Regency Bling

Edme-frantois-joseph_bochet-ingres 1811a

Hi.  Joanna here.

The Regency gentleman's code might be summed up as, "no perfumes, exquisitely fine linen and plenty of it, country washing . . ."
and bling. 

I went in search of Regency bling, hoping for a gold ring in the ear of at least some Regency fops. 
Alas, not so much. 

The robust and adventurous Tudors wore earrings.  The courtier Buckingham sported major rubies.  That man of action, Sir Walter Raleigh, a gold hoop.  A half century later, Charles I wore a great pearl in his ear when he mounted the block to face the axe. 
By the Eighteenth Century, however, earrings had become the province of buccaneers, exotic foreigners, and the most foppish of macaronis.   

Duc dorleans c 1790Still, we have this 1790 print of the Duc d'Orléans wearing an earring.  Not long afterward, of course, he, too, got his head chopped off. 

Perhaps Regency gentlemen recognized a trend.

And here's Joachim Murat, complete with a manly gold earring.  He was Marshall of France under Napoleon. Joacim murat

He was executed by firing squad.  His last words are reported to have been,
« Soldats ! Faites votre devoir ! Droit au cœur mais épargnez le visage. Feu ! »
("Soldiers! Do your duty! Straight to the heart but avoid the face. Fire!")
Really, the French have all the good lines.

I'd hoped to
Cravat pins c19 british museum bag some cravat pins on my bling hunt.  Maybe sparkly diamond ones. 
"Ohhhh," said I.  "Shiny."
But again . . . not so much.     

A cravat pin is a metal needle, about 8 cm long, (3 inches), with a decorative  
Diamond tie pin2 finial on top.  It pierces the fabric of the cravat and sits there at the base of the neck, being decorative. 
This works better in some neckcloths than in others.  A Frenchman of the Old Regime or an English gentleman dressing for the Court of St. James might nestle a diamond stickpin into the lace at his throat.  Sherlock's Dr. Watson probably tacked down his ascot tie with something regimental in the way of a stickpin.

I don't see many cravat pins in Regency portraits.  Common sense argues that a stickpin would not be happy jabbed through those intricate, stiffly starched Regency cravats. 

So . . . not so many cravat pins in the era. 

Sleeve links encland early c18 gold and cryatal v and a crop
At least we have jeweled studs.  They travel in pairs.  Like this. 

Now, they did not use studs up and down the front of the shirt or at the collar.  There were darned few buttons on the shirt at all. Reverend Eli Forbes early c19 crop Mostly they had a couple quiet, shy ones that peeked out at the sleeves. 

Like this.

The fancy buttons slipped into buttonholes at the cuff, which is now
lace-free –  doubtless a relief to anyone who actually did anything with
his hands. 

They possess a
fugitive charm, these linked, jeweled buttons.  They're not  going to
show much.  A glimpse of gold now and then.  A flash of sapphire.

And speaking of buttons . . .  May I rant briefly? 

Regency shirts did not open all the way down the front with a line of buttons. Paul-Lemoyne by
ingres for website Regency heroes, be they ever so stalwart or inflamed by passion, cannot tear their shirt off their manly chest like they're opening an oyster.  They have to pull it off over their heads.
That's the way it is.

Back to bling.

So, where did the Regency gentleman cut loose, sartorially speaking?
Rings, watches and fobs.  I turn my attention to them.

FABRE, François-Xavier Portrait of Vittorio Alfieri 1793 etail Regency men can't compete with the Tudors in terms of man-rings.  Elizabethan portraits click and clank with finger jewels.  Regency hands look undressed by comparison. 
GAINSBOROUGH, Thomas _ Johann Christian Bach 1776 detail

But there's still a flock of Regency rings.

It's generally just the one ring.  It can be on either hand, on any finger.  Some are plain gold, though there's no indication these were wedding rings.  A few rings hold small, discreet jewels. 

By far the most common sort of ring is the signet ring. 

A signet ring is a seal.  What a signet ring does — what any kind of seal does — is stamp an image on some soft material that then dries to preserve the imprint.  Seals have been around since iron was the new cutting-edge technology in Babylon. 

The seal is signature and authentication and anti-counterfeit security feature all in one.  A seal says, "I was here," or "This is mine," or "He speaks in my name," or simply, "Be impressed.  Be very impressed."

Naturally, your Regency gentlemen wore one. 

Seal ring c16 v and a detailThe design of this signet ring would be cast in gold or cut into a semiprecious stone.  It might be an old family crest — this was a good way for the gentleman to show the world he has an old family — or the design might be a tad bit more recent and inventive. 
The signet ring is swank.  It's bragging, in an understated way.

But it's useful.  That signet ring gets pressed into the blob of hot wax that closes up a letter and makes it private.  We use glue.  They used a wax seal.  Same principle, but I think messing with wax  would be more fun.  Lang seal georgian 1 no permis

The gentleman would likely have a seal in his desk drawer.  
This would be a substantial object. It might even be a thing of beauty   

  "A guinea under seal" — remember all those Regency schoolboys who got one from their favorite uncle? — would be a gold guinea, set on the closure of the letter with hot wax dripped over it, to hide it.  The seal would be that signet ring pressed on top. 

I wonder though . . .   A gold guinea under George III was 24 mm in diameter — almost exactly the size of a US quarter.  Jane Austen, in Mansfield Park, speaks of sending "a half guinea under the seal."  At 20 mm, about the size of a US penny.  That sounds more doable.
Fause montreuSeal-Impression-1
The signet ring held its design in reverse.  A negative image, if you will.  See how it's done?  You wouldn't necessarily appreciate the artwork or recognize the  design of that ring till you looked at the wax imprint. 

The phantom 

The Phantom's ring, on the other hand, is a positive image that would leave a negative, and permanent, dent in the villain he slugged.  With all this comic book goodness for the taking, PhantomRing_wikcropiwhy do we not see more signet rings leaving their imprint on the jaws of Regency villains?

 

Which brings us to the fob.

We talk about fobbing somebody off.  It is not immediately obvious how this is related to watch fobs.

The word fob comes to us from two, possibly unrelated sources.  Going back to 1600 the word means a cheat or trick.  To fob somebody off is to attempt to pass off deceit or hand over inferior product.  Not long afterwards, fob came to mean a small pocket sewed into the breeches for carrying a watch or money or valuables.  Maybe it was considered a deceitful pocket?  Maybe that's why they called it a fob.

In any case, this same pocket — this fob in the waistband — is there for our Regency gentleman to put his watch in.  On this right side, generally.  Gold watch 2


Watches were a big deal.  Not just beautiful.  
Not just expensive.  

Not just  useful for telling the time — it's never just about
Gold watch moma telling the time, is it?  

They were there for the joy  of displaying them.
And aren't they beautiful objects?

WPantaloon-pocket-1809hat happens next is an example of the eons-long struggle between clothing designers who are righteously bound and determined that they will not put useful pockets into any sort of clothing and the ordinary bloke who has to — you  guessed it — put stuff into those bitty little pockets.  Watch pockets were large enough to hold your fingers up to about the second joint, or a watch, but were not large enough to hold fingers and a     watch.  So you couldn't reach in and extract said watch. 


Watch chain fob and key late c18 london v and a crop

Dealing with this idiocy in a typically pragmatic fashion, folks attached a chain or a ribbon to the watch and used that to pull the watch out of the fob pocket.  
They tucked the watch in the pocket and let the chain or ribbon hang out in the breeze where it was useful to pickpockets.  Then they hung stuff on the chain, giving in to what seems to be an irresistible temptation to humankind.  

Words creep around.  Fob started out meaning the pocket, began to mean the ribbon or chain that hung out of the pocket, and eventually fob meant the ornaments hanging on the end of the fob ribbon. 

What ornaments?  Oh, there's a long list of them.  Jewels, keys for winding the watch, (so practical,) pretty silver and gold charms, tassels.  And seals.  That's what hangs on the end of the fob chain or ribbon very commonly.  A seal.  Like signet rings, the dangling fob seal says, "This is who I am.  This is my coat of arms.  I write important letters at the drop of a hat.  I have a seal and I'm not afraid to use it."  

Copley 1783
charles_callis_western_detail 
ODEVAERE, Joseph-Denis crop Wedgewood 1790 seal
4 cm tall v and aPortrait_of_nicholas-pierre_tiolier picot 1817crop Watche chain with keey 1800 geneva v and a crop
 


Some of these fob ribbons are six, seven, eight, nine inches long.  Nine inches.  The longer ones must have slapped and twirled and jingled when the fops walked.  (Fop, in case you were wondering, is not related to the word fob.  It's a century older in the English language and comes from a Latin word for fool.) 


Chatelaine 1730 v and a

When I look at pictures of these elaborate multi-fobs, I'm reminded of the  chatelaine –  that useful object the lady of the house wore at her waist.  Here's one.  You can see how it hooked over the waistband.  This plethora of fobs the menfolk started toting around is a bit like that, but without the utility value.

One more interesting fob fact.  A couple decades before the
Cruquet historie2 de la mode francaise costumes de paris 1790 crop Regency,  fashionable gentlemen decided that if one watch was good, two would be twice as good.
They started wearing two watches and two sets of fobs.  (Maybe so they'd stop listing to one side?)  1787-Journal-des-Luxus cropped

Women took this up, doubtless as tit for tat, since men had swiped the chatelaine. 

For a few years all the ton, men and  women alike, were carrying double.

It's not amazing the American and French Revolutions broke out almost immediately.  The habit of carrying two watches — how often would they agree? — left everybody with a profound distrust of authority.

(stick pins and both gold watches are from The Met here; Chatelaine, Wedgewood fob, gold signet ring with bird, sleeve links, watch with chain and fobs, and watch chain with fobs are from the Victoria and Albert Museum here ; Phantom comic and ring are from wikipedia under cc attrib; casting of a watch fob is from the Museum of London here ; Georgian citrine seal is from Lang's Antiques here.)   

So . . . what's your favorite masculine bling, either 'in real life' or for your fictional hero?  And why?

One poster will be chosen at random from the comment trail to win a copy of Forbidden Rose, or a copy of the Trade Paperback of Spymaster's Lady.  Your choice.

265 thoughts on “Regency Bling”

  1. Joanna, that’s such fun. I’d not previously connected the chain with the small pocket, but of course.
    Such a shame about the earrings, in my opinion. There’s something about one. They were still fashionable in the mid 18th century with the wilder sort of young men, so I’ve been able to indulge now and then.
    Truth to tell, I like men in bright and beautiful clothing. Damn that Brummell!
    Jo

    Reply
  2. Joanna, that’s such fun. I’d not previously connected the chain with the small pocket, but of course.
    Such a shame about the earrings, in my opinion. There’s something about one. They were still fashionable in the mid 18th century with the wilder sort of young men, so I’ve been able to indulge now and then.
    Truth to tell, I like men in bright and beautiful clothing. Damn that Brummell!
    Jo

    Reply
  3. Joanna, that’s such fun. I’d not previously connected the chain with the small pocket, but of course.
    Such a shame about the earrings, in my opinion. There’s something about one. They were still fashionable in the mid 18th century with the wilder sort of young men, so I’ve been able to indulge now and then.
    Truth to tell, I like men in bright and beautiful clothing. Damn that Brummell!
    Jo

    Reply
  4. Joanna, that’s such fun. I’d not previously connected the chain with the small pocket, but of course.
    Such a shame about the earrings, in my opinion. There’s something about one. They were still fashionable in the mid 18th century with the wilder sort of young men, so I’ve been able to indulge now and then.
    Truth to tell, I like men in bright and beautiful clothing. Damn that Brummell!
    Jo

    Reply
  5. Joanna, that’s such fun. I’d not previously connected the chain with the small pocket, but of course.
    Such a shame about the earrings, in my opinion. There’s something about one. They were still fashionable in the mid 18th century with the wilder sort of young men, so I’ve been able to indulge now and then.
    Truth to tell, I like men in bright and beautiful clothing. Damn that Brummell!
    Jo

    Reply
  6. What about the gentleman’s blade? This is still an object men of all classes treasure and are willing to pay surprising amounts to own. There’s the sword hanging by our gay blade’s side if he’s a military gent, or the ivory and silver penknife he carries not only to trim his pen, but for emergency use: to pry stones from his horse’s hoof, or cut the reins should they become dangerously entangled.
    An example

    Reply
  7. What about the gentleman’s blade? This is still an object men of all classes treasure and are willing to pay surprising amounts to own. There’s the sword hanging by our gay blade’s side if he’s a military gent, or the ivory and silver penknife he carries not only to trim his pen, but for emergency use: to pry stones from his horse’s hoof, or cut the reins should they become dangerously entangled.
    An example

    Reply
  8. What about the gentleman’s blade? This is still an object men of all classes treasure and are willing to pay surprising amounts to own. There’s the sword hanging by our gay blade’s side if he’s a military gent, or the ivory and silver penknife he carries not only to trim his pen, but for emergency use: to pry stones from his horse’s hoof, or cut the reins should they become dangerously entangled.
    An example

    Reply
  9. What about the gentleman’s blade? This is still an object men of all classes treasure and are willing to pay surprising amounts to own. There’s the sword hanging by our gay blade’s side if he’s a military gent, or the ivory and silver penknife he carries not only to trim his pen, but for emergency use: to pry stones from his horse’s hoof, or cut the reins should they become dangerously entangled.
    An example

    Reply
  10. What about the gentleman’s blade? This is still an object men of all classes treasure and are willing to pay surprising amounts to own. There’s the sword hanging by our gay blade’s side if he’s a military gent, or the ivory and silver penknife he carries not only to trim his pen, but for emergency use: to pry stones from his horse’s hoof, or cut the reins should they become dangerously entangled.
    An example

    Reply
  11. very interesting. I’ve always been a fan of a nice ring on a man. A nice manly ring on strong fingers is sexy. I often looked and admired pocket watches — they often have such beautifully worked covers, they just aren’t common/pratical so much in today’s world. But if I lived in regency or earier period, I’d probably be buying them for the men in my family.

    Reply
  12. very interesting. I’ve always been a fan of a nice ring on a man. A nice manly ring on strong fingers is sexy. I often looked and admired pocket watches — they often have such beautifully worked covers, they just aren’t common/pratical so much in today’s world. But if I lived in regency or earier period, I’d probably be buying them for the men in my family.

    Reply
  13. very interesting. I’ve always been a fan of a nice ring on a man. A nice manly ring on strong fingers is sexy. I often looked and admired pocket watches — they often have such beautifully worked covers, they just aren’t common/pratical so much in today’s world. But if I lived in regency or earier period, I’d probably be buying them for the men in my family.

    Reply
  14. very interesting. I’ve always been a fan of a nice ring on a man. A nice manly ring on strong fingers is sexy. I often looked and admired pocket watches — they often have such beautifully worked covers, they just aren’t common/pratical so much in today’s world. But if I lived in regency or earier period, I’d probably be buying them for the men in my family.

    Reply
  15. very interesting. I’ve always been a fan of a nice ring on a man. A nice manly ring on strong fingers is sexy. I often looked and admired pocket watches — they often have such beautifully worked covers, they just aren’t common/pratical so much in today’s world. But if I lived in regency or earier period, I’d probably be buying them for the men in my family.

    Reply
  16. Hi Jo —
    I feel like the Regency gentleman spent just as much time and trouble as the early Georgian gentleman in his dressing, took his clothes just as seriously, and was just as hindered by them when it came to getting out and changing a flat tire.
    But I think the Georgians had more fun with the sparklies and the fine silk and the embroidered waistcoats. Museums keep copies of 1806 men’s clothing because it’s historically interesting. They keep 1760s outfits because they are stunningly beautiful.
    I’m going to acquit the Beau on this, though. He was froth on the wave, as it were. Part of a zeitgeist that had a philosophical foundation utterly alien to him.
    I wonder, sometimes, if England avoided bloody revolution in 1815-1830 because the nobility hid in plain sight, camouflaged. Ostentation polarized. The plain mode, doubtless by pure accident, tended to blur class lines and encourage social mobility.

    Reply
  17. Hi Jo —
    I feel like the Regency gentleman spent just as much time and trouble as the early Georgian gentleman in his dressing, took his clothes just as seriously, and was just as hindered by them when it came to getting out and changing a flat tire.
    But I think the Georgians had more fun with the sparklies and the fine silk and the embroidered waistcoats. Museums keep copies of 1806 men’s clothing because it’s historically interesting. They keep 1760s outfits because they are stunningly beautiful.
    I’m going to acquit the Beau on this, though. He was froth on the wave, as it were. Part of a zeitgeist that had a philosophical foundation utterly alien to him.
    I wonder, sometimes, if England avoided bloody revolution in 1815-1830 because the nobility hid in plain sight, camouflaged. Ostentation polarized. The plain mode, doubtless by pure accident, tended to blur class lines and encourage social mobility.

    Reply
  18. Hi Jo —
    I feel like the Regency gentleman spent just as much time and trouble as the early Georgian gentleman in his dressing, took his clothes just as seriously, and was just as hindered by them when it came to getting out and changing a flat tire.
    But I think the Georgians had more fun with the sparklies and the fine silk and the embroidered waistcoats. Museums keep copies of 1806 men’s clothing because it’s historically interesting. They keep 1760s outfits because they are stunningly beautiful.
    I’m going to acquit the Beau on this, though. He was froth on the wave, as it were. Part of a zeitgeist that had a philosophical foundation utterly alien to him.
    I wonder, sometimes, if England avoided bloody revolution in 1815-1830 because the nobility hid in plain sight, camouflaged. Ostentation polarized. The plain mode, doubtless by pure accident, tended to blur class lines and encourage social mobility.

    Reply
  19. Hi Jo —
    I feel like the Regency gentleman spent just as much time and trouble as the early Georgian gentleman in his dressing, took his clothes just as seriously, and was just as hindered by them when it came to getting out and changing a flat tire.
    But I think the Georgians had more fun with the sparklies and the fine silk and the embroidered waistcoats. Museums keep copies of 1806 men’s clothing because it’s historically interesting. They keep 1760s outfits because they are stunningly beautiful.
    I’m going to acquit the Beau on this, though. He was froth on the wave, as it were. Part of a zeitgeist that had a philosophical foundation utterly alien to him.
    I wonder, sometimes, if England avoided bloody revolution in 1815-1830 because the nobility hid in plain sight, camouflaged. Ostentation polarized. The plain mode, doubtless by pure accident, tended to blur class lines and encourage social mobility.

    Reply
  20. Hi Jo —
    I feel like the Regency gentleman spent just as much time and trouble as the early Georgian gentleman in his dressing, took his clothes just as seriously, and was just as hindered by them when it came to getting out and changing a flat tire.
    But I think the Georgians had more fun with the sparklies and the fine silk and the embroidered waistcoats. Museums keep copies of 1806 men’s clothing because it’s historically interesting. They keep 1760s outfits because they are stunningly beautiful.
    I’m going to acquit the Beau on this, though. He was froth on the wave, as it were. Part of a zeitgeist that had a philosophical foundation utterly alien to him.
    I wonder, sometimes, if England avoided bloody revolution in 1815-1830 because the nobility hid in plain sight, camouflaged. Ostentation polarized. The plain mode, doubtless by pure accident, tended to blur class lines and encourage social mobility.

    Reply
  21. Hi Jenny Brown —
    Interesting about penknives is that the two-century-old variety looks so much like the modern sort.
    In the Regency, plenty of penknives were just small specialized knives that stayed at home in a desk, cutting quills and trimming pencils. But from mid C18 onward, there were also penknives that folded. Some had two blades, even.
    I was lucky enough to see one of Napoleon’s penknives displayed in a museum. Ivory handle. Very pretty.
    For anyone trying to picture the knife our hero carried, see
    http://www.loringpage.com/pens/cat01d.htm
    I have to admit, I expect a hero from any era to have a useful sort of small knife about his person. I find practicality sexy.

    Reply
  22. Hi Jenny Brown —
    Interesting about penknives is that the two-century-old variety looks so much like the modern sort.
    In the Regency, plenty of penknives were just small specialized knives that stayed at home in a desk, cutting quills and trimming pencils. But from mid C18 onward, there were also penknives that folded. Some had two blades, even.
    I was lucky enough to see one of Napoleon’s penknives displayed in a museum. Ivory handle. Very pretty.
    For anyone trying to picture the knife our hero carried, see
    http://www.loringpage.com/pens/cat01d.htm
    I have to admit, I expect a hero from any era to have a useful sort of small knife about his person. I find practicality sexy.

    Reply
  23. Hi Jenny Brown —
    Interesting about penknives is that the two-century-old variety looks so much like the modern sort.
    In the Regency, plenty of penknives were just small specialized knives that stayed at home in a desk, cutting quills and trimming pencils. But from mid C18 onward, there were also penknives that folded. Some had two blades, even.
    I was lucky enough to see one of Napoleon’s penknives displayed in a museum. Ivory handle. Very pretty.
    For anyone trying to picture the knife our hero carried, see
    http://www.loringpage.com/pens/cat01d.htm
    I have to admit, I expect a hero from any era to have a useful sort of small knife about his person. I find practicality sexy.

    Reply
  24. Hi Jenny Brown —
    Interesting about penknives is that the two-century-old variety looks so much like the modern sort.
    In the Regency, plenty of penknives were just small specialized knives that stayed at home in a desk, cutting quills and trimming pencils. But from mid C18 onward, there were also penknives that folded. Some had two blades, even.
    I was lucky enough to see one of Napoleon’s penknives displayed in a museum. Ivory handle. Very pretty.
    For anyone trying to picture the knife our hero carried, see
    http://www.loringpage.com/pens/cat01d.htm
    I have to admit, I expect a hero from any era to have a useful sort of small knife about his person. I find practicality sexy.

    Reply
  25. Hi Jenny Brown —
    Interesting about penknives is that the two-century-old variety looks so much like the modern sort.
    In the Regency, plenty of penknives were just small specialized knives that stayed at home in a desk, cutting quills and trimming pencils. But from mid C18 onward, there were also penknives that folded. Some had two blades, even.
    I was lucky enough to see one of Napoleon’s penknives displayed in a museum. Ivory handle. Very pretty.
    For anyone trying to picture the knife our hero carried, see
    http://www.loringpage.com/pens/cat01d.htm
    I have to admit, I expect a hero from any era to have a useful sort of small knife about his person. I find practicality sexy.

    Reply
  26. Hi Donna Ann —
    Pocket watches. I love them.
    I love the touch of the cool skin of them, love the click of opening, love the ticking that makes them feel alive, love the mechanical complexity inside the shell.
    I love the imprecision, the organic perception of time. What kind of society needs to have everybody know whether it’s 11:38 or 11:39?
    And pocket watches have to be babied. Have to be taken out and wound every day, just so. Have to be checked against some higher authority every week and delicately, painstakingly, adjusted. Consulting them is not a flick of the wrist and a glance. It’s slow, deliberate communication with the lords of time.
    Really, having a fine watch is like carrying around a neopet.
    And oh la la, pocket watches can be beautiful. I look at the museum specimens and I wants.

    Reply
  27. Hi Donna Ann —
    Pocket watches. I love them.
    I love the touch of the cool skin of them, love the click of opening, love the ticking that makes them feel alive, love the mechanical complexity inside the shell.
    I love the imprecision, the organic perception of time. What kind of society needs to have everybody know whether it’s 11:38 or 11:39?
    And pocket watches have to be babied. Have to be taken out and wound every day, just so. Have to be checked against some higher authority every week and delicately, painstakingly, adjusted. Consulting them is not a flick of the wrist and a glance. It’s slow, deliberate communication with the lords of time.
    Really, having a fine watch is like carrying around a neopet.
    And oh la la, pocket watches can be beautiful. I look at the museum specimens and I wants.

    Reply
  28. Hi Donna Ann —
    Pocket watches. I love them.
    I love the touch of the cool skin of them, love the click of opening, love the ticking that makes them feel alive, love the mechanical complexity inside the shell.
    I love the imprecision, the organic perception of time. What kind of society needs to have everybody know whether it’s 11:38 or 11:39?
    And pocket watches have to be babied. Have to be taken out and wound every day, just so. Have to be checked against some higher authority every week and delicately, painstakingly, adjusted. Consulting them is not a flick of the wrist and a glance. It’s slow, deliberate communication with the lords of time.
    Really, having a fine watch is like carrying around a neopet.
    And oh la la, pocket watches can be beautiful. I look at the museum specimens and I wants.

    Reply
  29. Hi Donna Ann —
    Pocket watches. I love them.
    I love the touch of the cool skin of them, love the click of opening, love the ticking that makes them feel alive, love the mechanical complexity inside the shell.
    I love the imprecision, the organic perception of time. What kind of society needs to have everybody know whether it’s 11:38 or 11:39?
    And pocket watches have to be babied. Have to be taken out and wound every day, just so. Have to be checked against some higher authority every week and delicately, painstakingly, adjusted. Consulting them is not a flick of the wrist and a glance. It’s slow, deliberate communication with the lords of time.
    Really, having a fine watch is like carrying around a neopet.
    And oh la la, pocket watches can be beautiful. I look at the museum specimens and I wants.

    Reply
  30. Hi Donna Ann —
    Pocket watches. I love them.
    I love the touch of the cool skin of them, love the click of opening, love the ticking that makes them feel alive, love the mechanical complexity inside the shell.
    I love the imprecision, the organic perception of time. What kind of society needs to have everybody know whether it’s 11:38 or 11:39?
    And pocket watches have to be babied. Have to be taken out and wound every day, just so. Have to be checked against some higher authority every week and delicately, painstakingly, adjusted. Consulting them is not a flick of the wrist and a glance. It’s slow, deliberate communication with the lords of time.
    Really, having a fine watch is like carrying around a neopet.
    And oh la la, pocket watches can be beautiful. I look at the museum specimens and I wants.

    Reply
  31. I’m not actually a fan of ornamentation (although antique watch fob chains do make interesting necklaces for teens).
    But talking about ‘fobbing off’ reminded me of “Don’t blow smoke up my…” which led to last month’s BBC magazine which had an article on Tobacco Resuscitators (pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/darri/4598385170/) which led me to reading about the popularity of tobacco enemas, which led me to think about what modern medicine will look as bizarre in a few hundred years.
    Picturing those posted about the Thames in case of emergency – that’s the sort of thing that puts one right off the old time travel idea.

    Reply
  32. I’m not actually a fan of ornamentation (although antique watch fob chains do make interesting necklaces for teens).
    But talking about ‘fobbing off’ reminded me of “Don’t blow smoke up my…” which led to last month’s BBC magazine which had an article on Tobacco Resuscitators (pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/darri/4598385170/) which led me to reading about the popularity of tobacco enemas, which led me to think about what modern medicine will look as bizarre in a few hundred years.
    Picturing those posted about the Thames in case of emergency – that’s the sort of thing that puts one right off the old time travel idea.

    Reply
  33. I’m not actually a fan of ornamentation (although antique watch fob chains do make interesting necklaces for teens).
    But talking about ‘fobbing off’ reminded me of “Don’t blow smoke up my…” which led to last month’s BBC magazine which had an article on Tobacco Resuscitators (pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/darri/4598385170/) which led me to reading about the popularity of tobacco enemas, which led me to think about what modern medicine will look as bizarre in a few hundred years.
    Picturing those posted about the Thames in case of emergency – that’s the sort of thing that puts one right off the old time travel idea.

    Reply
  34. I’m not actually a fan of ornamentation (although antique watch fob chains do make interesting necklaces for teens).
    But talking about ‘fobbing off’ reminded me of “Don’t blow smoke up my…” which led to last month’s BBC magazine which had an article on Tobacco Resuscitators (pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/darri/4598385170/) which led me to reading about the popularity of tobacco enemas, which led me to think about what modern medicine will look as bizarre in a few hundred years.
    Picturing those posted about the Thames in case of emergency – that’s the sort of thing that puts one right off the old time travel idea.

    Reply
  35. I’m not actually a fan of ornamentation (although antique watch fob chains do make interesting necklaces for teens).
    But talking about ‘fobbing off’ reminded me of “Don’t blow smoke up my…” which led to last month’s BBC magazine which had an article on Tobacco Resuscitators (pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/darri/4598385170/) which led me to reading about the popularity of tobacco enemas, which led me to think about what modern medicine will look as bizarre in a few hundred years.
    Picturing those posted about the Thames in case of emergency – that’s the sort of thing that puts one right off the old time travel idea.

    Reply
  36. I so enjoy your posts Jo! I feel like I’m walking through a museum accompanied by your words. The Jo Bourne Regency Bling ‘Audio’ Tour.
    In real life, it’s definitely the cuff links that I find most sexy & attractive. It serves to reveal a bit of a man’s personality, if he has one, lol. Earrings, neckchains, rings (other than wedding band) I can do without.
    From fiction, Elizabeth Hoyt’s latest hero, Lazarus, carries a walking/sword stick that made him so dashing & dangerous! Very nice.

    Reply
  37. I so enjoy your posts Jo! I feel like I’m walking through a museum accompanied by your words. The Jo Bourne Regency Bling ‘Audio’ Tour.
    In real life, it’s definitely the cuff links that I find most sexy & attractive. It serves to reveal a bit of a man’s personality, if he has one, lol. Earrings, neckchains, rings (other than wedding band) I can do without.
    From fiction, Elizabeth Hoyt’s latest hero, Lazarus, carries a walking/sword stick that made him so dashing & dangerous! Very nice.

    Reply
  38. I so enjoy your posts Jo! I feel like I’m walking through a museum accompanied by your words. The Jo Bourne Regency Bling ‘Audio’ Tour.
    In real life, it’s definitely the cuff links that I find most sexy & attractive. It serves to reveal a bit of a man’s personality, if he has one, lol. Earrings, neckchains, rings (other than wedding band) I can do without.
    From fiction, Elizabeth Hoyt’s latest hero, Lazarus, carries a walking/sword stick that made him so dashing & dangerous! Very nice.

    Reply
  39. I so enjoy your posts Jo! I feel like I’m walking through a museum accompanied by your words. The Jo Bourne Regency Bling ‘Audio’ Tour.
    In real life, it’s definitely the cuff links that I find most sexy & attractive. It serves to reveal a bit of a man’s personality, if he has one, lol. Earrings, neckchains, rings (other than wedding band) I can do without.
    From fiction, Elizabeth Hoyt’s latest hero, Lazarus, carries a walking/sword stick that made him so dashing & dangerous! Very nice.

    Reply
  40. I so enjoy your posts Jo! I feel like I’m walking through a museum accompanied by your words. The Jo Bourne Regency Bling ‘Audio’ Tour.
    In real life, it’s definitely the cuff links that I find most sexy & attractive. It serves to reveal a bit of a man’s personality, if he has one, lol. Earrings, neckchains, rings (other than wedding band) I can do without.
    From fiction, Elizabeth Hoyt’s latest hero, Lazarus, carries a walking/sword stick that made him so dashing & dangerous! Very nice.

    Reply
  41. Fabulous article and meticulous research! I’m not particularly fond of manly bling. But no one does it better than Captain Jack Sparrow, who has been sighted near the Marine Corps Base in Kaneohe Bay. His new ship, The Revenge of the Queen Anne, is anchored in the Harbor. Although we have balmy weather, can you imagine wearing a wig, costume, makeup, and bling in the summer heat?

    Reply
  42. Fabulous article and meticulous research! I’m not particularly fond of manly bling. But no one does it better than Captain Jack Sparrow, who has been sighted near the Marine Corps Base in Kaneohe Bay. His new ship, The Revenge of the Queen Anne, is anchored in the Harbor. Although we have balmy weather, can you imagine wearing a wig, costume, makeup, and bling in the summer heat?

    Reply
  43. Fabulous article and meticulous research! I’m not particularly fond of manly bling. But no one does it better than Captain Jack Sparrow, who has been sighted near the Marine Corps Base in Kaneohe Bay. His new ship, The Revenge of the Queen Anne, is anchored in the Harbor. Although we have balmy weather, can you imagine wearing a wig, costume, makeup, and bling in the summer heat?

    Reply
  44. Fabulous article and meticulous research! I’m not particularly fond of manly bling. But no one does it better than Captain Jack Sparrow, who has been sighted near the Marine Corps Base in Kaneohe Bay. His new ship, The Revenge of the Queen Anne, is anchored in the Harbor. Although we have balmy weather, can you imagine wearing a wig, costume, makeup, and bling in the summer heat?

    Reply
  45. Fabulous article and meticulous research! I’m not particularly fond of manly bling. But no one does it better than Captain Jack Sparrow, who has been sighted near the Marine Corps Base in Kaneohe Bay. His new ship, The Revenge of the Queen Anne, is anchored in the Harbor. Although we have balmy weather, can you imagine wearing a wig, costume, makeup, and bling in the summer heat?

    Reply
  46. Hi Meoskop —
    I like to see vintage jewelry given a new life — watch fobs as pendants or charms on bracelets.
    Good jewelry isn’t meant for temporary. Like any true art, it should outlast the generation that made it.

    Reply
  47. Hi Meoskop —
    I like to see vintage jewelry given a new life — watch fobs as pendants or charms on bracelets.
    Good jewelry isn’t meant for temporary. Like any true art, it should outlast the generation that made it.

    Reply
  48. Hi Meoskop —
    I like to see vintage jewelry given a new life — watch fobs as pendants or charms on bracelets.
    Good jewelry isn’t meant for temporary. Like any true art, it should outlast the generation that made it.

    Reply
  49. Hi Meoskop —
    I like to see vintage jewelry given a new life — watch fobs as pendants or charms on bracelets.
    Good jewelry isn’t meant for temporary. Like any true art, it should outlast the generation that made it.

    Reply
  50. Hi Meoskop —
    I like to see vintage jewelry given a new life — watch fobs as pendants or charms on bracelets.
    Good jewelry isn’t meant for temporary. Like any true art, it should outlast the generation that made it.

    Reply
  51. Hi Scorpio —
    It is so sad nobody wears cufflinks much.
    Some of the reason for cufflinks, and all kinds of detachable shirt buttons and studs, disappeared when shirts began to be washed more gently.
    Yes. Truly. For the masses, machine washing is more kindly to clothing than hand washing.
    Remember the Houseman poem:
    From the wash the laundress sends
    My collars home with ravelled ends.

    We no longer have to detach our cuff buttons from the shirt before sending it out to be washed because our cuff buttons are not being scrubbed and grated on the slats of a wooden board slanted into the river. Thus we can have cheap buttons that stay sewed on the shirt instead of jewelled and fancy buttons we take off every night.
    An interesting sidenote on cufflinks . . . For a short while in the 1790s, the shirt cuff didn’t peek out from under the coat sleeve. This is about the only time this has been true. Other periods in history we see that spill of lace or that half inch of clean starched cuff. The coat sleeve is shorter, specifically to show off the white of the shirt.
    Those longer coat sleeves of the 1790s were fashion in the service of philosophy. The hidden shirt cuff, the lengthened coat sleeve, are making the statement, “We’re not effete aristocrats. We work with our hands. We can’t keep our cuffs pristine.”
    . . . which was a wise statement to make in the early 1790s in France, what with the guillotine and all.

    Reply
  52. Hi Scorpio —
    It is so sad nobody wears cufflinks much.
    Some of the reason for cufflinks, and all kinds of detachable shirt buttons and studs, disappeared when shirts began to be washed more gently.
    Yes. Truly. For the masses, machine washing is more kindly to clothing than hand washing.
    Remember the Houseman poem:
    From the wash the laundress sends
    My collars home with ravelled ends.

    We no longer have to detach our cuff buttons from the shirt before sending it out to be washed because our cuff buttons are not being scrubbed and grated on the slats of a wooden board slanted into the river. Thus we can have cheap buttons that stay sewed on the shirt instead of jewelled and fancy buttons we take off every night.
    An interesting sidenote on cufflinks . . . For a short while in the 1790s, the shirt cuff didn’t peek out from under the coat sleeve. This is about the only time this has been true. Other periods in history we see that spill of lace or that half inch of clean starched cuff. The coat sleeve is shorter, specifically to show off the white of the shirt.
    Those longer coat sleeves of the 1790s were fashion in the service of philosophy. The hidden shirt cuff, the lengthened coat sleeve, are making the statement, “We’re not effete aristocrats. We work with our hands. We can’t keep our cuffs pristine.”
    . . . which was a wise statement to make in the early 1790s in France, what with the guillotine and all.

    Reply
  53. Hi Scorpio —
    It is so sad nobody wears cufflinks much.
    Some of the reason for cufflinks, and all kinds of detachable shirt buttons and studs, disappeared when shirts began to be washed more gently.
    Yes. Truly. For the masses, machine washing is more kindly to clothing than hand washing.
    Remember the Houseman poem:
    From the wash the laundress sends
    My collars home with ravelled ends.

    We no longer have to detach our cuff buttons from the shirt before sending it out to be washed because our cuff buttons are not being scrubbed and grated on the slats of a wooden board slanted into the river. Thus we can have cheap buttons that stay sewed on the shirt instead of jewelled and fancy buttons we take off every night.
    An interesting sidenote on cufflinks . . . For a short while in the 1790s, the shirt cuff didn’t peek out from under the coat sleeve. This is about the only time this has been true. Other periods in history we see that spill of lace or that half inch of clean starched cuff. The coat sleeve is shorter, specifically to show off the white of the shirt.
    Those longer coat sleeves of the 1790s were fashion in the service of philosophy. The hidden shirt cuff, the lengthened coat sleeve, are making the statement, “We’re not effete aristocrats. We work with our hands. We can’t keep our cuffs pristine.”
    . . . which was a wise statement to make in the early 1790s in France, what with the guillotine and all.

    Reply
  54. Hi Scorpio —
    It is so sad nobody wears cufflinks much.
    Some of the reason for cufflinks, and all kinds of detachable shirt buttons and studs, disappeared when shirts began to be washed more gently.
    Yes. Truly. For the masses, machine washing is more kindly to clothing than hand washing.
    Remember the Houseman poem:
    From the wash the laundress sends
    My collars home with ravelled ends.

    We no longer have to detach our cuff buttons from the shirt before sending it out to be washed because our cuff buttons are not being scrubbed and grated on the slats of a wooden board slanted into the river. Thus we can have cheap buttons that stay sewed on the shirt instead of jewelled and fancy buttons we take off every night.
    An interesting sidenote on cufflinks . . . For a short while in the 1790s, the shirt cuff didn’t peek out from under the coat sleeve. This is about the only time this has been true. Other periods in history we see that spill of lace or that half inch of clean starched cuff. The coat sleeve is shorter, specifically to show off the white of the shirt.
    Those longer coat sleeves of the 1790s were fashion in the service of philosophy. The hidden shirt cuff, the lengthened coat sleeve, are making the statement, “We’re not effete aristocrats. We work with our hands. We can’t keep our cuffs pristine.”
    . . . which was a wise statement to make in the early 1790s in France, what with the guillotine and all.

    Reply
  55. Hi Scorpio —
    It is so sad nobody wears cufflinks much.
    Some of the reason for cufflinks, and all kinds of detachable shirt buttons and studs, disappeared when shirts began to be washed more gently.
    Yes. Truly. For the masses, machine washing is more kindly to clothing than hand washing.
    Remember the Houseman poem:
    From the wash the laundress sends
    My collars home with ravelled ends.

    We no longer have to detach our cuff buttons from the shirt before sending it out to be washed because our cuff buttons are not being scrubbed and grated on the slats of a wooden board slanted into the river. Thus we can have cheap buttons that stay sewed on the shirt instead of jewelled and fancy buttons we take off every night.
    An interesting sidenote on cufflinks . . . For a short while in the 1790s, the shirt cuff didn’t peek out from under the coat sleeve. This is about the only time this has been true. Other periods in history we see that spill of lace or that half inch of clean starched cuff. The coat sleeve is shorter, specifically to show off the white of the shirt.
    Those longer coat sleeves of the 1790s were fashion in the service of philosophy. The hidden shirt cuff, the lengthened coat sleeve, are making the statement, “We’re not effete aristocrats. We work with our hands. We can’t keep our cuffs pristine.”
    . . . which was a wise statement to make in the early 1790s in France, what with the guillotine and all.

    Reply
  56. What a interesting post. I must admit I am kind of sad tof\ find out they did not wear those cravat pins as often as I thought. I always like to picture my hero with pin that matches his the naughty twinkle in his eye. Oh well,that’s why we have imagination.

    Reply
  57. What a interesting post. I must admit I am kind of sad tof\ find out they did not wear those cravat pins as often as I thought. I always like to picture my hero with pin that matches his the naughty twinkle in his eye. Oh well,that’s why we have imagination.

    Reply
  58. What a interesting post. I must admit I am kind of sad tof\ find out they did not wear those cravat pins as often as I thought. I always like to picture my hero with pin that matches his the naughty twinkle in his eye. Oh well,that’s why we have imagination.

    Reply
  59. What a interesting post. I must admit I am kind of sad tof\ find out they did not wear those cravat pins as often as I thought. I always like to picture my hero with pin that matches his the naughty twinkle in his eye. Oh well,that’s why we have imagination.

    Reply
  60. What a interesting post. I must admit I am kind of sad tof\ find out they did not wear those cravat pins as often as I thought. I always like to picture my hero with pin that matches his the naughty twinkle in his eye. Oh well,that’s why we have imagination.

    Reply
  61. Hi Kat —
    I was sad about the stickpins myself. Fortunately, if you go 40 years back or 40 years forward, you’ve got them again.
    Remember Devil’s Cub by Heyer? The Duke of Avon’s brother pawned his diamond stickpin to pay for the hurried trip to France.
    Stickpins would be just enticingly stealable, wouldn’t they? Can’t you imagine snuggling up close to the hero, getting ready to lift his expensive diamond . . .?

    Reply
  62. Hi Kat —
    I was sad about the stickpins myself. Fortunately, if you go 40 years back or 40 years forward, you’ve got them again.
    Remember Devil’s Cub by Heyer? The Duke of Avon’s brother pawned his diamond stickpin to pay for the hurried trip to France.
    Stickpins would be just enticingly stealable, wouldn’t they? Can’t you imagine snuggling up close to the hero, getting ready to lift his expensive diamond . . .?

    Reply
  63. Hi Kat —
    I was sad about the stickpins myself. Fortunately, if you go 40 years back or 40 years forward, you’ve got them again.
    Remember Devil’s Cub by Heyer? The Duke of Avon’s brother pawned his diamond stickpin to pay for the hurried trip to France.
    Stickpins would be just enticingly stealable, wouldn’t they? Can’t you imagine snuggling up close to the hero, getting ready to lift his expensive diamond . . .?

    Reply
  64. Hi Kat —
    I was sad about the stickpins myself. Fortunately, if you go 40 years back or 40 years forward, you’ve got them again.
    Remember Devil’s Cub by Heyer? The Duke of Avon’s brother pawned his diamond stickpin to pay for the hurried trip to France.
    Stickpins would be just enticingly stealable, wouldn’t they? Can’t you imagine snuggling up close to the hero, getting ready to lift his expensive diamond . . .?

    Reply
  65. Hi Kat —
    I was sad about the stickpins myself. Fortunately, if you go 40 years back or 40 years forward, you’ve got them again.
    Remember Devil’s Cub by Heyer? The Duke of Avon’s brother pawned his diamond stickpin to pay for the hurried trip to France.
    Stickpins would be just enticingly stealable, wouldn’t they? Can’t you imagine snuggling up close to the hero, getting ready to lift his expensive diamond . . .?

    Reply
  66. My husband does not wear bling, but we got him Star Trek Enterprise cufflinks for fathers’ day. He wants to wear them with his tux which is his only outfit with french cuffs. I guess he will have the ultimate mix of centuries when in that get up.

    Reply
  67. My husband does not wear bling, but we got him Star Trek Enterprise cufflinks for fathers’ day. He wants to wear them with his tux which is his only outfit with french cuffs. I guess he will have the ultimate mix of centuries when in that get up.

    Reply
  68. My husband does not wear bling, but we got him Star Trek Enterprise cufflinks for fathers’ day. He wants to wear them with his tux which is his only outfit with french cuffs. I guess he will have the ultimate mix of centuries when in that get up.

    Reply
  69. My husband does not wear bling, but we got him Star Trek Enterprise cufflinks for fathers’ day. He wants to wear them with his tux which is his only outfit with french cuffs. I guess he will have the ultimate mix of centuries when in that get up.

    Reply
  70. My husband does not wear bling, but we got him Star Trek Enterprise cufflinks for fathers’ day. He wants to wear them with his tux which is his only outfit with french cuffs. I guess he will have the ultimate mix of centuries when in that get up.

    Reply
  71. Hi Lyn —
    Interesting how the Star Trek Universe assumes a future pretty much without bling.
    That Star Trek Fleet uniform . . . Military uniforms don’t have to be dull. Lookit the C18 military uniform. Just a shout of color.
    Interesting, from a Regency standpoint, that military conservatism held onto the gaudy colors, straps, belts and buckles long after they’d left civilian clothes. A soldier was the brightest spot in the Regency ballroom, carrying Eighteenth Century exuberance into the drabbery of the Regency.
    Dressing up is so human. Tribal peoples who carry all their possessions in a leather pouch over their shoulders still wear bead necklaces. They dye their hair and stick feathers into it. They paint themselves. They tattoo.
    But Star Fleet uniforms are understated, utilitarian, bland. Here’s a future society of infinite leisure, infinite material wealth . . . and they don’t decorate their bodies. So weird.

    Reply
  72. Hi Lyn —
    Interesting how the Star Trek Universe assumes a future pretty much without bling.
    That Star Trek Fleet uniform . . . Military uniforms don’t have to be dull. Lookit the C18 military uniform. Just a shout of color.
    Interesting, from a Regency standpoint, that military conservatism held onto the gaudy colors, straps, belts and buckles long after they’d left civilian clothes. A soldier was the brightest spot in the Regency ballroom, carrying Eighteenth Century exuberance into the drabbery of the Regency.
    Dressing up is so human. Tribal peoples who carry all their possessions in a leather pouch over their shoulders still wear bead necklaces. They dye their hair and stick feathers into it. They paint themselves. They tattoo.
    But Star Fleet uniforms are understated, utilitarian, bland. Here’s a future society of infinite leisure, infinite material wealth . . . and they don’t decorate their bodies. So weird.

    Reply
  73. Hi Lyn —
    Interesting how the Star Trek Universe assumes a future pretty much without bling.
    That Star Trek Fleet uniform . . . Military uniforms don’t have to be dull. Lookit the C18 military uniform. Just a shout of color.
    Interesting, from a Regency standpoint, that military conservatism held onto the gaudy colors, straps, belts and buckles long after they’d left civilian clothes. A soldier was the brightest spot in the Regency ballroom, carrying Eighteenth Century exuberance into the drabbery of the Regency.
    Dressing up is so human. Tribal peoples who carry all their possessions in a leather pouch over their shoulders still wear bead necklaces. They dye their hair and stick feathers into it. They paint themselves. They tattoo.
    But Star Fleet uniforms are understated, utilitarian, bland. Here’s a future society of infinite leisure, infinite material wealth . . . and they don’t decorate their bodies. So weird.

    Reply
  74. Hi Lyn —
    Interesting how the Star Trek Universe assumes a future pretty much without bling.
    That Star Trek Fleet uniform . . . Military uniforms don’t have to be dull. Lookit the C18 military uniform. Just a shout of color.
    Interesting, from a Regency standpoint, that military conservatism held onto the gaudy colors, straps, belts and buckles long after they’d left civilian clothes. A soldier was the brightest spot in the Regency ballroom, carrying Eighteenth Century exuberance into the drabbery of the Regency.
    Dressing up is so human. Tribal peoples who carry all their possessions in a leather pouch over their shoulders still wear bead necklaces. They dye their hair and stick feathers into it. They paint themselves. They tattoo.
    But Star Fleet uniforms are understated, utilitarian, bland. Here’s a future society of infinite leisure, infinite material wealth . . . and they don’t decorate their bodies. So weird.

    Reply
  75. Hi Lyn —
    Interesting how the Star Trek Universe assumes a future pretty much without bling.
    That Star Trek Fleet uniform . . . Military uniforms don’t have to be dull. Lookit the C18 military uniform. Just a shout of color.
    Interesting, from a Regency standpoint, that military conservatism held onto the gaudy colors, straps, belts and buckles long after they’d left civilian clothes. A soldier was the brightest spot in the Regency ballroom, carrying Eighteenth Century exuberance into the drabbery of the Regency.
    Dressing up is so human. Tribal peoples who carry all their possessions in a leather pouch over their shoulders still wear bead necklaces. They dye their hair and stick feathers into it. They paint themselves. They tattoo.
    But Star Fleet uniforms are understated, utilitarian, bland. Here’s a future society of infinite leisure, infinite material wealth . . . and they don’t decorate their bodies. So weird.

    Reply
  76. I think tie clasps are prob the modern statement jewelry for men (along with the tie itself in clothing). My mom & recently went through an old tin that my dad kept misc stuff in on the dresser when he was alive and it included several tie clasps (either civic/vetern org related or “quirky”). I love looking at the tie department and think tie clasps/pins are great and allow the personality of the person to shine through.

    Reply
  77. I think tie clasps are prob the modern statement jewelry for men (along with the tie itself in clothing). My mom & recently went through an old tin that my dad kept misc stuff in on the dresser when he was alive and it included several tie clasps (either civic/vetern org related or “quirky”). I love looking at the tie department and think tie clasps/pins are great and allow the personality of the person to shine through.

    Reply
  78. I think tie clasps are prob the modern statement jewelry for men (along with the tie itself in clothing). My mom & recently went through an old tin that my dad kept misc stuff in on the dresser when he was alive and it included several tie clasps (either civic/vetern org related or “quirky”). I love looking at the tie department and think tie clasps/pins are great and allow the personality of the person to shine through.

    Reply
  79. I think tie clasps are prob the modern statement jewelry for men (along with the tie itself in clothing). My mom & recently went through an old tin that my dad kept misc stuff in on the dresser when he was alive and it included several tie clasps (either civic/vetern org related or “quirky”). I love looking at the tie department and think tie clasps/pins are great and allow the personality of the person to shine through.

    Reply
  80. I think tie clasps are prob the modern statement jewelry for men (along with the tie itself in clothing). My mom & recently went through an old tin that my dad kept misc stuff in on the dresser when he was alive and it included several tie clasps (either civic/vetern org related or “quirky”). I love looking at the tie department and think tie clasps/pins are great and allow the personality of the person to shine through.

    Reply
  81. Loved the pictures here. That French gentleman, Napolean’s Marshall of France–quite a gutsy guy, I’d say. I can hear his voice, that lovely French rolling off his tongue, and the courage he must have had. What a pity they had to shoot someone like him(sigh).

    Reply
  82. Loved the pictures here. That French gentleman, Napolean’s Marshall of France–quite a gutsy guy, I’d say. I can hear his voice, that lovely French rolling off his tongue, and the courage he must have had. What a pity they had to shoot someone like him(sigh).

    Reply
  83. Loved the pictures here. That French gentleman, Napolean’s Marshall of France–quite a gutsy guy, I’d say. I can hear his voice, that lovely French rolling off his tongue, and the courage he must have had. What a pity they had to shoot someone like him(sigh).

    Reply
  84. Loved the pictures here. That French gentleman, Napolean’s Marshall of France–quite a gutsy guy, I’d say. I can hear his voice, that lovely French rolling off his tongue, and the courage he must have had. What a pity they had to shoot someone like him(sigh).

    Reply
  85. Loved the pictures here. That French gentleman, Napolean’s Marshall of France–quite a gutsy guy, I’d say. I can hear his voice, that lovely French rolling off his tongue, and the courage he must have had. What a pity they had to shoot someone like him(sigh).

    Reply
  86. Fabulous post! Yet another going straight to my research files.
    I, too, am sad about the nonhistoricity of glittery stickpins, but am psyched about the cuff links, which Regency romance authors almost never mention. Hmm…all sorts of sexy maneuverings seem possible with getting those off a hero. (Men’s wrists are such a sexy-but-underrated part of their anatomy.)

    Reply
  87. Fabulous post! Yet another going straight to my research files.
    I, too, am sad about the nonhistoricity of glittery stickpins, but am psyched about the cuff links, which Regency romance authors almost never mention. Hmm…all sorts of sexy maneuverings seem possible with getting those off a hero. (Men’s wrists are such a sexy-but-underrated part of their anatomy.)

    Reply
  88. Fabulous post! Yet another going straight to my research files.
    I, too, am sad about the nonhistoricity of glittery stickpins, but am psyched about the cuff links, which Regency romance authors almost never mention. Hmm…all sorts of sexy maneuverings seem possible with getting those off a hero. (Men’s wrists are such a sexy-but-underrated part of their anatomy.)

    Reply
  89. Fabulous post! Yet another going straight to my research files.
    I, too, am sad about the nonhistoricity of glittery stickpins, but am psyched about the cuff links, which Regency romance authors almost never mention. Hmm…all sorts of sexy maneuverings seem possible with getting those off a hero. (Men’s wrists are such a sexy-but-underrated part of their anatomy.)

    Reply
  90. Fabulous post! Yet another going straight to my research files.
    I, too, am sad about the nonhistoricity of glittery stickpins, but am psyched about the cuff links, which Regency romance authors almost never mention. Hmm…all sorts of sexy maneuverings seem possible with getting those off a hero. (Men’s wrists are such a sexy-but-underrated part of their anatomy.)

    Reply
  91. Hi dknybutinva —
    Tie clasps, huh?
    I guess my favorite would be the plainish gold ones with maybe a little pattern to them. And there are some with Western themes, silver and turquoise, that are rough-hewn and kinda wild.

    Reply
  92. Hi dknybutinva —
    Tie clasps, huh?
    I guess my favorite would be the plainish gold ones with maybe a little pattern to them. And there are some with Western themes, silver and turquoise, that are rough-hewn and kinda wild.

    Reply
  93. Hi dknybutinva —
    Tie clasps, huh?
    I guess my favorite would be the plainish gold ones with maybe a little pattern to them. And there are some with Western themes, silver and turquoise, that are rough-hewn and kinda wild.

    Reply
  94. Hi dknybutinva —
    Tie clasps, huh?
    I guess my favorite would be the plainish gold ones with maybe a little pattern to them. And there are some with Western themes, silver and turquoise, that are rough-hewn and kinda wild.

    Reply
  95. Hi dknybutinva —
    Tie clasps, huh?
    I guess my favorite would be the plainish gold ones with maybe a little pattern to them. And there are some with Western themes, silver and turquoise, that are rough-hewn and kinda wild.

    Reply
  96. Hi Joyce Moore —
    Joachim Murat. The most famous of many daring and charismatic French cavalry commanders
    His wiki is
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Murat
    He was an innkeeper’s son who ended up a king. Sound interesting?
    As to how he died . . .
    Murat walked with a firm step to the place of execution, as calm, as unmoved, as if he had been going to an ordinary review. He would not accept a chair, nor suffer his eyes to be bound. “I have braved death (said he) too often to fear it.” He stood upright, proudly and undauntedly, with his countenance towards the soldiers; and when all was ready, he kissed a cameo on which the head of his wife was engraved, and gave the word — thus,
    “Soldats, Faites votre devoir.”
    “Soldiers, Do your duty.”

    Reply
  97. Hi Joyce Moore —
    Joachim Murat. The most famous of many daring and charismatic French cavalry commanders
    His wiki is
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Murat
    He was an innkeeper’s son who ended up a king. Sound interesting?
    As to how he died . . .
    Murat walked with a firm step to the place of execution, as calm, as unmoved, as if he had been going to an ordinary review. He would not accept a chair, nor suffer his eyes to be bound. “I have braved death (said he) too often to fear it.” He stood upright, proudly and undauntedly, with his countenance towards the soldiers; and when all was ready, he kissed a cameo on which the head of his wife was engraved, and gave the word — thus,
    “Soldats, Faites votre devoir.”
    “Soldiers, Do your duty.”

    Reply
  98. Hi Joyce Moore —
    Joachim Murat. The most famous of many daring and charismatic French cavalry commanders
    His wiki is
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Murat
    He was an innkeeper’s son who ended up a king. Sound interesting?
    As to how he died . . .
    Murat walked with a firm step to the place of execution, as calm, as unmoved, as if he had been going to an ordinary review. He would not accept a chair, nor suffer his eyes to be bound. “I have braved death (said he) too often to fear it.” He stood upright, proudly and undauntedly, with his countenance towards the soldiers; and when all was ready, he kissed a cameo on which the head of his wife was engraved, and gave the word — thus,
    “Soldats, Faites votre devoir.”
    “Soldiers, Do your duty.”

    Reply
  99. Hi Joyce Moore —
    Joachim Murat. The most famous of many daring and charismatic French cavalry commanders
    His wiki is
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Murat
    He was an innkeeper’s son who ended up a king. Sound interesting?
    As to how he died . . .
    Murat walked with a firm step to the place of execution, as calm, as unmoved, as if he had been going to an ordinary review. He would not accept a chair, nor suffer his eyes to be bound. “I have braved death (said he) too often to fear it.” He stood upright, proudly and undauntedly, with his countenance towards the soldiers; and when all was ready, he kissed a cameo on which the head of his wife was engraved, and gave the word — thus,
    “Soldats, Faites votre devoir.”
    “Soldiers, Do your duty.”

    Reply
  100. Hi Joyce Moore —
    Joachim Murat. The most famous of many daring and charismatic French cavalry commanders
    His wiki is
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Murat
    He was an innkeeper’s son who ended up a king. Sound interesting?
    As to how he died . . .
    Murat walked with a firm step to the place of execution, as calm, as unmoved, as if he had been going to an ordinary review. He would not accept a chair, nor suffer his eyes to be bound. “I have braved death (said he) too often to fear it.” He stood upright, proudly and undauntedly, with his countenance towards the soldiers; and when all was ready, he kissed a cameo on which the head of his wife was engraved, and gave the word — thus,
    “Soldats, Faites votre devoir.”
    “Soldiers, Do your duty.”

    Reply
  101. Oh, I love the pocket watches. I can imagine a gentlemen pulling one out,and examining it gravely, a frown on his face, before securing it back in his pocket, ready now to take on the world. Sigh.

    Reply
  102. Oh, I love the pocket watches. I can imagine a gentlemen pulling one out,and examining it gravely, a frown on his face, before securing it back in his pocket, ready now to take on the world. Sigh.

    Reply
  103. Oh, I love the pocket watches. I can imagine a gentlemen pulling one out,and examining it gravely, a frown on his face, before securing it back in his pocket, ready now to take on the world. Sigh.

    Reply
  104. Oh, I love the pocket watches. I can imagine a gentlemen pulling one out,and examining it gravely, a frown on his face, before securing it back in his pocket, ready now to take on the world. Sigh.

    Reply
  105. Oh, I love the pocket watches. I can imagine a gentlemen pulling one out,and examining it gravely, a frown on his face, before securing it back in his pocket, ready now to take on the world. Sigh.

    Reply
  106. Hi Linda —
    Pocket watches.
    Beautiful works of art.
    http://tiny.cc/vf0dh
    You know, there was a whole Victorian thing of women wearing little watches pinned to them somewhere. They were worn upside down and you’d sort of take hold and peer down and squint — the upside down being so the wearer could read them. Logical, when you think about it.
    I don’t know what it says about societal assumptions that men carried their watches loose and women carried them tacked down.

    Reply
  107. Hi Linda —
    Pocket watches.
    Beautiful works of art.
    http://tiny.cc/vf0dh
    You know, there was a whole Victorian thing of women wearing little watches pinned to them somewhere. They were worn upside down and you’d sort of take hold and peer down and squint — the upside down being so the wearer could read them. Logical, when you think about it.
    I don’t know what it says about societal assumptions that men carried their watches loose and women carried them tacked down.

    Reply
  108. Hi Linda —
    Pocket watches.
    Beautiful works of art.
    http://tiny.cc/vf0dh
    You know, there was a whole Victorian thing of women wearing little watches pinned to them somewhere. They were worn upside down and you’d sort of take hold and peer down and squint — the upside down being so the wearer could read them. Logical, when you think about it.
    I don’t know what it says about societal assumptions that men carried their watches loose and women carried them tacked down.

    Reply
  109. Hi Linda —
    Pocket watches.
    Beautiful works of art.
    http://tiny.cc/vf0dh
    You know, there was a whole Victorian thing of women wearing little watches pinned to them somewhere. They were worn upside down and you’d sort of take hold and peer down and squint — the upside down being so the wearer could read them. Logical, when you think about it.
    I don’t know what it says about societal assumptions that men carried their watches loose and women carried them tacked down.

    Reply
  110. Hi Linda —
    Pocket watches.
    Beautiful works of art.
    http://tiny.cc/vf0dh
    You know, there was a whole Victorian thing of women wearing little watches pinned to them somewhere. They were worn upside down and you’d sort of take hold and peer down and squint — the upside down being so the wearer could read them. Logical, when you think about it.
    I don’t know what it says about societal assumptions that men carried their watches loose and women carried them tacked down.

    Reply
  111. Fabulous article, Joanna! Another one for my research notebook.
    I have a special place in my heart for pocket watches. When we were stationed in England (forty years ago) my father bought three Regency era pocket watches at estate sales in Suffolk where we lived. He loved those watches and had them displayed in those lovely display domes, always meticulously wound and keeping perfect time. The best part? One of them had a name engraved on it, worn by time, but you can make out the surname – Bolton. My father’s name? Abram James Bolton. My father has been gone for 12 years but those watches are a lovely reminder of his appreciation of intricate craftsmanship and being on time! (He was a stickler for that.)

    Reply
  112. Fabulous article, Joanna! Another one for my research notebook.
    I have a special place in my heart for pocket watches. When we were stationed in England (forty years ago) my father bought three Regency era pocket watches at estate sales in Suffolk where we lived. He loved those watches and had them displayed in those lovely display domes, always meticulously wound and keeping perfect time. The best part? One of them had a name engraved on it, worn by time, but you can make out the surname – Bolton. My father’s name? Abram James Bolton. My father has been gone for 12 years but those watches are a lovely reminder of his appreciation of intricate craftsmanship and being on time! (He was a stickler for that.)

    Reply
  113. Fabulous article, Joanna! Another one for my research notebook.
    I have a special place in my heart for pocket watches. When we were stationed in England (forty years ago) my father bought three Regency era pocket watches at estate sales in Suffolk where we lived. He loved those watches and had them displayed in those lovely display domes, always meticulously wound and keeping perfect time. The best part? One of them had a name engraved on it, worn by time, but you can make out the surname – Bolton. My father’s name? Abram James Bolton. My father has been gone for 12 years but those watches are a lovely reminder of his appreciation of intricate craftsmanship and being on time! (He was a stickler for that.)

    Reply
  114. Fabulous article, Joanna! Another one for my research notebook.
    I have a special place in my heart for pocket watches. When we were stationed in England (forty years ago) my father bought three Regency era pocket watches at estate sales in Suffolk where we lived. He loved those watches and had them displayed in those lovely display domes, always meticulously wound and keeping perfect time. The best part? One of them had a name engraved on it, worn by time, but you can make out the surname – Bolton. My father’s name? Abram James Bolton. My father has been gone for 12 years but those watches are a lovely reminder of his appreciation of intricate craftsmanship and being on time! (He was a stickler for that.)

    Reply
  115. Fabulous article, Joanna! Another one for my research notebook.
    I have a special place in my heart for pocket watches. When we were stationed in England (forty years ago) my father bought three Regency era pocket watches at estate sales in Suffolk where we lived. He loved those watches and had them displayed in those lovely display domes, always meticulously wound and keeping perfect time. The best part? One of them had a name engraved on it, worn by time, but you can make out the surname – Bolton. My father’s name? Abram James Bolton. My father has been gone for 12 years but those watches are a lovely reminder of his appreciation of intricate craftsmanship and being on time! (He was a stickler for that.)

    Reply
  116. Hi Louisa —
    It’s not impossible the watch belonged to some far distant relative. How cool is that?
    I am not in love with objects. I don’t want to own them and be weighed down by them. But, by golly, if you are going to own something, (and let it own you,) it should be —
    what did William Morris say?
    “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”
    That’s what those old, old watches were. Useful and beauiful and a link to the human past with the craft that made them and the owners who held them and enjoyed them.
    Your father was wise. What a lovely memory for you.

    Reply
  117. Hi Louisa —
    It’s not impossible the watch belonged to some far distant relative. How cool is that?
    I am not in love with objects. I don’t want to own them and be weighed down by them. But, by golly, if you are going to own something, (and let it own you,) it should be —
    what did William Morris say?
    “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”
    That’s what those old, old watches were. Useful and beauiful and a link to the human past with the craft that made them and the owners who held them and enjoyed them.
    Your father was wise. What a lovely memory for you.

    Reply
  118. Hi Louisa —
    It’s not impossible the watch belonged to some far distant relative. How cool is that?
    I am not in love with objects. I don’t want to own them and be weighed down by them. But, by golly, if you are going to own something, (and let it own you,) it should be —
    what did William Morris say?
    “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”
    That’s what those old, old watches were. Useful and beauiful and a link to the human past with the craft that made them and the owners who held them and enjoyed them.
    Your father was wise. What a lovely memory for you.

    Reply
  119. Hi Louisa —
    It’s not impossible the watch belonged to some far distant relative. How cool is that?
    I am not in love with objects. I don’t want to own them and be weighed down by them. But, by golly, if you are going to own something, (and let it own you,) it should be —
    what did William Morris say?
    “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”
    That’s what those old, old watches were. Useful and beauiful and a link to the human past with the craft that made them and the owners who held them and enjoyed them.
    Your father was wise. What a lovely memory for you.

    Reply
  120. Hi Louisa —
    It’s not impossible the watch belonged to some far distant relative. How cool is that?
    I am not in love with objects. I don’t want to own them and be weighed down by them. But, by golly, if you are going to own something, (and let it own you,) it should be —
    what did William Morris say?
    “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”
    That’s what those old, old watches were. Useful and beauiful and a link to the human past with the craft that made them and the owners who held them and enjoyed them.
    Your father was wise. What a lovely memory for you.

    Reply
  121. What a fascinating article! My choice for male bling would be earrings. They have that whole pirate/sexy/dangerous thing going for them! Yes, Johnny Depp does come to mind, but a rugged handsome guy (thinking of Viggo Mortensen in Lord of the Rings) has it all if he just adds a bit of gold to his persona. Sigh…

    Reply
  122. What a fascinating article! My choice for male bling would be earrings. They have that whole pirate/sexy/dangerous thing going for them! Yes, Johnny Depp does come to mind, but a rugged handsome guy (thinking of Viggo Mortensen in Lord of the Rings) has it all if he just adds a bit of gold to his persona. Sigh…

    Reply
  123. What a fascinating article! My choice for male bling would be earrings. They have that whole pirate/sexy/dangerous thing going for them! Yes, Johnny Depp does come to mind, but a rugged handsome guy (thinking of Viggo Mortensen in Lord of the Rings) has it all if he just adds a bit of gold to his persona. Sigh…

    Reply
  124. What a fascinating article! My choice for male bling would be earrings. They have that whole pirate/sexy/dangerous thing going for them! Yes, Johnny Depp does come to mind, but a rugged handsome guy (thinking of Viggo Mortensen in Lord of the Rings) has it all if he just adds a bit of gold to his persona. Sigh…

    Reply
  125. What a fascinating article! My choice for male bling would be earrings. They have that whole pirate/sexy/dangerous thing going for them! Yes, Johnny Depp does come to mind, but a rugged handsome guy (thinking of Viggo Mortensen in Lord of the Rings) has it all if he just adds a bit of gold to his persona. Sigh…

    Reply
  126. Hi Dee Feagin —
    I’d love to see Sean Connery in a gold earring. And, yes, Viggo Mortensen too. Most definitely.
    Viggo ‘What the hell kind of name is that’ Mortensen is the character face for Sebastian, my hero in LORD AND SPYMASTER.
    http://tiny.cc/hot66
    Sebastian is a maritime type, arguabley about half pirate. He is just an excellent, excellent candidate to wear an earring, if I may say so.

    Reply
  127. Hi Dee Feagin —
    I’d love to see Sean Connery in a gold earring. And, yes, Viggo Mortensen too. Most definitely.
    Viggo ‘What the hell kind of name is that’ Mortensen is the character face for Sebastian, my hero in LORD AND SPYMASTER.
    http://tiny.cc/hot66
    Sebastian is a maritime type, arguabley about half pirate. He is just an excellent, excellent candidate to wear an earring, if I may say so.

    Reply
  128. Hi Dee Feagin —
    I’d love to see Sean Connery in a gold earring. And, yes, Viggo Mortensen too. Most definitely.
    Viggo ‘What the hell kind of name is that’ Mortensen is the character face for Sebastian, my hero in LORD AND SPYMASTER.
    http://tiny.cc/hot66
    Sebastian is a maritime type, arguabley about half pirate. He is just an excellent, excellent candidate to wear an earring, if I may say so.

    Reply
  129. Hi Dee Feagin —
    I’d love to see Sean Connery in a gold earring. And, yes, Viggo Mortensen too. Most definitely.
    Viggo ‘What the hell kind of name is that’ Mortensen is the character face for Sebastian, my hero in LORD AND SPYMASTER.
    http://tiny.cc/hot66
    Sebastian is a maritime type, arguabley about half pirate. He is just an excellent, excellent candidate to wear an earring, if I may say so.

    Reply
  130. Hi Dee Feagin —
    I’d love to see Sean Connery in a gold earring. And, yes, Viggo Mortensen too. Most definitely.
    Viggo ‘What the hell kind of name is that’ Mortensen is the character face for Sebastian, my hero in LORD AND SPYMASTER.
    http://tiny.cc/hot66
    Sebastian is a maritime type, arguabley about half pirate. He is just an excellent, excellent candidate to wear an earring, if I may say so.

    Reply
  131. Hi Christine —
    Yes indeed. That’s the watch fob in both cases.
    One thing strikes me as curious.
    In the second picture you link to, he’s wearing the watch fob on his left side.
    This is uncommon. Does it mean he’s left-handed? If so, why is the fob on the right side in the first image?
    Now I’m all puzzled . . .

    Reply
  132. Hi Christine —
    Yes indeed. That’s the watch fob in both cases.
    One thing strikes me as curious.
    In the second picture you link to, he’s wearing the watch fob on his left side.
    This is uncommon. Does it mean he’s left-handed? If so, why is the fob on the right side in the first image?
    Now I’m all puzzled . . .

    Reply
  133. Hi Christine —
    Yes indeed. That’s the watch fob in both cases.
    One thing strikes me as curious.
    In the second picture you link to, he’s wearing the watch fob on his left side.
    This is uncommon. Does it mean he’s left-handed? If so, why is the fob on the right side in the first image?
    Now I’m all puzzled . . .

    Reply
  134. Hi Christine —
    Yes indeed. That’s the watch fob in both cases.
    One thing strikes me as curious.
    In the second picture you link to, he’s wearing the watch fob on his left side.
    This is uncommon. Does it mean he’s left-handed? If so, why is the fob on the right side in the first image?
    Now I’m all puzzled . . .

    Reply
  135. Hi Christine —
    Yes indeed. That’s the watch fob in both cases.
    One thing strikes me as curious.
    In the second picture you link to, he’s wearing the watch fob on his left side.
    This is uncommon. Does it mean he’s left-handed? If so, why is the fob on the right side in the first image?
    Now I’m all puzzled . . .

    Reply
  136. I have a pocket watch. It hangs from a chain very similar to this one:
    http://tinyurl.com/36d7zvc
    Women wore tiny versions of pocket watches around their necks and would sometimes pin them or tuck them in their bodice using these chains.
    I love a pocket watch on a man. Even now. The occasional ring as well though my DH doesn’t wear even his wedding band. With the work he does, we don’t want his finger getting caught and then removed!
    I’ve always thought Regency men were some of the most dashing, more because they didn’t wear their bling on their lapels or cuffs, but on their ears, or tucked into a watch pocket with just the chain for show.

    Reply
  137. I have a pocket watch. It hangs from a chain very similar to this one:
    http://tinyurl.com/36d7zvc
    Women wore tiny versions of pocket watches around their necks and would sometimes pin them or tuck them in their bodice using these chains.
    I love a pocket watch on a man. Even now. The occasional ring as well though my DH doesn’t wear even his wedding band. With the work he does, we don’t want his finger getting caught and then removed!
    I’ve always thought Regency men were some of the most dashing, more because they didn’t wear their bling on their lapels or cuffs, but on their ears, or tucked into a watch pocket with just the chain for show.

    Reply
  138. I have a pocket watch. It hangs from a chain very similar to this one:
    http://tinyurl.com/36d7zvc
    Women wore tiny versions of pocket watches around their necks and would sometimes pin them or tuck them in their bodice using these chains.
    I love a pocket watch on a man. Even now. The occasional ring as well though my DH doesn’t wear even his wedding band. With the work he does, we don’t want his finger getting caught and then removed!
    I’ve always thought Regency men were some of the most dashing, more because they didn’t wear their bling on their lapels or cuffs, but on their ears, or tucked into a watch pocket with just the chain for show.

    Reply
  139. I have a pocket watch. It hangs from a chain very similar to this one:
    http://tinyurl.com/36d7zvc
    Women wore tiny versions of pocket watches around their necks and would sometimes pin them or tuck them in their bodice using these chains.
    I love a pocket watch on a man. Even now. The occasional ring as well though my DH doesn’t wear even his wedding band. With the work he does, we don’t want his finger getting caught and then removed!
    I’ve always thought Regency men were some of the most dashing, more because they didn’t wear their bling on their lapels or cuffs, but on their ears, or tucked into a watch pocket with just the chain for show.

    Reply
  140. I have a pocket watch. It hangs from a chain very similar to this one:
    http://tinyurl.com/36d7zvc
    Women wore tiny versions of pocket watches around their necks and would sometimes pin them or tuck them in their bodice using these chains.
    I love a pocket watch on a man. Even now. The occasional ring as well though my DH doesn’t wear even his wedding band. With the work he does, we don’t want his finger getting caught and then removed!
    I’ve always thought Regency men were some of the most dashing, more because they didn’t wear their bling on their lapels or cuffs, but on their ears, or tucked into a watch pocket with just the chain for show.

    Reply
  141. What a fabulous blog, Joanna!
    I think jewelry or any other accoutrement can tell a lot about a person, so if a hero wants to wear a stickpin, it can be for sentimental reasons or because he doesn’t approve of current fads or he’s setting his own style.
    My husband and I both have pocket watches from our grandparents, all we have of them, actually. I used to wear mine as a necklace but it’s too heavy these days.

    Reply
  142. What a fabulous blog, Joanna!
    I think jewelry or any other accoutrement can tell a lot about a person, so if a hero wants to wear a stickpin, it can be for sentimental reasons or because he doesn’t approve of current fads or he’s setting his own style.
    My husband and I both have pocket watches from our grandparents, all we have of them, actually. I used to wear mine as a necklace but it’s too heavy these days.

    Reply
  143. What a fabulous blog, Joanna!
    I think jewelry or any other accoutrement can tell a lot about a person, so if a hero wants to wear a stickpin, it can be for sentimental reasons or because he doesn’t approve of current fads or he’s setting his own style.
    My husband and I both have pocket watches from our grandparents, all we have of them, actually. I used to wear mine as a necklace but it’s too heavy these days.

    Reply
  144. What a fabulous blog, Joanna!
    I think jewelry or any other accoutrement can tell a lot about a person, so if a hero wants to wear a stickpin, it can be for sentimental reasons or because he doesn’t approve of current fads or he’s setting his own style.
    My husband and I both have pocket watches from our grandparents, all we have of them, actually. I used to wear mine as a necklace but it’s too heavy these days.

    Reply
  145. What a fabulous blog, Joanna!
    I think jewelry or any other accoutrement can tell a lot about a person, so if a hero wants to wear a stickpin, it can be for sentimental reasons or because he doesn’t approve of current fads or he’s setting his own style.
    My husband and I both have pocket watches from our grandparents, all we have of them, actually. I used to wear mine as a necklace but it’s too heavy these days.

    Reply
  146. Hi Theo —
    How pretty a chain. I love opals.
    The whole, ‘which jewels are popular in any time period and what do the jewels mean’, is fascinating in and of itself.
    As to the practicalities of men wearing rings . . .
    In the Regency, when we’re not looking at portraits of court dress, we’re seeing men wearing their ordinary ‘best clothes’ and the rings they wore habitually. These rings had to fit inside gloves. That means — no rubies the size of healthy lima beans. The low-profile signet ring worked for the Regency gentleman in a lot ways.

    Reply
  147. Hi Theo —
    How pretty a chain. I love opals.
    The whole, ‘which jewels are popular in any time period and what do the jewels mean’, is fascinating in and of itself.
    As to the practicalities of men wearing rings . . .
    In the Regency, when we’re not looking at portraits of court dress, we’re seeing men wearing their ordinary ‘best clothes’ and the rings they wore habitually. These rings had to fit inside gloves. That means — no rubies the size of healthy lima beans. The low-profile signet ring worked for the Regency gentleman in a lot ways.

    Reply
  148. Hi Theo —
    How pretty a chain. I love opals.
    The whole, ‘which jewels are popular in any time period and what do the jewels mean’, is fascinating in and of itself.
    As to the practicalities of men wearing rings . . .
    In the Regency, when we’re not looking at portraits of court dress, we’re seeing men wearing their ordinary ‘best clothes’ and the rings they wore habitually. These rings had to fit inside gloves. That means — no rubies the size of healthy lima beans. The low-profile signet ring worked for the Regency gentleman in a lot ways.

    Reply
  149. Hi Theo —
    How pretty a chain. I love opals.
    The whole, ‘which jewels are popular in any time period and what do the jewels mean’, is fascinating in and of itself.
    As to the practicalities of men wearing rings . . .
    In the Regency, when we’re not looking at portraits of court dress, we’re seeing men wearing their ordinary ‘best clothes’ and the rings they wore habitually. These rings had to fit inside gloves. That means — no rubies the size of healthy lima beans. The low-profile signet ring worked for the Regency gentleman in a lot ways.

    Reply
  150. Hi Theo —
    How pretty a chain. I love opals.
    The whole, ‘which jewels are popular in any time period and what do the jewels mean’, is fascinating in and of itself.
    As to the practicalities of men wearing rings . . .
    In the Regency, when we’re not looking at portraits of court dress, we’re seeing men wearing their ordinary ‘best clothes’ and the rings they wore habitually. These rings had to fit inside gloves. That means — no rubies the size of healthy lima beans. The low-profile signet ring worked for the Regency gentleman in a lot ways.

    Reply
  151. Hi Patricia —
    I have a pocket watch from my grandfather as well. Not intrinsically valuable – – but I’ve never felt comfortable carrying it around. It’s a big thing, and I can’t rid myself of the belief it must be fragile.
    Modern clothing just doesn’t lend itself to pocket watches, does it? I see fob pockets in some bluejeans, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen anything IN those pockets.

    Reply
  152. Hi Patricia —
    I have a pocket watch from my grandfather as well. Not intrinsically valuable – – but I’ve never felt comfortable carrying it around. It’s a big thing, and I can’t rid myself of the belief it must be fragile.
    Modern clothing just doesn’t lend itself to pocket watches, does it? I see fob pockets in some bluejeans, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen anything IN those pockets.

    Reply
  153. Hi Patricia —
    I have a pocket watch from my grandfather as well. Not intrinsically valuable – – but I’ve never felt comfortable carrying it around. It’s a big thing, and I can’t rid myself of the belief it must be fragile.
    Modern clothing just doesn’t lend itself to pocket watches, does it? I see fob pockets in some bluejeans, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen anything IN those pockets.

    Reply
  154. Hi Patricia —
    I have a pocket watch from my grandfather as well. Not intrinsically valuable – – but I’ve never felt comfortable carrying it around. It’s a big thing, and I can’t rid myself of the belief it must be fragile.
    Modern clothing just doesn’t lend itself to pocket watches, does it? I see fob pockets in some bluejeans, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen anything IN those pockets.

    Reply
  155. Hi Patricia —
    I have a pocket watch from my grandfather as well. Not intrinsically valuable – – but I’ve never felt comfortable carrying it around. It’s a big thing, and I can’t rid myself of the belief it must be fragile.
    Modern clothing just doesn’t lend itself to pocket watches, does it? I see fob pockets in some bluejeans, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen anything IN those pockets.

    Reply
  156. Hi again Jo,
    I didn’t mean to trick you with the secomd sneaky Mr. Darcy picture . I think that one is reversed as I found a smaller and harder to see version of the same picture and his fob is back on the right ( and also correct side).
    There is no fooling you! Good eyes!
    Must be all those years in the spy business :0)
    Thanks again for the great reads,
    Christine

    Reply
  157. Hi again Jo,
    I didn’t mean to trick you with the secomd sneaky Mr. Darcy picture . I think that one is reversed as I found a smaller and harder to see version of the same picture and his fob is back on the right ( and also correct side).
    There is no fooling you! Good eyes!
    Must be all those years in the spy business :0)
    Thanks again for the great reads,
    Christine

    Reply
  158. Hi again Jo,
    I didn’t mean to trick you with the secomd sneaky Mr. Darcy picture . I think that one is reversed as I found a smaller and harder to see version of the same picture and his fob is back on the right ( and also correct side).
    There is no fooling you! Good eyes!
    Must be all those years in the spy business :0)
    Thanks again for the great reads,
    Christine

    Reply
  159. Hi again Jo,
    I didn’t mean to trick you with the secomd sneaky Mr. Darcy picture . I think that one is reversed as I found a smaller and harder to see version of the same picture and his fob is back on the right ( and also correct side).
    There is no fooling you! Good eyes!
    Must be all those years in the spy business :0)
    Thanks again for the great reads,
    Christine

    Reply
  160. Hi again Jo,
    I didn’t mean to trick you with the secomd sneaky Mr. Darcy picture . I think that one is reversed as I found a smaller and harder to see version of the same picture and his fob is back on the right ( and also correct side).
    There is no fooling you! Good eyes!
    Must be all those years in the spy business :0)
    Thanks again for the great reads,
    Christine

    Reply
  161. Sherrie, here. Hi, Joanna. Fascinating post! I loved all the pictures and links. I used to work for a man who took to wearing his grandfather’s pocket watch. He wore 3 piece suits, and always carried the watch in his vest pocket, on a chain. Very posh and unaffected. That pocket watch was not small, either! I was surprised at how big and heavy it was.
    Back in the 1960s watches on necklace chains were very popular. I still have mine, and though it’s 50-years-old, I wear it on occasion. You have no idea how many times strangers have said to me, “Oh! I used to have one of those back in the ’60s!”
    And Kim, re Captain Jack: while filming one scene, Jack had to jump into the water in full costume. But when he hit the water, his wig and hat came off and floated away (amid much hilarity), and they had to figure a way for his wig, at the very least, to stay on for the next take.

    Reply
  162. Sherrie, here. Hi, Joanna. Fascinating post! I loved all the pictures and links. I used to work for a man who took to wearing his grandfather’s pocket watch. He wore 3 piece suits, and always carried the watch in his vest pocket, on a chain. Very posh and unaffected. That pocket watch was not small, either! I was surprised at how big and heavy it was.
    Back in the 1960s watches on necklace chains were very popular. I still have mine, and though it’s 50-years-old, I wear it on occasion. You have no idea how many times strangers have said to me, “Oh! I used to have one of those back in the ’60s!”
    And Kim, re Captain Jack: while filming one scene, Jack had to jump into the water in full costume. But when he hit the water, his wig and hat came off and floated away (amid much hilarity), and they had to figure a way for his wig, at the very least, to stay on for the next take.

    Reply
  163. Sherrie, here. Hi, Joanna. Fascinating post! I loved all the pictures and links. I used to work for a man who took to wearing his grandfather’s pocket watch. He wore 3 piece suits, and always carried the watch in his vest pocket, on a chain. Very posh and unaffected. That pocket watch was not small, either! I was surprised at how big and heavy it was.
    Back in the 1960s watches on necklace chains were very popular. I still have mine, and though it’s 50-years-old, I wear it on occasion. You have no idea how many times strangers have said to me, “Oh! I used to have one of those back in the ’60s!”
    And Kim, re Captain Jack: while filming one scene, Jack had to jump into the water in full costume. But when he hit the water, his wig and hat came off and floated away (amid much hilarity), and they had to figure a way for his wig, at the very least, to stay on for the next take.

    Reply
  164. Sherrie, here. Hi, Joanna. Fascinating post! I loved all the pictures and links. I used to work for a man who took to wearing his grandfather’s pocket watch. He wore 3 piece suits, and always carried the watch in his vest pocket, on a chain. Very posh and unaffected. That pocket watch was not small, either! I was surprised at how big and heavy it was.
    Back in the 1960s watches on necklace chains were very popular. I still have mine, and though it’s 50-years-old, I wear it on occasion. You have no idea how many times strangers have said to me, “Oh! I used to have one of those back in the ’60s!”
    And Kim, re Captain Jack: while filming one scene, Jack had to jump into the water in full costume. But when he hit the water, his wig and hat came off and floated away (amid much hilarity), and they had to figure a way for his wig, at the very least, to stay on for the next take.

    Reply
  165. Sherrie, here. Hi, Joanna. Fascinating post! I loved all the pictures and links. I used to work for a man who took to wearing his grandfather’s pocket watch. He wore 3 piece suits, and always carried the watch in his vest pocket, on a chain. Very posh and unaffected. That pocket watch was not small, either! I was surprised at how big and heavy it was.
    Back in the 1960s watches on necklace chains were very popular. I still have mine, and though it’s 50-years-old, I wear it on occasion. You have no idea how many times strangers have said to me, “Oh! I used to have one of those back in the ’60s!”
    And Kim, re Captain Jack: while filming one scene, Jack had to jump into the water in full costume. But when he hit the water, his wig and hat came off and floated away (amid much hilarity), and they had to figure a way for his wig, at the very least, to stay on for the next take.

    Reply
  166. So interesting, Joanna. I do love a single, understated gold hoop in a man’s ear. Pair it with a gorgeous smile and I melt.

    Reply
  167. So interesting, Joanna. I do love a single, understated gold hoop in a man’s ear. Pair it with a gorgeous smile and I melt.

    Reply
  168. So interesting, Joanna. I do love a single, understated gold hoop in a man’s ear. Pair it with a gorgeous smile and I melt.

    Reply
  169. So interesting, Joanna. I do love a single, understated gold hoop in a man’s ear. Pair it with a gorgeous smile and I melt.

    Reply
  170. So interesting, Joanna. I do love a single, understated gold hoop in a man’s ear. Pair it with a gorgeous smile and I melt.

    Reply
  171. I too like the idea of a single gold hoop in a mans ear. However, I have to say I have only ever seen one and it was a gypsy, here in Australia.
    On shirt and cuff links. Nearly all of my son’s (age 19) shirts, he has a button, but there is also the option for links as well. If you look carefully near where the button is sewn there is another button hole for use with a link.
    On fobs, I have an Edwardian gentleman’s fob that I can wear on a chain. However, it is the fob that is interesting. It is gold, with a round open circle and set inside the circle are a pair of womens legs. Yes legs. And it is possible to turn the legs around inside their circle. The legs are from the toe to just below the knee, and are wearing button boots. The legs are rather plump as well. I really don’t know what to think about the original owner of these ‘legs’

    Reply
  172. I too like the idea of a single gold hoop in a mans ear. However, I have to say I have only ever seen one and it was a gypsy, here in Australia.
    On shirt and cuff links. Nearly all of my son’s (age 19) shirts, he has a button, but there is also the option for links as well. If you look carefully near where the button is sewn there is another button hole for use with a link.
    On fobs, I have an Edwardian gentleman’s fob that I can wear on a chain. However, it is the fob that is interesting. It is gold, with a round open circle and set inside the circle are a pair of womens legs. Yes legs. And it is possible to turn the legs around inside their circle. The legs are from the toe to just below the knee, and are wearing button boots. The legs are rather plump as well. I really don’t know what to think about the original owner of these ‘legs’

    Reply
  173. I too like the idea of a single gold hoop in a mans ear. However, I have to say I have only ever seen one and it was a gypsy, here in Australia.
    On shirt and cuff links. Nearly all of my son’s (age 19) shirts, he has a button, but there is also the option for links as well. If you look carefully near where the button is sewn there is another button hole for use with a link.
    On fobs, I have an Edwardian gentleman’s fob that I can wear on a chain. However, it is the fob that is interesting. It is gold, with a round open circle and set inside the circle are a pair of womens legs. Yes legs. And it is possible to turn the legs around inside their circle. The legs are from the toe to just below the knee, and are wearing button boots. The legs are rather plump as well. I really don’t know what to think about the original owner of these ‘legs’

    Reply
  174. I too like the idea of a single gold hoop in a mans ear. However, I have to say I have only ever seen one and it was a gypsy, here in Australia.
    On shirt and cuff links. Nearly all of my son’s (age 19) shirts, he has a button, but there is also the option for links as well. If you look carefully near where the button is sewn there is another button hole for use with a link.
    On fobs, I have an Edwardian gentleman’s fob that I can wear on a chain. However, it is the fob that is interesting. It is gold, with a round open circle and set inside the circle are a pair of womens legs. Yes legs. And it is possible to turn the legs around inside their circle. The legs are from the toe to just below the knee, and are wearing button boots. The legs are rather plump as well. I really don’t know what to think about the original owner of these ‘legs’

    Reply
  175. I too like the idea of a single gold hoop in a mans ear. However, I have to say I have only ever seen one and it was a gypsy, here in Australia.
    On shirt and cuff links. Nearly all of my son’s (age 19) shirts, he has a button, but there is also the option for links as well. If you look carefully near where the button is sewn there is another button hole for use with a link.
    On fobs, I have an Edwardian gentleman’s fob that I can wear on a chain. However, it is the fob that is interesting. It is gold, with a round open circle and set inside the circle are a pair of womens legs. Yes legs. And it is possible to turn the legs around inside their circle. The legs are from the toe to just below the knee, and are wearing button boots. The legs are rather plump as well. I really don’t know what to think about the original owner of these ‘legs’

    Reply
  176. Hi Sherrie —
    Do you know, I have never given any thought at all to the attachment of wigs.
    Hats come off in a high wind. Did wigs? Did Georgian gentlemen go racing down the street, their close-shorn heads naked and their powdered wigs rolling away?

    Reply
  177. Hi Sherrie —
    Do you know, I have never given any thought at all to the attachment of wigs.
    Hats come off in a high wind. Did wigs? Did Georgian gentlemen go racing down the street, their close-shorn heads naked and their powdered wigs rolling away?

    Reply
  178. Hi Sherrie —
    Do you know, I have never given any thought at all to the attachment of wigs.
    Hats come off in a high wind. Did wigs? Did Georgian gentlemen go racing down the street, their close-shorn heads naked and their powdered wigs rolling away?

    Reply
  179. Hi Sherrie —
    Do you know, I have never given any thought at all to the attachment of wigs.
    Hats come off in a high wind. Did wigs? Did Georgian gentlemen go racing down the street, their close-shorn heads naked and their powdered wigs rolling away?

    Reply
  180. Hi Sherrie —
    Do you know, I have never given any thought at all to the attachment of wigs.
    Hats come off in a high wind. Did wigs? Did Georgian gentlemen go racing down the street, their close-shorn heads naked and their powdered wigs rolling away?

    Reply
  181. Hi Patty —
    It’s not impossible one of my male characters could have a gold ring in their ear in the 1790s, especially in France or Italy.
    I will go add that to the scene I’m working on and see if it works . . .

    Reply
  182. Hi Patty —
    It’s not impossible one of my male characters could have a gold ring in their ear in the 1790s, especially in France or Italy.
    I will go add that to the scene I’m working on and see if it works . . .

    Reply
  183. Hi Patty —
    It’s not impossible one of my male characters could have a gold ring in their ear in the 1790s, especially in France or Italy.
    I will go add that to the scene I’m working on and see if it works . . .

    Reply
  184. Hi Patty —
    It’s not impossible one of my male characters could have a gold ring in their ear in the 1790s, especially in France or Italy.
    I will go add that to the scene I’m working on and see if it works . . .

    Reply
  185. Hi Patty —
    It’s not impossible one of my male characters could have a gold ring in their ear in the 1790s, especially in France or Italy.
    I will go add that to the scene I’m working on and see if it works . . .

    Reply
  186. Hi Jenny —
    Oh my, how lovely. That fob sounds delightfully ‘naughty’. I imagine it was the prized possession of some fond gentleman a century and more ago.
    That’s something I’m not sure we have with us any more . . . the sense of amusingly erotic in a small gentle way.
    What will our great-great-great-grandchildren wear on gold chains and take out to treasure and smile at and feel connected to? 2010 jeweled body piercings?

    Reply
  187. Hi Jenny —
    Oh my, how lovely. That fob sounds delightfully ‘naughty’. I imagine it was the prized possession of some fond gentleman a century and more ago.
    That’s something I’m not sure we have with us any more . . . the sense of amusingly erotic in a small gentle way.
    What will our great-great-great-grandchildren wear on gold chains and take out to treasure and smile at and feel connected to? 2010 jeweled body piercings?

    Reply
  188. Hi Jenny —
    Oh my, how lovely. That fob sounds delightfully ‘naughty’. I imagine it was the prized possession of some fond gentleman a century and more ago.
    That’s something I’m not sure we have with us any more . . . the sense of amusingly erotic in a small gentle way.
    What will our great-great-great-grandchildren wear on gold chains and take out to treasure and smile at and feel connected to? 2010 jeweled body piercings?

    Reply
  189. Hi Jenny —
    Oh my, how lovely. That fob sounds delightfully ‘naughty’. I imagine it was the prized possession of some fond gentleman a century and more ago.
    That’s something I’m not sure we have with us any more . . . the sense of amusingly erotic in a small gentle way.
    What will our great-great-great-grandchildren wear on gold chains and take out to treasure and smile at and feel connected to? 2010 jeweled body piercings?

    Reply
  190. Hi Jenny —
    Oh my, how lovely. That fob sounds delightfully ‘naughty’. I imagine it was the prized possession of some fond gentleman a century and more ago.
    That’s something I’m not sure we have with us any more . . . the sense of amusingly erotic in a small gentle way.
    What will our great-great-great-grandchildren wear on gold chains and take out to treasure and smile at and feel connected to? 2010 jeweled body piercings?

    Reply
  191. Chiming in late here, Joanna, but what a fabulous blog! I confess, the subject is near and dear to my heart. (I just gave one of the heroes in my new trilogy an earring which he wears to deliberately outrage the ton.)
    As for fobs . . . oh, don’t get me started. I LOVE them, and was delighted to see your examples, especially the double ones.
    Since my pocketbook does not allow me to collect the snazzy gold ones, I’ve taking to hunting out ornate silver ones (I was at the Portobello market on Saturday and bought two small ones—alas Edwardian rather than Regency but still fun.)

    Reply
  192. Chiming in late here, Joanna, but what a fabulous blog! I confess, the subject is near and dear to my heart. (I just gave one of the heroes in my new trilogy an earring which he wears to deliberately outrage the ton.)
    As for fobs . . . oh, don’t get me started. I LOVE them, and was delighted to see your examples, especially the double ones.
    Since my pocketbook does not allow me to collect the snazzy gold ones, I’ve taking to hunting out ornate silver ones (I was at the Portobello market on Saturday and bought two small ones—alas Edwardian rather than Regency but still fun.)

    Reply
  193. Chiming in late here, Joanna, but what a fabulous blog! I confess, the subject is near and dear to my heart. (I just gave one of the heroes in my new trilogy an earring which he wears to deliberately outrage the ton.)
    As for fobs . . . oh, don’t get me started. I LOVE them, and was delighted to see your examples, especially the double ones.
    Since my pocketbook does not allow me to collect the snazzy gold ones, I’ve taking to hunting out ornate silver ones (I was at the Portobello market on Saturday and bought two small ones—alas Edwardian rather than Regency but still fun.)

    Reply
  194. Chiming in late here, Joanna, but what a fabulous blog! I confess, the subject is near and dear to my heart. (I just gave one of the heroes in my new trilogy an earring which he wears to deliberately outrage the ton.)
    As for fobs . . . oh, don’t get me started. I LOVE them, and was delighted to see your examples, especially the double ones.
    Since my pocketbook does not allow me to collect the snazzy gold ones, I’ve taking to hunting out ornate silver ones (I was at the Portobello market on Saturday and bought two small ones—alas Edwardian rather than Regency but still fun.)

    Reply
  195. Chiming in late here, Joanna, but what a fabulous blog! I confess, the subject is near and dear to my heart. (I just gave one of the heroes in my new trilogy an earring which he wears to deliberately outrage the ton.)
    As for fobs . . . oh, don’t get me started. I LOVE them, and was delighted to see your examples, especially the double ones.
    Since my pocketbook does not allow me to collect the snazzy gold ones, I’ve taking to hunting out ornate silver ones (I was at the Portobello market on Saturday and bought two small ones—alas Edwardian rather than Regency but still fun.)

    Reply
  196. Great post Jo! I love reading this kind of information and wish clothing was as intricate and important nowadays. But two watch fobs? What on earth is the point of that?
    I also wish I could carry a sword, but that’s another story

    Reply
  197. Great post Jo! I love reading this kind of information and wish clothing was as intricate and important nowadays. But two watch fobs? What on earth is the point of that?
    I also wish I could carry a sword, but that’s another story

    Reply
  198. Great post Jo! I love reading this kind of information and wish clothing was as intricate and important nowadays. But two watch fobs? What on earth is the point of that?
    I also wish I could carry a sword, but that’s another story

    Reply
  199. Great post Jo! I love reading this kind of information and wish clothing was as intricate and important nowadays. But two watch fobs? What on earth is the point of that?
    I also wish I could carry a sword, but that’s another story

    Reply
  200. Great post Jo! I love reading this kind of information and wish clothing was as intricate and important nowadays. But two watch fobs? What on earth is the point of that?
    I also wish I could carry a sword, but that’s another story

    Reply
  201. Hi Deniz —
    I wouldn’t mind carrying around a sword if I got to use it fairly often. But think how awkward it would be all the moments one was not poking it in to somebody.
    Stepping on it, ouch at aerobics class. Balancing it in the shopping cart along with the baby. Tossing it into the back seat of the SUV.
    “Chad, if you don’t stop hitting Tiffany over the head with that sword I’m going to stop the car and . . .”
    Sometimes the second watch was a fake. A faux montre. Though why one would carry a fake watch is even more puzzling than why one would carry two real ones.

    Reply
  202. Hi Deniz —
    I wouldn’t mind carrying around a sword if I got to use it fairly often. But think how awkward it would be all the moments one was not poking it in to somebody.
    Stepping on it, ouch at aerobics class. Balancing it in the shopping cart along with the baby. Tossing it into the back seat of the SUV.
    “Chad, if you don’t stop hitting Tiffany over the head with that sword I’m going to stop the car and . . .”
    Sometimes the second watch was a fake. A faux montre. Though why one would carry a fake watch is even more puzzling than why one would carry two real ones.

    Reply
  203. Hi Deniz —
    I wouldn’t mind carrying around a sword if I got to use it fairly often. But think how awkward it would be all the moments one was not poking it in to somebody.
    Stepping on it, ouch at aerobics class. Balancing it in the shopping cart along with the baby. Tossing it into the back seat of the SUV.
    “Chad, if you don’t stop hitting Tiffany over the head with that sword I’m going to stop the car and . . .”
    Sometimes the second watch was a fake. A faux montre. Though why one would carry a fake watch is even more puzzling than why one would carry two real ones.

    Reply
  204. Hi Deniz —
    I wouldn’t mind carrying around a sword if I got to use it fairly often. But think how awkward it would be all the moments one was not poking it in to somebody.
    Stepping on it, ouch at aerobics class. Balancing it in the shopping cart along with the baby. Tossing it into the back seat of the SUV.
    “Chad, if you don’t stop hitting Tiffany over the head with that sword I’m going to stop the car and . . .”
    Sometimes the second watch was a fake. A faux montre. Though why one would carry a fake watch is even more puzzling than why one would carry two real ones.

    Reply
  205. Hi Deniz —
    I wouldn’t mind carrying around a sword if I got to use it fairly often. But think how awkward it would be all the moments one was not poking it in to somebody.
    Stepping on it, ouch at aerobics class. Balancing it in the shopping cart along with the baby. Tossing it into the back seat of the SUV.
    “Chad, if you don’t stop hitting Tiffany over the head with that sword I’m going to stop the car and . . .”
    Sometimes the second watch was a fake. A faux montre. Though why one would carry a fake watch is even more puzzling than why one would carry two real ones.

    Reply

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