so easy to take for granted eyesight especailly in a world with laser eye surgery and eyeglasses custom made just for your eyes. The perch-on-the-nose glasses and those you whip around do look quite fashionable, though for the one perching on the nose would be quite uncomfortable when reading for long periods of time. Thank you for such an interesting post.

    Reply
  34. The world would definitely be a little less brighter. It’s so easy to take for granted eyesight especailly in a world with laser eye surgery and eyeglasses custom made just for your eyes. The perch-on-the-nose glasses and those you whip around do look quite fashionable, though for the one perching on the nose would be quite uncomfortable when reading for long periods of time. Thank you for such an interesting post.

    Reply
  35. The world would definitely be a little less brighter. It’s so easy to take for granted eyesight especailly in a world with laser eye surgery and eyeglasses custom made just for your eyes. The perch-on-the-nose glasses and those you whip around do look quite fashionable, though for the one perching on the nose would be quite uncomfortable when reading for long periods of time. Thank you for such an interesting post.

    Reply
  36. It’s a fairly obvious answer but, reading. I can’t imagine not being able to settle down with a good book and lose myself in a story.

    Reply
  37. It’s a fairly obvious answer but, reading. I can’t imagine not being able to settle down with a good book and lose myself in a story.

    Reply
  38. It’s a fairly obvious answer but, reading. I can’t imagine not being able to settle down with a good book and lose myself in a story.

    Reply
  39. It’s a fairly obvious answer but, reading. I can’t imagine not being able to settle down with a good book and lose myself in a story.

    Reply
  40. It’s a fairly obvious answer but, reading. I can’t imagine not being able to settle down with a good book and lose myself in a story.

    Reply
  41. I would miss reading and needlepoint – and since I am a woman, I would have been bored to tears! No wonder some women seemed to be forever complaining of migraines!

    Reply
  42. I would miss reading and needlepoint – and since I am a woman, I would have been bored to tears! No wonder some women seemed to be forever complaining of migraines!

    Reply
  43. I would miss reading and needlepoint – and since I am a woman, I would have been bored to tears! No wonder some women seemed to be forever complaining of migraines!

    Reply
  44. I would miss reading and needlepoint – and since I am a woman, I would have been bored to tears! No wonder some women seemed to be forever complaining of migraines!

    Reply
  45. I would miss reading and needlepoint – and since I am a woman, I would have been bored to tears! No wonder some women seemed to be forever complaining of migraines!

    Reply
  46. I would miss reading the most. My family teases me about my reading stating that if I have nothing else to read, I’ll read the ingredients on packages!!

    Reply
  47. I would miss reading the most. My family teases me about my reading stating that if I have nothing else to read, I’ll read the ingredients on packages!!

    Reply
  48. I would miss reading the most. My family teases me about my reading stating that if I have nothing else to read, I’ll read the ingredients on packages!!

    Reply
  49. I would miss reading the most. My family teases me about my reading stating that if I have nothing else to read, I’ll read the ingredients on packages!!

    Reply
  50. I would miss reading the most. My family teases me about my reading stating that if I have nothing else to read, I’ll read the ingredients on packages!!

    Reply
  51. Like so many others, I would miss reading. How different your life would be if you had to give up something so fundamental to your routine!
    I’d also miss people watching. I’d probably be one of those odd women staring through my quizzing glass, trying to catch every nuance of expression!
    Thanks for the interesting post!

    Reply
  52. Like so many others, I would miss reading. How different your life would be if you had to give up something so fundamental to your routine!
    I’d also miss people watching. I’d probably be one of those odd women staring through my quizzing glass, trying to catch every nuance of expression!
    Thanks for the interesting post!

    Reply
  53. Like so many others, I would miss reading. How different your life would be if you had to give up something so fundamental to your routine!
    I’d also miss people watching. I’d probably be one of those odd women staring through my quizzing glass, trying to catch every nuance of expression!
    Thanks for the interesting post!

    Reply
  54. Like so many others, I would miss reading. How different your life would be if you had to give up something so fundamental to your routine!
    I’d also miss people watching. I’d probably be one of those odd women staring through my quizzing glass, trying to catch every nuance of expression!
    Thanks for the interesting post!

    Reply
  55. Like so many others, I would miss reading. How different your life would be if you had to give up something so fundamental to your routine!
    I’d also miss people watching. I’d probably be one of those odd women staring through my quizzing glass, trying to catch every nuance of expression!
    Thanks for the interesting post!

    Reply
  56. Glad your post finally saw the light, Joanna! I once had a Regency heroine who needed glasses but couldn’t afford them, so she pretty much gave up reading. My copyeditor got aggravated and called her a stupid ninnyhammer for not reading a crucial piece of correspondence. We really do take our ability to read too lightly!

    Reply
  57. Glad your post finally saw the light, Joanna! I once had a Regency heroine who needed glasses but couldn’t afford them, so she pretty much gave up reading. My copyeditor got aggravated and called her a stupid ninnyhammer for not reading a crucial piece of correspondence. We really do take our ability to read too lightly!

    Reply
  58. Glad your post finally saw the light, Joanna! I once had a Regency heroine who needed glasses but couldn’t afford them, so she pretty much gave up reading. My copyeditor got aggravated and called her a stupid ninnyhammer for not reading a crucial piece of correspondence. We really do take our ability to read too lightly!

    Reply
  59. Glad your post finally saw the light, Joanna! I once had a Regency heroine who needed glasses but couldn’t afford them, so she pretty much gave up reading. My copyeditor got aggravated and called her a stupid ninnyhammer for not reading a crucial piece of correspondence. We really do take our ability to read too lightly!

    Reply
  60. Glad your post finally saw the light, Joanna! I once had a Regency heroine who needed glasses but couldn’t afford them, so she pretty much gave up reading. My copyeditor got aggravated and called her a stupid ninnyhammer for not reading a crucial piece of correspondence. We really do take our ability to read too lightly!

    Reply
  61. I was born cross-eyed and had glasses by the age of three. Without my specs, I’d probably never have learned to read which would have been an incalculable loss. Going through life seriously cross-eyed I might also not have attracted my full complement of adoring swains–a lesser inconvenience, from my present perspective.

    Reply
  62. I was born cross-eyed and had glasses by the age of three. Without my specs, I’d probably never have learned to read which would have been an incalculable loss. Going through life seriously cross-eyed I might also not have attracted my full complement of adoring swains–a lesser inconvenience, from my present perspective.

    Reply
  63. I was born cross-eyed and had glasses by the age of three. Without my specs, I’d probably never have learned to read which would have been an incalculable loss. Going through life seriously cross-eyed I might also not have attracted my full complement of adoring swains–a lesser inconvenience, from my present perspective.

    Reply
  64. I was born cross-eyed and had glasses by the age of three. Without my specs, I’d probably never have learned to read which would have been an incalculable loss. Going through life seriously cross-eyed I might also not have attracted my full complement of adoring swains–a lesser inconvenience, from my present perspective.

    Reply
  65. I was born cross-eyed and had glasses by the age of three. Without my specs, I’d probably never have learned to read which would have been an incalculable loss. Going through life seriously cross-eyed I might also not have attracted my full complement of adoring swains–a lesser inconvenience, from my present perspective.

    Reply
  66. Glasses make everything more distinct and are such a necessity. Even with lasik people over a certain age still need reading glasses. Reading, computer work, even housework requires glasses. Such an interesting and great post today.

    Reply
  67. Glasses make everything more distinct and are such a necessity. Even with lasik people over a certain age still need reading glasses. Reading, computer work, even housework requires glasses. Such an interesting and great post today.

    Reply
  68. Glasses make everything more distinct and are such a necessity. Even with lasik people over a certain age still need reading glasses. Reading, computer work, even housework requires glasses. Such an interesting and great post today.

    Reply
  69. Glasses make everything more distinct and are such a necessity. Even with lasik people over a certain age still need reading glasses. Reading, computer work, even housework requires glasses. Such an interesting and great post today.

    Reply
  70. Glasses make everything more distinct and are such a necessity. Even with lasik people over a certain age still need reading glasses. Reading, computer work, even housework requires glasses. Such an interesting and great post today.

    Reply
  71. I read so much and enjoy it so much that I shudder at the thought of not being able to see clearly. My mother has macular degeneration so I have witnessed first hand how devastating loss of vision can be.
    Please exempt me from the contest–The Black Hawk is already waiting for me in my TBR stack and I can hardly wait to get to it!

    Reply
  72. I read so much and enjoy it so much that I shudder at the thought of not being able to see clearly. My mother has macular degeneration so I have witnessed first hand how devastating loss of vision can be.
    Please exempt me from the contest–The Black Hawk is already waiting for me in my TBR stack and I can hardly wait to get to it!

    Reply
  73. I read so much and enjoy it so much that I shudder at the thought of not being able to see clearly. My mother has macular degeneration so I have witnessed first hand how devastating loss of vision can be.
    Please exempt me from the contest–The Black Hawk is already waiting for me in my TBR stack and I can hardly wait to get to it!

    Reply
  74. I read so much and enjoy it so much that I shudder at the thought of not being able to see clearly. My mother has macular degeneration so I have witnessed first hand how devastating loss of vision can be.
    Please exempt me from the contest–The Black Hawk is already waiting for me in my TBR stack and I can hardly wait to get to it!

    Reply
  75. I read so much and enjoy it so much that I shudder at the thought of not being able to see clearly. My mother has macular degeneration so I have witnessed first hand how devastating loss of vision can be.
    Please exempt me from the contest–The Black Hawk is already waiting for me in my TBR stack and I can hardly wait to get to it!

    Reply
  76. Without my glasses, I see the world 20 paces away in a misty fog. That works great when I want to pause a moment and dream while looking at my pretty, diffused Christmas tree lights; however, most of the time it’s a nuisance.
    Unlike others here, I have fine vision for reading and many times take my glasses off to read. I won’t even consider Lasik surgery because I’m afraid I’d be the .1 of 1 percent who would have complications and forever ruin my vision, such as it is.
    And I agree with you, Jo The iPod and iPhone have undermined our nation’s common sense in regards to travel.

    Reply
  77. Without my glasses, I see the world 20 paces away in a misty fog. That works great when I want to pause a moment and dream while looking at my pretty, diffused Christmas tree lights; however, most of the time it’s a nuisance.
    Unlike others here, I have fine vision for reading and many times take my glasses off to read. I won’t even consider Lasik surgery because I’m afraid I’d be the .1 of 1 percent who would have complications and forever ruin my vision, such as it is.
    And I agree with you, Jo The iPod and iPhone have undermined our nation’s common sense in regards to travel.

    Reply
  78. Without my glasses, I see the world 20 paces away in a misty fog. That works great when I want to pause a moment and dream while looking at my pretty, diffused Christmas tree lights; however, most of the time it’s a nuisance.
    Unlike others here, I have fine vision for reading and many times take my glasses off to read. I won’t even consider Lasik surgery because I’m afraid I’d be the .1 of 1 percent who would have complications and forever ruin my vision, such as it is.
    And I agree with you, Jo The iPod and iPhone have undermined our nation’s common sense in regards to travel.

    Reply
  79. Without my glasses, I see the world 20 paces away in a misty fog. That works great when I want to pause a moment and dream while looking at my pretty, diffused Christmas tree lights; however, most of the time it’s a nuisance.
    Unlike others here, I have fine vision for reading and many times take my glasses off to read. I won’t even consider Lasik surgery because I’m afraid I’d be the .1 of 1 percent who would have complications and forever ruin my vision, such as it is.
    And I agree with you, Jo The iPod and iPhone have undermined our nation’s common sense in regards to travel.

    Reply
  80. Without my glasses, I see the world 20 paces away in a misty fog. That works great when I want to pause a moment and dream while looking at my pretty, diffused Christmas tree lights; however, most of the time it’s a nuisance.
    Unlike others here, I have fine vision for reading and many times take my glasses off to read. I won’t even consider Lasik surgery because I’m afraid I’d be the .1 of 1 percent who would have complications and forever ruin my vision, such as it is.
    And I agree with you, Jo The iPod and iPhone have undermined our nation’s common sense in regards to travel.

    Reply
  81. I was exceedingly nearsighted 20-400 so couldn’t even read without my glasses (everything past 6″ was a blur. I realized that it was great I never time traveled as I would break my glasses and walk off a cliff. Worried about that I got Lasik when I was a Girl Scout leader (afraid I would lose my glasses or contacts and walk the troop off a cliff). Best thing about Lasik was I could shave my legs in the shower. Now I am old and starting to need reading glasses to thread needles and read package ingredients, but so far no trouble reading books by Word Wenches.

    Reply
  82. I was exceedingly nearsighted 20-400 so couldn’t even read without my glasses (everything past 6″ was a blur. I realized that it was great I never time traveled as I would break my glasses and walk off a cliff. Worried about that I got Lasik when I was a Girl Scout leader (afraid I would lose my glasses or contacts and walk the troop off a cliff). Best thing about Lasik was I could shave my legs in the shower. Now I am old and starting to need reading glasses to thread needles and read package ingredients, but so far no trouble reading books by Word Wenches.

    Reply
  83. I was exceedingly nearsighted 20-400 so couldn’t even read without my glasses (everything past 6″ was a blur. I realized that it was great I never time traveled as I would break my glasses and walk off a cliff. Worried about that I got Lasik when I was a Girl Scout leader (afraid I would lose my glasses or contacts and walk the troop off a cliff). Best thing about Lasik was I could shave my legs in the shower. Now I am old and starting to need reading glasses to thread needles and read package ingredients, but so far no trouble reading books by Word Wenches.

    Reply
  84. I was exceedingly nearsighted 20-400 so couldn’t even read without my glasses (everything past 6″ was a blur. I realized that it was great I never time traveled as I would break my glasses and walk off a cliff. Worried about that I got Lasik when I was a Girl Scout leader (afraid I would lose my glasses or contacts and walk the troop off a cliff). Best thing about Lasik was I could shave my legs in the shower. Now I am old and starting to need reading glasses to thread needles and read package ingredients, but so far no trouble reading books by Word Wenches.

    Reply
  85. I was exceedingly nearsighted 20-400 so couldn’t even read without my glasses (everything past 6″ was a blur. I realized that it was great I never time traveled as I would break my glasses and walk off a cliff. Worried about that I got Lasik when I was a Girl Scout leader (afraid I would lose my glasses or contacts and walk the troop off a cliff). Best thing about Lasik was I could shave my legs in the shower. Now I am old and starting to need reading glasses to thread needles and read package ingredients, but so far no trouble reading books by Word Wenches.

    Reply
  86. There does seem to be a theme: we’d all miss being able to read. Perhaps not surprising as this is a blog about books, after all.
    I can read if I can hold books very close, but beyond a few inches and everything is a blur, plus after a short time reading that way I get a headache. I still remember my first pair of glasses; I was thrilled to be able to see individual leaves on the trees (who knew you were supposed to see each leaf and not just general greenness).

    Reply
  87. There does seem to be a theme: we’d all miss being able to read. Perhaps not surprising as this is a blog about books, after all.
    I can read if I can hold books very close, but beyond a few inches and everything is a blur, plus after a short time reading that way I get a headache. I still remember my first pair of glasses; I was thrilled to be able to see individual leaves on the trees (who knew you were supposed to see each leaf and not just general greenness).

    Reply
  88. There does seem to be a theme: we’d all miss being able to read. Perhaps not surprising as this is a blog about books, after all.
    I can read if I can hold books very close, but beyond a few inches and everything is a blur, plus after a short time reading that way I get a headache. I still remember my first pair of glasses; I was thrilled to be able to see individual leaves on the trees (who knew you were supposed to see each leaf and not just general greenness).

    Reply
  89. There does seem to be a theme: we’d all miss being able to read. Perhaps not surprising as this is a blog about books, after all.
    I can read if I can hold books very close, but beyond a few inches and everything is a blur, plus after a short time reading that way I get a headache. I still remember my first pair of glasses; I was thrilled to be able to see individual leaves on the trees (who knew you were supposed to see each leaf and not just general greenness).

    Reply
  90. There does seem to be a theme: we’d all miss being able to read. Perhaps not surprising as this is a blog about books, after all.
    I can read if I can hold books very close, but beyond a few inches and everything is a blur, plus after a short time reading that way I get a headache. I still remember my first pair of glasses; I was thrilled to be able to see individual leaves on the trees (who knew you were supposed to see each leaf and not just general greenness).

    Reply
  91. Hi Quilt Lady —
    The idea of glasses is very old. But they were pretty much for scholars and fine craftsmen for most of history. I think ordinary folks didn’t start using them till the Eighteenth Century.
    I’ll bet thirty or fifty years from now nobody will need them. It’ll all be corrected by surgery or something.

    Reply
  92. Hi Quilt Lady —
    The idea of glasses is very old. But they were pretty much for scholars and fine craftsmen for most of history. I think ordinary folks didn’t start using them till the Eighteenth Century.
    I’ll bet thirty or fifty years from now nobody will need them. It’ll all be corrected by surgery or something.

    Reply
  93. Hi Quilt Lady —
    The idea of glasses is very old. But they were pretty much for scholars and fine craftsmen for most of history. I think ordinary folks didn’t start using them till the Eighteenth Century.
    I’ll bet thirty or fifty years from now nobody will need them. It’ll all be corrected by surgery or something.

    Reply
  94. Hi Quilt Lady —
    The idea of glasses is very old. But they were pretty much for scholars and fine craftsmen for most of history. I think ordinary folks didn’t start using them till the Eighteenth Century.
    I’ll bet thirty or fifty years from now nobody will need them. It’ll all be corrected by surgery or something.

    Reply
  95. Hi Quilt Lady —
    The idea of glasses is very old. But they were pretty much for scholars and fine craftsmen for most of history. I think ordinary folks didn’t start using them till the Eighteenth Century.
    I’ll bet thirty or fifty years from now nobody will need them. It’ll all be corrected by surgery or something.

    Reply
  96. Hi Amy —
    Right you are, about having folks read to you.
    There’s a story that Milton’s daughters read Latin and Greek to him after he went blind. But . . . he taught them to read the languages. He didn’t teach them to understand what they were reading.

    Reply
  97. Hi Amy —
    Right you are, about having folks read to you.
    There’s a story that Milton’s daughters read Latin and Greek to him after he went blind. But . . . he taught them to read the languages. He didn’t teach them to understand what they were reading.

    Reply
  98. Hi Amy —
    Right you are, about having folks read to you.
    There’s a story that Milton’s daughters read Latin and Greek to him after he went blind. But . . . he taught them to read the languages. He didn’t teach them to understand what they were reading.

    Reply
  99. Hi Amy —
    Right you are, about having folks read to you.
    There’s a story that Milton’s daughters read Latin and Greek to him after he went blind. But . . . he taught them to read the languages. He didn’t teach them to understand what they were reading.

    Reply
  100. Hi Amy —
    Right you are, about having folks read to you.
    There’s a story that Milton’s daughters read Latin and Greek to him after he went blind. But . . . he taught them to read the languages. He didn’t teach them to understand what they were reading.

    Reply
  101. Hi Phyllis —
    I always tyhink of my poor vision in terms of not being able to read. And not being able to read fine print even with my glasses on, alas.
    But yes. It would limit all sorts of physical activities.
    I guess the folks who couldn’t see very well were glad the horse knew the way. (And, true to the season, my mind just zips along with ‘… knows the way to carry the sleigh …’

    Reply
  102. Hi Phyllis —
    I always tyhink of my poor vision in terms of not being able to read. And not being able to read fine print even with my glasses on, alas.
    But yes. It would limit all sorts of physical activities.
    I guess the folks who couldn’t see very well were glad the horse knew the way. (And, true to the season, my mind just zips along with ‘… knows the way to carry the sleigh …’

    Reply
  103. Hi Phyllis —
    I always tyhink of my poor vision in terms of not being able to read. And not being able to read fine print even with my glasses on, alas.
    But yes. It would limit all sorts of physical activities.
    I guess the folks who couldn’t see very well were glad the horse knew the way. (And, true to the season, my mind just zips along with ‘… knows the way to carry the sleigh …’

    Reply
  104. Hi Phyllis —
    I always tyhink of my poor vision in terms of not being able to read. And not being able to read fine print even with my glasses on, alas.
    But yes. It would limit all sorts of physical activities.
    I guess the folks who couldn’t see very well were glad the horse knew the way. (And, true to the season, my mind just zips along with ‘… knows the way to carry the sleigh …’

    Reply
  105. Hi Phyllis —
    I always tyhink of my poor vision in terms of not being able to read. And not being able to read fine print even with my glasses on, alas.
    But yes. It would limit all sorts of physical activities.
    I guess the folks who couldn’t see very well were glad the horse knew the way. (And, true to the season, my mind just zips along with ‘… knows the way to carry the sleigh …’

    Reply
  106. Hi Shelley —
    I have a friend whose vision problems weren’t diagnosed till she was halfway grown. She said to me once — “I put on the glasses and realize that all the trees had leaves on them.”

    Reply
  107. Hi Shelley —
    I have a friend whose vision problems weren’t diagnosed till she was halfway grown. She said to me once — “I put on the glasses and realize that all the trees had leaves on them.”

    Reply
  108. Hi Shelley —
    I have a friend whose vision problems weren’t diagnosed till she was halfway grown. She said to me once — “I put on the glasses and realize that all the trees had leaves on them.”

    Reply
  109. Hi Shelley —
    I have a friend whose vision problems weren’t diagnosed till she was halfway grown. She said to me once — “I put on the glasses and realize that all the trees had leaves on them.”

    Reply
  110. Hi Shelley —
    I have a friend whose vision problems weren’t diagnosed till she was halfway grown. She said to me once — “I put on the glasses and realize that all the trees had leaves on them.”

    Reply
  111. Hi Liz —
    Thank you for the further references to vision and glasses sites. I love references.
    I remember Miss Marple as a bird watcher, with frequent forays into nosiness. I love that woman. So awkward to love fictional people. The relationship is never reciprocated.

    Reply
  112. Hi Liz —
    Thank you for the further references to vision and glasses sites. I love references.
    I remember Miss Marple as a bird watcher, with frequent forays into nosiness. I love that woman. So awkward to love fictional people. The relationship is never reciprocated.

    Reply
  113. Hi Liz —
    Thank you for the further references to vision and glasses sites. I love references.
    I remember Miss Marple as a bird watcher, with frequent forays into nosiness. I love that woman. So awkward to love fictional people. The relationship is never reciprocated.

    Reply
  114. Hi Liz —
    Thank you for the further references to vision and glasses sites. I love references.
    I remember Miss Marple as a bird watcher, with frequent forays into nosiness. I love that woman. So awkward to love fictional people. The relationship is never reciprocated.

    Reply
  115. Hi Liz —
    Thank you for the further references to vision and glasses sites. I love references.
    I remember Miss Marple as a bird watcher, with frequent forays into nosiness. I love that woman. So awkward to love fictional people. The relationship is never reciprocated.

    Reply
  116. Hi LilMissMolly —
    I will cross my fingers for you. *g* The winner is generated by Sherrie’s random mind, so I can’t cheat.

    Reply
  117. Hi LilMissMolly —
    I will cross my fingers for you. *g* The winner is generated by Sherrie’s random mind, so I can’t cheat.

    Reply
  118. Hi LilMissMolly —
    I will cross my fingers for you. *g* The winner is generated by Sherrie’s random mind, so I can’t cheat.

    Reply
  119. Hi LilMissMolly —
    I will cross my fingers for you. *g* The winner is generated by Sherrie’s random mind, so I can’t cheat.

    Reply
  120. Hi LilMissMolly —
    I will cross my fingers for you. *g* The winner is generated by Sherrie’s random mind, so I can’t cheat.

    Reply
  121. Hi Marie —
    I had not thought about seeing other people’s faces. Yes! What a fascinating thought.
    Talking to someone in the dark is different from talking to them in the light. A person who couldn’t see the fine reactions on another person’s face would probably become very sensitive to the nuances of voice.
    Hmmm …

    Reply
  122. Hi Marie —
    I had not thought about seeing other people’s faces. Yes! What a fascinating thought.
    Talking to someone in the dark is different from talking to them in the light. A person who couldn’t see the fine reactions on another person’s face would probably become very sensitive to the nuances of voice.
    Hmmm …

    Reply
  123. Hi Marie —
    I had not thought about seeing other people’s faces. Yes! What a fascinating thought.
    Talking to someone in the dark is different from talking to them in the light. A person who couldn’t see the fine reactions on another person’s face would probably become very sensitive to the nuances of voice.
    Hmmm …

    Reply
  124. Hi Marie —
    I had not thought about seeing other people’s faces. Yes! What a fascinating thought.
    Talking to someone in the dark is different from talking to them in the light. A person who couldn’t see the fine reactions on another person’s face would probably become very sensitive to the nuances of voice.
    Hmmm …

    Reply
  125. Hi Marie —
    I had not thought about seeing other people’s faces. Yes! What a fascinating thought.
    Talking to someone in the dark is different from talking to them in the light. A person who couldn’t see the fine reactions on another person’s face would probably become very sensitive to the nuances of voice.
    Hmmm …

    Reply
  126. Hi Na —
    Well within my memory, older, especially European, gentlemen used to wear pince-nez glasses. They’d take them out and read something, then take them off and put them away carefully in a little case.
    Since regular glasses were readily available, there must have been some reason to use those. Dunnoh what.

    Reply
  127. Hi Na —
    Well within my memory, older, especially European, gentlemen used to wear pince-nez glasses. They’d take them out and read something, then take them off and put them away carefully in a little case.
    Since regular glasses were readily available, there must have been some reason to use those. Dunnoh what.

    Reply
  128. Hi Na —
    Well within my memory, older, especially European, gentlemen used to wear pince-nez glasses. They’d take them out and read something, then take them off and put them away carefully in a little case.
    Since regular glasses were readily available, there must have been some reason to use those. Dunnoh what.

    Reply
  129. Hi Na —
    Well within my memory, older, especially European, gentlemen used to wear pince-nez glasses. They’d take them out and read something, then take them off and put them away carefully in a little case.
    Since regular glasses were readily available, there must have been some reason to use those. Dunnoh what.

    Reply
  130. Hi Na —
    Well within my memory, older, especially European, gentlemen used to wear pince-nez glasses. They’d take them out and read something, then take them off and put them away carefully in a little case.
    Since regular glasses were readily available, there must have been some reason to use those. Dunnoh what.

    Reply
  131. Hi Wendy —
    Ah. That’s the reason all the older ladies in Regency novels run around interfering in their grandkids’ lives. They had to give up needlepoint.

    Reply
  132. Hi Wendy —
    Ah. That’s the reason all the older ladies in Regency novels run around interfering in their grandkids’ lives. They had to give up needlepoint.

    Reply
  133. Hi Wendy —
    Ah. That’s the reason all the older ladies in Regency novels run around interfering in their grandkids’ lives. They had to give up needlepoint.

    Reply
  134. Hi Wendy —
    Ah. That’s the reason all the older ladies in Regency novels run around interfering in their grandkids’ lives. They had to give up needlepoint.

    Reply
  135. Hi Wendy —
    Ah. That’s the reason all the older ladies in Regency novels run around interfering in their grandkids’ lives. They had to give up needlepoint.

    Reply
  136. Hi Betty —
    It’s addictive. Reading. And yes, I have been guilty of reading cereal boxes in an absent-minded way.
    I suspect this is why Regency ladies had companions. Not to fetch and carry cloaks or keep them company or walk the dog.
    To read to them.

    Reply
  137. Hi Betty —
    It’s addictive. Reading. And yes, I have been guilty of reading cereal boxes in an absent-minded way.
    I suspect this is why Regency ladies had companions. Not to fetch and carry cloaks or keep them company or walk the dog.
    To read to them.

    Reply
  138. Hi Betty —
    It’s addictive. Reading. And yes, I have been guilty of reading cereal boxes in an absent-minded way.
    I suspect this is why Regency ladies had companions. Not to fetch and carry cloaks or keep them company or walk the dog.
    To read to them.

    Reply
  139. Hi Betty —
    It’s addictive. Reading. And yes, I have been guilty of reading cereal boxes in an absent-minded way.
    I suspect this is why Regency ladies had companions. Not to fetch and carry cloaks or keep them company or walk the dog.
    To read to them.

    Reply
  140. Hi Betty —
    It’s addictive. Reading. And yes, I have been guilty of reading cereal boxes in an absent-minded way.
    I suspect this is why Regency ladies had companions. Not to fetch and carry cloaks or keep them company or walk the dog.
    To read to them.

    Reply
  141. Hi Deb —
    I would have been great with a quizzing glass. Or a lorgnette.
    Yep. That’s how I see myself. Armed with a haughty expression and a lorgnette, surveying the young ladies’ necklines.

    Reply
  142. Hi Deb —
    I would have been great with a quizzing glass. Or a lorgnette.
    Yep. That’s how I see myself. Armed with a haughty expression and a lorgnette, surveying the young ladies’ necklines.

    Reply
  143. Hi Deb —
    I would have been great with a quizzing glass. Or a lorgnette.
    Yep. That’s how I see myself. Armed with a haughty expression and a lorgnette, surveying the young ladies’ necklines.

    Reply
  144. Hi Deb —
    I would have been great with a quizzing glass. Or a lorgnette.
    Yep. That’s how I see myself. Armed with a haughty expression and a lorgnette, surveying the young ladies’ necklines.

    Reply
  145. Hi Deb —
    I would have been great with a quizzing glass. Or a lorgnette.
    Yep. That’s how I see myself. Armed with a haughty expression and a lorgnette, surveying the young ladies’ necklines.

    Reply
  146. Hi Pat —
    Durned straight we take glasses for granted. I just have to mislay my glasses to become completely fuddled and useless.
    Pat, pat, search, mutter, ‘Now where did I put my glasses …?’

    Reply
  147. Hi Pat —
    Durned straight we take glasses for granted. I just have to mislay my glasses to become completely fuddled and useless.
    Pat, pat, search, mutter, ‘Now where did I put my glasses …?’

    Reply
  148. Hi Pat —
    Durned straight we take glasses for granted. I just have to mislay my glasses to become completely fuddled and useless.
    Pat, pat, search, mutter, ‘Now where did I put my glasses …?’

    Reply
  149. Hi Pat —
    Durned straight we take glasses for granted. I just have to mislay my glasses to become completely fuddled and useless.
    Pat, pat, search, mutter, ‘Now where did I put my glasses …?’

    Reply
  150. Hi Pat —
    Durned straight we take glasses for granted. I just have to mislay my glasses to become completely fuddled and useless.
    Pat, pat, search, mutter, ‘Now where did I put my glasses …?’

    Reply
  151. Grace —
    And there’s another blessing we overlook — testing infants and very young children for vision disorders.
    I’m always a little surprised to see toddlers with glasses. And then I think, ‘How wonderful’.

    Reply
  152. Grace —
    And there’s another blessing we overlook — testing infants and very young children for vision disorders.
    I’m always a little surprised to see toddlers with glasses. And then I think, ‘How wonderful’.

    Reply
  153. Grace —
    And there’s another blessing we overlook — testing infants and very young children for vision disorders.
    I’m always a little surprised to see toddlers with glasses. And then I think, ‘How wonderful’.

    Reply
  154. Grace —
    And there’s another blessing we overlook — testing infants and very young children for vision disorders.
    I’m always a little surprised to see toddlers with glasses. And then I think, ‘How wonderful’.

    Reply
  155. Grace —
    And there’s another blessing we overlook — testing infants and very young children for vision disorders.
    I’m always a little surprised to see toddlers with glasses. And then I think, ‘How wonderful’.

    Reply
  156. Hi Ellie —
    I’m so lucky. My sight was pretty good till I reached middle age.
    It’s watching my eyesight deteriorate, maybe, that makes me so grateful for glasses and so sensitive to what life would be like without them.

    Reply
  157. Hi Ellie —
    I’m so lucky. My sight was pretty good till I reached middle age.
    It’s watching my eyesight deteriorate, maybe, that makes me so grateful for glasses and so sensitive to what life would be like without them.

    Reply
  158. Hi Ellie —
    I’m so lucky. My sight was pretty good till I reached middle age.
    It’s watching my eyesight deteriorate, maybe, that makes me so grateful for glasses and so sensitive to what life would be like without them.

    Reply
  159. Hi Ellie —
    I’m so lucky. My sight was pretty good till I reached middle age.
    It’s watching my eyesight deteriorate, maybe, that makes me so grateful for glasses and so sensitive to what life would be like without them.

    Reply
  160. Hi Ellie —
    I’m so lucky. My sight was pretty good till I reached middle age.
    It’s watching my eyesight deteriorate, maybe, that makes me so grateful for glasses and so sensitive to what life would be like without them.

    Reply
  161. Hi Anne —
    Looking at the Georgian and Regency periods — any historical period, really — I think of all the work women did that required good vision.
    Sewing, of course, but also nursing and cooking.

    Reply
  162. Hi Anne —
    Looking at the Georgian and Regency periods — any historical period, really — I think of all the work women did that required good vision.
    Sewing, of course, but also nursing and cooking.

    Reply
  163. Hi Anne —
    Looking at the Georgian and Regency periods — any historical period, really — I think of all the work women did that required good vision.
    Sewing, of course, but also nursing and cooking.

    Reply
  164. Hi Anne —
    Looking at the Georgian and Regency periods — any historical period, really — I think of all the work women did that required good vision.
    Sewing, of course, but also nursing and cooking.

    Reply
  165. Hi Anne —
    Looking at the Georgian and Regency periods — any historical period, really — I think of all the work women did that required good vision.
    Sewing, of course, but also nursing and cooking.

    Reply
  166. Hi Maureen —
    That would be an interesting scene, wouldn’t it? Somebody who’d gone without glasses all their life and somebody buys them for her.
    She sees everybody’s faces for the first time. Really sees them. Might be a bit of a shock.

    Reply
  167. Hi Maureen —
    That would be an interesting scene, wouldn’t it? Somebody who’d gone without glasses all their life and somebody buys them for her.
    She sees everybody’s faces for the first time. Really sees them. Might be a bit of a shock.

    Reply
  168. Hi Maureen —
    That would be an interesting scene, wouldn’t it? Somebody who’d gone without glasses all their life and somebody buys them for her.
    She sees everybody’s faces for the first time. Really sees them. Might be a bit of a shock.

    Reply
  169. Hi Maureen —
    That would be an interesting scene, wouldn’t it? Somebody who’d gone without glasses all their life and somebody buys them for her.
    She sees everybody’s faces for the first time. Really sees them. Might be a bit of a shock.

    Reply
  170. Hi Maureen —
    That would be an interesting scene, wouldn’t it? Somebody who’d gone without glasses all their life and somebody buys them for her.
    She sees everybody’s faces for the first time. Really sees them. Might be a bit of a shock.

    Reply
  171. Hi MJ —
    I wonder if there are personality traits we tend to pick up if we see the world around us in a sort of soft fog.
    Are there ancient philosophers and storytellers who created worlds of the imagination because they couldn’t see the real one all that clearly?

    Reply
  172. Hi MJ —
    I wonder if there are personality traits we tend to pick up if we see the world around us in a sort of soft fog.
    Are there ancient philosophers and storytellers who created worlds of the imagination because they couldn’t see the real one all that clearly?

    Reply
  173. Hi MJ —
    I wonder if there are personality traits we tend to pick up if we see the world around us in a sort of soft fog.
    Are there ancient philosophers and storytellers who created worlds of the imagination because they couldn’t see the real one all that clearly?

    Reply
  174. Hi MJ —
    I wonder if there are personality traits we tend to pick up if we see the world around us in a sort of soft fog.
    Are there ancient philosophers and storytellers who created worlds of the imagination because they couldn’t see the real one all that clearly?

    Reply
  175. Hi MJ —
    I wonder if there are personality traits we tend to pick up if we see the world around us in a sort of soft fog.
    Are there ancient philosophers and storytellers who created worlds of the imagination because they couldn’t see the real one all that clearly?

    Reply
  176. Hi Lyn —
    I’ve decided folks were lucky to be on horses in pre-glasses days. You might walk your GS troop off a cliff. A horse would presumably have sense enough not to take you over.

    Reply
  177. Hi Lyn —
    I’ve decided folks were lucky to be on horses in pre-glasses days. You might walk your GS troop off a cliff. A horse would presumably have sense enough not to take you over.

    Reply
  178. Hi Lyn —
    I’ve decided folks were lucky to be on horses in pre-glasses days. You might walk your GS troop off a cliff. A horse would presumably have sense enough not to take you over.

    Reply
  179. Hi Lyn —
    I’ve decided folks were lucky to be on horses in pre-glasses days. You might walk your GS troop off a cliff. A horse would presumably have sense enough not to take you over.

    Reply
  180. Hi Lyn —
    I’ve decided folks were lucky to be on horses in pre-glasses days. You might walk your GS troop off a cliff. A horse would presumably have sense enough not to take you over.

    Reply
  181. Hi Susan —
    ‘Because it’s a blog about books’
    Oh, *g* How right you are. On a different sort of blog everyone would be talking about the difficulty of playing baseball or shooting pheasant or landing small aircraft.

    Reply
  182. Hi Susan —
    ‘Because it’s a blog about books’
    Oh, *g* How right you are. On a different sort of blog everyone would be talking about the difficulty of playing baseball or shooting pheasant or landing small aircraft.

    Reply
  183. Hi Susan —
    ‘Because it’s a blog about books’
    Oh, *g* How right you are. On a different sort of blog everyone would be talking about the difficulty of playing baseball or shooting pheasant or landing small aircraft.

    Reply
  184. Hi Susan —
    ‘Because it’s a blog about books’
    Oh, *g* How right you are. On a different sort of blog everyone would be talking about the difficulty of playing baseball or shooting pheasant or landing small aircraft.

    Reply
  185. Hi Susan —
    ‘Because it’s a blog about books’
    Oh, *g* How right you are. On a different sort of blog everyone would be talking about the difficulty of playing baseball or shooting pheasant or landing small aircraft.

    Reply
  186. Hi Barbara —
    I have a friend who can’t see her surroundings very well, and doesn’t wear her glasses.
    She gets lost a lot. *g*

    Reply
  187. Hi Barbara —
    I have a friend who can’t see her surroundings very well, and doesn’t wear her glasses.
    She gets lost a lot. *g*

    Reply
  188. Hi Barbara —
    I have a friend who can’t see her surroundings very well, and doesn’t wear her glasses.
    She gets lost a lot. *g*

    Reply
  189. Hi Barbara —
    I have a friend who can’t see her surroundings very well, and doesn’t wear her glasses.
    She gets lost a lot. *g*

    Reply
  190. Hi Barbara —
    I have a friend who can’t see her surroundings very well, and doesn’t wear her glasses.
    She gets lost a lot. *g*

    Reply
  191. Hi Beebs —
    Reading is the big loss for me too. It’s so much of my life, and hearing someone read to me is not a true substitute.

    Reply
  192. Hi Beebs —
    Reading is the big loss for me too. It’s so much of my life, and hearing someone read to me is not a true substitute.

    Reply
  193. Hi Beebs —
    Reading is the big loss for me too. It’s so much of my life, and hearing someone read to me is not a true substitute.

    Reply
  194. Hi Beebs —
    Reading is the big loss for me too. It’s so much of my life, and hearing someone read to me is not a true substitute.

    Reply
  195. Hi Beebs —
    Reading is the big loss for me too. It’s so much of my life, and hearing someone read to me is not a true substitute.

    Reply
  196. It was when I couldn’t read the sign on the bus to know which one to signal to stop for me to get on, that I gave in and started wearing my glasses. It would be sad to live in a vague mist, never seeing the horizon and the detail of things more than three feet away.
    I did read that glasses have been found in Viking longboats – wonder if they came raping and pillaging wearing glasses…?

    Reply
  197. It was when I couldn’t read the sign on the bus to know which one to signal to stop for me to get on, that I gave in and started wearing my glasses. It would be sad to live in a vague mist, never seeing the horizon and the detail of things more than three feet away.
    I did read that glasses have been found in Viking longboats – wonder if they came raping and pillaging wearing glasses…?

    Reply
  198. It was when I couldn’t read the sign on the bus to know which one to signal to stop for me to get on, that I gave in and started wearing my glasses. It would be sad to live in a vague mist, never seeing the horizon and the detail of things more than three feet away.
    I did read that glasses have been found in Viking longboats – wonder if they came raping and pillaging wearing glasses…?

    Reply
  199. It was when I couldn’t read the sign on the bus to know which one to signal to stop for me to get on, that I gave in and started wearing my glasses. It would be sad to live in a vague mist, never seeing the horizon and the detail of things more than three feet away.
    I did read that glasses have been found in Viking longboats – wonder if they came raping and pillaging wearing glasses…?

    Reply
  200. It was when I couldn’t read the sign on the bus to know which one to signal to stop for me to get on, that I gave in and started wearing my glasses. It would be sad to live in a vague mist, never seeing the horizon and the detail of things more than three feet away.
    I did read that glasses have been found in Viking longboats – wonder if they came raping and pillaging wearing glasses…?

    Reply
  201. I’ve worn glasses to see farther than 8″ from me since I was four. I could never explain to anyone what I actually saw until Alfred Hitchcock used the ‘soft focus’ lens in one of his episodes. I thought, “Hey! That’s me!”
    I had lasik surgery about 10 years ago. It was the first time I’d seen the alarm clock in the morning without having to reach for my glasses! I was already wearing progressive lenses at the time and had the option to have the surgery for either far vision, reading or one eye for each. I already have enough trouble staying on my feet so I opted for the far vision correction and continued to wear reading glasses.
    What they fail to tell you though is that your eyes will still age naturally and so, about six years after the surgery, I ended up back in glasses and yes, the progressive lenses. I couldn’t have any more corrections because my astigmatism was so bad prior to the surgery that to correct it, they thinned my cornea to almost nothing.
    The good thing about the surgery that lingers though is, because they thinned my cornea so much, I can wear contact lenses which I haven’t been able to wear for 20 years!
    Hey! I have to look on the bright side, yes?
    So,as long as I can still read, that’s all I care about.

    Reply
  202. I’ve worn glasses to see farther than 8″ from me since I was four. I could never explain to anyone what I actually saw until Alfred Hitchcock used the ‘soft focus’ lens in one of his episodes. I thought, “Hey! That’s me!”
    I had lasik surgery about 10 years ago. It was the first time I’d seen the alarm clock in the morning without having to reach for my glasses! I was already wearing progressive lenses at the time and had the option to have the surgery for either far vision, reading or one eye for each. I already have enough trouble staying on my feet so I opted for the far vision correction and continued to wear reading glasses.
    What they fail to tell you though is that your eyes will still age naturally and so, about six years after the surgery, I ended up back in glasses and yes, the progressive lenses. I couldn’t have any more corrections because my astigmatism was so bad prior to the surgery that to correct it, they thinned my cornea to almost nothing.
    The good thing about the surgery that lingers though is, because they thinned my cornea so much, I can wear contact lenses which I haven’t been able to wear for 20 years!
    Hey! I have to look on the bright side, yes?
    So,as long as I can still read, that’s all I care about.

    Reply
  203. I’ve worn glasses to see farther than 8″ from me since I was four. I could never explain to anyone what I actually saw until Alfred Hitchcock used the ‘soft focus’ lens in one of his episodes. I thought, “Hey! That’s me!”
    I had lasik surgery about 10 years ago. It was the first time I’d seen the alarm clock in the morning without having to reach for my glasses! I was already wearing progressive lenses at the time and had the option to have the surgery for either far vision, reading or one eye for each. I already have enough trouble staying on my feet so I opted for the far vision correction and continued to wear reading glasses.
    What they fail to tell you though is that your eyes will still age naturally and so, about six years after the surgery, I ended up back in glasses and yes, the progressive lenses. I couldn’t have any more corrections because my astigmatism was so bad prior to the surgery that to correct it, they thinned my cornea to almost nothing.
    The good thing about the surgery that lingers though is, because they thinned my cornea so much, I can wear contact lenses which I haven’t been able to wear for 20 years!
    Hey! I have to look on the bright side, yes?
    So,as long as I can still read, that’s all I care about.

    Reply
  204. I’ve worn glasses to see farther than 8″ from me since I was four. I could never explain to anyone what I actually saw until Alfred Hitchcock used the ‘soft focus’ lens in one of his episodes. I thought, “Hey! That’s me!”
    I had lasik surgery about 10 years ago. It was the first time I’d seen the alarm clock in the morning without having to reach for my glasses! I was already wearing progressive lenses at the time and had the option to have the surgery for either far vision, reading or one eye for each. I already have enough trouble staying on my feet so I opted for the far vision correction and continued to wear reading glasses.
    What they fail to tell you though is that your eyes will still age naturally and so, about six years after the surgery, I ended up back in glasses and yes, the progressive lenses. I couldn’t have any more corrections because my astigmatism was so bad prior to the surgery that to correct it, they thinned my cornea to almost nothing.
    The good thing about the surgery that lingers though is, because they thinned my cornea so much, I can wear contact lenses which I haven’t been able to wear for 20 years!
    Hey! I have to look on the bright side, yes?
    So,as long as I can still read, that’s all I care about.

    Reply
  205. I’ve worn glasses to see farther than 8″ from me since I was four. I could never explain to anyone what I actually saw until Alfred Hitchcock used the ‘soft focus’ lens in one of his episodes. I thought, “Hey! That’s me!”
    I had lasik surgery about 10 years ago. It was the first time I’d seen the alarm clock in the morning without having to reach for my glasses! I was already wearing progressive lenses at the time and had the option to have the surgery for either far vision, reading or one eye for each. I already have enough trouble staying on my feet so I opted for the far vision correction and continued to wear reading glasses.
    What they fail to tell you though is that your eyes will still age naturally and so, about six years after the surgery, I ended up back in glasses and yes, the progressive lenses. I couldn’t have any more corrections because my astigmatism was so bad prior to the surgery that to correct it, they thinned my cornea to almost nothing.
    The good thing about the surgery that lingers though is, because they thinned my cornea so much, I can wear contact lenses which I haven’t been able to wear for 20 years!
    Hey! I have to look on the bright side, yes?
    So,as long as I can still read, that’s all I care about.

    Reply
  206. Delightful post and very inSIGHTful! Blame it on Cara! She made me do it.
    I’ve only started wearing glasses in the last few years. Now I cannot read without them. That would be my greatest loss, not being able to read OR write! Shudder! And not being able to see all of the things I want to see when I finally get to return to England.
    Technically I only need them to read or to drive at night. However, the girls in the bakery are always bugging me to wear them at work because I constantly have to ask them to read the small print on something. However, I work at Walmart and some of those customers look far better when I DON’T wear glasses!

    Reply
  207. Delightful post and very inSIGHTful! Blame it on Cara! She made me do it.
    I’ve only started wearing glasses in the last few years. Now I cannot read without them. That would be my greatest loss, not being able to read OR write! Shudder! And not being able to see all of the things I want to see when I finally get to return to England.
    Technically I only need them to read or to drive at night. However, the girls in the bakery are always bugging me to wear them at work because I constantly have to ask them to read the small print on something. However, I work at Walmart and some of those customers look far better when I DON’T wear glasses!

    Reply
  208. Delightful post and very inSIGHTful! Blame it on Cara! She made me do it.
    I’ve only started wearing glasses in the last few years. Now I cannot read without them. That would be my greatest loss, not being able to read OR write! Shudder! And not being able to see all of the things I want to see when I finally get to return to England.
    Technically I only need them to read or to drive at night. However, the girls in the bakery are always bugging me to wear them at work because I constantly have to ask them to read the small print on something. However, I work at Walmart and some of those customers look far better when I DON’T wear glasses!

    Reply
  209. Delightful post and very inSIGHTful! Blame it on Cara! She made me do it.
    I’ve only started wearing glasses in the last few years. Now I cannot read without them. That would be my greatest loss, not being able to read OR write! Shudder! And not being able to see all of the things I want to see when I finally get to return to England.
    Technically I only need them to read or to drive at night. However, the girls in the bakery are always bugging me to wear them at work because I constantly have to ask them to read the small print on something. However, I work at Walmart and some of those customers look far better when I DON’T wear glasses!

    Reply
  210. Delightful post and very inSIGHTful! Blame it on Cara! She made me do it.
    I’ve only started wearing glasses in the last few years. Now I cannot read without them. That would be my greatest loss, not being able to read OR write! Shudder! And not being able to see all of the things I want to see when I finally get to return to England.
    Technically I only need them to read or to drive at night. However, the girls in the bakery are always bugging me to wear them at work because I constantly have to ask them to read the small print on something. However, I work at Walmart and some of those customers look far better when I DON’T wear glasses!

    Reply
  211. All this improvement in eyeglass technology meant people could pay intelligent attention to where they were going. This lasted till the invention of the ipod.
    BEST. BURN. EVER!
    I would miss being able to drive. *LOL* And watching TV without being 2 inches from the TV. *LOL*

    Reply
  212. All this improvement in eyeglass technology meant people could pay intelligent attention to where they were going. This lasted till the invention of the ipod.
    BEST. BURN. EVER!
    I would miss being able to drive. *LOL* And watching TV without being 2 inches from the TV. *LOL*

    Reply
  213. All this improvement in eyeglass technology meant people could pay intelligent attention to where they were going. This lasted till the invention of the ipod.
    BEST. BURN. EVER!
    I would miss being able to drive. *LOL* And watching TV without being 2 inches from the TV. *LOL*

    Reply
  214. All this improvement in eyeglass technology meant people could pay intelligent attention to where they were going. This lasted till the invention of the ipod.
    BEST. BURN. EVER!
    I would miss being able to drive. *LOL* And watching TV without being 2 inches from the TV. *LOL*

    Reply
  215. All this improvement in eyeglass technology meant people could pay intelligent attention to where they were going. This lasted till the invention of the ipod.
    BEST. BURN. EVER!
    I would miss being able to drive. *LOL* And watching TV without being 2 inches from the TV. *LOL*

    Reply
  216. Most of your responses mention reading and I certainly agree with that.
    However, I find it odd that all these responses were sent to you by computers (or similar technology) and yet no one else has mentioned using the computer (for reading blogs and blogging; for games, for news, for genealogy, for ebooks?); I am on the computer for an average of 6 hours a day or more (but not 6 hours in one sitting).

    Reply
  217. Most of your responses mention reading and I certainly agree with that.
    However, I find it odd that all these responses were sent to you by computers (or similar technology) and yet no one else has mentioned using the computer (for reading blogs and blogging; for games, for news, for genealogy, for ebooks?); I am on the computer for an average of 6 hours a day or more (but not 6 hours in one sitting).

    Reply
  218. Most of your responses mention reading and I certainly agree with that.
    However, I find it odd that all these responses were sent to you by computers (or similar technology) and yet no one else has mentioned using the computer (for reading blogs and blogging; for games, for news, for genealogy, for ebooks?); I am on the computer for an average of 6 hours a day or more (but not 6 hours in one sitting).

    Reply
  219. Most of your responses mention reading and I certainly agree with that.
    However, I find it odd that all these responses were sent to you by computers (or similar technology) and yet no one else has mentioned using the computer (for reading blogs and blogging; for games, for news, for genealogy, for ebooks?); I am on the computer for an average of 6 hours a day or more (but not 6 hours in one sitting).

    Reply
  220. Most of your responses mention reading and I certainly agree with that.
    However, I find it odd that all these responses were sent to you by computers (or similar technology) and yet no one else has mentioned using the computer (for reading blogs and blogging; for games, for news, for genealogy, for ebooks?); I am on the computer for an average of 6 hours a day or more (but not 6 hours in one sitting).

    Reply
  221. Theo, that was a very interesting post; I rarely see anything about how lasik is working out 5 – 10 years down the line. You have convinced me that the game isn’t worth the candle.
    I can’t stand progressive lenses so have opted for separate driving and computer glasses. Fortunately I can see quite well at close distance so I have no problem reading paperbacks or ebooks. But for TV or a big book I have to resort to eyeglasses and it’s really annoying, even as comfortable as they can make glasses now. My distance lenses used to be coke bottle glass and so heavy they used to leave scars next to my nose; the modern ones I have are featherlight.
    We are so lucky to live now. Much as I would like to experience the real regency, I know I would not be able to handle the physical demands – poor light, no glasses, no painkillers except alcohol and laudanum, cold, isolation by distance from the larger world, male rule — and the scarcity of good books.
    Pass 🙂

    Reply
  222. Theo, that was a very interesting post; I rarely see anything about how lasik is working out 5 – 10 years down the line. You have convinced me that the game isn’t worth the candle.
    I can’t stand progressive lenses so have opted for separate driving and computer glasses. Fortunately I can see quite well at close distance so I have no problem reading paperbacks or ebooks. But for TV or a big book I have to resort to eyeglasses and it’s really annoying, even as comfortable as they can make glasses now. My distance lenses used to be coke bottle glass and so heavy they used to leave scars next to my nose; the modern ones I have are featherlight.
    We are so lucky to live now. Much as I would like to experience the real regency, I know I would not be able to handle the physical demands – poor light, no glasses, no painkillers except alcohol and laudanum, cold, isolation by distance from the larger world, male rule — and the scarcity of good books.
    Pass 🙂

    Reply
  223. Theo, that was a very interesting post; I rarely see anything about how lasik is working out 5 – 10 years down the line. You have convinced me that the game isn’t worth the candle.
    I can’t stand progressive lenses so have opted for separate driving and computer glasses. Fortunately I can see quite well at close distance so I have no problem reading paperbacks or ebooks. But for TV or a big book I have to resort to eyeglasses and it’s really annoying, even as comfortable as they can make glasses now. My distance lenses used to be coke bottle glass and so heavy they used to leave scars next to my nose; the modern ones I have are featherlight.
    We are so lucky to live now. Much as I would like to experience the real regency, I know I would not be able to handle the physical demands – poor light, no glasses, no painkillers except alcohol and laudanum, cold, isolation by distance from the larger world, male rule — and the scarcity of good books.
    Pass 🙂

    Reply
  224. Theo, that was a very interesting post; I rarely see anything about how lasik is working out 5 – 10 years down the line. You have convinced me that the game isn’t worth the candle.
    I can’t stand progressive lenses so have opted for separate driving and computer glasses. Fortunately I can see quite well at close distance so I have no problem reading paperbacks or ebooks. But for TV or a big book I have to resort to eyeglasses and it’s really annoying, even as comfortable as they can make glasses now. My distance lenses used to be coke bottle glass and so heavy they used to leave scars next to my nose; the modern ones I have are featherlight.
    We are so lucky to live now. Much as I would like to experience the real regency, I know I would not be able to handle the physical demands – poor light, no glasses, no painkillers except alcohol and laudanum, cold, isolation by distance from the larger world, male rule — and the scarcity of good books.
    Pass 🙂

    Reply
  225. Theo, that was a very interesting post; I rarely see anything about how lasik is working out 5 – 10 years down the line. You have convinced me that the game isn’t worth the candle.
    I can’t stand progressive lenses so have opted for separate driving and computer glasses. Fortunately I can see quite well at close distance so I have no problem reading paperbacks or ebooks. But for TV or a big book I have to resort to eyeglasses and it’s really annoying, even as comfortable as they can make glasses now. My distance lenses used to be coke bottle glass and so heavy they used to leave scars next to my nose; the modern ones I have are featherlight.
    We are so lucky to live now. Much as I would like to experience the real regency, I know I would not be able to handle the physical demands – poor light, no glasses, no painkillers except alcohol and laudanum, cold, isolation by distance from the larger world, male rule — and the scarcity of good books.
    Pass 🙂

    Reply
  226. Wonderful post, Jo! I looked back into the history of glasses when I thought my MC Rosa wore spectacles (in 1492). The thing is, despite all the portraits and so on, even 100 years on from their invention, it’s hard to find ordinary people wearing them, and certainly not every day.
    I wonder what would have happened to myopic me, had I lived back then?

    Reply
  227. Wonderful post, Jo! I looked back into the history of glasses when I thought my MC Rosa wore spectacles (in 1492). The thing is, despite all the portraits and so on, even 100 years on from their invention, it’s hard to find ordinary people wearing them, and certainly not every day.
    I wonder what would have happened to myopic me, had I lived back then?

    Reply
  228. Wonderful post, Jo! I looked back into the history of glasses when I thought my MC Rosa wore spectacles (in 1492). The thing is, despite all the portraits and so on, even 100 years on from their invention, it’s hard to find ordinary people wearing them, and certainly not every day.
    I wonder what would have happened to myopic me, had I lived back then?

    Reply
  229. Wonderful post, Jo! I looked back into the history of glasses when I thought my MC Rosa wore spectacles (in 1492). The thing is, despite all the portraits and so on, even 100 years on from their invention, it’s hard to find ordinary people wearing them, and certainly not every day.
    I wonder what would have happened to myopic me, had I lived back then?

    Reply
  230. Wonderful post, Jo! I looked back into the history of glasses when I thought my MC Rosa wore spectacles (in 1492). The thing is, despite all the portraits and so on, even 100 years on from their invention, it’s hard to find ordinary people wearing them, and certainly not every day.
    I wonder what would have happened to myopic me, had I lived back then?

    Reply
  231. Janice,
    I was trying to peel potatoes the day after I had the lasik, I was wearing clear protective plastic covers taped to my face which you have to wear for a couple days, and I couldn’t see the potatoes because I couldn’t get my reading glasses over the lenses and I kept thinking, oh geez louise! What did I do?
    I managed to hang in there for a few days until it got better and for a long time, it was wonderful, but no. Eventually, they change. Where I went offers touch ups for free for the first three years, but it’s the fifth year or so when you really need to start that and in my case, there wasn’t enough left to touch up anyway.
    So…that said, think long and hard to all of you who consider it before you do it. Not everyone will have problems down the road, but you don’t know who will and who won’t.
    I think I’d have been okay if I’d lived back ‘then’ though. I mean, if you’ve never had glasses and your eyes just get a little worse all the time, I don’t think you tend to notice as much and just learn to live with it for the most part.

    Reply
  232. Janice,
    I was trying to peel potatoes the day after I had the lasik, I was wearing clear protective plastic covers taped to my face which you have to wear for a couple days, and I couldn’t see the potatoes because I couldn’t get my reading glasses over the lenses and I kept thinking, oh geez louise! What did I do?
    I managed to hang in there for a few days until it got better and for a long time, it was wonderful, but no. Eventually, they change. Where I went offers touch ups for free for the first three years, but it’s the fifth year or so when you really need to start that and in my case, there wasn’t enough left to touch up anyway.
    So…that said, think long and hard to all of you who consider it before you do it. Not everyone will have problems down the road, but you don’t know who will and who won’t.
    I think I’d have been okay if I’d lived back ‘then’ though. I mean, if you’ve never had glasses and your eyes just get a little worse all the time, I don’t think you tend to notice as much and just learn to live with it for the most part.

    Reply
  233. Janice,
    I was trying to peel potatoes the day after I had the lasik, I was wearing clear protective plastic covers taped to my face which you have to wear for a couple days, and I couldn’t see the potatoes because I couldn’t get my reading glasses over the lenses and I kept thinking, oh geez louise! What did I do?
    I managed to hang in there for a few days until it got better and for a long time, it was wonderful, but no. Eventually, they change. Where I went offers touch ups for free for the first three years, but it’s the fifth year or so when you really need to start that and in my case, there wasn’t enough left to touch up anyway.
    So…that said, think long and hard to all of you who consider it before you do it. Not everyone will have problems down the road, but you don’t know who will and who won’t.
    I think I’d have been okay if I’d lived back ‘then’ though. I mean, if you’ve never had glasses and your eyes just get a little worse all the time, I don’t think you tend to notice as much and just learn to live with it for the most part.

    Reply
  234. Janice,
    I was trying to peel potatoes the day after I had the lasik, I was wearing clear protective plastic covers taped to my face which you have to wear for a couple days, and I couldn’t see the potatoes because I couldn’t get my reading glasses over the lenses and I kept thinking, oh geez louise! What did I do?
    I managed to hang in there for a few days until it got better and for a long time, it was wonderful, but no. Eventually, they change. Where I went offers touch ups for free for the first three years, but it’s the fifth year or so when you really need to start that and in my case, there wasn’t enough left to touch up anyway.
    So…that said, think long and hard to all of you who consider it before you do it. Not everyone will have problems down the road, but you don’t know who will and who won’t.
    I think I’d have been okay if I’d lived back ‘then’ though. I mean, if you’ve never had glasses and your eyes just get a little worse all the time, I don’t think you tend to notice as much and just learn to live with it for the most part.

    Reply
  235. Janice,
    I was trying to peel potatoes the day after I had the lasik, I was wearing clear protective plastic covers taped to my face which you have to wear for a couple days, and I couldn’t see the potatoes because I couldn’t get my reading glasses over the lenses and I kept thinking, oh geez louise! What did I do?
    I managed to hang in there for a few days until it got better and for a long time, it was wonderful, but no. Eventually, they change. Where I went offers touch ups for free for the first three years, but it’s the fifth year or so when you really need to start that and in my case, there wasn’t enough left to touch up anyway.
    So…that said, think long and hard to all of you who consider it before you do it. Not everyone will have problems down the road, but you don’t know who will and who won’t.
    I think I’d have been okay if I’d lived back ‘then’ though. I mean, if you’ve never had glasses and your eyes just get a little worse all the time, I don’t think you tend to notice as much and just learn to live with it for the most part.

    Reply
  236. Hi Deniz —
    Right. So right. I think you have to be in C17, at least, before common folk started wearing glasses. And even then, it’s the substantial common folks — people who lived in substantial houses and made a living at a trade.
    I would liken it to computers. You could count on one hand the folks who had access to computing power in 1954, even though computers existed. It’d be like your 1492 heroine.
    In 2012, everybody in the first world has a computer. They carry more computing power in their pocket than powered the moon landing. That would be like the Regency period, for glasses. It’d be perfectly possible for the ordinary bloke to buy them.
    I think, prior to glasses, folks were well aware that some people couldn’t see very well. The hunter who could see all the seven sisters of the Pleiades was acknowledged as something special. The sailor who could spent a lot of time in the crows nest.
    If you hadn’t been able to see distant things, they just wouldn’t have sent you out to stone the crows. You would have been known far and wide for your skill at embroidery.
    Did you know the word myopic dates to the Regency?

    Reply
  237. Hi Deniz —
    Right. So right. I think you have to be in C17, at least, before common folk started wearing glasses. And even then, it’s the substantial common folks — people who lived in substantial houses and made a living at a trade.
    I would liken it to computers. You could count on one hand the folks who had access to computing power in 1954, even though computers existed. It’d be like your 1492 heroine.
    In 2012, everybody in the first world has a computer. They carry more computing power in their pocket than powered the moon landing. That would be like the Regency period, for glasses. It’d be perfectly possible for the ordinary bloke to buy them.
    I think, prior to glasses, folks were well aware that some people couldn’t see very well. The hunter who could see all the seven sisters of the Pleiades was acknowledged as something special. The sailor who could spent a lot of time in the crows nest.
    If you hadn’t been able to see distant things, they just wouldn’t have sent you out to stone the crows. You would have been known far and wide for your skill at embroidery.
    Did you know the word myopic dates to the Regency?

    Reply
  238. Hi Deniz —
    Right. So right. I think you have to be in C17, at least, before common folk started wearing glasses. And even then, it’s the substantial common folks — people who lived in substantial houses and made a living at a trade.
    I would liken it to computers. You could count on one hand the folks who had access to computing power in 1954, even though computers existed. It’d be like your 1492 heroine.
    In 2012, everybody in the first world has a computer. They carry more computing power in their pocket than powered the moon landing. That would be like the Regency period, for glasses. It’d be perfectly possible for the ordinary bloke to buy them.
    I think, prior to glasses, folks were well aware that some people couldn’t see very well. The hunter who could see all the seven sisters of the Pleiades was acknowledged as something special. The sailor who could spent a lot of time in the crows nest.
    If you hadn’t been able to see distant things, they just wouldn’t have sent you out to stone the crows. You would have been known far and wide for your skill at embroidery.
    Did you know the word myopic dates to the Regency?

    Reply
  239. Hi Deniz —
    Right. So right. I think you have to be in C17, at least, before common folk started wearing glasses. And even then, it’s the substantial common folks — people who lived in substantial houses and made a living at a trade.
    I would liken it to computers. You could count on one hand the folks who had access to computing power in 1954, even though computers existed. It’d be like your 1492 heroine.
    In 2012, everybody in the first world has a computer. They carry more computing power in their pocket than powered the moon landing. That would be like the Regency period, for glasses. It’d be perfectly possible for the ordinary bloke to buy them.
    I think, prior to glasses, folks were well aware that some people couldn’t see very well. The hunter who could see all the seven sisters of the Pleiades was acknowledged as something special. The sailor who could spent a lot of time in the crows nest.
    If you hadn’t been able to see distant things, they just wouldn’t have sent you out to stone the crows. You would have been known far and wide for your skill at embroidery.
    Did you know the word myopic dates to the Regency?

    Reply
  240. Hi Deniz —
    Right. So right. I think you have to be in C17, at least, before common folk started wearing glasses. And even then, it’s the substantial common folks — people who lived in substantial houses and made a living at a trade.
    I would liken it to computers. You could count on one hand the folks who had access to computing power in 1954, even though computers existed. It’d be like your 1492 heroine.
    In 2012, everybody in the first world has a computer. They carry more computing power in their pocket than powered the moon landing. That would be like the Regency period, for glasses. It’d be perfectly possible for the ordinary bloke to buy them.
    I think, prior to glasses, folks were well aware that some people couldn’t see very well. The hunter who could see all the seven sisters of the Pleiades was acknowledged as something special. The sailor who could spent a lot of time in the crows nest.
    If you hadn’t been able to see distant things, they just wouldn’t have sent you out to stone the crows. You would have been known far and wide for your skill at embroidery.
    Did you know the word myopic dates to the Regency?

    Reply
  241. Hi Hellion —
    Are you the first person to mention TV? How right you are. And movies! Folks would be cut off from all the new visuals.
    One thing I love about text sizing is that I can pull my glasses off and still work with the computer. And I set my kindle to HUGE text and am very happy with it.
    Ah, technology.

    Reply
  242. Hi Hellion —
    Are you the first person to mention TV? How right you are. And movies! Folks would be cut off from all the new visuals.
    One thing I love about text sizing is that I can pull my glasses off and still work with the computer. And I set my kindle to HUGE text and am very happy with it.
    Ah, technology.

    Reply
  243. Hi Hellion —
    Are you the first person to mention TV? How right you are. And movies! Folks would be cut off from all the new visuals.
    One thing I love about text sizing is that I can pull my glasses off and still work with the computer. And I set my kindle to HUGE text and am very happy with it.
    Ah, technology.

    Reply
  244. Hi Hellion —
    Are you the first person to mention TV? How right you are. And movies! Folks would be cut off from all the new visuals.
    One thing I love about text sizing is that I can pull my glasses off and still work with the computer. And I set my kindle to HUGE text and am very happy with it.
    Ah, technology.

    Reply
  245. Hi Hellion —
    Are you the first person to mention TV? How right you are. And movies! Folks would be cut off from all the new visuals.
    One thing I love about text sizing is that I can pull my glasses off and still work with the computer. And I set my kindle to HUGE text and am very happy with it.
    Ah, technology.

    Reply
  246. Hi Chey and Theresa and Cate —
    Three excellent points.
    I especially like the thought of not really seeing people’s faces.
    Perhaps the hero sees himself as homely and resists the idea of the heroine getting glasses. He’s afraid that when she sees him, she’ll be disappointed. (Remember the Thing in Marvel Comics and how he married a blind sculptoress who saw him as strong and beautiful?)
    Then, of course, she sneaks out and gets glasses and thinks he’s just wonderful. She comes to her clear sight without preconceptions about human beauty.

    Reply
  247. Hi Chey and Theresa and Cate —
    Three excellent points.
    I especially like the thought of not really seeing people’s faces.
    Perhaps the hero sees himself as homely and resists the idea of the heroine getting glasses. He’s afraid that when she sees him, she’ll be disappointed. (Remember the Thing in Marvel Comics and how he married a blind sculptoress who saw him as strong and beautiful?)
    Then, of course, she sneaks out and gets glasses and thinks he’s just wonderful. She comes to her clear sight without preconceptions about human beauty.

    Reply
  248. Hi Chey and Theresa and Cate —
    Three excellent points.
    I especially like the thought of not really seeing people’s faces.
    Perhaps the hero sees himself as homely and resists the idea of the heroine getting glasses. He’s afraid that when she sees him, she’ll be disappointed. (Remember the Thing in Marvel Comics and how he married a blind sculptoress who saw him as strong and beautiful?)
    Then, of course, she sneaks out and gets glasses and thinks he’s just wonderful. She comes to her clear sight without preconceptions about human beauty.

    Reply
  249. Hi Chey and Theresa and Cate —
    Three excellent points.
    I especially like the thought of not really seeing people’s faces.
    Perhaps the hero sees himself as homely and resists the idea of the heroine getting glasses. He’s afraid that when she sees him, she’ll be disappointed. (Remember the Thing in Marvel Comics and how he married a blind sculptoress who saw him as strong and beautiful?)
    Then, of course, she sneaks out and gets glasses and thinks he’s just wonderful. She comes to her clear sight without preconceptions about human beauty.

    Reply
  250. Hi Chey and Theresa and Cate —
    Three excellent points.
    I especially like the thought of not really seeing people’s faces.
    Perhaps the hero sees himself as homely and resists the idea of the heroine getting glasses. He’s afraid that when she sees him, she’ll be disappointed. (Remember the Thing in Marvel Comics and how he married a blind sculptoress who saw him as strong and beautiful?)
    Then, of course, she sneaks out and gets glasses and thinks he’s just wonderful. She comes to her clear sight without preconceptions about human beauty.

    Reply
  251. Hi Beth —
    I’m going to admit that my ‘visuals’ of Vikings do not include spectacles perched on their noses.
    There you go — a failure of imagination.

    Reply
  252. Hi Beth —
    I’m going to admit that my ‘visuals’ of Vikings do not include spectacles perched on their noses.
    There you go — a failure of imagination.

    Reply
  253. Hi Beth —
    I’m going to admit that my ‘visuals’ of Vikings do not include spectacles perched on their noses.
    There you go — a failure of imagination.

    Reply
  254. Hi Beth —
    I’m going to admit that my ‘visuals’ of Vikings do not include spectacles perched on their noses.
    There you go — a failure of imagination.

    Reply
  255. Hi Beth —
    I’m going to admit that my ‘visuals’ of Vikings do not include spectacles perched on their noses.
    There you go — a failure of imagination.

    Reply
  256. Hi Sue —
    If I had to choose between reading only print books and reading only e-texts, I would still choose print books.
    The tide is changing on this. The tide is changing.
    I love the current generation of electronic reads because I can adjust text size. I like the text reading features too. So useful.

    Reply
  257. Hi Sue —
    If I had to choose between reading only print books and reading only e-texts, I would still choose print books.
    The tide is changing on this. The tide is changing.
    I love the current generation of electronic reads because I can adjust text size. I like the text reading features too. So useful.

    Reply
  258. Hi Sue —
    If I had to choose between reading only print books and reading only e-texts, I would still choose print books.
    The tide is changing on this. The tide is changing.
    I love the current generation of electronic reads because I can adjust text size. I like the text reading features too. So useful.

    Reply
  259. Hi Sue —
    If I had to choose between reading only print books and reading only e-texts, I would still choose print books.
    The tide is changing on this. The tide is changing.
    I love the current generation of electronic reads because I can adjust text size. I like the text reading features too. So useful.

    Reply
  260. Hi Sue —
    If I had to choose between reading only print books and reading only e-texts, I would still choose print books.
    The tide is changing on this. The tide is changing.
    I love the current generation of electronic reads because I can adjust text size. I like the text reading features too. So useful.

    Reply
  261. Hi Louisa —
    Ouch. Look, another visual pun. I didn’t see that one coming.
    Looking at historical times . . . I think there’d be a psychological difference between people who saw their surroundings and the people they met every day in sharp focus and people who lived in a world of soft colorful blur.

    Reply
  262. Hi Louisa —
    Ouch. Look, another visual pun. I didn’t see that one coming.
    Looking at historical times . . . I think there’d be a psychological difference between people who saw their surroundings and the people they met every day in sharp focus and people who lived in a world of soft colorful blur.

    Reply
  263. Hi Louisa —
    Ouch. Look, another visual pun. I didn’t see that one coming.
    Looking at historical times . . . I think there’d be a psychological difference between people who saw their surroundings and the people they met every day in sharp focus and people who lived in a world of soft colorful blur.

    Reply
  264. Hi Louisa —
    Ouch. Look, another visual pun. I didn’t see that one coming.
    Looking at historical times . . . I think there’d be a psychological difference between people who saw their surroundings and the people they met every day in sharp focus and people who lived in a world of soft colorful blur.

    Reply
  265. Hi Louisa —
    Ouch. Look, another visual pun. I didn’t see that one coming.
    Looking at historical times . . . I think there’d be a psychological difference between people who saw their surroundings and the people they met every day in sharp focus and people who lived in a world of soft colorful blur.

    Reply
  266. Joanna, I have my kindle set on semi-huge print so I can push the button faster 🙂
    Now working my way through The Romance of the Forest — our regency heroines must have had enormous patience. Adeline wanders around the forest musing upon bad nature poetry without a qualm for her personal safety, while all sorts of strange, mysterious or threatening men are running around loose. This is carrying innocent purity of thought to levels of silliness I don’t meet with in more modern writing 🙂
    But it’s free on kindle and since Harriet Smith recommended it, I thought I should check it out.

    Reply
  267. Joanna, I have my kindle set on semi-huge print so I can push the button faster 🙂
    Now working my way through The Romance of the Forest — our regency heroines must have had enormous patience. Adeline wanders around the forest musing upon bad nature poetry without a qualm for her personal safety, while all sorts of strange, mysterious or threatening men are running around loose. This is carrying innocent purity of thought to levels of silliness I don’t meet with in more modern writing 🙂
    But it’s free on kindle and since Harriet Smith recommended it, I thought I should check it out.

    Reply
  268. Joanna, I have my kindle set on semi-huge print so I can push the button faster 🙂
    Now working my way through The Romance of the Forest — our regency heroines must have had enormous patience. Adeline wanders around the forest musing upon bad nature poetry without a qualm for her personal safety, while all sorts of strange, mysterious or threatening men are running around loose. This is carrying innocent purity of thought to levels of silliness I don’t meet with in more modern writing 🙂
    But it’s free on kindle and since Harriet Smith recommended it, I thought I should check it out.

    Reply
  269. Joanna, I have my kindle set on semi-huge print so I can push the button faster 🙂
    Now working my way through The Romance of the Forest — our regency heroines must have had enormous patience. Adeline wanders around the forest musing upon bad nature poetry without a qualm for her personal safety, while all sorts of strange, mysterious or threatening men are running around loose. This is carrying innocent purity of thought to levels of silliness I don’t meet with in more modern writing 🙂
    But it’s free on kindle and since Harriet Smith recommended it, I thought I should check it out.

    Reply
  270. Joanna, I have my kindle set on semi-huge print so I can push the button faster 🙂
    Now working my way through The Romance of the Forest — our regency heroines must have had enormous patience. Adeline wanders around the forest musing upon bad nature poetry without a qualm for her personal safety, while all sorts of strange, mysterious or threatening men are running around loose. This is carrying innocent purity of thought to levels of silliness I don’t meet with in more modern writing 🙂
    But it’s free on kindle and since Harriet Smith recommended it, I thought I should check it out.

    Reply
  271. Hi Janice —
    I wonder if all those folks who fought for freedom of the press and universal literacy, who worked so hard to create the technology that lets us have e-readers would approve of what we DO with all this freedom and dowop technology. *g*

    Reply
  272. Hi Janice —
    I wonder if all those folks who fought for freedom of the press and universal literacy, who worked so hard to create the technology that lets us have e-readers would approve of what we DO with all this freedom and dowop technology. *g*

    Reply
  273. Hi Janice —
    I wonder if all those folks who fought for freedom of the press and universal literacy, who worked so hard to create the technology that lets us have e-readers would approve of what we DO with all this freedom and dowop technology. *g*

    Reply
  274. Hi Janice —
    I wonder if all those folks who fought for freedom of the press and universal literacy, who worked so hard to create the technology that lets us have e-readers would approve of what we DO with all this freedom and dowop technology. *g*

    Reply
  275. Hi Janice —
    I wonder if all those folks who fought for freedom of the press and universal literacy, who worked so hard to create the technology that lets us have e-readers would approve of what we DO with all this freedom and dowop technology. *g*

    Reply

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